Skip to main content

Full text of "Variety (June 1909)"

See other formats


. _ 



* * = * r ^VT*hU«F7' 





.YT.lI:l/7 av \: *>n y,"..**; »*■''* 



.-, .iadsl 



If I' " 

I 



**p 



~»- 



■ ■■■ ■:>■■ — 



i i ■ —*— aaj— js SB)— 




00 



W» r.»» « f*«»^» • • *•*-* W ■»■! 









I 

■ 



» 






*T.C 




■■ 



■■■ 








»wi«. 






s 




ous 



(6HlTRIP) on the ORPHE^MMCIRCUIT 

The First ~~ 

The Original jb^sw m m*+ m*+ ml -* 

One continuous BIG LAUGH an^ BIG RECEPTION at EACH performance 

(Doing My New Aot) 

Which proves that any favorite is worth the money. Reference— SOME of the following ORPHEUM MANAGERS: M. LEHMAN, Kansas City; MGR. BURNS, Omaha; 

\\ c. «: 




. 



Minstrel 









\ sa' males' ■ I ^W ■ BS* 

\ W Br 

FRED BUCHAltA*, 0m Moines; DAVE BEEHLER, Sioux City* C.-RAYMOND, Minneapolis; C. SUTTON, Butte, Montana; MGR. MULLER, Spokane; C. REITER, 
Seattle; MGR. ERICESON, Portland; J. MORRISSEY, San Francisco. \ 

AGENTS WHO HAVE SEEN: PAT CASEY, FRANK VINCENT, JENIE JACOBS, AL. SUTHERLAND, ALF. WILTON, ARTHUR KLEIN, CHAS. STEVENSON 
and JO. P. SMITH. 



/ 



opened at Proctor's, Newark, Aug..a4th, with a mate of 64 weeks. OPEN TIME COMMENCING NOV. 8TH. J hare two more NEW GREAT ACTS. YES, DEARIE, 
atta, July s-ia t Orpneum, toe Angeles, Cat 






■ 



■■ 



• 






•— 



REICH & PLUNKETT Present 



•• 



■ 






AMERICA'S MINSTREL IDOL 



« 






• 



. - 




■ 



Many thanks to the show at the Lincoln Square, New York, for using my song "IDA, SWEET AS APPLE CIDER" 

on which I am drawing big royalties monthly 



Gaumont iKS 




* 




Licensed by Motion ^Vf^ 7 Picture Patents Company 

RCLCASE, TUUDAY, JUNE 8tH. lOOQ 

• f A MOTHER'S CHOICE" 

DRAMA ...Approximate length, 806 feet. 

RXLEASE, tATURDAT, JUNE 19th, 1909 



"A STRONG DIET" 

length, SM ft 



"HISTORICAL FAN" 

_ Coloring, extra, fT.Sf. 

PANORAMA, Approximate length, 171 ft 










Films 






> 

Licensed by Motion Picture Patents Company. 

RELEASE WEDNESDAY. JUNE 9th, IOOO 






"TWO HEROES" 

Approximate length, SM ft 



"THE RACE COURSE" 

8P0RTINQ, Approximate length, ttfl ft 



■* 



.: 



WRITE FOR ADVANCE FILM DESCRIPTIONS. 












Ml 
Importer of Gaumont and Urban-Eclipse Filma. 
St STATE »n^HI€A€0, ILL. „ |f EAST Hat ST., MEW TORE 



. 



Do You Want a New Act ? 



v 



I am at liberty fox a few weeks to write for competent people only. 

If yon have a peculiar personality I can fit yon, 

If yon want something original that win bring yon steady time, I can write 
it for yon. 

Do yon know that I wrote the beat comedy-novelty sketch of the season? 
If yon have not seen it yon have heard of it— 

"THE DEVIL AND TOM WALKER" 

pronounced by press and public to be the most original idea presented to 
vaudeville in years. 

VARIETY Mid: "To Mr. Hyraer moat go tba credit for glrlng vaadorllle the best comedy 
norclty sketch It hat aeon la many • day.** 

"Tie Morning Telegraph" Mid: "It was the mirth producer of tba programme. The offer- 
ing la entirely away and different from all aketcbee so far aaaa at the randerllla 

THE ANSWER 

I also wrote 



BOOKED SOLID— 40 WEEKS-NEXT SEASON, 
OPENINQ AUO. 16. 






■ 



• 









■ 



"TONY AND THE STORK 



If 



1 

* 



1 • 



How being presented by MAURICE FREEMAN AHD CO. 



These bits from Newark: "Once la a while there la produced In rauderllle a playlet or 

sketch whose ORIGINALITY la conception and TREATMENT OF TDBMB leeres such a strong 

Impression that the production Ixea Itself la one's memory. Such a sketch la Joan B. Hymer'e 

•TONY AND THE STORK.' which la delighting audiences at Proctor's Theatre this weak." 

• 

"In 'Tony and the Stork,' which Introduces afsurlce Freeman at Proctor's Theatre this 

week, John B. Hymer baa p roduced one of the moat Interesting playlets that bare been aaaa at 

a local theatre doting the present seasoa." 



In preparation: 






. 






If 



"TEN, TWENTY AND THIRTY 

If yon want an original sketch, monologue, song or parody, call, telephone or write 
inUM D UVVCQ Zofa Court, SZ Cathedral Parkway, New York 

JUlIn D. Ifltn, (Tea. SSJO Riverside) 









- 



1 • 






TEN CENTS 




VOL. XIV., NO. 13. 



JUNE 5, 1909. 



PRICE TEN CENTS. 



SMALL TIME FORMING UNION 
WITH WHITE RATS AGENCY 



Over 50 Houses Joining the Independent Booking 

Office. Details in Process of Settlement. Small 

Time Opposition. Cash Bonds to Guarantee 

44 Play or Pay" White Rats Contracts. 



Over fifty of the smaller vaudeville 
theatres have combined to book their 
shows under the banner of the White Rats 
of America as represented by the Inde- 
pendent Booking Office in New York, the 
corporation formed by the artists' society 
when an interest was taken by the order 

in the Mozart Circuit. 

In the new combination are (besides 
Mozart) Fciber, Shea & Coutant, with 
seven weeks; M. R. Sheedy, eleven weeks, 
and John .1. Quigley, a Boston agent, who 
claims to have over twenty-five houses to 
book for in New England. The Mozart 
Circuit has about twelve houses, giving 
the chain a total of over fifty theatres to 
commence with. Some Of these houses 
play shows but three days a week, chang- 
ing the bill twice. The net time to be 
offered will be forty weeks as the list now 
stands. 

Each circuit joining will use the White 
Kat form of contract. This was agreed 
to at a meeting at the White Rats' rooms 
on Tuesday last, when all the circuits, 
with attorneys, were represented. 

At the meeting it was agreed that a 
cash bond of $2,500, it is said, be de- 
posited with a trust company, obliging 
under penalty of forfeiture that each cir- 
cuit play or pay its contracts. For the 
artists, the Rats pledged itself to see that 
each member contracting to play did so, 
and upon default the order would reim- 
burse the manager for the amount of sal- 
ary contracted for, with any additional 
expenses incurred, dealing with the artist 
afterwards for his dereliction. 

The filing of the bonds and other pre- 
liminaries will require al>out ten more 
days. When the matters have l>een satis- 
faetorily arranged, a large oflico will l>e 
rented. Each circuit can make that its 
headquarters, or be represented in it. 



The present Board of Directors of the 
Independent Booking Office will be en- 
larged to permit a member of each circuit 
joining it. The Board will select an office 
manager or general director of the office, 
with power left to each circuit to book 
its own shows. 

There has been a provisional agreement 
signed by all the circuits in the combine. 
It requires but the signature of the White 
lists to make it binding. 

Harry Mountford, secretary of the Rats' 
lit.; 1 rd of Directors, said this week regard- 
ing the proposed amalgamation: "This 
is not a combination in opposition to any 
one or any booking office. We ask only 
that managers assure us they are trust- 
worthy by filing a bond, and then using 
our form of contract. The Independent 
looking Office will oppose no circuit, and 
has no fight on with any. We ask only 
that the artist be secured in his dealings 
with the manager." 

There has been quite some excitement 
among the "small time*' all week. It has 
In-en claimed that the Metropolitan Vaude- 
ville Exchange, of which Joe Wood is 
manager, with an office in the Long Acre 
Building, is in reality a branch of the 
United Booking Offices, and that Mr. 
Wood is under contract to the United at 
a salary of cither $7,500 or $10,000 yearly. 
It was also said that Woofl was threaten- 
ing small acts if they played for any 
other small time than his own they would 
be blacklisted in the United offices. 

The threat of blacklist was made to 
Carita, a toe dancer, who has been on the 
Feil>cr, Shea & Coutant Circuit, and is 
hooked to play their house at Bayonnc 
next week. 

On Wednesday Miss Carita said that 
Wood told her if she played Bayonnc next 
week she need expect no time from the 

(Continued on pagv 11.) 



"WHITE CITY" QUITS. 

New Orleans, June 3. 

"W'hite City" closed down here Tues- 
day night. W. H. Labb, who assumed the 
management, accumulated $12,000 in debts. 
When the power company sent in its bill 
for lighting, he could not meet it and 
service was discontinued. Without light 
the place had to clone it h doors. Monday 
night the show was given by candle light. 
Fifty small candles decorated the stage. 

Labb leased the property from the 
Standard Operating Co., of Philadelphia, 
the owners. The latter concern will seek 
to have the debts settled and may resume 
the management by the middle of the 
month. It is said the receipts paid ope- 
rating expenses and the successful hand- 
ling of the proposition is merely a matter 
of capital. 

Vaudeville was booked into the park 
tleatre by William Morris. The acts 
have been transferred to Blaney's Lyric 
Theatre to allow the artists to get their 
salaries. 

The Dove of Peace has hovered not over 
Blaney's Lyric, a temple of weepodrama. 
The "ghost" did not walk when the last 
week's work was done, in fact the ceme- 
tery habitue didn't even crawl, and the 
actors were peeved, perplexed and put out. 

They swore loathsome, cantankerous 
swears upon the heads of Charles E. 
Hlaney and his house manager, Mr. Mc- 
Stea. William Bel fort, a juvenile, made 
so bold as to invade the local Mgr.'s 
sanctum to demand pelf. He received 
various and sundry bruises. Belfort then 
Marat honed over to Newspaper How and 
told all he knew. With some "padding" 
it consumed a column. 

McStea was charged with malicious 
mauling in attempt to defraud. At the 
preliminary trial salaries were spoken of. 
Ii seems that principals received from 
forty to sixty dollars per week, and the 
"rank and vile" from live to ten dollars 
a week. The case was continued. 



TWO ACTS OPEN IN LONDON. 

(Special Cable to Variety.) 

Ivondon, June '.i. 
Two American acts opened here Moii- 
dav. Alexander and Scott at the Coliseum 
did quite well, while Lyons and Parks, a 
youthful team appearing at the Tivoli, 
did very good. 



MORRIS AND BARASSFORD? 

(Special Cable to Vabiety.) 

London, June 3. 

There was a very secret meeting or 
conference held between William Morris, 
Thomas Barassford, of the Barassford 
Tour, and The Great Lafayette yesterday 
morning. It was too early really, for 
show people, especially in London, but the 
trio were noticed. 

It tends to confirm the rumor about 
before Morris reached here that there 
might be some affiliation between his 
American circuit and Barassford's English 
tour. 

The Great Lafayette is believed to have 
been instrumental in bringing the two 
managers together. Lafayette is very 
strong with Barassford. 



PITOU-O'HARA DEAL OFF. 

Augustus Pitou will not star Fiske 
O'Hara next season after all. Mr. Pitou 
is the manager of Chauncey Olcott, who 
is in the same Irish romantic singing class 
that Mr. O'Hara is. Mr. Olcott, according 
to the reports, thinks one of a kind is 
enough for any single manager. Pitou 
agreed with him, 'tis said, and still has 
Olcott under his management. 



MAASE LEAVES MARINELLI. 

(Special Cable to Vakikty.) 

Berlin, June 2. 
I. co Manse, formerly the Berlin repre- 
sentative in charge of the II. B. Marinelli 
office here, left that position yesterday 
and started an agency of his own at 57 
Unter Den Linden. 



COUPLE OF THOU. FOR MILLER. 

A couple of thou, or so for each 
week for a quartet of them will bring 
Henry Miller back to the variety stage. 
It's just a matter now of the salary, the 
managers and the time if the latter can 
be brought to light by M. S. Bent ham 
for immediate engagements. 

GIRLS FOR JACK GARDNER. 

Some girls a'i«| . lin-k t:. •Miner will com- 
pose a v;iinlevil!'- ihhmI.it •Imihil' the sum 
nier. |»l.i\in^ on (In- i ""I- or at the 
Ijcaclic*. | •« ■ 1 1 • . 1 1 •— ii l»"lli places. 

•'11 r ^nl.r I'niire" was t lie last piece 
to have Mr. Gardner in the cast. 



VARIETY 



ROBINSON'S "BRIGHTON THEATRE." 

The new house by the tea erected by 
the David Robinson Go. has been named 
"The Brighton Theatre" by Mr. Robinson. 

The Brighton Beach Music Hall secured 
an injunction against the Robinson Co. 
infringing upon its title. 

The Music Hall opens its season June 
7 with the following bill booked by its. 
manager, Arthur Hopkins: Irene Frank- 
lin, Felix and Barry, Waterbury Brothers 
and Tenney, James Harrigan, Camille 
Trio, Hugh Lloyd, Doherty Sisters, and 
one other act, besides pictures. 

For the opening of Mr. Robinson's New 
Brighton Theatre on June 14, the mana- 
ger announces Jos. Hart's "Bathing Girls," 
Montgomery and Moore, Valerie Bergere 
and Go., Willy Pantzer Troupe, Stuart 
Barnes, Raymond and Oaverly, Paul 
Kleist, Rooney Sisters, Bobby Dohn, and 
pictures. 

The policy of the new house will in- 
clude ten numbers weekly. 



GOTCH "PINNED DOWN." 

Chicago, June 3. 

Frank Gotch has announced his engage- 
ment to Minnie Warner, telephone opera- 
tor at the offices of the Western Vaude- 
ville Association. The wedding is to be 
soon. The pair met last summer when 
the big wrestler was hereabouts arrang- 
ing his vaudeville time. They have been 
engaged for some time, but the compact 
was* kept a secret even from friends of the 
interested parties. 

Gotch will likely retire from the wrest- 
ling arena and stage after his marriage. 



WESTERN MANAGERS MEET SATUR- 
DAY. 

The meeting of the middle-west legiti- 
mate managers in New York to discuss 
the "open door" policy will be held Satur- 
day at some large hotel in New York. 

The strife lies between opening the 
doors of the houses in the circuit to all 
attractions, or deciding between the Klaw 
ft Erlanger or the Shubert side of the 
legitimate fight. 



SIR EDWARD IN TRISCO. 

San Francisco, June 3. 

Sir Edward Moss, the senior member of 
the Moss-Stoll Tour Corporation, England, 
with his wife, arrived here this week from 
Yokohoma. 

While Sir Edward has taken no active 
part of late years in the bookings of the 
large English circuit, he said there were 
several novelties noticed by him while in 
Japan that are being negotiated for. 

The titled vaudeville manager will leave 
for New York, where he is due to catch 
boat for London June IP. 



MURDOCH MATTER CLOSED. 

The closing of the sale of John J. Mur- 
dock's vaudeville interests in the west oc- 
curred early in the week, according to 
report. 

No one was positive whether the pur- 
chaser was Fred Henderson, of Hender- 
son's, Coney Island, or the western con- 
tingent booking through the Western 
Vaudeville Association, who came on to 
New York last week to buy out Mr. Mur- 
dock. The opinion prevailed that the 
western people had bought out their for- 
mer associate. 



I. 0. U.'S, LESS COMMISSION. 

There are a few acts about town with 
I. 0. U.'s signed by Tidd & Whelan, man- 
agers of the Duval Theatre, Jacksonville, 
Fla. They are of the bill which appeared 
at the house week of May 17, booked 
through the United Booking Offices. 

When Saturday and pay night arrived 
for that week the managers informed the 
acts that the season had been a bad one 
for them in vaudeville and that they had 
formulated what was known (to them) 
as a "building fund." 

Although it was reported about the the- 
atre that the house had cleared the largest 
profit of the season for the week then 
ending, the managers stated they would 
have to make a deposit in the "building 
fund," and would the artists object to re- 
ceiving a little cash and a lot of I. G. U.'s T 

The artists did object, but they got a 
little cash and a lot of I. O. U.'s just the 
same. The proportion was about two- 
fifths cash and three-fifths promise to pay. 

At the United this week it was said 
that the management has written saying 
the I. O. U.'s would be very shortly 
taken up. 

On the bill for the I. O. U. week were 
Roatta and Stevens, Colby and May, Mrs. 
Dan McAvoy, The Chameroys, Urma and 
Von Tiller and one or two others. 

In most cases the acts had "jumped" 
from a long distance, but received no 
transportation or allowance for that in 
the turning over of the cash installment. 
The managers, though, deducted the com- 
mission from the I. O. U.'s, for which the 
artists were grateful. 

The United is no longer booking the 
house. It is reported a New Orleans book- 
ing agency with a title similar to the 
United's is now supplying acts there. 

Next season the Duval will probably 
be under the management of Jake Wells, 
playing vaudeville and booked in conjunc- 
tion with the Lyric, Atlanta, one of the 
houses to be then supplied by the Or- 
pheum Circuit. 



JEFFRIES GOING TRAVELING. 

Next Monday James J. Jeffries will 
head a show at the Academy of Music, 
Montreal, booked in for the week by the 
Morris office. 

On June 15 Jeffries and his sparring 
partner, Sam Berger, will box six rounds 
at the Duquesne Gardens, Pittsburg, under 
a large guarantee. The Morris office is 
trying to secure one-night stands to 
fill out the second week, sending on a 
vaudeville program for the houses after 
the Pittsburg bout. 



INCREASING GRADE OF ACT. 

Johnstown, Pa., June 3. 

When the Majestic reopens on Labor 
Day a noticeable advance in the grade of 
acts to be played will be observed. 

The advancement will take on the as- 
pect of an experiment. The steel works 
are employing their forces steadily, and 
the country around is more prosperous 
just now than for some time back. 

The Majestic prices will remain at the 
old figures. United Booking Offices acts 
only will appear, sent here by Charles J. 
Stevenson, who is located at the United 
headquarters in New York as the Ma- 
jestic's representative. 



$1,000 TO MILK THE COW. 

The daughter of Lillian Russell, Dor- 
othy by name, wanted William Hammer- 
stein to pay her $1,000 weekly to milk 
the cow on Hammerstein's Roof once 
daily during each week. 

Jack Levy apologized to Mr. Hammer- 
stein when conveying the proposition from 
Miss Russell, but Jack explained that 
"Daughtie" was one grand milker and 
came high in consequence. 

Mr. Hammerstein wanted a big card to 
detach the baby's food from the animal. 
He commissioned Mr. Levy to secure 
either Miss Russell or Valeska Suratt. 
Miss Suratt answered she would delay her 
European trip for $600 weekly. The Roof 
manager secured the girl he had last sea- 
son, who can separate the cow and the 
milk for something like $10 per. 



CONSIDINE GOES HOME. 

On Tuesday last John W. Cbnsidine 
commenced his return trip to Seattle. If 
Mr. Considine did anything of importance 
while in New York it did not become 
known. 

The only report of interest in connec- 
tion with his visit was that something 
might happen in the near future of con- 
siderable concern to vaudeville people 
arising from the New York trip. 



LARGEST SIGN IN THE WORLD. 

The largest electric sign in the world 
has just been placed in position by the 
Globe Electric Go. of New York for Pali- 
sades Park, on the Jersey shore of the 
Hudson River. 

The sign measures four hundred feet 
long. Each letter is eighteen feet high. 
The whole reads "Palisades Amusement 
Park." 

The reflection may be seen from the 
knoll on Main Street, Sag Harbor, 110 
miles from New York, at the end of Long 
Island, and the sign can be read on a dark 
night from Babylon, about 50 miles away. 

The electrical power employed could 
operate the entire street car service of 
New York City. 

Harry Biasing, of the Globe Co., says 
anything approaching the Palisades dis- 
play has never been attempted in electri- 
cal readable illumination before. 



BUYS "FOOTBALL DOGS." 

Joseph Hart has imported a European dog 
act. The act opens with a view of a foot- 
ball field in Dogdom, wherever that place 
in located. The game continues until one 
side or the other has scored; then the tri- 
umphant team gives vent to its joy by a 
scries of enthusiastic barks, while the losers 
howl in disappointment The dogs are 
English bull terriers. 

The animals were purchased by Mr. Hart 
from C. A. Jones. They were trained by 
Richard Pierce, well known in England as 
o trainer. Mr. Hart will present the act 
in the near future. 



Bert Leslie will play both the Orpheum, 
Brooklyn, and Hammerstein's Roof next 
week. 



VAUDEVILLE AND NEW PLAY. 

At Carlsbad in Germany Arnold Daly is 
rusticating while thinking of his plans for 
next season. They include the presenta- 
tion of a new play on Broadway in No- 
vember; also the playing of vaudeville 
time for six weeks before the premiere 
occurs. 

M. S. Bentham will watch out for the 
vaudeville end. 



"FOR A WOMAN" A HIT. 

Atlantio City, June 3. 

"For a Woman," a gripping, intense 
melodrama, was presented at the Apollo 
last Monday night for the first show- 
ing. It was written by Paul Armstrong, 
and produced by Henry Miller. 

Although programed as "A Modern 
Drama" the piece is melodramatic. The 
second act is a splendid representation of 
the interior of a criminal court, with ex- 
cellent types of life's seamy side among 
those present. 

The consensus of opinion is that Mr. 
Armstrong has turned out a stronger play 
than his "Via Wireless." 

William B. Mack and John Miltern 
reaped honors, and Laura Hope Crews 
gave a delightful performance. Mary 
Mallon also come in for special notice, 
while the entire cast is exceptionally good 
and well balanced. 



HACKETT CLOSES ORPHEUM. 

Boston, June 3. 
William Morris will close his first sea- 
son as manager of the Orpheum next 
week when James K. Hackett will head- 
line. 



BOSTON OFFICE DISCONTINUED. 

Boston, June 3. 

The branch office of the United Book- 
ing Offices, presided, over by William H. 
Walsh, is closed. Mr. Walsh has returned 
to the main office in New York. 

The Boston branch booked through Mr. 
Walsh about fourteen small theatres in 
the near vicinity. These will be booked 
from New York hereafter. 



ANYTHING IS POSSIBLE. 

Chicago, June 3. 

To be held up by a footpad in the quiet 
and desolate town of Waukegan is almost 
unbelievable. Waukegan is 35 miles north 
of Chicago. It is near Kenosha and not 
far from Racine, where "split weeks" are 
a necessity. 

The victims of this unusual experience 
are John T. and Jessie Powers, who 
played a week at the Barrison Theatre. 
The thug particularly objected to Mrs. 
Powers wearing diamonds, and told her 
so. When Mr. Powers cheerfully declined 
to part with a part of his Waukegan sal- 
ary the stranger became insistent and 
followed them to their hotel, where he 
told the police he wanted to invite Mrs. 
Powers to dinner. 

The police, however, wouldn't believe 
his story, and now the only hold-up man 
in Waukegan is behind the bars. 



BOOKING UP ROAD SHOW. 

Several numbers for Martin Beck's Or- 
pheum Road Show which annually cavorts 
over the vaudeville circuits of the east 
and west, mostly west, have been engaged 
by Mr. Beck for next season. 

Among them are La Belle Amcricaine, 
Melville and Higgins, the Ushers and the 
Amatos. 

The sketch number will be produced by 
the Orpheum Circuit's Producing Depart- 
ment. 



Demling's, Rockaway Beach, L. I., starts 
its Sundays on June 0, playing vaudeville 
only on that day until June 20, when the 
weekly bill will be installed, booked by 
Hugo Morris, of the Morris office. 



VARIETY 



NEGRO ATTACKS ELFIE FAY. 

Baltimore, June 3. 

Intruded upon by a negro while asleep 
in her berth in a Pullman, en route to 
this city early last Sunday morning, El fie 
Fay, the vaudeville actress at the Mary- 
land this week, had a thrilling experience 
und proved her mettle by holding on to 
her assailant until help came, when he 
was taken into custody. 

It was pitch dark when Miss Fay felt 
Homething touch her hand. That "some- 
thing" proved to be the arm of the negro. 
She acted quickly and literally split the 
air with her screams. 

Miss Fay said she had been awakened 
by the jostling of the car. About to fall 
asleep again, she felt the blanket move. 
In a second there was excitement, Elfie 
retaining her hold on the offending hand. 
Men and women tumbled from their 
berths. Some one lighted a lamp, dis- 
covering the negro porter, his hand half 
hidden by the curtains, struggling to free 
himself. 

The negro was taken in charge, and 
when the train reached Baltimore turned 
over to the police. 



STAYED IN A TRANCE. 

Among the volunteers from the audi- 
ence who presented themselves as sub- 
jects for Prescelle, the hypnotist, at the 
Fifth Avenue, New York, was a man who 
would not come out of the cataleptic state 
the hypnotist had supposedly thrown him 
into. 

He was removed from the stage to the 
wings, where a physician declined to 
treat him, Baying the man was "faking." 

The man was sent to a hospital, but 
before any attention could be given him 
he arose and walked away. 



INJURED BY PASSING TRAIN. 

Dayton, O., June 3. 

The little boy of the Aerial Budd Trio 
had his arm broken by being struck by 
something from a passing train while the 
troupe were on another train en route to 
Allegheny, Pa. 

It is not known what hit the boy, who 
had his arm just protruding over the win- 
dow ledge. 



EVERYTHING FOR LOTTIE WILLIAMS 

New Canaan, Conn., June 3. 

Anyone would have to travel a long 
wny before finding a home surpassing 
that of Lottie Williams here, which Miss 
Williams enjoys during the summer only. 

In the grounds surrounding it are a 
private fishing pond and swimming pool. 
The landscape scheme and the interior of 
the house make Miss Williams' summer 
home truly magnificent. 

Over Decoration Day, Miss Williams en- 
tertained the Misses Jenie Jacobs and 
Pauline Cooke, of New York, both theat- 
rical people. 

ST. JOE FOR S.-C. 

Chicago, June 3. 

Negotiations arc under way for the 
erection of a modern vaudeville theatre at 
St. Joseph, Mo., for the Sullivan-Consi- 
dine Circuit. 

The site is said to have been selected. 
The house will be ready for occupancy 
late next winter. 

Phil Hunt is booking the several houses 
he represents from the Joe Wood office. 



CLOSES DIRTY PLAY. 

"The Narrow Path" was opened and 
closed at the Hackett, New York, on Mon- 
day night. It was produced by Al H. 
Woods and first presented at Atlantic 
City last week. It is in the class of plays 
Woods favors since melodrama got its 
bumps. 

"The Narrow Path" was ordered off the 
Hackett stage by Henry B. Harris, who 
secured the Hackett from Oscar Hammer - 
stein, afterwards leasing it to James K. 
Hackett. Mr. Harris said he would have 
the show declared a nuisance unless re- 
moved. After the performance at the 
Hackett those concerned realized "The 
Narrow Path" was too "raw" to take a 
chance with. 

The Shuberts booked the piece, the 
summer bookings for the Hackett having 
been placed with them. Woods' other 
warm show, "The Girl From Rector's," is 
still running at Weber's. 

One Broadwayite upon hearing "The 
Narrow Path" had been closed said: "Gee, 
tl at's tough! Al Woods' attempt to puri- 
fy the drama has done another flop." 



RATS SCAMPER ABOUT BUFFALO. 

"How We Love Buffalo" (written by M. 
Shay and Joan Adams) will provide the 
fun at a public scamper to be given by 
the White Rats in its lodge rooms to- 
night (Saturday) at 11 o'clock. 

Many invitations have been sent out, 
and several of the legislators who helped 
to pass the Voss Bill that the Mayor of 
Buffalo decided New York didn't need 
will enjoy the evening's sport. 

The general meeting of the White Rats 
will take place on June 17 at noon. 

The public meeting to be held at a Chi- 
cago theatre on the Friday following will 
be presided over by Junie McCree. * 

The cashier at the White Rats, A. J. 
Mahoney, was attacked with malaria on 
Wednesday, leaving no one in the office to 
acknowledge receipt of payments. 

Harry Knowles, formerly in charge of 
the Chicago office of the White Rats, has 
resigned as a member of that society. 



PRODUCTION WITH ONE PERSON. 

An elaborate spectacular production, 
called "Nord," will be produced next sea- 
son by B. A. Myers, who says that though 
a large and massive affair for vaudeville, 
the act will contain one person only. Mr. 
Myers declines to state whether the single 
person will be male or female. 



PROSPECTS GOOD, SAYS WEBER. 

"The prospects for next season are ex- 
cellent," said Harry F. Weber, the Chi- 
cago agent, who was in New York early in 
the week. Mr. Weber is acquainted with 
the vaudeville conditions of the middle- 
west. He says there will be a great many 
one- night stands playing the cheaper va- 
riety shows next season, and that there 
will be great competition for the booking 
of these houses by the agents. 



Moving Pktura, ^ 
Mutinied So»f> * J 
GnfcSoen* * <* 



HotuVrlanu Qtyratrr 
(Enmaany 



Hwaoraa Skcfehct > 
CUariul Sfccttkt > 
Hicb-GUa V.odtTUk. 



J/. /•**'*. ff.J., 






^/^t^t'jL Oj^yt 




n. 






j ia* < 'k*^-**--fi~-%»- - «tx-V '{sf/'iS/< cft^/i'-i* • - • a «<-^ 

' / / 






PL'S y/XU^t y\ , £\i o-T-t_<-f A/»/yVy t^U* -wi ,*^0 , *• /fr^ntp*, J 



rfVi«/ *S0m rv^t^ru^f A^-e-»y^y c ff f * ■<* 'u* '"£-&S\.( A^~> 
'^i^tfr^ /PZCAx**- *\-b-^£* si** Cj/f-t^.) // »^yf. 

OFFERS $25 FOR $750 ACT. 

The n»ntvr reproduction id an odd bit of evl«lciic« of the previous theatrical experience of many of 
the in h nailer* of the very small vaudeville time. J. Uurnstelii, who make* thla offer of $25 weekly to 
Trlslc Frlganza. might have palpitation of the heart when he learns that during Miss Frlgama'a brief 
tour In the varieties, she received $750 weekly, playing hut two shows dally. (At this time Miss 
Frlganza carried an advertisement in VARIETY.) Trlxle left vaudeville to strengthen "The Girl 
From Ysma" in Philadelphia. 

Some curl"Flty will be aroused through Burnstein stating that after Miss Frlganta plays four or 
Ave weeks In th" house "If everything Is satisfactory" she n.ny remain longer. The letter shown 
above, dated it St. Johns. Newfoundland, May 15. from the Wonderland Theatre, reads as follows: 
"Trlxle Prlcnnza. Dear Madam: I am desirous of obtaining a good comedian, and seeing your name In 
the VARIETY, I thought I would write yon. I would want you for four or five weeks, and, if every- 
thing is satisfactory, for longer. The wages would be from twenty to twenty-flvc dollars a week, and 
as this Is a nice healthy climate I know yon would not be sorry for coming, and you know twenty 
dollars here is letter than forty In New York. Trusting to hear from you Immediately, stating par- 
ticulars, I remain, yours respectfully. J. Burnstein, Ifgr." 



SEATTLE'S EXPOSITION OPENS. 

Seattle, June 3. 

When President Taft pressed the golden 
key at Washington Tuesday, he opened 
one of the world's greatest expositions. 
The city was given over to a day of jolli- 
fication. 

The Exposition was complete in every 
detail on the opening day, the first to 
make that record. 

The "Pay Streak" was one mass of gor- 
geous splendor, and the noise terrific. 
There is more "class" on the "Pay Streak" 
of the Alaska- Yukon-Pacific Exposition 
than on the "Midway" at Chicago, the 
'Pike'' at St. Louis, the "Trail" at Port- 
land, or the "War Path" at Jamestown. 
The number of attractions is not as great 
as at either Chicago or St. Louis, but the 
standard of quality and cleanliness and 
educational value is higher than at any 
exposition yet held. 

So far as individual features of the 
Alaska-Yukon-Paciflc Exposition are con- 
cerned, the "Pay Streak" is the biggest 
thing at the Fair. The Exposition is built 
upon the many times demonstrated prin- 
ciple that, when the world turns out to 
make a holiday, it is fun it is looking for. 
Life, action, color, a lot of music, the 
unique and bizarre are desired above dig- 
nity and the sober side; wherefore has the 
world been combed and three-quarters of 
a million of Seattle money invested in 
the newest and most effective fun-pro- 
ducing features that were to be found. 

There is a sermon to be read, if one 
cares to read it, in Capt. A. M. Bauer's 
village of Siberian Eskimo. It is new in 
every feature and always intensely inter- 
esting. The same may almost be said 
of the Igorrote Village. It is the first 
view, close at hand, that the west has had 
of its brown, head-hunting little brothers 
from the Philippines. Ezra Meeker has 
crowded the earliest history of the north- 
west into his reproduction of "the Oregon 
trail." It is a ride behind the ox-team 
that crossed the continent under Mr. 
Meeker's goad. 

E. W. McConnell's huge cycloramas, 
"Monitor and Merrimac" and "The Battle 
of Gettysburg," are declared historically 
correct. 

Thompson's scenic railway has been one 
of the best bets. On the "Pay Streak" 
Thompson has put up the biggest struc- 
ture he has ever built. Almost next to it 
on "The Streak" is the "Mountain Slide," 
an all-fun attraction. It is just what 
its name implies. 

N. Salih has spread a large "Streets of 
Cairo" and "Turkish Village.*' He employs 
over 150 people, many the highest-priced 
Oriental dancers and performers ever 
brought to the country. A herd of ele- 
phants and another of camels kneel in the 
market place when the muzzein calls the 
faithful to prayers. Besides arc the ba- 
zsars, cafes, theatres and a mosque. 

The Spanish Theatre is just as it was 
taken out of Madrid, and stars who trod 
the boards there will tread them here. It 
lias an excellent Spanish onhestra in na- 
tive costume. 

John Cort's at.-n.i is M»riu't.liitif' new in 
the list of jiitf.i ■! i« -is- . P "i:ik >< hug* 1 en 
closure with a s-ifiu- rapacity <>f 4,000 
aiM l j M jr \\>. •.i.'-imii' iIm- !-iir (until 
Oct. HP t.h<- .v-rM's "u ■'•• l boxers and 
lcnd ; "L' " '■■ '•«" * |,J rfhow their class 
. i ■.>,.,,;. ,/ n/i page 11.) 



VARIETY 



TOO MANY AGENTS. 

There are too many agents interested in 
the /salary of Work and Ower, the foreign 
comedy acrobats, to please Messrs. Work 
and Ower themselves. 

The agent the act objects to most 
strongly is II. B. Marinelli. Last week 
Marinelli had an attachment served upon 
the team while playing in Boston, causing 
a civil arrest of the foreigners, which dis- 
pleased them mightily. 

The annoyance in Boston determined the 
artists to prosecute the matter to the ut- 
most, and they have directed their attor- 
ney, Denis F. O'Brien, to bring a damage 
action against Marinelli for false arrest. 

It seems that the claim upon which the 
attachment was sworn out had previously 
been placed in suit in New York Oity, 
Work and Ower having been sued here by 
Marinelli for ten per cent, of all salary re- 
ceived by the act since it appeared in this 
country. 

The present contracts held by Work and 
Ower were secured through Al Sutherland. 
The Marinelli claim rests upon what is 
known as an "office copy" contract. It 
was signed by Work and Ower while still 
abroad, and before they appeared over here. 
Under the agreement, the Marinelli office 
asks ten per cent, commissions on all time 
played by the act in America. 

Should the courts oblige the act to honor 
this pernicious contract clause, Work and 
Ower would have to pay in all twenty per 
cent, commission, Mr. Sutherland receiving 
five, and the booking agency another five. 

The "office copy" agency agreement has 
been at the bottom of any amount of trou- 
ble abroad. One or two agents here have 
attempted to introduce it in New York, 
but when threatened with publication of 
the unfairness of the contract if they per- 
sisted, the agents reconsidered. 

Mr. O'Brien, who is also attorney for 
the White Rats, says he will secure a de- 
cision in the Work and Ower- Marinelli 
matter that will act as a precedent should 
other similar canes arise. 



ARKANSAS io-ao STRING. 

Chicago, June 3. 

The Arkansas Amusement Co. has been 
formed by R. G. Daniels and local capital- 
ists at Hot Springs for the purpose of 
operating a string of vaudeville theatres 
in the south. 

It is stated theatres will be opened at 
Hot Springs, Pine Bluff, Little Rock and 
ten others in that vicinity. 

Three shows daily at 10-20-30 will be 
the policy. Sam Du Vries has charge of 
the bookings. 



TALK OF BONDING MANAGERS. 

The Vaudeville Agents' Board of Trade, 
the association of booking agents, con- 
tinues to meet. It gathered Thursday 
evening last and the members passed on 
plans for an incorporation. 

The suggestion has been made and will 
be acted upon shortly that in any case 
where a manager shows himself to be 
unreliable the agents as a body enforce a 
demand that for all future bookings the 
manager file a cash bond to secure the 
fulfilment of contracts, stop arbitrary 
cimcellatioiiH ami insure the payment of 
all salaries. 

The initiation fee to the association has 
lxcn fixed at $10 per meml>cr and annual 
dr.es will be $25. No new members l>c- 
yond those irst announced have been re- 
ported. 



MAJESTIC OPENS SLOWLY. 

There have been no speculators outside 
the Majestic, at Columbus Circle, New 
York, this week. A show has been going 
on within under the management of the 
People's Vaudeville Co., which leased the 
theatre for the summer from the Shuberts. 

The attraction is pictures and vaude- 
ville at prices from 10 to 25 cents (or- 
chestra and boxes). 

Tuesday evening there seemed to be 
more pictures than acts. Five turns were 
on the program, but up to 8:45 none had 
appeared. For over an hour previously the 
house had been in semi -darkness with only 
moving pictures shown, varied for a few 
moments by one illustrated song number. 
There is an orchestra of four pieces. 

Very few people were present, especially 
on the lower floor. One man awoke at 8:30 
and walked out, followed a few minutes 
later by another, while the stage crew was 
wrestling with "C." "C" on the program 
called for the De Veau Twins. After the 
card had been placed on the eaael and re- 
moved twice the picture sheet was again 
lowered. 

The show is continuous, from 1 until 11. 
The vaudeville bills are changed twice 
weekly — Mondays and Thursdays. Book- 
ings are entered through Joe Wood. 

Next Monday the Shuberts' West End 
Theatre, New York, starts a summer sea- 
son, with the same policy of combination 
vaudeville. Wood has booked in the first 
show. 



FIRST SHOW IN FIVE YEARS. 

The variety show shipped into South 
America under the patronage of the 
Venezuelan Government through J. Harry 
Allen, of New York, is now playing Trini- 
dad. They left Caracas May 24* after 
playing to large business. It waa the 
first specialty show to appear in that city 
in five years and the population flocked to 
the "Circo Metropolitania" or bull ring, 
where the performances were given. 

Al Jundt, of Les Jundts, who are with 
the troupe, says the engagement has been 
most enjoyable, except for the fact that 
beer, alas, is of wretched quality and 
double price. The natives drop work of 
all kinds from 11 to 2 o'clock on account 
of the extreme heat and at all times 
appear in a costume of "Salome" brevity. 
Only night shows are given except on 
holidays and feast days, when matinees 
are included in the schedule. The Ameri- 
cans suffer somewhat from the heat at 
these performances. 

Mr. Jundt declares that some of the 
opera houses are exceedingly fine, better 
than even the pretentious American the- 
atres. 



PEOPLE'S GETS SAVOY. 

Atlantic City, June 3. 

On Monday the Savoy, controlled by 
Comstock & Gest, will commence a policy 
of moving pictures and vaudeville under 
the management of the People's Vaude- 
ville Co. This gives the concern thirteen 
large theatres devoted to that style of 
entertainment. 

Five acts will be booked in through Joe 
Wood with change every week. Acts will 
eome from New York, the concern having 
no stand between the booking office and 
1 he Jersey resort. 

(Veil I^enn nnd Florence Holhrook will 
return to vaudeville July 12 at Detroit. 



SHUBERTS TAKING ANYTHING. 

The theatrical people are commencing 
to believe the Shuberts are prepared to 
take anything for their theatrical enter- 
prises, either start or houses. 

It was talked about this week that the 
opposition to the "syndicate" offered one 
circuit $97,000 yearly rent for its seven 
houses for a period of ten years. The 
first year's rent was to be deposited in 
advance, according to the proposition, and 
the remainder of the million-dollar deal 
guaranteed by a bank. The offer was de- 
clined by the circuit. 

The impression is about that the Shu- 
berts have unlimited resources as far as 
the money end goes, and have been told 
by capitalists back of them in the fight 
with Klaw & Erlanger to go to a finish 
in it. 



SIX WEEKS IN MEXICO. 

Joe Wood has added to his string of 
houses an arrangement to book six weeks 
in Mexico, opening and closing in the 
capital city of the Republic. The time is 
sir-all, the entertainments being filled out 
with moving pictures. Wood has seen 
to it, however, that the payment of acts 
going into the far south shall be secure. 
For every act which leaves New York (by 
boat in all cases) the Sara Amusement 
Co. (a Canadian concern), which controls 
the Mexican property, will deposit by 
check to Wood's account enough money to 
pay the salary for the entire six weeks. 
In addition to this The Sara Co. through 
Wood will pay transportation in advance 
to Mexico City and return. An advance 
of half the first week's salary will also 
be made. 

Contracts will be made net. No com- 
mission will be deducted for booking. The 
company pays a commission for the first 
bills. After that they will pay a fixed 
sum for each house. The first house 
1 1 play vaudeville under the new scheme 
will open in Mexico City next Monday. 
Others will open at the rate of one each 
week. 



COULDN'T BUY HOUSE. 

Atlantic City, June 3. 

Fred Moore, manager of the Apollo, 
where "The Follies of 1909" is to open 
June 7, refused to sell the entire orches- 
tra floor for the first night to Leon Fried- 
man who was here early in the week. 
Mr. Friedman is the advance man for the 
show. He said a trainload of New York- 
ers would be on to witness the premiere, 
nnd he wanted to provide for them. 

Manager Moore answered he must take 
care of his Atlantic City patrons first. 
The Apollo is a Nixon & Zimmerman 
house. 



SEASHORE STOCK MINSTELS. 

Atlantic City, June 3. 

Murphy's American Minstrels com- 
menced a stock season at the Steel Pier 
last Saturday. Vic Richards and Eddie 
Cassady arc the ends. John E. Murphy is 
interlocutor. Gilbert Losee, Vaughn Com- 
fort, Edwin Goldrick and Clarence Marks 
are the soloists. 

Most of the company is from the Du- 
mont stock minstrel company, recently 
closed in Philadelphia. Mr. Comfort has 
signed with the Cohan & Harris blackface 
organization for next season. 



SHAPIRO AND ATLANTIC CITY. 

Atlantic Oity, June 3. 

The Maurice Shapiros think well enough 
of this town to live in it all summer. They 
have taken an apartment on the board- 
walk, which they will occupy about 
July 1. 

The Shapiro Atlantic City store opens 
here June 15. Tommy Quigley from the 
Chicago office will remove to the' beach 
side in charge. 

Mr. Shapiro, who is one of New York's 
largest music publishers, claims that in 
Atlantic City he obtains advance informa- 
tion of the musical numbers published 
by him destined for hits. 

"I carry the melodies of all the songs 
we publish," said Mr. Shapiro when here 
last. "I get up every morning about 3 
o'clock, when it is quiet. Softly stealing 
to the beach so I will not disturb the roll 
of the ocean, I listen to the music of the 
waves breaking on the sand. If it is the 
melody of 'Gloaming* I hear, I know 
that's going to be a hit. If it's 'Oh, You 
Kid!' same answer. 

"The waves have given inside informa- 
tion, saving me hundreds of thousands of 
dollars. Why, the other day a fellow 
came in with a piece of music and asked 
$6,000 for the song outright. He is well 
known and with a good piece his name 
would do the rest. I stuck that in my 
pocket, and this morning I went out on 
the beach. The ocean didn't seem to know 
anything about the song, so the fellow 
can't have his six." 

When Mr. Shapiro was asked whether 
he walked on the beach when it rained, he 
replied, "Oh, no. When that happens, I 
lose a hit." 



PRINCESS RAJAH. 

Princess Rajah, who enjoys an interna- 
tional reputation from the unprecedented 
success scored by the dancer during her 
long run at Hammerstein's a few months 
ago, has returned to the place of her 
greatest fame, appearing as one of the 
opening features on the Roof bill this 
week. The Princess' latest photos are 
6hown on the front page. 

"The Cleopatra Dance" which Rajah 
presents was created by her. Since leav- 
ing Hammerstein's she has appeared in 
Chicago, Pittsburg and other large west- 
ern cities, having been complimented by 
the very officials in these towns who have 
stopped the many "Salome" dancers of the 
season from appearing. 

The Princess has been booked for eight 
weeks on the Roof. She may take a trip 
abroad following the engagement. 



SUTHERLAND HAS FOREIGN ACTS. 

Several foreign acts were engaged by 
Al Sutherland, the agent, while abroad. 
Mr. Sutherland says that in Howard Cul- 
linson Co. he has one of the best comedy 
acrobatic numbers he has ever seen. This 
act will reach here in September, and 
routings are now being arranged in the 
United offices for it. Several others, says 
Mr. Sutherland, are under tentative con- 
tracts. 

The vaudeville business as he found it 
on the European continent is flourishing, 
according to the agent, who went abroad 
more on pleasure than business bent. 



Edw. S. Keller has continued hjs tem- 
porary management of the Maryland. 
Baltimore, for another week, the third. 



VARIETY 



finiETY 

A Variety Papar lor Variety People. 

Pabltaaat every l«tv«ar by 

THB VARIETY PUBU8HINO CO. 



How York aty. 



■Met aai g i aftie tar. 



Jnt#r«* at teoa»tf^l«M matter Deoember 22, 
1905; et «A« Pat* OJIee et #«• Fore. V. 7. f 
wndm tk% mot o/ CoepreM of March S, 1870. 



OHZOAOO OITIOX, 
Meaga Open, Kease 
(Vaaae, Mala MM). 



LOVBOV OITIGE, 
HI Una* 
(Oatte, "Jaaarraa, Leaiea,") 
I. niBtlW, is eaeirga. 



bav FEisonoo orrm, 

JOHV J. O'OOMYOE, Eapraaaatatlve, 



unroot omox, 

Orjatal Tfcaatra BatMIaf. 
KAJULY BXAUKOVT, Bt pmaa tatfra. 

VAmn omox, 

NKilN lalat DMlOT, 

IDWAJLD O. XKXDBXW, BeafaaaatatlTe. 



mix* omoi, 

Uater tea Lladaa €1, 

IBBL'I XJBBAXT. 

0. M. SHBT, BapraaantatlYa. 



Bate oard may be found in adTertUlnff ■action 
of this Uaaa. 

■VBSOBIFTIOV BATH. 

Annual U 

Foralfo B 

Bli and Urea moatha la proportloa. 
Slagla coplaa 10 casta. 

VAB1BTY will ba nulled to a parmanant ad- 
drau or aa par rooto, aa deatred. 

AdwtlMOMDts forwardad by mall moat ba ac- 
compaalad by remlttanca, mado payable to Variety 
Fubllablng Co. 

Copyright, IMP, by Variety Publlabing Co. 



VaJ. XIV. 



JUNE 5. 



No, 13. 



The "ten-twenty cent" vaudeville propo- 
sition is one the artist might study for an 
understanding. Because the artist knows 
he will never play that time is no reason 
why he should not acquaint himself with 
the probable influence the "10-20" shows 
may have in general on all vaudeville. 



There are three sides to the incoming 
"10-20" style. They are the influence 
these shows will have on the smaller big 
time; the numberless new acts they will 
introduce to vaudeville, and the ultimate 
result the bookings will bring forth. 



The "10-20" shows charge from Ave to 
thirty cents admission. The gallery here 
and there has an admission of five cents. 
Seats in boxes are sold at thirty cents in 
some houses. The popular prices are ten 
and twenty cents. There are no statistics 
to show whether the ten or the twenty 
cent rate is the most popular. That de- 
pends upon locality. There have been 
houses which steadily pushed back their 
twenty cent seats until few at ten cents 
were left in the orchestra. The ten cent 
seats, however, are apt to prove the choice, 
and the ten cent patronage must be ca- 
tered to. That is the part of the clientele 
which booms the theatre into a successful 
one under this policy, and it is the "ten 
cents" advertised which draws. 



It aeems to have been settled and ac- 
cepted that towns not considered large 
enough to support a theatre every day, 
whether in the legitimate or vaudeville, can 
maintain a "10-20" house. In these 
towns the admission runs down to five 
cents, and the bills are changed every 
Monday and Thursday, throwing the theatre 
into the "split-week" style, the house ex- 
changing with some other theatre con- 
veniently close, run under the same plan. 



This is what will cause many managers 
having "one-night-stand" houses taking up 
the vaudeville end to the exclusion of the 
legitimate. Though with a small profit, 
they will conclude that is preferable con- 
tinuously, than a hazard with an "attrac- 
tion" now and then. This conversion of an 
unlimited and uncountable list of theatres 
throughout the country w ; ll provide a vast 
market for the smaller acts, if the "one- 
nighters" can stick it out for a season. It 
looks as though they could from the past 
season's experience of the smallest time. 



In towns which have supported regular 
vaudeville theatres or stock companies but 
at a lesser price of admission than in the 
large cities, "10-20" will have easier sail- 
ing. Though not of capacity large enough 
perhaps to battle successfully against the 
regular vaudeville house (where the admis- 
sion runs up to fifty cents in the boxes) 
the "10-20" may force the fifty cent thea- 
tre to reduce to "10-20" also for active com- 
petition. When the reduction in prices has 
been made, the fifty cent house can no 
longer remain in the bigger-small time. It 
frill look for good acts cheap, and try to 
secure them as cheaply as the "10-20" peo- 
ple do. The small-big manager cannot ob- 
tain acts cheaper than their set figure from 
one of the large agencies. He must go 
elsewhere. This may take him for a time 
anyway from the list booking through the 
large agencies. 

If many of these small-big houses leave 
the large agencies, they will be cramped 
for the weeks whereby to offer an act a 
season's booking, unless, say, the United 
Booking Offices, for instance, should book 
in with the Orpheum Circuit and the west. 
The United has about eighteen first-class 
weeks in the east. The Orpheum and the 
West can give thirty-two weeks, includ- 
ing jumps; also a couple of "split-salary" 
towns. 



The "10-20" manager isn't always the 
best showman in the world. Ofttimes his 
small theatre is his debut in the show 
business. When his agent makes up a 
bill which seems overhigh to him, the agent 
saying the bill cannot be cheapened, the 
manager replies by ordering the agent to 
remove an act. To replace it, the mana- 
ger invites some local amateur talent to 
go on for the week. The amateur or ama- 
teurs prove a good drawing card locally, 
but for the week only, when the manager 
is through with them. But the amateurs 
are not through with vaudeville. They 
liked the lights on the stage, or someone 
on the street slipped it to them that they 
were good. So they keep right on playing. 
This brings many acts into the business, 
and will continue to do so. They are hap- 
py to work at almost any figure upon start- 
ing, until they think they have become nec- 
essary, when the salary goes up. 



The possible increase of new houses in 
the ten-twenty grade, the decrease of the 
smaller big-time through that, and the less- 
ened demand for first-claw acts through 
the loss of this time, with the additional 
acts from which good material may be 
obtained, may have a perceptible effect 
next season in the best time lists which 
should be watched by artists, and followed 
accordingly. 



The bookings for these "ten-twenty" 
houses are going to keep the smaller 
agents busy. There is already strife over 
the bookings, in the east and west. Dur- 
ing the summer the agents will be after the 
managers, while the larger "ten-twenty" 
managers may get together for what they 
deem their own best protection. 



Though the smallest time brings back 
to its level some of the small big time, 
eventually many of the "10-20" houses will 
graduate into the small-big time through 
the survival of the fittest, and the demand 
for a better grade of show by an estab- 
lished patronage. 



What big agency will secure this addi- 
tional future booking or whether there 
will be a third party in the first-class 
vaudeville field of the smaller class are 
questions which time only can answer. 
For the booking agencies the "10-20" 
houses are something that might be well 
worth while closely watching. 



The demand for the smaller acts from 
the smaller houses will raise salaries on 
the small time. The increase of the 
smaller time has already done that with- 
in the past three months. 



For the artists the "10-20" vaudeville in 
a way is a boon. It may prove the founda- 
tion rock of an opposition for the next few 
years, and cannot be stopped, no matter 
how many or what combinations occur in 
the higher vaudeville divisions. 



"10-20" vaudeville is something the 
United Booking Offices or William Morris 
or any one else cannot control as it is now. 
In fact, neither of these agencies has any 
conception of the enormity of the smallest 
time, or its fast growth. Each has been 
occupied with other matters the past sea- 
son. 



The "10-20" vaudeville theatre is here, 
though, and to stay, from the outlook, em- 
bracing enough good houses to make a fair 
showing with increased prices of admis- 
siou against the combination of nil the 
present biggest vaudeville circuits (includ- 
ing even the Sullivan-Considiuc and Van- 
tages' Western States. While these two 
western small time circuits were in reality 
the pioneers (especially Sullivan & Consi- 
dine) iu this particular "10-20" scheme, 
this new "10-20" idea is not exactly 
the same in all its details, although re- 
sembling to some extent the early days of 
the former Snllivan-Cnnsidiiie and Van- 
tages who have each developed greatly 
since. Neither is now looked upon as "10- 
20" time. They play large acts at lnrge 
salaries, charging mostly 10-20-30, with 
houses in the far west holding rank as 
first-class for those towns. The prices of 
some of these circuits' ordinary shows 
would be considered ruinous by the pres 
out "10-20" mnnagers). . 



There is one thing we want to say to 
artists playiug this very small time. Stop 
finding fault when you arc canceled or fail 
t) secure your salary. And stop "kicking" 
with your agent the first week you are laid 
oft through a house closing or refusing to 
play you. Remember the time you are 
playing on, and that many of the managers 
are irresponsible, as are many of the agents 
who book these houses. This "10-20" flood 
is too young to regulate itself thus early. 
An agent in his anxiety to secure as many 
weeks as he can to book for will not be 
over particular iu investigating the finan- 
cial resources or the character of every 
manager who applies. The reliable agents 
will weed these houses and managers out 
in time. That is about all they can do. 
The irresponsible managers will go to the 
irresponsible agents, and both do business 
again with the artist. So when you work 
for either of these irresponsible parties, 
willing to take a chance without investigat- 
ing or finding out for yourself, don't squeal, 
but take your medicine. If you don't "take 
a chance," there isn't much danger of you 
being "stung." 



Leo Carrillo, Variety's cartoonist, re- 
turned to New York on Thursday from 
his long tour of 50 weeks. 



Bonita and Lew Hearn were married 
Wednesday in New York. Both were with 
the "Wine, Woman and Song" show. 



Fred Mardo is the present manager of 
the Morris branch office in Boston. Fred 
Curtis, formerly in charge, Is now in the 
New York headquarters. 



One thousand dollars weekly is the 
salary that Billy B. Van will command 
next season. Contracts have been entered 
into between him and the United Booking 
Ollices for a 11)00 10 tour. 



Fields and Lewis open on the Morris 
time June 14, and also have a contract 
over the opposition circuit for twenty 
weeks next season, placed through B. A. 
Myers. 



CJracc Towner (Towner Sisters) and 
Win. J. Clayton, manager, of Indianapolis, 
were married May 27 at Huntington, Ind., 
by the Rev. Frank Lenig. Mrs. Clayton 
will retire from the stage. 

Mosc Gumblc sails to-day (Saturday) 
on the Vhiladclphia for London, where he 
will remain about three weeks. Clarice 
Vance (Mrs. (jumble) is at the Palace 
iu the big English town for a long run. 



Charles Grapewin has engaged to play a 
few weeks on the Morris time at the own- 
ing of next season, preliminary to Mr. 
Grapewin commencing his regular season 
in the legitimate. B. A. Myers placed the 
hooking. 



The decision of Supreme Court .Justice 
Greenbaum, in the actions against the 
Alhambra and Hurtig & Seamon's Music 
Hall for violations of (In- Doucll ordinance, 
practically nullified that ordinance, bring- 
ing about a "straightening up" of the 
vaudeville kImws in V-w York last Sun- 
day. The former general laws governing 
entertainment ■< on Sundays, which the 
ordinance delined more clearly, are again 
in elTeef. 



8 



VARIETY 



REVISING WHEEL ARRANGEMENTS. 

The Executive Committee of the Em- 
pire Circuit Co. (Western Burlesque 
Wheel) are in session in the Knicker- 
bocker Theatre Building Headquarters 
this -week. The meeting will probably con- 
tinue until Wednesday of next week. Many 
matters of importance to next season's tour 
are being gone over, and it is likely that 
the Wheel will be considerably changed by 
August, when the opening of the '09-' 10 
season will occur. 

No official statement has been given out 
of the deliberations, but it is said that the 
executive committeemen are considering a 
plan to cut the Bon Ton, Jersey City, 
down to a three-day stand. To patch up 
the Wheel, it may be arranged to let out 
either Albany or Troy. Then the shows 
will play three days in Paterson-Jersey 
City (one week) and Schenectady and Al- 
bany (or Troy) a week together. 

From all thai could be learned on the 
outside, the "pool" arrangement is per- 
manently off. Those managers who came 
out ahead with their shows, but were 
forced to share their winnings with the 
owners finishing with a deficit, do not 
think much of the scheme. The dis- 
satisfied ones were in the majority. The 
men who lost by the arrangement were in 
most cases men who controlled but one 
show. 

Although the directors themselves denied 
that any arrangement was made for the 
leasing of the Lincoln Square Theatre next 
season by the Empire for burlesque, the 
report was widely spread that negotiations 
were on and were in a fair way to be 
closed. 

During the meeting yesterday and 
Thursday drawings were made for open- 
ing dates on the Wheel in August. 



BURLESQUE ON ROOF? 

All plans for the Madison Square Roof 
this summer remain in abeyance for the 
time being. Mortimer M. Thiese, who 
holds the lease on the aerial resort, is still 
h< Washington producing stock burlesque 
at the Western Wheel house (Lyceum) 
there. 

It is not unlikely that the latest pro- 
duction of this organization will be 
moved to the city as a roof attraction. 
hi the company are Arna Deck, Virginia 
Ware, Will Patten, Ted Burns and others. 
Vaudeville may be introduced during the 
show, the attractions being changed 
weekly. 



FIRST BURLESQUE OPENING. 

The Sam T. Jack Show under the man- 
agement of the Miner Estate, will prob- 
ably be the first of the burlesque shows 
to get under way for the season of *09-'10. 
It is due to open at the LaFayette The- 
atre, Buffalo, August 2. 

Tom Miner, accompanied by Dan Dody, 
will assemble the company in that city 
about the middle of July. The pieces will 
be whipped into shape at the theatre, 
where three weeks later the show opens. 

The vehicle was written by Harry 
Montague. The opening piece will have 
three scenes and the burlesque will show 
six changes of stage setting. 

Among the principals already placed 
under contract are Rube Welch, Kittie 
Francis and Co., Henry and Francis, 
Phillips and Gordon, Eddie Barto and Abe 
Leavitt and Co. 



TALK OF TWO WHEELS. 

A new suggestion has been made in an 
unofficial way by one of the prominent 
burlesque men. He has worked out a 
scheme by which the two opposition 
wheels could be merged and again divided 
into a No. 1 and No. 2 wheel. 

"A season of thirty weeks of the cream 
of the burlesque houses could be framed 
up," said the inventor of the scheme. "The 
best of the shows could be played on this 
time. The assurances of a profitable tour 
through these first-class theatres would 
encourage enterprising producers to make 
their best efforts and venture large in- 
vestments. With a solid circuit of popu- 
lar theatres and attractions of merit both 
show and house managers could not fail 
to get large returns. 

"The mediocre shows could be relegated 
to the second-class houses. Their cost of 
production and operation could be gauged 
to the average receipts of the houses. As 
it stands a manager who puts on an ex- 
pensive show will make money in a cer- 
tain number of towns. If he could play 
that show (on either Wheel) only in the 
twenty or twenty -five best theatres, he 
would make a large profit. But under 
the present organization what he makes 
in these good houses he in part loses in 
the 'lemon' stands. 

"In the same way the good shows make 
money for the house manager in the good 
theatres, while the poor shows that come 
along spoil his business. These dis- 
crepancies could be accommodated and 
regulated by the system of two wheels/ 



»» 



BARTON WITH COLUMBIA. 

Charles E. Barton, of Wiswell & Bar- 
ton, who control a string of popular- priced 
musical and dramatic shows, this week 
assumed the position of private secretary 
to the general manager of the Columbia 
Amusement Co. Barton has the burlesque 
business at his finger ends. While he was 
general manager for Gus Hill's enterprises 
a large part of the latter's burlesque in- 
terests were under his care. 

In his new post Barton will be stationed 
in the headquarters of the circuit, and 
will at the same time retain his holdings 
in the Barton & Wiswell properties. 
Among his other duties will be the care 
of all printing and the advertising policy 
or all Eastern Wheel burlesque shows. 



FINE FIVE WEEKS OLD. 

A burlesque show closing for the season 
Inst Saturday night made an extra five 
dollar bill through the manager unexpect- 
edly remembering one of the chorus girls 
(at $16 weekly) had misbehaved herself in 
Providence, R. I., five weeks before. He 
fined her $5 for the lapse, deducting it 
from the salary. 

The chorus girl would like to know if it 
is legal to impose a fine five weeks after 
something happens, but she is without 
sufficient funds to successfully pursue 
Iter desire for the knowledge. 

It is said by members of the company 
that during the five weeks the chorus girl 
was quite friendly with a female principal 
of the show, who was likewise friendly 
with the manager. When the two women 
disagreed, the manager brushed up his 
memory. 



BURLESQUE FOR FIVE CENTS. 

Chicago, June 3. 

There is a five-cent burlesque theatre on 
State Street. It is called the United 
States Theatre. It is situated directly op- 
posite the Folly, and performances arc 
given half hourly. The show consists of 
the conventional burlesque comedians and 
about six girls. Special scenery is used. 
The stage is no larger than the regular 
moving picture platform. Seats down in 
front are reserved for ten cents. 

The house seems to be doing good busi- 
ness, with a cluster of other nickel houses 
in the vicinity. 



MAY HOWARD TRAVELING WEST. 

Chicago, June 3. 

May Howard is organizing a musical 
comedy company for a tour of the one- 
night stands through the west as far as 
the coast. Several of her previous suc- 
cesses and a few new pieces will be 
utilized. 

Miss Howard is to direct the show her- 
self, although it is intimated that Ray 
Fulton (who was interested with Frank 
Carr in the "Thoroughbreds") is finan- 
cially concerned with her. 



NONE TOO BIG FOR HOWARD. 

Boston, June 3. 

Dr. Lothrop and Jay Hunt, of the How- 
ard, have agreed that commencing with 
the opening of next season the Howard 
will go after the very largest attractions 
in vaudeville for a feature number each 
week, paying as high as $1,500 weekly. 

This move is made, according to report, 
by the coming opposition of Charles 
Waldron's new theatre on the Eastern 
Burlesque Wheel. That is situated near 
the Howard and will seat 3,000 when 
completed. It replaces the former Palace 
here on the Eastern route. 

The Howard plays the Western Bur- 
lesque Wheel shows. During the past sea- 
son it guaranteed $1,486 each week to the 
traveling company. There is a vaudeville 
olio booked through Phil Hunt, of New 
York, which is added to the regular bur- 
lesque entertainment. 

The Howard is one of the largest houses 
in Boston and the second oldest theatre in 
the United States. 

Dr. Lothrop and Jay Hunt sail for 
Europe June 24. 



Pauline? holds over for the third week 
at the Colonial, New York, commencing 
Monday. 



UNDECIDED ABOUT MONTREAL. 

Reports have been in circulation in New 
York this week that the Princess Theatre, 
Montreal, would be eliminated from the 
Eastern Burlesque Wheel next season, 
either going into the William Morris 
camp or changing into a legitimate stand, 
possibly with bookings by the Shuberts. 

Questioned as to the situation in the 
Canadian city, Sam A. Scribner, general 
manager of the Columbia Amusement Co., 
ssid this week: 

"We have not yet been consulted on 
any such proposition. Inasmuch as the 
Columbia Amusement Co. is financially 
interested in the Princess Theatre, it is 
not likely that the other parties in inter- 
est would consider disposing of it without 
consulting us first. At any rate if there 
is any change it cannot be made until the 
interests of the Columbia Co. have been 
consulted." 

The Princess has not been a large win- 
ner with burlesque this season. 



ON AGAIN— OFF AGAIN. 

Louisville, June 3. 

That Gayety Theatre case here is estab- 
lishing a record for rapid fire litigation, 
l^ate last week the owners of the building 
secured the court's permission to appeal 
from an injunction forbidding the con- 
tinuance of work on the building. Fri- 
day morning workmen appeared on the 
scene and construction work was resumed. 
A few hours later the Commonwealth At- 
torney went before Justice Gordon, who 
had first issued the injunction stopping 
work and later gave the right of appeal 
and a stay, and asked that the order for 
the stay and appeal be rescinded. 

Operations had been going on only a 
few hours at the Gayety when an order 
was again served on the superintendent 
requiring him to cease. The work had 
been forbidden, permitted and again for- 
bidden, all within twenty-four hours. 

However, in the few hours spent upon 
the building pretty nearly all the finish- 
ing touches were made. The Gayety is 
practically complete. It could be opened 
as it stands. Contractor Kennedy, who 
built the house, has left for Cincinnati. 

On Monday Judge Gordon fined A. C. 
Erksine, a workman, $30 for contempt of 
court in working on the building while 
the injunction was pending. The man said 
he was acting under instructions in wiring 
the building. 



ENGAGEMENTS FOR "LID LIFTERS." 

II. S. Woodhull, manager of "The Lid 
Lifters" (Eastern Wheel), has announced 
the following engaged for his show next 
season : Hattie Mills, Clara Berg, Eliza- 
beth Mayne, Blanch Rose Irene Delma, 
Margie Webster, Dollie Rogers, Gladys 
Anderson, Virginia Comstock, Maud Mat- 
thiessen, Lillian Bart, Tyson and Brown, 
Jno. W. Jess, Ed. Oliver, Frank S. Pierce 
and Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Liebmann. 



STOCK AT "TROC." 

Chicago, June 3. 

The Trocadero is running with stock 
burlesque and business is reported as sat- 
isfactory. 

The company consists of Frank Har- 
court, Tony West, Tessie Noble, Imogene 
Mansfield, Francis V. Gray, and about fif- 
teen girls. A. Zinn is the producer. 



NO OPEN-AIR TIGHTS. 

Chicago, June 3. 

About 300 girls employed by the con 
cessions at the various parks are up in 
arms against the owners for compelling 
them to don tights and appear on plat- 
forms while the ballyhoos emit their ora- 
toric vocabulary to curious crowds. 

The girls, it is said, have sent their ulti- 
matum to the different managers of the 
concessions that they will not expose 
their legs in the sunlight or while the 
moon glares. A large number have ex- 
pressed willingness to wear the garments 
provided they were not pink. They ob- 
ject to "flesh" color. 

At Sans Souci park are a number of 
these damsels as the attraction of a show 
billed as "The Girl from Madrid." They 
appear more frequent out doom than 
inside. 

"Girl" shows are popular at the parks, 
and some of them even try to outdo the 
"Salome" and "cooch" regime of the past. 



VARIETY 



ARTISTS' FORUM 



Ceallae 
Am 
b« held la strict 



te ISO wards aat write ae eae ale* af paper •oly. 

wOl rat ba prtatad. Nmn «f writer mtut ba alsaad and 



.If 



LatUn to b« paWshrt la thta oolama most W written «xoluiv«ly to YSJUETY. DopMootoi 
Utten will Mt bo printed. Tho writer who dapUomtoo a lotter to tho Forum, olthor baforo or after 
It appaan horo, will set bo pormittod tbo prlTiloso of It aaaia. 



New York, J line 2. 
Editor Variety: 

Many references have been made dur- 
ing the past five months to the "Voss 
Employment Agency Bill," incorrectly 
called the "White Rat Bill." I would 
ask in justice to those most vitally inter- 
ested that you publish the appended facts 
which I personally stand for. 

In 1904 the Employment Agency Bill 
was originally passed and signed. In 
1006, The Actors' Union introduced an 
amended bill including "Theatrical Agen- 
cies." This was passed and signed by 
Governor Higgins. 

In September, 1908, The Actors' Union 
again introduced at the State Convention 
of the Workingmen's State Federation 
(held in Rochester) a resolution again 
amending the bill. This was passed and 
accepted as a preferred measure by that 
body. 

In February, 1909, after waiting for 
several weeks for a response without avail 
from the various theatrical organizations 
we had invited to confer in regard to 
drafting an amended bill to suit all per- 
sons concerned, we again introduced the 
measure, and through an interested Al- 
bany official prevailed upon Assemblyman 
Voss to father the measure. 

After the bill was in the hands of the 
introducer, word was received from the 
White Rats and the Actors' Society that 
tliey would meet and confer on this mat- 
ter; we met in the rooms of the Actors' 
Society and appointed a committee of one 
from each interested association to make 
any changes recommended by the various 
societies. 

I immediately wired to Albany and 
stopped the advance of the bill until the 
new measure was prepared. After several 
conferences, the Actors' Society, White 
Rata, Comedy Club and Magicians submit- 
ted some changes in the original draft, 
which were sent to the Assembly. 
This measure passed the Assembly and 
when advanced to the Senate, that body 
cut out the principal amended portions, 
passing the original Actors' Union Bill 
with but a few immaterial changes. 

We continued our conferences until 
such time as a hearing had been set in 
the Assembly, after which no notice of 
any further developments was given to 
the Actors' Union, other than what was 
received from the official labor representa- 
tive in Albany, Mr. T. D. Fitzgerald. 

We attended the Senate hearing and 
later received word from the Governor 
that a hearing was set for Thursday, May 
6. On May <5 a telegram was received at 
this office stating that the hearing was 
postponed until a later date, no notifica- 
tion, of* any Buffalo hearing having been 
submitted. My committee was ready to 
go anywhere in the State, but no intima- 
tion was given and the following week 
we learned through the press that a hear- 
ing had been held in Buffalo, at which only 
a committee of Whate Rats appeared and 
after which the bill was vetoed. 



There was no real reason for attempt- 
ing to sidetrack the Actors' Union, other 
than a selfish motive, and I can state now 
that had we been properly informed by 
either telephone, telegraph or letter we 
would have been in Buffalo, and a different 
story would have been told to-day. 

It is hardly necessary to go into details 
as to what personal and political and 
labor pressure was exerted through the 
efforts singly and alone of the Actors' 
Union; sufficient to say the letters, tele- 
grams and other data on file at this office 
are a sufficient guarantee that what was 
accomplished was only possible through 
these channels. 

I would ask that you give the above 
space in your paper as I know you have 
been fair in the past and will not be a 
party to a misconstruction of facts or a 
distortion of the real issue. I do not wish 
to state any more at this time, only in 
closing would repeat: The measure that 
finally passed both houses of the Legis- 
lature was the "Actors' Union Bill," but 
its purpose was defeated on account of 
ali the necessary forces not being present 
before Mayor Adam of Buffalo properly 
to present the issue. 

Harry De Veauw, 
President Actors' Union. 



Boston, May 31. 
Editor Vakiety : 

Within the past two years I have been 
informed by artists and stage hands (from 
coast to coast) that I look just like Jim- 
inie Barry (Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy Barry). 
To each and every one 1 could only make 
one reply, "I am sorry for Jimmy." 

Kindly let me know if there is any way 
1 can make him change his face by growing 
n beard, or dying bis hair, for I have often 
been told that I am the handsomest man 
in vaudeville. 

I met Mr. Barry once face to face, on 
a train, but thought I was looking in a 
mirror, and he escaped me. 

Charles Van. 
(Chas. and Fannie Van.) 



London, May 25. 
Editor Variety: 

Regarding the note you had about 
Callahan and St. George in the last issue 
to arrive here, would say that there was 
a slight error. 

We have finished the Barrasford Tour 
and the independent halls in England 
with flattering results, playing a number 
of return dates in the short time we have 
been over here, the act having been an 
instantaneous success in England, Ireland 
find Scotland. 

While resting here in London an offer 
was mode Miss St. George to play her 
single act this summer on the continent 
(Germany, France, etc.). A single turn 
would please more than a character 
sketch over there. 

She declined the offer for the present at 
least, needing a bit of a rest. 

Regarding figure for salary we have 



MORRIS' THREE-A-DAY CONTRACT. 

An unexpected clause in the contract 
issued by the William Morris office for 
next season calls upon the act engaging 
to play three shows daily if requested 
while at the American Music Hall, New 
York City. The clause relates to that 
"American" only. 

The mystery of the "three-a-day" has 
evoked discussion among acts receiving 
contracts. A number thought it meant 
that a scheme of two shows nightly would 
be given in the Morris New York music 
hall each Saturday and Sunday. 

At the Morris headquarters this week, 
a Variety representative was informed, 
upon asking the significance of the un- 
usual clause in a contract calling for first- 
class time, that the third show, if required, 
would be given in the Wintergarden on 
top of the building. 

The Wintergarden, it was said, will be 
the summer roof garden enclosed. The 
alterations and improvements now going 
on for the opening of the American Roof 
about July 1 will include a steam heating 
plant and all the appliances of a first-class 
theatre. 

During the week the Wintergarden will 
be to let for private entertainments or 
social functions, but no dates will be 
entered for Saturday and Sunday. 

During the past season the American 
has turned away large crowds at each of 
the night shows the last two days of the 
week. This suggested to the Morris Cir- 
cuit the idea of providing the third show 
to hold the turn-aways, if it should *be 
found that the condition repeats itself 
next season. 



MONTREAL HOUSE BUILDING. 

Montreal, June 3. 

The story printed by Variety over 
eight months ago that there would be a 
new vaudeville theatre in this city for the 
season of '09-' 10, with vaudeville booked 
through William Morris, has been officially 
confirmed by Robert McVean, manager of 
Bennett's Theatre here, announcing his 
resignation to take the direction of the new 
theatre. 

Mr. McVean says the foundation for the 
theatre has already been begun. It is on 
Catherine Street, just east of "The 
Nickel," and will seat, when completed, 
2,500, 500 more than Bennett's. The lat- 
tei house was opened about two years ago. 
It is booked through the United Booking 
Offices. 

On the other hand it is said the Morris 
fireuit ha* no knowledge of the McVean 
theatre, if it is in existence or will be, but 
that the independent circuit has been ne- 
gotiating during the past week for the 
lease of the Princess, with a fair pros- 
pect of securing it. 

had no trouble and have booked same time 
o*er again commencing in May, 1910. 

I may add that I am expecting to pro- 
duce my three-act comedy drama in Eng- 
land this summer, preparatory to show- 
ing it in America in the near future. 

Jamen Callahan 
(Callahan and St. Ceorge), 
("The Old Neighborhood"). 



CHANGES IN BUTTE. 

Butte, Mont., June 3. 

The local line-up of theatres has bean 
materially changed thia week. Sullivan 
& Considine have taken ten-year leaaea 
upon both the Lulu and Orpheum The- 
atres. Attractions booked through the 
Orpheum Circuit will be discontinued in 
the latter house and next Monday Sulli- 
van-Considine's own selection of features 
will hold forth in that theatre. The ad- 
mission scale will be from 15 to 26 cents. 
The list will be selected from the shows 
playing Denver, Portland, Salt Lake, Se- 
attle Itnd Spokane, the prize establish- 
ments of the S.-C string. The name will 
be changed to "Majestic." 

During the summer months the Lulu 
Theatre will be entirely remodeled and 
when it reopens in the fall it will be 
called the Orpheum. 

The Orpheum Circuit will have a new 
house here ready for opening in August, 
presenting attractions booked through the 
circuit's New York office. Dick P. Sut- 
ton is the owner of both the Lulu and the 
Orpheum properties. He also holds a one- 
third interest in Sullivan-Considine's Fam- 
ily Theatre here. The latter will be the 
home of the Donohue Co., playing stock. 

Under the terms of the Sullivan-Oon- 
sidinc- Sutton leases, Mr. Sutton agrees 
not to go into the vaudeville field in 
Butte during a period of ten years. The 
tiansactions were brought about by the 
failure of the Lulu to show satisfactory 
returns as a stock house. C. N. Sutton 
will be the Sullivan-Considine representa- 
tive in Montana. 



NOT EVEN IN GERMAN VILLAGE. 

Indianapolis, June 3. 

Indianapolis is in the midst of a strong 
temperance movement. The managers of 
Wonderland Park are victims of the popu- 
lar crusade. At some expense they con- 
structed a German village. They bought 
imported steins and fixtures and even 
hired Teutonic waiters to supply atmos- 
phere to the place. 

Atmosphere was as thick around that 
village as in a Bohemian table d'hote. 
When the opening came Monday the at- 
mosphere vanished because the police sent 
word that the sale of beer would not be 
permitted. 

Picture a German village without beer! 
The management gave up and closed the 
concession. They hadn't the heart to sell 
pink lemonade.. 



MUSIC INSTEAD OF DRAMA. 

Chicago, June 3. 
Following the three weeks' engagement 
or Virginia Harned at the new Sans Souci 
Park Theatre, June 13, a new policy will 
be inaugurated for the summer. Instead 
of playing the constellation of dramatic 
stars announced, a musical comedy will be 
organized, and will be headed by well- 
known stars. 



Juliet?, Ad Newlierger's proline, will* 
be the special feature at Revere Itcach, 
Boston, next week. 



THE ABRAMOFF FUND. 

The following sul^eript .ions have Im-cii 
received this week fur S. AhraiMofT: 

I r t • v 1 1 > 1 1 h I > Mrk'i«iwlc.l,n| flMVOO 

.Fuck V-.n Til/iw 10.00 

WMIIhiii I'xih I*..! 5.011 

K.lw. S K< II, 5.00 

Tula I $2<M».00 

Hoi ii> ' I...- i f t i he Mainnierstein 
Hoof sh . v. ,.,, Tn.-i;i.. "The" Quartet 

nlf[»l'<! in. 



10 



VARIETY 



London, May 26. 
There is every prospect that the com- 
ing two months or so arc going to be a 
pretty severe strain upon the vaudeville 
magnates over here. Throughout the 
country the music halls are in a very poor 
financial condition. Business is far from 
encouraging in the provincial towns. Ac- 
cording to an expert opinion, scores of 
halls will be unable to hold out. 

The new Gibbons and Barrasford offices, 
about to be opened for business, excel 
anything in London for luxury and 
beauty. They occupy three floors, Pri- 
vate staif ways (one could almost call them 
secret passages) communicate from floor 
to floor for the use of the magnates. The 
first suite of rooms is occupied by Mr. 
Gibbons, Mr. Masters, Mr. Collins and Mr. 
Barrasford, with private rooms in the or- 
der named. Masters is in with Mr. Gib- 
•bons, while Mr. Barrasford shares his pri- 
vacy with Mr. Collins. 



It is not unlikely that Bransby Will- 
iams will have his time in the States set 
over from Christmas week to Feb. 1. 



There is quite a delegation of American 
illusionists in London just now. In the 
number are included Carl Hertz, Horace 
(Joldin and Houdini. All three are playing 
the De Frece Circuit. 



Some of the English managers, accord- 
ing to trade gossip, are going to extreme 
lengths in their barring practices. It has 
been said that in order to secure any 
considerable bookings here an artist must 
stay out of England for some time, in 
some cases as long as an entire season. 
One artist relates that he was promised 
a tour of the Stoll time on condition that 
he remain out of England until 1011. 



Middleton, Spellmeyer and Co. have 
caught on and will have no trouble keep- 
ing booked up. They have Gibbons' dates 
for some time ahead for "A Texas 
Wooing." 



There is pending before Parliament a 
bill which will cause the music hall man- 
agers a good deal of inconvenience, and if 
it passes will work financial harm to 
them. It aims at the increase of liquor 
license in halls in some cases as much as 
500 per cent. In many variety houses the 
bar profits represent a large part of the 
total gain and the passage of the measure 
will cat a big hole in this asset. 



Percy Percival, manager of the Hackney 
Empire, died last week of heart disease. 



Maude and Sydney Wood started on 
tour last week, opening at Tunbridge 
Wells. 



Herbert Lloyd returned from the Conti- 
nent last week. He had just concluded an 
engagement at Hamburg. Dorothy Ken- 
ton returns shortly for a return engage- 
ment at the Hansa Theatre in that Ger- 
man city. Return engagements are as 
rare on the Continent as an affable man- 
ager, and the American girl is considered 
to have scored a conspicuous success. 



Caryl Wilbur put on a new sketch at 
the Empire, Holborn, last week. 



*m 



LONDON NOTES 

VARHTTS LONDON OFFICE. 

411 RSAV9, V. 0. 

(Mall for American* and Europeans In Evrope If addressed care VARIETY, aa above, will 
ha promptly forwarded.) 



Hayman and Franklyn have returned older ones he had the audience roaring all 
from a tour of the provinces. the time. 



Radie Furman is scheduled to play a 
week at the Hippodrome, Richmond, before 
leaving for the States. 



New electric signs on the Alhambra in 
Leicester Square brighten up the Square 
wonderfully at night now. 

Probably the best acrobatic dancer in 
the halls at present is Kitty Colyer. 



Clarice Vance has established herself as 
a big favorite at the Palace. At least five 
songs every night are sung by Miss Vance, 
who could make the total seven were she 
so inclined. It seems almost like home 
over here to "catch" anyone singing that 
number of selections, after hearing hun- 
dreds of single acts rush out, throw over 
one selection and rush off so they won't 
be closed in. 



It is about settled that Helen Trix will 
visit South Africa next season for a tour 
of the Hyman houses there. Miss Trix 
will likely open in the diamond fields dur- 
ing October. Last week she commenced a 
tour of the north of Scotland. 



Harry Rickards came in last week from 
Australia. Winton, the ventriloquist, was 
with him. 



While Alfred Butt was in Paris he en- 
gaged "Consul Peter," the ape, for the Pal- 
ace. Mr. Butt says he expects this monk 
to give London a sensation. 



It is announced that Cissy Loftus will 
fill another engagement at the Coliseum 
shortly. 



Last week at the Empire, Hollo way, 
Gardner and Stoddart "cleaned up" finely. 
They were laughed at from beginning until 
ending, and will probably tarry on this 
side just as long as they want to. 



Another Stoll "find," Arthur Astill, was 
at the Holloway Empire last week. He 
was billed as "the whistling plow boy." 
(Over here they think "plow" should be 
spelled "plough.") Arthur also imitates 
a cow and other things found in the back 
yard. Stoll is a great fellow to "find" 
acts. As to Arthur, I venture to say, 
without having seen him in harness, that 
he is a kid wonder when behind the plow. 



The other day Paul Murray received a 
letter from the other side signed by Josh 
Dreano. It read as follows: 

"New York City, May 0, 1909. 
Mr. Paul Murray, 

London, England : 
Dear Sir : 

Have you anything open for next week? 

Very Truly." 



Walter C. Kelly, who opened at the 
Palace Monday night, again showed that 
he was the popular fellow at this house. 
With a few new stories mixed with his 



Joe Welch arrived here on Monday of 
this week and will probably start some- 
thing with the Stoll people over a con- 
tract. In the meantime, however, Mr. 
Welch will slip up to Glasgow and play 
the Palace in that town, opening next 
Monday (May 31). 



Yvette Guilbert is back again at the 
Palace, doing very big, usual with her. 



A look over the Palace bill this week 
shows seven single acts earning money 
there. It makes rough going for the few 
near the finish of the show. 



Clarice Vance after Monday evening 
was moved down to close the show at the 
Palace as the management did not like 
to see the people leaving as they did be- 
fore this change was made. Miss Vance 
did all that was required Tuesday even- 
ing, for no one left until she had finished. 



Percy Williams returned to London 
from the Continent on Tuesday in order 
to attend the Derby on Wednesday. 



It is reported that Sam Bernard, who 
came over here to look over "The King 
of Cadonia," a musical comedy, did not 
fancy the play. Mr. Bernard will sail for 
the States from France. 



At a new skating rink at II ford the 
management is running a session at 6:30 
in the morning for the working people. 
It is easily understood how people that 
skate that early in the morning must be 
of the working kind. 



Ritter and Foster, who are appearing in 
Cork, must have taken the Irish city by 
storm, judging from the press notices. 



Harry Tate's "Motoring" is up against 
a hard proposition this week at the 
Tivoli, where they are closing the show. 
Nevertheless the act holds most of the 
people in and they are still laughing at it. 
This act has played the same house for a 
number of months for some years back, 
but it never seems to lose a laugh. 



Sam Langford, the colored fighter, who 
blighted all the hopes and ambitions of 
one Ian Hague the other night at the Na- 
tional Sporting Club (when he put the 
English champion to the feathers), is now 
on the market for vaudeville dates. There 
is quite an interesting argument going 
around just now about fighters on the 
music hall stage. 



The new theatrical and music hall bill 
now before Parliament has caused discus- 
sion between the legitimate performer and 
the music hall artist. The bill is designed 
to allow longer and larger dramatic pro- 
ductions in the halls. That means licenses 
would be granted for all kinds of theat- 
rical productions in the music halls. 



"Pop" Leamy, who managed the Leamy 
Ladies in America, has returned again to 
this side. 



Harry Corson Clarke will shortly pro- 
duce a sketch in a London hall, having 
completed his engagement with "The Dol- 
lar Princess." 



The Palace is back again in its sum- 
mer stride and large and live audiences 
are seen there nightly. 



Martinetti and Sylvester arc in their 
last week at the Empire. 



It is a pity to see a little girl called 
Dollie Denton open the show at the Palace. 
Monday night, when the girlie was on, 
there wasn't a person seated or standing 
downstairs save the program girls. Dollie 
is a real cute-looking youngster. 



William Morris and a party, including 
Mrs. William Morris, William Morris, Jr., 
and Nate B. Spingold reached London 
Tuesday. The party are stopping at the 
Waldorf. On Wednesday they witnessed 
the winning of the Derby by the King's 
entry. The Morris party arriving on the 
Lusitania gave the junior member of the 
family his first sight of England from the 
upper deck of the ocean liner. Billy, Jr., 
after carefully gazing at a few "bobbies" 
scattered about on the dock and at a 
royal mail wagon, waved the small Ameri- 
can flag he carried across the sea, defiant- 
ly saying, "This ain't got anything on 
New York." The Morris party will return 
to America after short stops in Paris, Ber- 
lin and Vienna. 



Nora Stewart, a member of the Four 
Stewart Sisters, dancing act, was married 
May 10 to William G. B. Thatcher, an 
officer on the steamship Coronia, sailing 
between New York and Liverpool. The 
wedding was held in one of the suburbs 
of Liverpool, England. The other sis- 
ters, who were lately in America with 
their dancing turn, returned home to be 
piescnt. The bridal pair will make their 
heme at Harleck, Kingsway, Crosby, 
Liverpool. Nellie Stewart will return to 
the act when it again goes on tour June 
11, opening at the Empire Shoreditch, 
London. 



SETTLES BREACH OF CONTRACT. 

A suit for breach of contract brought 
against Irving Jones (colored) has been 
settled. Jones signed contracts to play a 
Connecticut picture house, but played an- 
other theatre that week instead. 

When the agent brought the suit Jones 
wanted to settle by playing the original 
contract on one of his open weeks. The 
agent refused to consider a transaction any 
further in the future than immediately. 
The case was dropped upon Jones' pay- 
ment of the cost of billing him in Stam- 
ford, Conn., and the agent's commission. 



James F. Flynn, one time vaudeville 
agent, is in business at Smyrna, Okla. 



Carter and Bluford, colored, will play 
in Budapest July and August, placed 
abroad through M. S. Bentham, the agent 
with the yacht. 



VARIETY 



11 




PARt$ (NOTES 

BY BDWASD 0. UlfWUW . 




Parii, May 24. 
Otero U a frequent visitor to her friend 
Themis in Lutetia, and the artful old 
judges are always glad of an opportunity 
to cross-examine this famous beauty. 
When her legal representatives this week 
asked for an injunction and $965 damages 
to stop a journal publishing Otero's biog- 
raphy, of which she claims she knows noth- 
ing, the areopagus postponed judgment till 
June 11 in order to enable the plaintiff 
to appear personally. Otero states the 
memoires published are false, and though 
she may eventually be tempted to write 
her souvenirs (which may make some 
men quake), she is at present too young. 
It is only when a professional career is 
ended that the autobiography should be 
published. 



Rafael Noniega, of the Symphonic Or- 
chestra in Madrid, was noted for the en- 
ergy with which he played the big drum. 
This phenomenon is now explained, the 
musician having won a weight-lifting prize 
by carrying 62G pounds. — Yvette Guilbert 
i.i engaged for the Palace, London, until 
July. — The Alhambra will close for the 
season May 31, to reopen Sept. 1. Dur- 
ing the interval the theatre will be thor- 
oughly renovated and some alterations 
made on the stage, although it is already 
one of the best stages in the city. — The 
200th performance of the Folies Bergere 
revue was given on May 15, when the tak- 
ings reached $1,500. This house closes 
in June, and in view of the hot weather 
here would finish a little earlier if certain 
engagements could be canceled. 



All the al fresco resorts of the Champs 
E'ysees are now in full swing, the Jardin 
de Paris taking the lead as a cool place for 
relaxation. The Alcazar d'Et6 has a good 
vaudeville program, with Haley's Juveniles, 
Sahary-Djeli, the Tschin Maa Chinese 
Troupe, Dranem, and several local stars. 
A revue is due in June. The same at the 
Ambassadeurs, where Gaby Deslys and 
Will Bishop are booked for the revue next 
month. — There has been some bother at the 
Parisiana, where many spectators have 
objected to an anti-religious song entitled 
"Popes and Cardinals," given by Lerie, 
and expressed their disapproval by stop- 
ping the show. Paul Ruez immediately de- 
cided to cut it, and the disagreeable ditty 
will no longer be sung. 



For the summer revue at La Cigale, due 
in June, there will be Claudius, Jane Ma- 
venac, de Germaine, Sabiana, Fred Pascal, 
Miles O. Brienz, Eza Berre, Esniee, Bor- 
doni, and Lancret. 



"Luna" Park, Limited, on the site of 
Printania, Porte Maillot, in Paris, opens 
May 26, with all the attractions of an 
American park. 



The spring season is now at its height. 
There are quite a number of vaudeville 
people coming and going, combining busi- 
ness with pleasure, seeing that side of the 
gay life here essentially Parisian and 
yet little frequented by the frugal French 
people. At the Alhambra I met Percy 
Williams with Cliff Fischer acting as Cice- 
ron. Mr. Willinms snid he had not seen 



much over this Bide to interest him, 
but I have heard that he has booked 
eighteen acts in Paris, through Marinelli's 
office. On Sunday at the Olympia it was 
almost a manager's night, and I noticed 
Ben Tieber (Apollo, Vienna), Fritz Van 
Haarlan (Amsterdam), Le Roy (Geneva), 
Rotter (Dresden), Paul Murray and Sam 
Bernard. At the Folies Bergere I saw 
Manny Warner, Grell (Hansa Theatre, 
Hamburg), Soriano and Fernandez (Bar- 
celona), and our own Jess Freeman; at 
the Pigolle I saluted Kid McCoy, Jimmy 
Britt and his staunch little friend Walter 
C. Kelly, who is putting on weight prior 
to his engagement at the London Palace. 
Taking supper at the Moulin Rouge Pal- 
ace, I came across Alfred Butt (London). 
Charles Braun, Abel Rubi (Das Pro- 
graming and Neva Aymar. This resort 
(where Consul-Peter first appeared in 
Paris) has become terribly staid and re- 
spectable of late, and some of us felt out 
of place! 



The Moulin Rouge Attraction Syndicate, 
with head offices in London, which is run- 
ning that famous Parisian music hall, was 
this week declared bankrupt and a winding- 
up ordered by the French court. The place 
remains open. 



Max Dearly, the great French versatile 
comedian, at present playing at the Varie- 
tes Theatre, is engaged for the Empire 
revue (London), for June 10. Clare Fau- 
rans (chanteuse), now imitating Rejane 
at Barassford's Alhambra, has signed 
through L. Klopp for a tour through Ger- 
many and Austria. 



I hear that Messrs. Barassford and 
Parkinson have taken the lease of a plot 
of ground in the Rue Amsterdam, and in- 
tend building a skating rink, which is to 
be ready by the autumn, so they will get 
ahead of the others, after all. 



Leon Herrmann, the magician, died 
here last week. He was 42 years of age 
at his death. Herrmann has been travel- 
ing about for some months on this side. 
When Herrmann, the Great, died in the 
States, Mme. Herrmann, his widow, sent 
for her nephew, Leon, also named Herr- 
mann. He left for America as the suc- 
cessor of Herrmann, the Great. Leon had 
one trick at least to his credit. That is 
known as the "glass trunk." This is ac- 
cepted by the magical fraternity as of 
Herrmann's own origination. His death 
was caused by consumption, contracted in 
Russia. 



SEATTLE EXPOSITION STARTS. 

(Continued from page 5.) 

with the gloves and on the mat. It will 
be an athletic carnival the like of which 
has never before been brought off. 

The "Old Mill" is established on the 
south bank of the "Pay Streak" in an 
ideal position. "The Klondike Mine" is 
another new one. It will reproduce a 
placer mine of the Dawson country in full 
operation, and visitors may see the daily 
clean-up of real gold dust from real Klon- 
dike gravels. There will be a stretch of 



the Yukon trail with its roadhouse, 
dog team, reindeer and moose teams 
and all of the rest that goes to make the 
northland romantic and intensely inter- 
esting. 

The Japanese Village and the Chinese 
Village are two attractions of very large 
interest, yet so widely different in every 
essential that they will in no wise appear 
as competitors one with the other. There 
ib a Japanese theatre, cafe, and the usual 
bazaars. Also a rice field, with native 
laborers planting the roots and singing as 
they work. 

The Chinese Village is a reproduction of 
the life at home, faithful in every particu- 
lar. The theatre will be a feature and a 
section of one of the most famous streets 
of Pekin will be pictured. The building 
alone in the Chinese Village cost $14,000. 

Chevalier De Loris' Giant Piano is a 
very novel, amusing and educational at- 
traction. Twenty pianos are played at 
one time. Also De Loris' own act and 
the "Atra" exhibit. 

"Dixieland" is a magnificent southern 
spectacle. "Aladdin's Magic Swing" is 
counted one of the best illusions of recent 
years. It is financed by Captain A. W. 
Johnston, the Nome millionaire. 

"Fighting the Flames," "Glass Blowers," 
"Mirror Maze" and a dozen others com- 
plete "The Streak." 



UNION WITH WHITE RATS. 

(Continued from page 3.) 
United, for that agency would blacklist 
her. 

At the regular weekly meeting of the 
White Rats Tuesday evening, Harry 
Mountford made a speech on the floor in- 
forming members that the Joe Wood 
agency was merely a subterfuge for the 
United to book its small time. 

In his office on Wednesday Mr. Wood, 
when questioned about the reports and 
statements of acts, said: "There is no 
circuit that I consider opposition. I will 
ti»ke acts from the United time, Morris 
Circuit, Feiber & Shea, Sheedy or any- 
where I find an act that I need. I will 
also try to keep acts from other cir- 
cuits if I can, and I may have told an 
act about to play some of the smaller 
time it would be barred in the United 
offices if it did so, as I understand some 
circuits are considered 'opposition' by the 
United, but it is not considered opposition 
by me. I have said nothing to acts that 
other agents have not told theirs. 

"This agency is independent, owned by 
Pat Casey and myself. I will take all the 
houses the United wants to send to me, 
and I will take any house anybody else 
sends here." 

Pat Casey is the president of the Metro- 
politan. When asked whether the United 
owned that agency or controlled Joe 
Wood, Mr. Casey replied: "There's no one 
the boss of that office but Pat Casey. You 
can go as far as you please with that. 
I have been after a small time office for a 
year. I got a chance to go in with Joe 
Wood, and wo are doing business. I want 
that office for this office (the Casey 
Agency). There's no one who can say a 
word about running the Metropolitan 
Vaudeville Exchange but Wood and my- 
self, and you can go bet a million dollars 
on that. I have heard some of this talk 
before and I just want to settle it right 
here." 



The general impression formed when 
Joe Wood separated from M. R. Sheedy, 
who was his partner in "Joe Wood, IncV 
was that the United intended to turn over 
thirty or more houses to Wood in his new 
quarters, including "The Brotherhood Cir- 
cuit," brought into the United by C. P. 
Gilmore of Oswego, who formerly booked 
it. 

Mr. Gilmore came to New York with 
his houses, and routed them from the big 
agency, having for an assistant L. M. 
Sneden. Booking through the United 
proving unsatisfactory, the agency was 
placed in a position where some move was 
necessary to retain its smallest time. 
Then followed the arrangement with Wood 
to take this time intact and book it. 
What terms were made are not known be- 
yond the stories which Wood and Casey 
deny. 

Gilmore had a contract with the 
United, which he agreed to vacate upon 
the delivery to him of the time he had 
placed with the Offices. This was agreed 
to and Gilmore's houses returned to him. 

Meanwhile on the fifth floor of the Long 
Acre Building (the United's suite is on the 
sixth), there had arisen overnight the 
Long Acre Circuit. On last Friday E. F. 
Albee, the general manager of the 
United, was greatly surprised when 
informed that the Long Acre Circuit 
held contracts from twelve Small theatres 
he thought were still booking through the 
United, that agency also holding contracts 
from these houses. In the list was the 
Imperial on 116th Street; Empires in Troy 
and Cohoes; Family, Cleveland; Majestic, 
Albany, and several others, some playing 
ii. opposition to the Proctor small time 
theatres. 

Mr. Albee sent for Mr. Sneden, and 
asked for an explanation inasmuch as 
Sneden was still supposed to be Gilmore's 
assistant in the United. 

Reports say that Sneden literally told 
Mr. Albee in unparliamentary language 
"where he got off" as far as the Long 
Acre Circuit was concerned, and laughing- 
ly retorted to Albee's threat that ne 
(Sneden) would have to leave the build- 
ing. (The Long Acre is still there.) 

William S. ("Young") Hennessy is rout- 
ing for the Long Acre time. Mr. Hen- 
nessy said he received an offer of the posi- 
tion, and as he thought it held out better 
prospects for him than anything in sight, 
the position was accepted. 

It could not be learned this week what 
the United had left to place with Wood 
after Mr. Gilmore returned to Oswego 
with his thirty theatres, and Snellen made 
the smash in the centre of the remaining 
list of small time houses. The Keith- 
Proctor's converted theatres in New York 
might be placed. The 125th Street Thea- 
tre is playing a few acts. F. F. Proctor 
has houses at Troy, Cohoes. Elizabeth, 
Newark and Plainfield. The last three 
consitute one week, each changing the bill 
every two days. 

It is said the fourteen houses brought 
o\er to Now York from the closed Bos- 
ton office of the big agency this week by 
William 11. WaNh would he placed with 
Wood, uHlmii-li Mr. Wal<*h stated to a 
YAiUF.n representative mi Wednesday 
that Ii wmild continue to book his New 
Eiighi"'! In.iis.s from the United Hooking 
Oflir. *. 



12 



VARIETY 



RISKED DEATH WITHOUT PAY. 

Frienzo or Desperado, the fellow from 
the other side who ventured his life twice 
daily with the Buffalo Bill show at 
Madison Square Garden, has not yet re- 
ceived his salary for the ten days or so 
■pent with the exhibition. 

On Tuesday of the second New York 
, week, Desperado (renamed "Frienzo" by 
the Marinelli agency) slightly injured 
himself in making the long dive from near 
the roof to an inclined slide, on which he 
•truck on his padded chest, gliding to the 
ground. A day or so afterwards, Despera- 
do quit the thrilling attempt and the show. 
Later on, when calling for his salary, 
the venturesome foreigner was told he had 
no contract with the Buffalo Bill show; 
that his manager, H. B. Marinelli, had 
signed him to appear. Inasmuch as his 
manager had failed to fulfil his contract 
through his (Desperado) having given up 
performing, the fellow who had risked his 
life twice daily was informed the Wild 
West management construed such action 
aa a breach of contract. In pursuit of 
this belief, Desperado learned the "Bill 
Show" was holding onto his salary as 
partial damages. 

The claim has been placed with Denis 
F. O'Brien, who was given to understand 
by Desperado he had no knowledge that 
Marinelli was his manager until informed 
by the show people. Desperado said he 
had engaged Marinelli as his agent. 

The agency brought him over here after 
having first imported "Gadbin, the Sec- 
ond" in a similar act, for the Barnum- 
Bailey Circus. 

Since Desperado left the Wild West, a 
Jap has been given the hair-raising feat 
from an improvised apparatus. 



GIRGUS NEWS 



STORIES OF MUTTERINGS. 

Philadelphia, June 3. 

During last week when the Buffalo Bill 
and Pawnee Bill show exhibited here, 
there were many stories going about of 
discontented mutterings in the personnel of 
the organisation. 

Even the purchase of Mrs. James A/ 
Bailey's one-third interest by her former 
partners (Buffalo Bill and Major Lillie), 
and the ousting of Jos. McCaddon and Al 
Stewart (who represented Mrs. Bailey with 
the show) did not stop the talk. 

It was said that since Major Lillie 
(Pawnee Bill) assumed the business direc- 
tion of the Wild West exhibition, he or 
members of his staff have clashed often 
with those on what is known as the "Buf- 
falo Bill side." 

The friction between the Lillie manage- 
ment and Mrs. Bailey's representatives 
which culminated in an open conflict dur- 
ing the Brooklyn week of the show, is sup- 
posed to have brought about the purchase 
of Mrs. Bailey's share. 

Those employes who have been for a 
long time with the Buffalo Bill Wild 
West are becoming anxious at what they 
consider indications of a general house- 
cleaning of the staff. 

They fear that Maj. Lillie, the new gen- 
eral manager, will replace a large portion 
of the staff next year if not before. Joe 
Harper, the former treasurer, was re- 
placed Saturday night in Philadelphia by 
Charle9 Meagtis. a former treasurer with 
the Pawnee Bill Show. 

It was said about New York this week 
that Pawnee Bill (Major Lillie) alone had 
purchased Mrs. Bailey's one-third interest 
in the show, giving the Major a two- 
thirds votp in the organization. 



TRUST AND ANTI-TRUST CLINCH. 

Butte, Mont., June 3. 

It is on the card that there will be 
lively doings in Butte between now and 
the middle of July. The Sells -Floto Cir- 
cus and the Ringling Brothers' show are 
both due to appear here within two weeks 
of each other. The managers of the two 
organizations are bitter enemies. It has 
been stated that the Sells-Floto advance 
billers are followed by a permanent oppo- 
sition brigade from the Baraboo mag- 
nates. 

The Sells-Floto paper had scarcely been 
posted announcing arrival July 16, when 
another set of billers swooped through the 
town heralding to the public the coming 
of the Ringling show August 0. 

The warm enmity between the two 
shows promises plenty of "covering up" 
and even personal clashes between the two 
billing gangs. 



RINGLINGS' HEAVY BILLING. 

Boston, June 3. 

The Ringling Bros.' Circus. is showing 
here this week. Notwithstanding the 
heavy preliminary expense of opening in 
Boston, through the cost of securing the 
lot the show is on, the brothers ought to 
leave town with a lot of money in the 
surplus bag. 

There never has been a circus billed 
over the village like this one. It is said 
here the Ringlings were taught a lesson 
at the Madison Square Garden, New 
York, through the lateness and the 
meagrenesB of • their "paper" in the 
metropolis for that engagement, which the 
combined family has taken to heart for 
"the road." 



BARNUM-BAILEY, INC., LIQUIDATED. 

Stockholders in the old Barnum & 
Bailey, Inc., were delighted this week to 
receive the last dividend on their stocks. 
The total payments reached nearly 10 
shillings. When the concern first started 
upon the liquidation process (following 
its purchase by the Ringlings) it was esti- 
mated that the stock would return about 
8 shillings. 

The stockholders say that the excellent 
returns received were due to" the expert 
handling of the affair by Jos. McCaddon, 
who conducted the liquidation. 

When the Barnum & Bailey Co. was 
organized James A. Bailey gave to a num- 
ber of his lieutenants large blocks of 
stock with the idea of perpetuating the 
staff. Dividends received for the first 
three years returned 55 per cent, on the 
par value. The proceeds of the liquida- 
tion brought the sum up to about par 
value. 

Barnum & Bailey, Inc., at one time sold 
as high as 35 shillings. Those who bought 
then and held their stock recovered only 
about a quarter of the investment. But 
there has been a good deal of manipula- 
tion, and the stock in most cases passed 
through a great many hands. Some was 
bought as low as 7 shillings, and these 
purchasers made a profit on the final 
clearing up of the concern. 

The La Tour Sisters are playing vaude- 
ville. 



ROBINSON BUYS MUNDY CIRCUS. 

Cincinnati, June 3. 

John G. Robinson, owner of the Robin- 
son Ten Combined Shows, haa purchased 
the Mundy Circus Company, owned and 
operated by Col. P. J. Mundy. The con- 
sideration was $20,000. The sale took 
place at Troy, Ohio. 

Col. Mundy, one of the oldest circus 
men in America, announced this week 
that he had retired permanently from the 
big top field, and would devote his time 
to the handling of his big farm at Jack- 
sonville, Fla. The sale had been for some 
time in negotiation. 

By this transaction the Robinson 
Amusement Co., takes over all the equip- 
ment, menagerie and stock of the Mundy 
organization and acquires the right to use 
the name. It has not yet been decided 
whether to handle the new property under 
its old name or bill it as a Robinson 
property. 



TURNOUR'S INTERESTING ARTICLE. 

The Saturday Evening Post of last week 
had a very interesting story on clowns, 
written by Jules Tumour, of the Ring- 
ling Brothers' Circus. 

Mr. Tumour is a principal clown with 
the circus. In the story he writes en- 
tertainingly of his early life, how he be- 
came a clown through an accident, bringing 
his days as a contortionist to an end, and 
tells in an easy, readable style of the 
present-day circus clown, his work and 
study. 

The article is not signed, nor does Mr. 
Tumour's last name appear anywhere in 
it, but he can be surely identified from the 
story. Something unusual in instances of 
this kind also where a circus or theatrical 
story is accepted by a big paper ; no press 
agent wrote Mr. Tumour's article ; he 
wrote it himself. 

In the telling, Mr. Turn our mentions Al 
Miaco as one of the oldest clowns of to- 
day, placing his age at about seventy. 
Tumour admits he has seen sixty-three 
years come and go. Turnour says Miaco 
is as spry and active to-day as he was 
twenty-five years ago. 



PHILLY'S OPEN-AIR SHOW. 

Philadelphia, June 3. 

The first permanent open-air exhibition 
this city has had in many years opened 
here last Monday. It is called the Hip- 
podrome, and shows at the old American 
League baseball grounds. Although this 
city is tied up fast in the throes of the 
biggest street car strike in history, a 
crowd which filled every one of the 0,000 
seats was on hand for the opening day and 
several hundred more clamored for ad- 
mission. 

The performance started at 8:15 and 
moved rapidly with an excellent bill. 
There was a roomy stage for the vaude- 
ville acts and a ring for the equestrians 
and clowns. Every act appeared to make 
good and the immense audience seemed 
delighted with all it saw. 

The bill included Rose Wentworth, 
bareback rider; Handy's "Dancing Dolls"; 
Marvelous Barlows; Five Musical Ban- 
yards; Toki Kitchies, Japanese Troupe; 
Mme. La Rosa, high school act, and Fred 
Bennett's troupe of clowns. The special 
feature was The Diving Nords. 



"BUCKING" BUFFALOES. 

Cincinnati, June 3. 

A novel exhibition is being given daily 
in front of the grand stand at the race 
track here. A small herd of buffalo has 
been shipped here under direction of Maj. 
Bob Yokum, of Pierre, S. D., together 
with a troupe of performing horses. The 
exhibition includes rough riding of the 
buffaloes, who put up a performance of 
bucking that makes the operations of a 
mustang look like child's play. The show 
is here for two weeks. 



Miller Brothers' "101 Ranch" Wild West 
took Buffalo, N. Y., with a rush last week. 
This is the most easterly point the outfit 
has appeared in, although future bookings 
will bring it to the New England Coast. 
It has been declared that the Ponco City 
organization will enter Boston, which was 
passed by by the Buffalo Bill show. 
The Miller show is likely to get within 
trolley car distance of New York. 



CLOWNS WIN AT BASEBALL. 

York, Pa., June 1. 
The clowns of the Barnum-Bailey Cir- 
cus won the baseball game played yester- 
day at Harrisburg by a score of 7—4. The 
opposing nine were recruited from the 
riders and acrobats with the show. 



COLE'S MASCOT. 

Buffalo, June 3. 

Just as the Cole Brothers' circus train 
was pulling into the train yards here 
May 28 a mascot joined the menagerie in 
the shape of an infant camel. 

With an eye to local sentiment Press 
Agent Corey announced that the new- 
comer would be christened "Buffalo," al- 
though that name is likely to confuse the 
superintendent of menagerie. 

The circus played to two good shows 
Saturday, the night performance witness- 
ing a turaaway. 



MACHINE JUST MISSED. 

An automobile in which Eddie Arling- 
ton and Billy Thompson were returning 
from Coney Island on Monday just missed 
seriously injuring a youngster with whom 
it collided. 

The accident struck Mr. Arlington as so 
serious at the moment that without 
thought of Miller Brothers' "101 Ranch" 
(with which Arlington is connected for the 
advance contracting work), Eddie hopped 
in a train with Canada for his'n. 

Thompson remained behind to discover 
the boy had not been harmed, when all 
Broadway heaved a sigh of relief. 



Martin Downs, of the Cole Bros.' Cir- 
cus, is still confined to his home in Erie, 
Pa., the winter quarters of the outfit. His 
son came on from the show to visit his 
father early this week, and told family 
friends that uowns, Sr., was much im- 
proved in health. 



The Sells-Floto Circus had two turn- 
aways during four performances in Port- 
land, Ore., last week. The newspapers 
speak with enthusiasm of the exhibition. 



Mrs. Thomas Glenroy, of "McFadden's 
Flats," was operated on In the Eastern 
District Hospital, Brooklyn, this week. 



VARIETY 



13 



PICTURE TRUST THREATENING 
SUITS FOR INFRINGEMENT 

Talking About Patents, But No One Understands. 

Murdock Says There's a Reason. 



The legal representatives of the Bio- 
graph -Edison combine, ,Kerr, Page, Cooper 
& Hayward, have sent out to a long list 
of moving picture exhibitors suspected to 
be running projecting machines without 
the license of the Patents Co., a circular 
letter warning them again that unless 
they take out licenses they will have to 
defend a legal action under the Patents 
Co.'s patents, a list of which is given to 
the number of eight. The letter likewise 
states that every suit will contain a claim 
for profits and damages arising out of 
the use of such unlicensed machine. The 
letter is dated May 25. 

A second letter under the same date 
written from the law offices of Gifford & 
Dull refers in like manner to the use of 
films. 

The circular or notification containing 
the legal firm's missive gave the patents 
by numbers. The first is 578,185 and the 
last is 785,205, with the other six patents 
claimed containing no less than six figures 
in the numerals by which they are dis- 
tinguished in the Patent offices at Wash- 
ington. 

It may be as plain as A B to the 
lawyers, and perhaps to the Edison con- 
cern, which probably claims most of 
the patents, but to the ordinary moving 
picture exhibitor unversed in patents or 
the rights Edison has always claimed 
without having ever maintained, the group 
of figures resemble a sea of mud. 

Since the legal action on "patents" in- 
stituted by the Edison Company against 
the Biograph Company did a double 
somersault just before the two concerns 
combined, no one has taken anything said 
about patents on cameras or projecting 
machines seriously. It is even said now 
the greatest impediment to outside capital 
investing largely in a moving picture 
plant in America is the number of one- 
man machines which take a picture 
wherever and whenever the whim seizes, 
without looking at the machine he is 
carrying or trying to ascertain if it is 
in the 785,000 class. 

In those circumstances an article pub- 
lished May 23 by the Moving Picture 
News, an independent organ of New York, 
is interesting as having a now bearing on 
the tangled patent situation. 

The article is by Louis Wood, of Car- 
men, Okla., and purports to show that the 
first motion picture projecting machine in- 
volving the principle of the intermittent 
motion was made by a resident of that 
State, one J. R. Uonheur, a student of 
optics, in 1886. With a rough device em- 
bodying that principle Bonheur gave ex- 
hibitions in his State. Later he con- 
structed plans for a better machine and, 
Mr. Wood declares, submitted them to 
Thomas Edison. 

In 1000 Bonheur made a claim upon 
Edison for the credit and remuneration for 
his services in developing the idea. These 
demands were disregarded. In the corre- 
spondence at that time there appeared the 
charge that Edison had by his own admis- 
sion acknowledged the idea had not oc- 



curred to him (Edison) until 1887, while 
Bonheur's plans were in his possession a 
year before that time. 

J. J. Murdock, president of the Interna- 
tional Projecting & Producing Co., the 
largest opposition to the picture trust, 
who was in New York the early part of 
the week, affected to. make light of the 
circular letter. He said: 

"It would appear to me that by this 
time moving picture people would be ac- 
customed to these tactics. The only peo- 
ple it can scare are the newcomers into 
the field who are not familiar with the 
past history of the moving picture busi- 
ness. 

"The fact of' the matter is that there 
was a stormy meeting of the trust sev- 
eral weeks ago, I am told. Several of the 
manufacturers threatened to withdraw un- 
less something was done. The 'terrible 
silence' which was described by one of 
their organs recently did not seem to ap- 
peal to them. Exhibitors who were paying 
the $2 a week were kicking. They 
wanted to know what they were 
paying it for. Exchanges compelled to 
pay the $2 a week for their exhibit- 
ors were also howling. In sheer des- 
peration they were compelled to do some- 
thing. If they can still the growls of 
discontent amongst their own ranks by 
starting a few suits, I would not be sur- 
prised to see them filed. It only costs 
a few dollars to start a suit and they 
might even spend eight or ten of the $2 
licenses they have collected. 

"There is one thing certain and that is 
that the trust will not dare interfere with 
International Projecting & Producing Co. 
films. As to their action in regard to 
other film, we cannot say and have no in- 
terest, but we will undertake to defend 
an attempt to interfere with our own 
goods. 

"The notice is simply the regular press 
bulletin. We must give the trust credit 
for the unique manner in which its bulle- 
tins are circulated. First came its own 
dictums, which fell flat; then the advice 
of the subsidized press, which was not ac- 
cepted ; and now they resort to a new 
method of circular letters, vaguely in- 
sinuating and threatening upon the letter- 
head of a firm of attorneys. It's the same 
old bugaboo in a different form." 



CONGRESS OF PHOTOGRAPHY. 

Paris, May 25. 

SociGte Photominc is the name of a new 
company founded at Marseilles to produce 
moving pictures. 

Up to the present Paris has been the 
only city where the French cinematographic 
industry really existed, and this decentrali- 
zation of the trade here will be watched 
with much interest. 

An international congress of photography 
and all applied arts will be held in July 
next, during the Photographers' Exposi- 
tion in Dresden. Details may be obtained 
from Prof. Miethe, of Charlottenhourg, or 
Herr Klemperer, director of the Bank of 
Dresden, Dresden, Germany. 



CHICAGO HEAVY PICTURE RENTALS. 

Chicago, June 3. 

A tour of the moving picture houses on 
State Street will convince the incredulous 
ones of their efficiency and enterprise. 
There are many five and ten-cent theatres 
on the main thoroughfare, from Monroe 
Street to Harrison, and it would seem al- 
most impossible for those more centrally 
located to meet the heavy rentals. 

The Orpheum is the largest and best of 
these enter-as-you-please houses. It origi- 
nally started with continuous vaudeville, 
and after a thorough test the idea was 
abandoned. The place was built for and by 
Jones, Linick & Schafer. It has a seating 
capacity of about 1,000, with a balcony 
seating about 250. A show lasting one 
hour is given for ten cents (the best seat 
in the house). There is an orchestra and 
uniformed ushers.. Four pictures and two 
illustrated singers make up the bill. "Song 
plugging" is much in* evidence. Tom 
Quigley, Shapiro's energetic booster, is the 
principal among them. 

The Premier offers pictures and vaude- 
ville. The house seats about 250. A piano 
and drum make uo the orchestra. Vaude- 
ville is also a drawing card. There are 
two shifts of acts, one in the afternoon and 
one in the evening, each section giving seven 
or eight performances. 

The Gem is rather small. It could 
hardly seat more than 200. Two sections 
of vaudeville, three acts each is the policy, 
exclusive of the two or three reels of films. 
There are many other picture houses where 
this style of entertainment is provided, and 
the evening performances are generally 
liberally patronized. For a very small fee 
one can be entertained on State Street at 
four or five different theatres, and the 
performances are worth the prices over 
again. 



MOVING PICTURE REVIEWS 



ESSANAY CO.'S NEW PLANT. 

Chicago, June 3. 

The Essanay Film Mfg. Co. is moving 
this week to its new quarters on the north 
side. The new buildings cover several 
acres of ground, and the structures are 
fitted out with every modern appointment 
for the making of film. It is one of the 
largest and best equipped studios of its 
kind in the country. 

The plant is so arranged as to facilitate 
the handling of photographic work at night 
as well as day. Every department is in a 
class by itself, so perfect and complete 
have the sections been made. 

Another important department is the 
scenic studio, where an army of artists is 
constantly painting and building scenery 
for the Essanay productions. 

PICTURE MEN COMBINE. 

Oxford. O., June 3. 

A score of cities in Ohio and Indiana 
were represented here a few days ago 
when the moving picture theatre man- 
agers of those States met to form an as- 
sociation for mutual protection and bene- 
fit. One of the announced purposes is to 
seek the elimination of objectionable film 
subjects. 

Among the picture men of local promi- 
nence in the movement are J. G. Reynolds, 
of Columbus; L. (\ Cordon, of Middle- 
town: Peter Bloom, of Miamisburg; J. C. 
Norris, of Liberty, Ind.; J. E. and F. M. 
Wheeler, of Connersville, Ind., and E. R. 
Miller, of College Corner. 



"Good Lack for the Coming Tear." 
Majestic. 

A series of adventures by a French 
woman who seeks a kiss from a soldier 
form a comedy picture made by Pathe. 
It is not such a bad idea, and brings some 
laughs, but it wasn't even funny to see 
soldiers refuse to kiss the wife after 
catching a sight of the woman. She was 
married, and a friend sent a note saying 
if she kissed a soldier that day good luck 
would follow for a year. The husband 
returning finds his wife entertaining a 
soldier in the parlor. The army man 
had called on the cook, who tells the hut- 
band immediately upon his return. There 
is almost murder, when the wife explains 
to save him in the nick of time, also tell- 
ing how she wandered through the streets 
on the lookout for a stray kiss and how 
everybody turned her down. Sim*. 



"The Man Who Walks on the Water." 
Majestic. 

A small boy sees what he believes to be 
a fisherman walking upon the water. The 
boy alarms the neighborhood; one telle 
another, and all flock to the bank of the 
stream, from where the fisherman 
emerges, walking upon stilts. The picture 
is short, but the surprise finish compen- 
sates for the brevity. Sime. 



♦'The Salesgirls' Idol." 
Dewey, New York. 

The matinee hero is, of course, the hero 
of the tale. A whole performance of a melo- 
drama is shown on the scene, the picture 
shifting from the stage to a section of the 
balcony and gallery, where an audience of 
shop girls sits in contemplation of the play. 
Each scene in the stage is introduced first 
by way of the gallery, the expression on 
the girls' faces reflecting accurately what 
is going on behind the footlights. Several 
of the girls in this part are first rate pan- 
tomimists. The film follows the girls to 
the stage door, where they further worship 
the stalwart leading man as he emerges, 
and from there to their homes, where they 
dream (in transparences back of the field 
of vision) of being courted by this same 
noble hero. The mother of one of the girls 
interrupts her dream to send her with a 
bundle of clothes to a washerwoman. Ar- 
riving at the humble abode of the mechanic 
of the tub, the grl finds in her frowsy hus- 
band the object of her worship. It is a 
novel and well handled reel, produced by 
the Edison Co. Rush. 



"A War Time Sweetheart." 
Chicago. 

This story might serve ns n four-net 
play. It tells of a romance during the 
Civil War, with Frederickstown, Md.. ns 
the background. There nre rivals for the 
hnnd of the pretty daughter of a judge. 
The srene opens as the war breaks out. 
There are intrigues, pursuits, flights and 
lots of excitement consistent with the 
period. The action is swift, certain and, 
above all. interesting. Frank Wicshcry. 

There arc m-vcral plant * adorning ITam- 
mcrstein'-! lobby, the entrance to the Roof. 
This is an awful blow to the usual crowd 
who 1 i \-f - in *'"• main entrance. 



14 



VARIETY 



NEW ACTS NEXT WEEK 

Initial Presentation, Firit Appearance or 
Reappearance in or Around New 
York City. 



[ NEW AGTS OP THE WEEK j 



Mrs. William E. Annia, Hammerstein's. 

"A Night in a Monkey Music HaD," 
Hammerstein's. 

Harry Brown and Co., (New Act), 
American. 

Henry and Alice Taylor (New Act), 
American. 

Violet King, Alhambra. 

Three Hanlons, Alhambra. 

Alick Lander, Fifth Avenue. 

Ruth Richmond and Co., 14th Street 
Theatre. 

"Swat Milligan," Columbia. 

Four Banta Brothers, Columbia. 

"Real Widow Brown," Columbia. 

H. V. Fitsgerald (New Act), Columbia. 

Four Banta Brothers, Henderson's. 

Prescelle. 

Hypnotism. 

38 Mins.; Full Stage. 

Fifth Avenue. 

These hypnotic acts for vaudeville, if 
they are to become a regular thing on va- 
riety programs, will depend very largely 
upon the operator or hypnotist What the 
subjects do is quite likely a matter of rou- 
tine. Hypnotists can probably change 
their program at each show. Perhaps 
there is something which may be done in 
this line, not shown before. That is doubt- 
ful, however. Since Pauline? opened at 
Hammerstein's, there are mesmerists or 
hypnotists in the wilds marooned among 
tanks for years past, who now see Broad- 
way as a possibility. Previous to Pauline's T 
coming they had forgotten there was a 
New York, but knew every train passing 
Woodland Junction. There may be hyp- 
notists outside New York as good or per- 
haps better than those now here. Prescelle 
Is the second for New York of these latter 
days, at the Fifth Avenue this week. 
Barring an advantage Pauline? has over 
Prescelle in commanding height, physically, 
Prescelle in his work, as far as an audi- 
ence is concerned, does just as well with 
the comedy portion, though suffering a 
large handicap through "appearance," 
which Pauline? has to a marked degree, 
and this is a great aid for "showmanship." 
Prescelle could quicken his act, giving a 
little more snap to it, but that is a matter 
of detail which a metropolitan vaudeville 
run will soon correct. Neither Pauline? 
nor Prescelle can probably do anything the 
other can't duplicate. Hypnotic acts are like 
acrobatic ones in this respect. Style, exe- 
cution and finish are the counts. Prescelle 
is a short fellow, of good appearance for 
his size, and an earnest talker. The talk 
may be routine also. When Prescelle wants 
a subject placed in a rigid state of cata- 
lepsy, he cries' "Stone," much as men 
about a pile driver notify the engineer all 
Is ready for tho fall. Pauline? cries 
"Rigid" for the same result. Each obtains 
it. Prescelle is a bit more sensible in his 
scientific demonstrations. He does noth- 
ing to bring a shudder or affront to sensi- 
tive women. His best demonstration is 
where a boy is placed horizontally on two 
chairs in bridge form, relaxes to a V with 
the hypnotist standing upon him ; then 
regains the former position. It is impos- 
sible under normal conditions. Another is 
PreRcello standing on the outstretched legs 



Fanner Wilke. 

The Bewhiakered Wonder. 

Hammerstein's Roof. 

Farmer Wilke is the Ostermoor Kid. He 
has a mattress running eleven feet off his 
face. The Farmer and his whiskers are 
the summer feature on Hammerstein's 
Roof, back on the farm, where the hair is 
fenced in so it won't trip up visitors. If 
you want to get to the Farmer quick, ask 
him if the mattress is all his own. Then 
you will hear a red hot Scotchman ex- 
plode. Willie Hammerstein picked up the 
Farmer for a summer diversion during in- 
termission. Willie forgot to make the Os- 
termoor Kid read the program, which says 
his beard is ten feet long, and that he hails 
from Red Oak, la. The Farmer claims 
his whiskers run down eleven feet, and that 
he came from the north of Scotland. His 
talk has the minced English accent pecu- 
liar to Scots. The boy with the bush is 
happy when he is talking. Asked why his 
hair was gray and his whiskers brown, he 
said the hair on the top of his head was 
54 years old, but as he stopped shaving 
when 21, his mattress had lived but 38 
years. The whiskers fall in two sweeps 
to the ground, and are nicely curried. In 
Scotland, where he came from, said the 
phony rube from Red Oak, the cost of a 
hair cut and a shave was only eight cents. 
No one over there ever thought of getting 
one without the other. He has never figured 
how much has been saved by him through 
not shaving after 21. The Farmer says 
he overslept one morning. On awakening 
he noticed the crop had quite a start. In- 
stead of working that day the Scotchman 
stayed at home and watched 'em grow. 
They grew and grew, so at night he watered 
them and combed them and spoke gently 
to his whiskers. In the morning they were 
traveling pretty fast, and it looked like 
a record run. So Wilke let 'em "grew." 
During the posing act of The Seldoms on 
the Roof Monday night, the Farmer tucked 
his whiskers under his coat and climbed 
the fence, sitting on the top rail. He 
seemed to admire art greatly. When La 
Belle Americaine appeared in white tights 
on a white horse, she had the Farmer 
from the take off. He just hopped over 
the fence, and picked out a good spot 
where nothing could get by him. If Mr. 
Hammerstein ever pulls a girl act up in 
the air this season it's a hundred to one 
the Roof will lose the Ostermoor Kid. 

Sime. 

of a subject seated on a chair. Prescelle 
brings his comedy through the customary 
methods, including a waltz and cake-walk 
for a finish, where the dozen subjects or 
more believe the brooms they carry are 
young women. Prescelle also says, like his 
predecessor, Pauline?, "If it's a fake, give 
me credit, it's a good one." Prescelle harps 
just a trifle overmuch on the fact that he is 
. a hypnotist, as though the audience con- 
tinually denied this. Both Pauline? and 
Prescelle present a good comedy act. That 
is all demanded in vaudeville. It's just 
a question who works the best and draws 
the most. There may be others. Bring 
them on before this freak thing dies. It's 
not all wool and a yard wide by any 
moans, as a staple vaudeville product. 

Sime. 



George Beban and Co. (7). 
"The Sign of tho Rose" (Dramatic). 
a 1 Mins.; Full Stage. 
Orpheum, Brooklyn. 

"The Sign of the Rose" is none other 
than the same versified rave that all Ital- 
ian comedians insist upon delivering at the 
end of a fifteen-minute laughing act — the 
one, you know, where the little girl called 
back "Hello-o-o- Pa-a-appa-a-." But what a 
difference in the George Beban version ! 
Here the touching little story has the ad- 
vantage of really dramatic surroundings, 
careful character drawing and adequate 
presentation. The Beban dramatization is 
as good as the comedian version, dragged 
in grotesquely as a "finish" is, has always 
been, and will continue to be, world with- 
out end, ahmen, bad. The first virtue in 
the present instance is the splendid charac- 
ter work of Mr. Beban. His Italian la- 
borer is a work of highly* perfected art — 
fine, simple, direct, unpretentious art. He 
has no heroics. His quiet acting is im- 
mensely more telling in effect than feverish 
elocution could ever be. Frank Sheridan, 
as a New York Central Officer, was the 
only other character that mattered, and he 
did matter materially. His handling of 
the big scene of the sketch was a model 
of forceful playing. Even though he was 
forced partly into the background by the 
chief character, he made his every word 
and action count in a decidedly gripping 
situation. The story of "The Sign of the 
Rose" has to do with a "Black. Hand" 
kidnapping. Little Edith Van Brunt, the 
daughter of a rich New Yorker, has been 
abducted. The kidnappers appoint 
Fleischman flower store, New York, as the 
place where their agent will take $10,000 
to return the child. The detective is there 
at the appointed hour disguised as the 
manager. Edith's father the day before 
had killed an Italian child while racing 
through the slums in his automobile. This 
much has just been explained when Pietro 
Massena appears and tries to buy a few 
flowers. The detective attempts to force 
upon him the money that will prove his 
guilt as the kidnapper. He refuses and ex- 
plains that his little daughter was yester- 
day killed by an automobile, and he wants 
a few flowers for her funeral. He sticks 
to his story, to the disgust and ridicule of 
the detective. The latter attempts to take 
him to jail, and the Italian, arming him- 
self with a pair of florists' shears, resists, 
declaring that he must return to his 
stricken home. This is the big scene of 
the sketch. At the critical moment, the 
father rushes in with the child, who has 
been found by the police. And so the sob- 
bing Pietro is allowed to depart with a 
huge bunch of roses, after pointing a moral 
to the millionaire of care for the children 
of others. Mary Sheridan, as the mother, 
was not up to the importance of her part. 
Paul Everton, the father, did fairly. 

Rush. 



Harry Tighe and Co. 
"The Invader." 
18 Mins.; Full Stsge. 
Young's Pier, Atlantic City. 

The program presents Harry Tighe and 
''The Invader" with a very prepossessing 
layout. Besides the star -are three men 
and one woman. Tighe does not appear 
for the first five minutes. Until then the 
net gives every indication of being dra- 
matic. This is dispelled when the come- 
dian arrives, however. There is nothing 
and could be nothing dramatic about 
Tighe's infectious laugh, his greatest as- 
set. The piece is one of those Richard 
Harding Davis revolutions in South 
America. The police are after Dick Rich- 
ards (Mr. Tighe), who for sport and a 
dollar and a half has started a revolution 
iu some country or other. Richards gets 
into the American consulate where he 
meets Lucy Winslow (Helen Whites ides), 
who has some plausible reason for being 
there. Another American who has been 
pursued by the police also gets into the 
consulate. As he wants to go where the 
police wish to take Richards, he changes 
passports, and is arrested as Richards. 
The sketch is amusing while Tighe and 
Miss Whitesides are on the stage together, 
otherwise it amounts to nothing. It is a 
playlet that can not be punctuated with 
songs of Broadway and still be expected 
t<; be taken seriously. Still there is too 
much of the seriousness to allow its being 
a comedv. Dash. 



Emma Janvier. 

Songs and Talk. 

11 Mins.; One. 

Young's Pier, Atlantic City. 

Emma Janvier is giving practically the 
spine act that she showed when last seen 
in vaudeville about a year ago. The open- 
ing talk, which occupies about five min- 
utes, is funny as handled by Miss Janvier, 
but from then on the specialty goes back. 
The eoubret bit of last season is not in 
use now. It should be put in at once. 
Miss Janvier needs it. The two songs 
sung after the opening talk got nothing. 
It the offering is to remain in its present 
shape it should be at least changed about, 
bringing the talk at the close. The board- 
walkers took kindly to the talk but they 
let the comedienne off with a spare hand 
or two. Dash. 



Imro Fox, the magician and illusionist, 
sails June 8 to visit Europe until Septem- 
ber, when Mr. Fox commences a tour of 
the United houses. 



Jerge, Alleene and Hamilton. 
Songs and Dances. 
12 Mins.; One. 
Columbia. 

Two very lively girls and a big, good- 
looking but rather staid man make up a 
very neat singing and dancing trio. There 
is some little talk. Most of it is a bit old. 
The talk should remain, but it needs 
brightening up. The singing is above the 
average heard in the line and the two 
girls get away nicely with a couple of 
a pry good dances. If the man could help 
out in the dancing it would aid greatly. 
The dressing is neat, the girls looking 
very well at the opening in light blue 
tsilor-msde suits. The pink dresses worn 
later are not as becoming. The act did 
not do as well as it deserved Tuesday 
night. Dash. 



The orij;innl engagement of three weeks 
of "Follies of the Day" at the Lincoln 
Square, hns been extended to six weeks. 



Mr. nnd Mrs. Lome Ehvyn received a 
daughter last week. The mother is pro- 
fesslonnlly known ns Mnrgarct Keene. 



VARIETY 



15 



The Seldoma (4). 
"Representation of Living Marble." 
14 Mint.; Full Stage (Special Setting). 
HammerBtein'e Roof. 

Three men and a prettily formed girl 
pose for the eleven groupings shown in the 
act known as The Seldoms. It is a for- 
eign number, having played over the Or: 
pheum Circuit during the season. The 

pictures are of the marble coloring, sev- 
eral fetching in arrangement. Two new 
groupings in acts of this nature are shown 
at the finish, "Reaching the Winning 
Post" and "The Fountain " each strikingly 
handsome. As a "posing act," the Sel- 
doms have one of the best, and it did ex- 
ceptionally well on the Roof, where no- 
body enthuses over anything. Sime. 



Fuji-ko. 

Japanese Dancer and Imitator. 

15 Mine.; One (xo); Full Stage (5). 

American. 

One has to be some distance from the 
stage to retain any idea that Fuji-ko is 
really a Japanese woman. The suspicion 
that she is a European occurs to one im- 
mediately she appears, and the Oriental 
illusion fades more and more rapidly as 
she progresses with her specialty. She ap- 
pears in "one" dressed in Japanese Geisha 

costume, and after singing a native song, 
announces that she will give Japanese im- 
pressions of Clarice Vance, Anna Held, 
Connie Ediss and a few others. She 
handles her ISuglish with amazing accu- 
racy, and gets altogether too close to the 
originals of her imitations to convince her 
auditors that she is struggling with alien 
people and tongue. The imitations over, 
Fuji-ko retires and reappears on the full 
stage, set to show an American imitation 
of a Japanese scene with a volcano on the 
back drop. Various spectacular light ef- 
fects are worked, including the eruption of 
the volcano while Fuji-ko, dressed very 
much a la "Salome" in a gauze-like affair 
cut startlingly decollete*, does a sort of 
dance. Monday night Fuji-ko's perform- 
ance was extremely rough and unsatisfac- 
tory. She was plainly nervous, and had 
to be prompted several times. Rush. 



Stutzman and May. 
Songs and Talk. 
15 Mins.; One (4); Two (11). 
Columbia. 

Stutzman and May have what should 
be a good idea for a talking act but it 
doesn't seem to work out just right. One 
is a street fakir and the other a rube 
constable. The constable is out after the 
fakir for selling goods on the corner with- 
out a license. The "con" man relates a 
hard luck tale and goes through the con- 
stable while doing it, securing everything 
he has, including his badge. This por- 
tion, the meat, for some reason or other 
did not bring the laughs that the idea 
carries. The comedian is a good rube, 
but the straight end is not sincere enough 
in his work to bring out the comedy. 
The opening is weak, the men appearing 
singly in "one," each singing a song that 
does nothing. Both songs should be 
dropped and the talk extended. The en- 
tire act should be in "two" or in "one." 
It could be played as well in "one." The 
act did fairly at the Columbia. 

Dash. 



Mile. D'Arcy and Co. 
"The Promising Model." 
as Mini.; Full Stage. 
Columbia. 

"The Promising Model" is a plotless 

piece which serves to introduce Mile. 

D'Arcy in several poses and also gives a 

reason for a quartet to break into song 

before and after each pose. The set is an 

artist's studio. The artist is raving about 

his beautiful model who poses for him 

exclusively. Three brother artists break 

into the picture, and the artist can not 

resist showing his beautiful model. He 

hides them behind a screen from whence 
they make various side remarks, evidently 
designed to give the act comedy. Each of 
the artists also lays claim to an exclusive 
model, and in the finish, of course, the 
same model has been the exclusive one for 
esch. The poses will not start anything. 
Mile. D'Arcy instead of bronze uses some 
silver preparation. This posing thing has 
been done to a turn and there was very 
little interest manifested in the exhibi- 
tion. The quartet is all right. It's an 
average straight singing four with noth- 
ing new to offer. The act will find diffi- 
culty in reaching the big time, and more 
difficulties if they do. Da%h. 



Burton, Burton and Jordan. 

Comedy Musical. 

xa Mins.; Full Stage. 

American. 

Under the name of Burton and Burton 
the comedy musical team is familiar to 
vaudeville. They have added a third mem- 
ber, a second woman. The act remains 
much the same, there being added only the 
singing and instrumental playing of the 
newcomer to the routine. The two women 
open with a duet on the saxophone. Com- 
edy business follows the entrance of the 
roan, and a routine of instrumental selec- 
tions, talk and comedy carries the turn- to 
its finish. Both women make two costume 
changes. Burton, who handles the comedy, 
is a poor talking comedian. Some of his 
nonsense on the trombone is funny, but as 
sure as he deals in spoken lines, his fun- 
making flops. Miss Burton is most pleas- 
ing to look at, and both women work grace- 
fully. The best of the music was a trio, 
'cello, reed organ and a high-pitched in- 
strument resembling an enlarged fife. 
These accompanied Miss Jordan in a solo. 
Playing "No. 3" at the American, the act 
won a fair degree of approval. Rush. 



Anna Marie Tyler. 

Songs. 

ix Mins.; One. 

Columbia. 

Anna Marie Tyler has a pleasing stage 
presence and dresses to best show off her 
statuesque figure. A very good soprano 
voice is revealed in the first two numbers. 
The third given is a comedy affair which 
pleased the Columbia crowd, but would 
hardly do elsewhere. It is not in keeping 
with the rest of the specialty. Miss Tyler 
is in the same class with' many other of 
the single straight singing women. Where 
they are liked she can easily make good. 

Dash. 



Bessie Browning. 
Imitations. 
18 Mins.; One. 
Columbia. 

Bessie Browing is proving conclusively 
that imitations are a staple article on the 
vaudeville market. She is easily one of 
the biggest hits to show at the Columbia, 
and this with the poorest lot of imitations 
seen to date. She goes through the usual 
routine — Alice Lloyd, Eva Tanguay, Bessie 
McCoy, Irene Franklin and Eddie Foy. 
The Foy imitation for face and talk is 
the only one possessed of any merit. This 
at times gets nearer to Tom McNaughton 
than it does the much imitated Eddie. 
Irene Franklin's "Redhead" song was a 
hit in itself and was very well rendered, 
but it was no imitation. The imitations 
were all costumed. Between each imita- 
tion the words of the song were thrown 
on the drop and a man sang each one, 
filling in the waits. The woman singB a 
straight song at the opening and spoils a 
very neat costume by not dressing her 
feet properly. Bessie Browning should be 
a good card for the smaller time. 

Doth. 



OUT OF TOWN. 



Joe Whitehead and Flo Grierson. 
Comedy, Songs and Dances. 
15 Mins.; One. 
American, Chicago. 

Following Eddie Foy and the intermis- 
sion the couple experienced some difficul- 
ties with their combination. Joe White- 
head is better known in Chicago than in 
any other city. He can dance anything 
from a jig to a "Merry Widow." He asks 
the audience to select the dance wanted 
Miss Grierson is rather dainty and fragile 
for the alertness and activity of White- 
head. The best part of the act is his in- 
dividual eccentricities. Some of the "busi- 
ness" and dialog is from "The Girl Ques- 
tion," in which Whitehead played the 
principal male part. He is an excellent 
eccentric dancer and a good comedian. 
The present arrangement depends largely 
upon Whitehead's individual work, and on 
that score made a genuine hit. 

Frank Wiesberg. 



La Petite Laurie. 

Contortionist. 

xx Mins.; Three (Interior). 

White City, New Orleans. 

La Petite Laurie is a child of ten. She 
has appeared in the west for a few weeks, 
coming direct to this country from Aus- 
tralia. Appearing in a natty pale blue 
costume, she went through a series of 
contortions which included the convention- 
al routine and many others seemingly 
new. She scored a distinct hit on Mon- 
day evening under rather trying circum- 
stances. O. M. Samuel. 

Emma Janvier opens at the Majestic, 
Chicago, Monday. She reappeared in 
vaudeville at Atlantic City Monday as a 
monologist. 



Richard Pitrot will leave for Europe 
during July as the permanent representa- 
tive abroad of the Pantnges' Western 
States Circuit. 



In the United Hooking Offices is a young 
fellow named Kenny who can hand Willie 
Ilammerstein so many laughs that Willie 
just sticks around to catch what Kenny 
says. Before Willie used to laugh at the 
agents, but the agents can't penetrate far 
enough into the United now to make them- 
selves heard. 



THE BOY AND THE GIRL. 

It takes four full lines across the pro- 
gram page to distribute credit among the 
half dozen or so experts who were con- 
cerned in creating the music and lyrics 
and staging "The Boy and the Girl," 
shown for the first time in New York 
on the New Amsterdam Roof Monday 
night. Five different persons labored in 
these directions. One looks in vain for 
the writer of the book. Richard Csvie 
probably did it. If so, he should come 
right out boldly and say so instead of 
ducking behind the introductory caption 
"Richard Carle's Whistling Summer 
Show." Perhaps he whistled the book. 

More likely it came into being by the 
"spontaneous generation" system after the 
manner of burlesque production — that is 
to say, the dialog was written as it he- 
came necessary to the proper rehearsal of 
the musical numbers. You see, if the 
musical numbers followed along, one im- 
mediately after the other, it would bo a 
concert, and the orders were not for a 
concert, but for a musical comedy. The 
introduction of comio incidents and 
speeches is necessary for a musical 
comedy. This is a fixed and immutable 
rule. 

Such parts of the Amsterdam aerial 
show as are not filled in with girls and 
music are taken up with the exploitation 
of what is known as "comedy bits" or 
"ad lib. business," an institution capable 
of unlimited abuse. For instance, when 
something has to be done with a painful 
pause between two incidents that have a 
more or less pertinent bearing on the 
piece or two numbers, one of the comedi- 
ans ambles forth and "cuts up" for no 
earthly reason except the apparent one 
that the stage cannot be left unoccupied. 
It was in rehearsal probably that Toby 
Lyons conceived the idea of reciting a silly 
jingle as a time killer. Somebody laughed. 
The book builder had an inspiration. So 
every time anybody needs a laugh for an 
exit Mr. Lyons projects himself to the 
centre stage and exclaims solemnly: 

Twinkle, twinkle, little star; 
How I wonder what you are; 
Up above the world so high — 
Many feet. 

And everybody goes away from there con- 
vulsed with merriment. The same thing 
occurs no less than a dozen times in the 
two acts, and the verses are in infinite 
variety. 

That is by no means the worst of the 
"bits." Another stock episode occurs with 
painful persistency. Barney Bernard as 
the shrewd theatrical man has occasion to 
"touch" the "angel" of his enterprises. 
Each time he extracts money from his 
victim, he writes out an I. O. U. and 
passes it over to the other to sign. Of 
course, the "money changing" business 
was inevitable, and the proportion of 
standard "gags" was about average. Many 
oi" the entrances were very awkwardly de- 
vised. Bernard's first appearance was 
worked up by an ensemble, but Marie 
Dressier elected to burst upon her audi- 
ei:ce unexpectedly and unannounced. Her 
reception left no doubt that she needed 
no preliminary whooping up 1o attract at- 
tention to her importance in the com- 
pany, a fa» t that became more and more 
obvious as the show proceeded. 

Without robust Marie "The Hoy and the 
Girl" would be a doleful pair. It was al- 



16 



VARIETY 



moat worth while to endure the dreary 
waste to enjoy her three songs and one 
riotous ten minute "rough-house" in the 
second act when Bernard and Edward M. 
Favor tried to tuck her into a toy auto- 
mobile. 

Miss Dressier got into the running right 
away with a capital song, "A Poor Work- 
ing Girl." It had a burlesque dance (one 
a "Salome") between each verse. Both of 
the people who don'£ think Marie Dressier 
an inspired funmaker would have to laugh 
at this performance. The musical hit of 
the piece is "Y la," also allotted to the 
star. It is a rollicking tune with a first- 
rate set of lyrics and from time to time 
gives opportunity for the singer to do her 
famous imitation of the six o'clock 
whistle. A bit of by play between Miss 
Dressier and the orchestra leader in 
which she appeared unexpectedly from 
different entrances and tried to get away 
on another verse before the orchestra 
could catch the opening note, helped 
things along. This happened well toward 
the end of the second act and marked 
one of the few moments of real en- 
thusiasm. 

Qua Sohlke, who staged the numbers 
and ensembles, has done wonders in pic- 
turesque chorus effects and stage pictures. 
"Katie, Come Kiss Me," the finale of the 
first act, owed quite as much to the pretty 
handling of the girls as to the melody or 
the charm of Harriet Standon, who sang 
It. A novel effect started the second net 
off nicely. The stage is set as an open air 
oafe with half a dosen tables about. An 
amusing song is nicely managed by Bur- 
roll Barberette. At its finish the tables 
resolve themselves into the pony ballet, 
a lively dosen of broilers. 

Mr. Bernard has put aside his Hebrew 
character in favor of a sort of Sam Ber- 
nard German, a change that works im- 
mensely to his advantage. He had half 
a dosen most amusing moments with Miss 
Dressier and got more out of the "junk" 
that fell to his lot than seemed possible. 
Marion Garson made an altogether charm- 
ing young Spanish girl and did a whole 
lot to display to the best advantage the 
musical goods supplied by H. L. Hearts 
(iiot forgetting the "additional music by 
Richard Carle"). She was graciously per- 
mitted to escape moat of the dialog and 
appeared at her best. Harriet Standon 
was not ao lucky, but her slim, girlish 
grace and an amazingly sweet voice won 
for her the good will of the audience. 

Eugene Plum and Felix Fantua ap- 
peared several times without exciting any 
curiosity, although they made a lot of 
nejse. Mr. Barberette made a fine, 
smooth, likable light comedian, though 
the part did its best to make him a 
wooden lay figure. The rest of the pro- 
gram waa taken up with a catalog of 
the show girls. The audience would like 
to have identified one of these. She had 
a gorgeous coiffure of auburn hair and a 
set of dancing movements that can be 
learned only from Al. Reeves. 

Owing perhaps to the small stage there 
are rather less than the uaual number of 
girls for a summer musical comedy organ- 
ization, but they are a well-behaved 
bunch and measure up to the standard of 
beauty in such caaea made and provided. 
The dressing is always bright, but de- 
cidedly economical. Beside the gorgeous 
creatures of a regular Broadway show 



HAMMERsronrs. 

The feature of Hammeretein'a Roof open- 
ing last Monday night waa Willie Ham- 
merstein's behaving himself like a regular 
married man. He sat in the stage box 
(with his family) all evening, the longest 
Willie ever remained in one place. Whether 
it waa Mrs. Willie, or a pot of glue that 
held him there, the curious out on "the 
Farm" couldn't decide. 

Some paint and few other things are 
fresh on the Roof, and that's about all. 
Among the "fresh things" waa Al Fields, 
who wantonly inaulted one duck for en- 
gaging in a playful pastime. The star on 
"the Farm" is Farmer Willfe (New Acts). 
A new cow waa captured by Harry Mock 
from the stock yards in Chicago. 
Harry got the bovine at a bargain, and he 
painted the cow to resemble a Guernsey. 
Between watching closely to see the cow 
scrapes no paint off while moving about, 
and bossing the nurse maid on the roof, 
Harry is kept busy these nights. The 
nurse or dairy maid is the same girl from 
East Eighteenth Street, who annoyed the 
milk-giver last summer. She's a good look- 
ing young woman, and there is no rube 
this summer to keep away temporary ad- 
mirers. 

For the Roof the opening bill was a cork- 
er, without any big. feature or big hit. 
La Belle Americaine (La Titcomb) drew 
down the most applause, but made the mis- 
take of singing an encore to it. She closed 
the first half with her magnificent white 
horses. The Seldoms (New Acts) were an- 
other popular number. 

The first show was opened by De Haven 
and Sidney, who have reframed and re- 
dressed their dancing act. It is away out 
of the conventional now for the two-boy 
dancing class. They are burglars at the 
opening, then dance in evening dreaa to 
"I Uaed to be Afraid," and close with the 
restaurant scene, getting away better in 
their position, probably, than any other 
act ever haa up there. 

The Chas. Ahearn Troupe in comedy 
bicycling made an ideal open air turn, 
and brought lota of laughs, losing some of 
the effect at the finish through the absence 
of the special drop carried for this. The 
young girl in the act was dressed very be- 
comingly in white with long black stock- 
ings. 

The musical act of the Exposition Four 
with the many changes of costumes (not 
forgetting that useless "choir boy" cos- 
tume) did very well, and Lester (without 
"The Great" on the program) got over 
with his ventriloquial act surprisingly 
well, considering he waa in the open air. 
Hia own voice and that through the 
"dummy" penetrated to the extreme rear. 

Princess Rajah returned with her dances 
and was another of the real roof acts to 
win favor, while Hoey and Lee, who fol- 
lowed her in the next to last position with 
parodies, were too far down. A burlesque 
on Rajah was expected from them, but it 
didn't show. Hastings and Wilson with 
comedy acrobatics closed. Sitne. 

they would look like ugly ducklings. 

To even up this perhaps the second act 
brought forth an elaborate electric ballet. 
Another electrical feat shown for an en- 
core after the first act finale ought to 
start something between the man who 
made the mechanical sign in front of the 
Knickerbocker Theatre Building and the 
producers of "The Boy and the Girl." 

Rush. 



AMERICAN. 

The Monday night crowd at the Ameri- 
can waa a remarkably undemonstrative 
audience for a holiday. Certainly their 
apparent lack of interest waa in no way to 
be explained by the show, an exceedingly 
good* entertainment after it had once got 
started. In the early part there waa a 
shortage of effective comedy, but the body 
of the program had large values. 

For volume of applause perhaps Henry 
Lee led by a small margin over Toye. Of 
course, Lee's impersonations of Gen. Grant 
and Lee were particularly pat for the oc- 
caaion, and the applause was led along by 
the patriotic incidental muaic. For the 
American week the "speaking likeness" of 
Oscar Hammerstein is left out of the series, 
perhaps on the theory that to use it would 
advertise an "opposition" theatre. Ham- 
merstein is not Lee's best impersonation, 
so the lapse did not matter much. 

Miss Toye scored a most encouraging 
success at the opening of her second week 
at the American, probably as hard a test 
of an artistic musical attraction as could 
well be devised. She sang four numbers, 
without change from last week, and could 
have sung another ballad had she elected 
to respond to a demand at the finish. The 
program this week goes back to the double- 
voiced singer's original billing of Dollie 
Toye. 

James J. Morton was on well toward 
the close of the show with his ridiculous 
patter. At the finish he has a new bunch 
of * 'speaking pieces," which for utter 
foolishness go any of his old stuff some 
better. The talk is about the same, and 
Morton looks more than ever like a New 
York cop. 

Sydney Drew and Co. had the place of 
honor on the program with "Billy's Tomb- 
stones." Jane Marbury haa Mrs. Sydney 
Drew's old part of the loving sister. Mrs. 
Drew's absence counts a distinct loss to 
the sketch. Her successor is much too 
cheerful about Billy's mishap. It was the 
solicitous solemnity of Mrs. Drew that 
made ao much of the situation. Her pro- 
found gravity was one of the most de- 
lightful touches in the sketch. Miss Mar- 
bury puts too much youthful frivolity into 
her part. 

May Ward was called upon to hold up 
the next to closing place with a straight 
single singing specialty. She sang three 
songs, each with a change of costume, and 
that she was called upon for an encore 
was evidence enough that she had got awny 
with her task. To this end her "plug- 
ging" of n popular song contributed not a 
little. 

Mile. Louise and her "Darwinian Dem- 
onstrators" (the same being programese 
for monkeys) closed the show. The mon- 
keys worked rather roughly in the Monday 
performance, but the clown animals 
aroused enough interest in their tricks to 
carry the turn through. A disrobing tra- 
peze monk made a capital comedy feature 
for the finish. 

In the early part of the bill were Shorty 
and Lillian Dewitt, Burton, Burton and 
Jordan (New Acta), Bresnah and Miller, 
Collins and Hart (moved up from a late 
spot), and Fuji-ko, Japanese dancer and 
imitator (New Acts) and John Rucker. 

Rush. 



FIFTH AVENUE. 

The Fifth Avenue program ran off aa 
published Monday afternoon. It haa prob- 
ably remained the same since then. 

The holiday matinee found the orchestra 
but half filled. About ten or twelve of 
those present downstairs belonged to Pres- 
celle (New Acts), who closed the show, 
taking up about forty minutes, which cut 
the customary bill down to seven acts and 
the pictures. 

Excepting Bimm Bomm Brrr Trio, the 
musical number, each act contained comedy, 
making a fast program to the closing. 

The headliner waa Bert Williams, who 
appeared next to last. Mr. Williams regis- 
tered a strong hit ; so did Bowers, Walters 
and Crooker with their very eccentric acro- 
batic comedy turn, the funny finale in 
"one" bringing a howl. 

Mr. Williams sang "Nobody" for a fin- 
ish, going big with it, and also with "That's 
Plenty," which opened. "Next Week, 
Sometime," did not do much. The talk 
Williams uses is well handled. 

It seems as though the chorus of "At 
the Country Club" might be rehearsed into 
singing, not shrieking or shouting the songs, 
and the principals not descend to "faking" 
laughter over an "accidental" bit. The act 
passed through nicely, aa did the Elinor© 
Slaters, just ahead. 

The "No. 2" position was held by Jose- 
phine Davis, Who might be thanked by 
those following her for placing the house in 
a genial mood. Miss Davis is a captivating 
little girl, quite a surprise with her songs, 
singing and manner. Opening with "Beau- 
tiful Eyes," she followed with "Sadie Sa- 
lome" and finished with a character song, 
showing a Hebrew, German and Italian 
aaying "Good-bye." Miss Davis scored 
with each, her rendition of "Sadie Salome" 
sending her over with lots to spare. 

As a "straight" single woman singing act. 
Miss Davis can stand by herself, and that 
is a whole lot these davs. She has no 
"pluggers" or "plants." What's more, 
any one who understands can tell this girl 
is singing those songs she believes best 
suited for her, not those a music publisher 
might pay her to sing. 

Miss Davis should go in for the "exclu- 
sive song" thing, either securing or pur- 
chasing the sole singing rights of numbers, 
written here or abroad, and make one 
change of costume at least, although she 
wore Monday afternoon a handsome gown 
having a long lace covering. 

The Bimm Bomm Brrr Trio have a 
musical act with a novelty. eThis, with the 
many little twists and turns they give to 
the music, mostly on brasses, makes them a 
solid success. The act is dressed well and 
looks good. The novelty is an upright 
holding ten circles, resembling an idea put 
on some seasons ago for a short time when 
emery stones were used instead. The, cir- 
cles light up, giving forth pleasing music 
when touched by sticks in the hands of 
two of the trio. It should be the finish for 
the act proper. They received a large 
send off as the first number, and could 
have fitted in almost any spot on the pro- 
gram. Sime. 



The Gotham, Brooklyn, closes for the 
season this week. It has been playing 
combination vaudeville and pictures of 
late. 



Klaw & Erlanger have announced that 
the new Mclntyre and Heath show wilt 
open at the Circle, tfew York, in August. 
Julian Rose, the Hebrew comedian, will be 
in the cast. The name first selected for 
the piece was "The Steeplechasers," but 
the announcement did not mention the 
title. 



VARIETY 



17 



PIANTADOSI and DUNHAM 

COMEDIANS, IN A SELECTED MUSICAL ENTERTAINMENT. 
All we need le an audience, a stage and a piano— we do the rest; then we collect oar salary. 

Management of E3 LELZ l^^ T ^^ CD CD F* EZZ F^ , 102 West 38th Street, New York. 

Al Piantadosi has composed such songs hits as 
"MARIUTCH TAKE A DE STEAMBOAT" "TOUGH GUY LEVI" "GOOD LUCK, MARY" 

P. 8. — We are comedians; it is not a "■one-plugging" act. 






Kitty Morris 

Singing "coon songs" in vaudeville. 
Booked solid to July 15. 

COMEDY 

NOVELTY ViUDEVILLE ACTS 



away, in a musical turn, having four 
young people for assistants. 



La Belle Americaine, at Hammerstein's 
Roof, has been engaged for the Orpheum 
Road Show next season. 



IMMEDIATE TIME. 

J. B. MORRIS. Agent 

1416 Broadway, New York. 

A sword descended too far into the 
throat of one Albert J. Pierce, a sword- 
swallower at Huber's, and the physicians at 
the Harlem Hospital, where he was taken 
Inst week, pronounced his condition serious. 



Harold Brooks Franklin, formerly treas- 
urer of the Knickerbocker Circuit Co., is 
no longer connected with that concern. 
Lester Mayne is now the controlling fac- 
tor in the business. 



Viola Harris (Mrs. Harry Brown, of 
Brown, Harris and Brown) is resting at 
Hot Springs, Ark. Mr. Brown is at the 
Brown bungalow, Riverside, R. I. The act 
starts on its fall tour Sept. 10. 



The Lambs' Club announced the tour of 
the "Gambol" netted $100,000. 



Joe Welch opened at the Palace, Glas- 
gow, last Monday. 



Mrs. William Annie, the widow of the 
victim of Capt. Peter Hains, appeared last 
Sunday anil Monday at Morrison's, Rock- 



Hall iday and Curley will appear in a 
new piece next fall. They have played 
"The Battle of Too Soon" this season. 



1909 



Gus Hill s Enterprises 



1910 



HOMER LIND 

In a Mew American Play 

"THE INNER MAN" 



"HAPPY DAYS" 

A Comedy With Music 

60 PEOPLE 60 



TheStewartSet McFaddens Flats 

MANAGEMENT OF BARTON * WIS WEL L. 
HILL A MANCHESTER'S ENTERPRISES 

"Vanity Fair" "Crackerjacks" "Masqueraders" 

WANTED. — Singers, Dancers, Novel Features, Comedians, Good-looking; Chorus Girls, 
Vaudeville Acts, etc. 

TO LET FOR ROAD OR STOCK 



"OAT NEW YORK" 
"A HOT OLD TIME'' 



"HAPPY HOOLIGAN" 
"THE SHOEMAKER" 



"AROUND THE CLOCK" 
"THROUGH THE BR 



GUS HILL, 358 Broadway, New York 



VARIETY ARTISTS' ROUTES 

FOR WEEK JUNE 7 

WHEN NOT OTHERWISE INDICATED. 

(The routes here riven, bearing no dates, are from JUNE to JUNE 18, inclusive, de- 
pendent upon the opening and olosing days of engagements in different parts of the oonntry. 
All addresses below are furnished VARIETY by artists. Addresses care managers or agents 
will not be printed.) 

"0. R.." "OraCUB ROUTES." 

ROUTES FOR THE FOLLOWING WEEK MUST REACH THIS OFFICE NOT LATER 
THAN TUESDAY MORNING TO ENSURE PUBLICATION. 



A B C D Girls, 320 W. 96, N. Y. 
Aballos. Hllarion & Rosalie. 770 State. Bridgeport. 
Abdallah Bros.. Three, 1235 Golden Gate, Frisco. 
Adair, Art, I*rlncesH, Wichita; 14, Convention 

Hall, Cblckasla. Okla. 
Adams, Edward B., 41S Strand, W. C, London. 
Adams A Kirk, 1553 Broadway. M. Y. 
Adams A Mark, Pantages', Tncoiua. 
Adams, Billy, 746 Sbawmut, Boston. 
Ader Trio. 2238 N. 3, Phlla. 
Adelyn, Box 240. Champaign. 111. 
Adler, Flo, 464 Cleveland, Chicago. 
Ahearn, Cbas., Troupe, HammerHtein'B, N. Y. 
Abearns, The, 200 Colo. Ave.. Chicago. 
Abl, Ed., Bangor. 
Alhanl, 1416 Broadway. N. Y. 
A 1 bene A La Brant, Gormans, So. Framlngbam, 

Mass. 
Alburtus A Millar, Empire, Stockport, Eng. 
Aldrach, Blanche, 142 Clayton, Athens. 
Alexandra A Bertles, 41 Acre Lane, London. 
Alexis A Scball. 327 E. 25, N. Y. 
Allaire, Aime, Bijou, Perth Aniboy, N. J. 
Allen, Cbss. II., 4fcl S. Morgan. Chicago. 
Allen-Deluialn-Allen, 840 Madison, Brooklyn. 
Allen, A. D., Co., 74 Pleasant, Montclalr. 
Allen, Violet. A Co., 222 R. 14, N. Y. 
Allen, Leon A Bet tie, 118 Central. Osbkosb. 
Allen A Francis, 511 Shot well, San Francisco. 
All, Hunter A All, Claude PL and New York Ave., 

Jamalcs, N. Y. 
Alpha Quartette, BIJou, Jackson; 15, Bijou, Ann 

Arbor. 
Alpine Troupe, Cole Bros.' Shows, C. R. 
Alvano A Co., West Mlddletown, O. 
Amstls Sisters, Four, 104 B. 14, N. Y. 
American Trio, 56 Penn, Newark. 
Angell Sisters. 712 W. New York, Indianapolis. 
Annis, Mrs. Wm., Hammerstein's, N. Y. 
Apollo Bros., 349 W. 4th, N. Y. 



Apollo Quartet, SO No. State, Chicago. 

Ardell Bros., Empire, Edmonton, Can. 

A nlr> & Eddo, Gwynne Pk., Baltimore. 

Arisona Troupe. 351 E. 18, N. Y. 

Armstrong A Verne, Union Hotel, Chicago. 

Armstrong A Clark, Orpheum, Spokane. 

Arnold A Felix, South A Henry, Jamaica. 

Arthur. May, 15, Unity, Boston. 

Arvlllc, Dorothy. 1 W. 85. N Y. 

Astalres, The. 42 Eldorado, Highland Pk., N. J. 

Atklson, Harry, Sheu's, Toronto. 

Auberts, Lee. 14 Frobel. III., Hamburg, Ger. 

Auburns, Three, 335 Beacon, Sommerville. 

Auers, The, 37 Heygate, Snutbend-on-8ea, Eng. 

Auger. Capt. Geo., 12 Lawrence Rd., So. Ealing. 

Austins, The, 10 Bakers Lane, Rockvllle, Conn. 

Avery, W. E.. 5006 Forrestvllle. Chicago. 

Ayres, Howard. 010 Rltner, Phlla. 

Azards. The, 220 W. 38, N. Y. 



Baader. La Valle Trio. 383 N. Christiana, Chicago. 

Baker, Harry. 3024 Reno, W. Philadelphia. 

Baraban Russian Troupe. 100 E. 116, X. Y. 

Barber, Tom. 607 Main, Hartford. 

Bachman, Marie. Grand, I»s Angeles. 

Ballats, The, 310 B. 14. N. Y. 

Ball A Marshall, 220 Lincoln PI.. Norwood Pk., 

Chicago. 
Barlowe, Mollle, 376 Washington Boul., Chicago. 
Barry A Wolford, Alhambra. N. V. 
Barry, Lydln, 77 Bay 32. Brooklyn. 
Barry A Richards, Dlngman's Ferry, Pn. 
B&rnes A I<cvlna, Savannah, Savnnnuh. 
Barnes, Remlng A Co., Washington, Spokane. 
Barron, Rube. 20 E. 88. N. Y. 
Barron, George, 2002 Fifth Ave.. N. Y. 
Barrett Sisters, 1064 N. 31. Phlla. 
Barrett, Mr. A Mrs. Geo. A., Missouri, Toledo. 
Barrett A Bsyne, 87 Wolcott, New Haven. 
Barrett, Marjorle, 4900 Fllmore, Pittsburg. 



Bates A Melville. 76 Gregory, New Haven. 

Batro A McCue, 810 North Second, Reading. 

Baxter A La Conda, 1703 Carson, Pittsburg. 

Bayes, Nors, New York Roof, N. Y. 

Beam, Will, 1553 Brosdwsy, N. Y. 

Bean, Wm. C, 8 Haddon, Atlantic City. 

Be Anos, The, 3442 Charlton, Chicago. 

Besrd, Billy, 1401 Dayton, Ssvannah. 

Beanvsls, Marldor, A Co., 274 Indians, Chicago. 

Bedlnt A Sonls, 106 Sulllvsn-Consldlne Bldg., 

Seattle. 
Beecber A Maye, 1553 Broadway, N. Y. 
Beeson. Lulu, Orpheum, Oakland. 

LULU BEESON TRIO 

Week June 6, Orpheum, Oakland. 

Beimel, Musical. 340 E. f7. N. Y. 

Belly. Frank, Keith A Proctor's, Jersey City. 

Belford Troupe. Rlngllng Bros., C. R. 

Bell. Arthur II.. 488 12. Newsrk. 

Bellclnlr Bros., Shea's, Toronto; 14, Keith's, Cleve- 
land. 

Bellmonte. Harry A Pearl, 20 W. Missouri, Kan- 
sas City. 

Bennett, Laura, 113 W. 70, N. Y. 

Bcnnetta Bros., 200 W. 07, N. Y. 

Berliner. Vera. Orpheum, Portland. 

Bernard A Sleftrt. 055 S. High. Columbus. 

Bernstein, Harry, BIJou. Racine. 

Bernlee A Howard, .TH>7 Calumet, Chicago. 

Bernler A Stella. 22 Haywood, Providence. 

Bend, Willi mi. 104 E. 14. N. Y. 

Berry A Berry, West End. New Orleans. 

Bertram A Co.. Koht., Pantages', Portland. 

Beyer. Ben, A Bio.. 1406 Bryant, N. Y. 

Behrend. Musical, 52 Springfleld. Newark. 

Bertlna A Broekway. 311 Third, N. Y. 

Beverley A West. 262 Delaware. Buffalo. 

Biff A Bang, 178 Bruce, Newark. 

Black A Co., Violet. Temple. Detroit. 

BlHinphln A Hehr. Liberty. Tomaipia. Pa. 

Blatiey A Wolfe. 257 W. 44. N. Y. 

Bimbos. The. Appleton, Wis. 

Biugli.'im, Kitty, .'{35 Beacon. Somervllle. 

Blnghiitn. .'{.'15 Itcacoii, Somervllle. 

Blrnes, Joe, 1553 Broadway. N. Y. 

Black A White Trio, 405 Columbus, N. Y. 

Black A Jo-ies. 113 W. 30, N. Y. 

Bla'ik's Marionettes, 1000 S. San Joaijulm. Stockton. 

Blessings, The. 104 E. 14. N. Y. 

Blondell. Mysterious. A Co.. 25 Second. N. Y. 

Blmm. Bom m. Brrr. K. A P. 5th Ave.. N. Y. 

I'.-'Ises, Sensational, Dreamland, Coney Island, 
N. Y. 

Bo'ith. Gordon A Booth. 1553 Broadway, N. Y. 

Boley, May. Port Washington, L. I. 

Borden, Zeno A Haydn Bros., Pantages, Portland. 

Bowers A Bowers. 2 Oliver PI., Everett. 

Bowers. Walter A Crooker. Shea's, Buffalo. 

Poweii Bros.. 1553 Bioadway, N. Y. 

P.oyds, Two. 1260 So. Decatur, Montgomery. 

Boyer A Bell. Del Roy House, Cleveland. 

Boys In Blue, 240 E. 21, N. Y. 

Brachard A Co., Mile., 124 Bloom! ngton, Indian 
n polls. 

Brady, Owen, 44 State, Auburn. 



Bradley A Davis. 217 B. Leloek, Pittsburg. 

Bradfords, The, 230 W. 41, N. Y. 

Brandons. Musical, 67 So. Clark, Chicago. 

Bransby A Wllllnms, 110 Stockton, W. PtttsDursr. 

Breakway Barlows, 201 B. 14. N. Y. 

Brenner. Ssmuel N., 2850 Tulip, Phils. 

Broad. Billy, 1563 Broadway, N. Y. 

Broadway Boys, 4 Huntings Co. 

Bingham, Anna R., 28 ExcbSLge, Blogbsmton. 

Brlokleys. The, 414 W. 39, N. Y. 

Brltton, Sadie, Coliseum, Burlington, la. 

Brixton A Brixton, 708 Lexington, Brooklyn. 

Brock. Temple A Co.. 28 W. 31, N. Y. 

Brooks A Denton, 670 6. N. Y. 

Brooks A Jeannette. 861 West, N. Y. 

Brown A Sheftsll. 340 W. 50, N. T. 

Brown. Harris A Brown. Brown's Bungalow* 

Riverside, R. I. 
Browne, Harry L., Hopkins, Loolavllle. 
Browne. Bnthwell, 407 West 123. N. Y. 
Brownies, The. Rural Del. No. 8, Topeka. 
Browning A Kellar, 2139 E. 16, Brooklyn. 
Brunettes, Cycling. 231 Cross, Lowell. 
Buchanan A Russell. Ontario Hotel, Chicago. 
Burke A Urli.ie. 636 Build. W. Phlla. 
Buckley, lolin. 205 E. 14. N. Y. 
Buhler. C. II.. 1363 Putnam. Brooklyn. 
Bunchu A Alger. 2310 N. Msln. Louisville. 
Burgess. Harvey J., 627 Trenton, Wllkinsburf 

Sta., Pittsburg. 
Burgomaster's Dream, Grand, Seattle; 13, Grand, 

Portland. 
Burke A Touley. Esft Hsddam, Conn. 
Bums A Emerson. 1 Piece Boledleu, Psrls. 
Bun A Daughter. Mr. ft Mrs. Wm. P., 143 W. 

45. N. Y. 
Burton, Hughes A Burton. 532 Stanton. Nlles, O. 
Burton, H. B.. Sherman House. Chicago. 
Bnch Bros.. Edison St.. Rldgefleld Pk., N. J. 
Buxton. Cbas.. Crystsl. Menssbs. Wis. 
Byers A Herman. 3640 Psxton rd.. Cloelnnstl. 
Byrne Golson Co.. Alrdome, Ft. Worth. 



Caesar. Mysterious. A Co.. Continental Hotel, 

Chicago. 
Cahlll. William. 305 7, Brooklyn. 
Cain Sisters. Empire, Youugstown. 
Cameron A Byrne, 01 Bartlette, San Francisco. 
Campbell A Brady. White Cltv. Dayton. 
Campliells. The. 121 W. 101. N. Y. 
Carbrey Bros.. 6 Oxford, Phlla. 
Cardownle Sisters, 244 W. 30. N. Y. 
Carle. Hilda, 12 W. Milwaukee. Detroit. 
C:irlln. Bob. 013 Prosper t. Hnffalo. 
Carrlllo, Leo. c o Variety. N. Y. 
('arrays. The. 10 Perry. Pittsburg, 
('arson A Devcrcaux. 41<» Lime, Evsnsvllle. 
(urol 8lsters. 310 W. 14<». N, Y. 
Csrlln, Rose. lot; w. m. N. Y. 
Cannelo. Feri.!irnlM. Illpp-xlrome. Lexington; 14", 

Hlpptidroint'. < 'li.-irli-stnii. 
Carlos Anlmiil circus, 1«M \v. 40, N. Y. 
Carroll. N«t:> 1'ii.i. Itarnum Ballev, C. R. 
Carroll A r.-.ke. M. ».-| York. \. Y. 
Ciiron A I'm num. '_'.:."> K. 24. X. Y. 
Carters. Tie. IM't l.:i Salle. Clilvago. 
Carey ,V Simni|i\ 52 Court, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Ca>a.l-Di- V.-iim- A Walter". 312 Valley, Day too. 
(i^t Dave «>. H , Hrlsf.l; 14, Grand, Augusta. 



18 



VARIETY 



Cobb's Corner 

HO. 170. SATUBDAY, TUVE 6, 19M. 

"Ski Plenty tf Show" 

By WILL D. OOBB. 

A ounbnrned farmer's sunburned ion. 

Said, "Fitter, I realffn; 
Thla farm thing •nine for Sweeney/ 

And It's Naw York town for mlna." 
"New York, New York," the old man aald, 

His rolce grew soft and kind, 
"I was there, gee. In eighty-three. 

When 70a get there, you'll find." 

CHORUS. 

It's a grand old town that New York town, 

It'a the farm where the fortunes grow; 
All yon need to do Is to pick yonrsslf a few, 
And tbst feller Rockefeller won't hare any* 

thing on yoq. 
When yow feet slam down on thst Amsterdsm 
town. 
Yon csn fill your trunk with nil the plunks 
yon choose; 
But It's s long roam, back home — 
Take plenty of shoes. 

THIS IS THEME 

"•HANBO'S GOT IT." 

WILL B. 1MB, Swig tfjltb 

14t« BROADWAY 



Celest, 74 Grore Bd., Clapbam Park, London. 

Chadwick Trio, Mt. Epbralm. N. Y. 

Chameroys. Tbe, 1351 43, Brooklyn. 

Chase, J. Percy, Bijou, Oshkosh. 

Chase A Cartua, 2516 So. Halstead, Chicago. 

Cherie, Doris, 23 B. 00, N. Y. 

Cheater A Grace, Majestic, Galveston. 

Chevalier, Louis. A Co., 1553 Broadway, N. Y. 

Chinko. 14, Majestic, Chicago. 

Chip. 8am, A Mary Marble, Temple, Detroit. 

Clarence Sisters, 360 West 45, N. Y. 

Clark A Turner, 146 W. 64, N. Y. 

Clarke. Wilfred, Lamb's Club, N. Y. 

ROUTES— 2 

Clayton, Prank A., Woodlawn Bd., Bedford Pk., 

N. Y. 
Clayton; Bessie, New York Roof, N. Y. 
Calopatra Dance, San Diego. 
Clermont as, Midway Pk., Wllllamstown; 14, 

Orange Lake Pk., Newburg. 
Clerlse, Ethel, 303 Livingston, Brooklyn. 
Cleveland. Claude A Marion, 91 Beacblaod, Be- 

•vere Beach, Mass. 
Clifford, Dave B., 173 E. 103, N. Y. 
Clifford A Ames, 2612 W Gray, Louisville. 
Cllto A Sylvester. East End Pk., Memphis. 
Clipper Comedy, West End Pk., New Orleans. 
Clyo A Rochelle. 87 Park, Attleboro, Mass. 
Cogan A Bancroft, Bijou, Duluth. 
Cohen, Tillle, St. James Hotel, Boston. 
Colby, Mr. A Mrs. Franklyn, 2084 West Lake, 

Chicago. 
Colbys. The, 77 Walton PI., Chicago. 
Cole, Will, 15 Fourth, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Cole A Clements, Say more Hotel, Pblla. 
Coleys, The, Elk Club, Chicago. 
Colonial Quartet, 1862 Page, San Francisco. 
Columbia Musical Trio, De Rue Bros.' Minstrels. 
Columbians, Five, 126 Midland, Fludlay, O. 
Comrades, Four, 834 Trinity, N. Y. 
Conover A Grant, 'J2 Lenox, N. Y. 
Cooper, John W., 110 Wyckoff, Brooklyn. 
Cooper, Geo. W., 47 Douglaa PL, Chicago. 
Conroy, Le Malre A Co., Majestic, Milwaukee; 14, 

Majestic, Chicago. 
Cook, Frank. Austin A Stones, Boston. 
Cooke A Myers, 1310 Park, Vancouver. 
Cooper, Jeannette, Thalia, San Francisco. 
Coote, Bert, Green Bocm Club, N. Y. 
Corcoran A Dixon, 23, Truxton, Brooklyn. 
Corellls, Three, Barnum A Bailey, C. B. 
Coasar, Mr. A Mrs. John, Majestic, Ft. Worth; 

14, Majestic, Dallas. 
Cotton, Lola, Box 125, Cuba. N. Y. 
Coulter A Wilson, Grand, Syracuse; 13, Sbubert, 

Utlca. 
Courtney A Dunn. 232 E. 18. N. Y. 
Cowles Family. Great, Valley City, No. Dak. 
Cowper, Jlmtnie, 86 Carroll, Blngbamton. 
Crane, Flnlay Co.. 101 Elm St., Weat Haven. 
Crawford A Manning. 115 Lawrence, Brooklyn. 
Crawford, Pat, 1020 Marlon. Columbia, S. C. 
Cree, Jessica, 501 Kirbly. Detroit. 
Creo A Co., 1404 Borle, Pblla. 
Creasy A Dayne, Concord, New Haven. 
Crlmmlngx A Geary, 45 Charles, Maiden. 
Cross A Co., Will II., Crystal, Cripple Creek. 
Cross A Maye, Orpbeum, Portsmouth, O. ; 14, Hip- 
podrome, Charleston. 
Culver A Lynne, 40 E. Town, Columbus. 
Cummings A Merley, Unique, Los Angeles. 
Cunningham A Marion. 155 E. 06, N. V. 
Cunningham, Bob, 1553 Broadway, N. Y. 
Curran A Milton. Globe, Johnstown. 
Curtis, Samuel J.. 2803 Ave. F, Brooklyn. 
Curson Sinters, c/o Kalar, Jackson. 
Cuttings, The, Lampasso, Tex. 
Cuttys, Musical, 3034 E. Baltimore, Baltimore. 



Dade. Genevieve, Electric Pk.. Pen Argyl, Pa. 

Dagwell. Natalie, and Aurie. 108 W. £4, N. Y. 

Dainty Four. 242 W. 43, N. Y. 

D'Arvllle Sisters, Chicago. 

D'Alvinl, Rocky Point. R. I. 

Dale. Dainty Dottle, O. II.. Gardner, Mc. 

Dance, Wm. H.. Majestic. Sioux Falls. 

Dandy George Duo. 221 W. 42, N. Y. 

Dare. Harry. 325 E. 14. N. Y. 

Da r row, Stuart, Mr. A Mrs., 40 Front, Omega, 
N. Y. 

Damley, Grace, Lagos House, Fairfield Bd., Vic- 
toria, B. C. 

Davenport, Etl:el. 65 Irving PI., Brooklyn. 

Daven|K>rt Troupe, Barnum A Bailey, C. B. 

Davey A Moore. 132 E. 17, N. Y. 

Davis, Sam. 217 E. Lalnck. Pittsburg. 

Davis, Mark, A Laura, Orpheum, Edmonton, Can. 



Davis, Edwards, Green Boom Club, N. Y. 

Davis, Floyd, Temple, Boulder, Col. 

Dawson A Whitfield, 346 E. 58, N. Y. 

Day, Carita, Washington, Spokane. 

Deagon, Ed A Kitty. Griffith, Ind. 

lHns A Deas. 253 W. 30, N. Y. 

Dell A Miller, Hippo., Buffalo. 

De Cot ret A Kego, 1553 Broadway, N. Y. 

De Fur A Estes, 2310« Bellefontalne, Indianapolis. 

De Loria, Dick, Brlnkman. Bemidji, Minn. 

De Trlckey Coy, Hunt'a Hotel, Chicago. 

De Veaux, Wells G., Crystal, Denver. 

De Voy A Dayton Sisters, Majestic. Little Bock. 

Deaton. Chas. W., Boom 8, 418 Strand, W C, 
London. 

Deaves, Harry, Automaton, Bergen Beach. 

1 leaves. Bowman, O. H., Cincinnati. 

Delavoyc A Frits, Garden, Jackson. 

Delmar A Delmar, C irco Bell, Mexico City. 

Del more. Misses', 418 W. Adams, Chicago. 

Delmore A Lee, 1553 Broadway, N. Y. 

Delton, Al H., 538 10. Milwaukee. 

Deltons, Three, 261 W. 38, N. Y. 

Demacos, Tbe. 112 North 0, Phlla. 

Demonio A Belle, 1536 Broadway, N. Y. 

Deinpseys, Tbe, Hotel Graymount, Denver. 

Desmond Sisters, 605 Milton, San Diego. 

Desmond A Co., 24 E. 21, N. Y. 

Derenda A Green, 14 Leicester St., London. 

Derr-Schadt. 028 S. 0, Allentown. 

Deverne A Shurti, 057 20, Brooklyn. 

De Veau, Herbert, 364 Prospect PI., Brooklyn. 

De Tellem A Co., 410 Best, Buffalo. 

De Young, Tom, 156 E. 113, N. Y. 

De Young, Mabel, Orpheum, Jacksonville; 14, Or- 
pheum, Birmingham. 

Diamond A Bell, 2403 Albemarle Boad, Brooklyn. 

Diavolino, Idle Hour, New Bedford. 

Dickinson. Rube. 2910 Vine, Lincoln. 

Dills A Templeton, 157 E. 46, N. Y. 

DUIa A Templeton, Novelty, Brooklyn. 

Dixie, Harris A Francis, 242 Jefferson, Decatur. 

Dlxona, Four, 756 Eighth. Ave., N. Y. 



4 DIXONS 4 



Teas} Anna, Bona. 



Dobson, Frank, Majestic, Wsahlngton. 

Doberty A Harlowe, 296 Broad, Brooklyn. 

Dolores, Angels A Co., Orpheum, Loo Angeles. 

Dooley, Jed., Falrvlew Pk., Dayton; 14, Farm Pk., 
Toledo. 

Donald A Carson, Orpheum, Oskland. 

Donlgan, John, 2538 Cedar, Phlla. 

Donnelly A Rotall, Unique, Minneapolis. 

Donovan A Mackln, 305 W. 43. N. Y. 

Donovan A Arnold, Farm, Toledo; 14, Ocean Grove, 
8prlngfleld. 

Dora, Queen, 249 W. 30, N. Y. 

Doves, Juggling, 1534 Broadway. N. Y. 

Doyle, Patsy, 1653 Broadway, N. Y. 

Dotaon, Howard, 1553 Broadway, N. Y. 

Douglaa A Van, 76 Pacific, Brooklyn. 

Dow A Dow, 1921 South 4, Phlla. 

Downey A Wlllard, 41 Lin wood, Detroit. 

Dragoons, Blsck, 129 W. 27, N. Y. 

Dreano, Josh, 240 W. 39, N. Y. 

Drew, Lowell B., 4229 Pechlo, Box borough, Phils. 

Drew, Dorothy, 377 Eighth Ave., N. Y. 

Du Boia, Great, 80 N. Washington, Bridgeport. 

Dudley, Gertrude, A Co., 243 Madison, Brooklyn. 

Duffy, Thomas H., 4926 Nargaretta, St. Louia. 

Duffy, Dan J., Lincoln Apts.. Atlantic City. 

DumltresenVermette Troupe, 46 W. 22, N. Y. 

Dunbars, Tbe, Happy Hour, San Antonio, Texas. 

Dunbar A Fisher. 235 Warren, Chicago. 

Dunbars. Four Casting, Forrest Pk., St. Louis; 
14, Ramona Pk., Grand Rapids. 

Duncan, arry, Hunt'a Hotel, Chicago. 

Dunn, Harvey, De Rue Bros.' Minstrels. 

Dunn. J. Lee, 201 E. 14. N. Y. 

Dupllle, Ernest A., 3017 Boudlnot, Phlla. 

Dupres, Fred, 150 Albany, Brooklyn. 

Dwyer Trio, Lottie, Scenic, Maiden. 

Dwyer, Campbell A O'Brien, Scenic Temple, Mai- 
den. 



Earle, Chas., 501 North Capt., Indianapolis. 

Eckhoff A Gordon, East Uaddam, Conn. 

Edinger Sisters, B. F. D., No. 1, Trenton. 

Edwards, Fred R., Bucklen Hotel, Elkhart. 

Edwarda, Gus, Alhambra. N. Y. 

Edwards, Geo.. 3505 Fleming. Allegheny. 

Edwards A Clarendon, 416 Elm, Cincinnati. 

Edyth. Rose. 345 W. 23, N. Y. 

Khrendall Bros. A Dutton, Family, Lafayette; 13, 
Majestic, Evansvllie. 

El Barto. 2531 N. Hollywood. Phlla, 

El Cota. 1144 Broadway. N. Y. 

Elastic Trio, Majestic, Pittsburg. 

Elite Muslral Four, Bell, Oakland. 

Elmore A Ray, 2442 State, Chicago. 

Elliotts, The. O. H., S. 8.. Pittsburg. 

Ellsworth, Mr. A Mrs., 1536 Broadway, N. Y. 

Ellsworth A Linden, 1553 Broadway, N. Y. 

Emerald, Connie, 41 Holland Rd., Brixton, Lon- 
don. 

Emerson A Baldwin, 50 Rupert, Coventry, Eng. 

E'mmet, Harry, 1115 Paterson, Baltimore. 

Emmett A Lower, Grand. Tacoma. 

Emmett, Oracle, A Co., Hamraersteln's, N. Y. 

Engcl. Lew, 223a Chauncey. Brooklyn. 

Englebreth. Geo. W., 300 W. 5, Cincinnati. 

English Belles, Four, Wilson. Mason City, la. 

English. J. A.. 240 W. 30, N. Y. 

Enlgmarelle. 252 Flint, Rochester. 

Erxleben, Bert A., Shootover Inn, Hamilton, City, 
Cal. 

Estelle A Cordova, Damon Shows. 

Eugene Trio. 258 W. 26, N. Y. 

Evans A Lloyd, Orpheum, Seattle; 14, Orpheum, 
Portland. 

Everett, Sophie, A Co., South and Henry, Jamaica. 

Everett, Great, Washington Pk., Bayonne. 

Evera, Geo., Unique, Des Moines. 



Faden. MacBryde Trio. 17 Eighth. Troy. 
Fslk. Billy A.. 46 Allen. Rochester. 
Falardeau, Doll Irene, Hotel Rexford, Boston. 
Falke, Rose Carlln. 106 W. 144. N. Y. 
Falke. Chas., 106 W. 144. N. Y. 
Fantas. Two, 211 E. 14, N. Y. 
Fanton, Geo., Co., Star, San Francisco. 



Farrell, Billy, Moss A Stall, London. 

Faurnnt, Marie, 70 B. 116, N. Y. 

Faust Bros., 242 W. 43, N. Y. 

Fay, Anna Eva. Melrose, Uighlanda, Mass. 

Fay, Frank A Gertrude, Elk's Club, Chicago. 

Fee, May A Forbes, 153 Chestnut, Phila. 

Felmar, Boae, Orpheum, Harrisburg. 

Ferguson, Frank, 480 E. 43, Chicago. 

Fernandes, May, Duo, 207 B. 87, N. Y. 

Ferrard, Grace, 217 Warsaw, Chicago. 

Ferry, Human Frog, Henderson's, Coney la., N. Y. 

Ferry The Freg, Orpheum, Altoona; 14, Orpheum, - 
Harrisburg. 

Fiddler A Shelton, Majestic. Milwaukee. 

Fields, W. C, Coliseum, London. 

Fields. Will H., Empire, Grand Forks. 

Fields A Hanson, Liberty, Phlla. 

Flnlay A Burke. Box 103 Onset, Mass. 

Finney, Chas., 258 W. 26. N. Y. 

Finnic. Jack, 1011 South Chadwick, Phlla. 

Fiske A McDonough, 272 W. 107. N. Y. 

Flemen, William, Majestic, Ft. Worth; 14, MaJ3S- 
tic, Dallas. 

Fleming, Mamie, Hotel Fortescue, Atlantic City. 

Fletcher, Chas. Leonard, 121 W. 42, N. Y. 

Fletcher A La Pierre, Family, Des Moines. 

Flynn, Earl, Park, Chattanooga; 14, Psrk. Chat- 
tanooga. 

Fogarty, Frank, Orpheum, Denver; 14, Majestic, 
Chicago. 

Follett, Lounle, 105 E. 107, N. Y. 

Force A Williams. Wonderland Park, Wichita. 

Ford, Chaa. L., 418 So. Franklyn, Muncle. 

Ford. Frank A La Petite, 418 So. Franklin, Great 
Falls, Mont. 

Fords, Famous, 301 Gates Ave., Brooklyn. 

Forrester A Lloyd, Lyceum, Calgary, Can. 

Forrests. Musical, 508-50 Dearborn, Chicago. 

Fostell A Emmett, Theatre. Weatbrook, Me. 

Fournott A Davla, 307 Third Ave., Minneapolis. 

Fox A Diamond, 11 Grandville Ave. Grand Rapids. 

Fox A Evans, Forrest Pk., Chicago; 14, Harlem 
Pk., Rockford, 111. 

Frederick, Helena, Orpheum, Butte. 

Fredericks, Musical, 107 E. 31, N. Y. 

Freeman, Harry J., Washington. 

Frey Trio, Chicago Poet, Chicago. 

Frey, Fred, 301 Grove, Scranton. 

Friend A Downing, 418 Strand, W. C, London. 

Freeman Bros., 37 Anderson, Boston. 

Frobel A Buge, 104 E. 14, N. Y. 

Fullerton, Lew J., Summer PI., Buffalo. 

Fulton, May, 694 Lenox, N. Y. 

Furnam. Badlr, Tottenham Court Bd., London. 



e 

Gale, Ernie, 169 Eastern, Toronto. 
Galleti'a Monkeys. 804 Maplewood. Chicago. 
Gardner A Law son, 1214 2d Ave., N. Nashville. 
Gardner, Georgia, A Co., 1951 Kenmore Ave., 

Chicago. 
Gardner, Weat A Sunshine, 24 Elm, Everett. 
Garrlty, Tom, 282 Academy, Newark. 
Gath, Carl A Emma, 1553 Broadway, N. Y.~ 
Gavin, Piatt A Peaches. 4417 Third Ave., N. Y. 
Gay lor A Graff, Wonderland, Revere Beach, Mass. 
Georgia Campers, Bartholdl Inn, N. Y. 
Geaaler, Chas., 824 Green, Indianapolis. 
Glbney, Blcknell, Schroder, Ybor City, Tampa. 
Gibson, Fay, Standard, Davenport. 
Gilden Sisters, Empire, Atlanta. 
Glllingwater A Co., Claude, 13, Orpheum, Oakland. 
Gllroy, Haynes A Montgomery, 1958 No. 8, Phlla. 
Girard A Gardner, Amltyville, L. I. 
Gladstone. Ida, 4457 Oakenwald, Chicago. 
Gleesons A Houlihan, 156 N. Willow, Trenton. 
Glendower A Manlon, Family, Butte. 
Glose, Augusta, Room 420, 135 Adams, Chicago. 
Glover, Edna May, Lyceum, Memphis, Tenn. 
Godfrey & Henderson. 1553 Broadway, N. Y. 
Goforth A Doyle, Colonial, Norfolk; 14, Academy, 

Lynchburg. 
Goldberg, Joseph, Mgr., Harris, Braddock. 
Goldfinger, Louis, 802 E. 168, N. Y. 
Goldle, Rube, 113 Prince, Newark. 
Goldln, Horace. Palace Theatre, London. 
Goldsmith A Hoppe, Union Pk., Dubuque. 
Gordon, Belle, P. O. Box 40, N. Y. 
Gordon A Henry, 1777 Atlantic Ave., Brooklyn. 
Gorman, Jos., Casino, Pittsburg. 
Gould A Bice, 326 Smith, Providence. 
Goolmans, Musical, 8 Matthews, Blngbamton. 
Gossans, Bobby, 400 So. 6, Columbus. 
Gottleb, Amy, 446 North St. Lewis, Chicago. 
Graces. The, 418 Grand, Brooklyn. 
Graff A Graff, 14, Atlantic Garden, Atlantic City. 
Graham, R. A., Dime, Walla Walla, Wash. 
Grant. Wells S.. 408 James, Utlca. 
Grant, Bert A Bertha, 2956 Dearborn, Chicago. 
Grant, Sydney, 260 W. 261. N. Y. 
Graham. Geo. W., Scenic, Providence. 
Gray A Van Lieu, 1406 Woodlawn. Indianapolis. 
Green A Weathers, 28 Garden, Boston. 



The Chas. K. Harris Courlar 

"NOBODY KNOWS, 
NOBODY (ARCS" 

Chas. K. Harris' reigning ballad hit has just 
struck England. A letter from B. Feldman A 
Co., Mr. Harris' London Publishers, states that 
Julie Mackey, the famous Contralto, is now sine;- 
ing this ballad success in the London Muaio Halls 
and is creating a sensation, being compelled to 
make a speech aftar the rendition of the song. 
The London "Era" saya that it is the beat song 
Harris has sent over the pond since his famous 
"After the Ball." 



CHAS. K. HARRIS, 

II WS8T list ST., TCW TO 
OOHXJi. Manager, 

Oaioage, Grand Opera 



Grimes, Mr. A Mrs. Thomaa, 8629 Williams, Cam- 
den. 
Grimm A Satchell. Majestic, Rockford. 111. 
Grossman, Al., 532 North. Rochester. 
Gullfoyle. Joseph V., 22 W. 128, N. Y. 
Guild, Martin J., 160 Boerum PI., Brooklyn. 



Haggarty A Le Clair, 120 17, Detroit. 

Haggerty, Larry, 317 Atlantic. McKeesport. 

Halllday A Curley, 1558 Broadway, N. Y. 

Hale. Lillian A Co., 2010 N. Marvlne. Phila. 

Hale A Co., Jess. Alrdome, Bridgeport; 13, Air- 
dome, Paris, 111. 

Hamilton, Estelle, 2641 No. 81. Pblla. 

Hamilton A Buckley, 26 Somerset. Boston. 

Hamlin A Noyes, Lyric, Robinson. 

Hamlin A Lyle, Family, Kane, Pa. 

Hamlin, Hugo, William Tell House, Boston. 

Hammond A Forrester, Box 83, Scarsdale, N. Y. 

Handler. Louis. 1512 Broadway, N. Y. 

Hanlon, Jr., George, 141 Charing Cross Rd., London. 

Hannon, Dlggs A Barns, 89 No. Clsrk, Chicago. 

Hansome, Gem, Lancaster; 14, Princess, Coshocton. 

Hanson, Mildred, 1843 Dean, Brooklyn. 

Hanson, Harry L., Bijou, Atlanta; 14, Grand, 
Nashville. 

Hanvey A Baylies, 247 Palisade, Ave., West 
Hoboken. 

Hara. Ayeshs, Watson's Circle Hotel, N. Y. 

Harris, Harry I., 2252 Wabash. Chicago. 

Harris, Chaa., 37 Llo. Fall River. 

HEIM CHILDREN 

ORPHEUM, HARRISBURG. 

Henry A Jones, 1813 Watts, Phils. 
Harris, 8am, Vogel's Minstrels. 
Harris, Hattle, New Home Hotel, Pittsburg. 
Harrington, Giles W., 024 Acklin, Toledo. 
Harrington, Alfred A., 825 B. 14, N. Y. 
Harmonious Four, Gem, St. Louis. 
Hsrt Bros., Hagenbeck- Wallace, C. R. 
Harvey. Elsie, A Boys, 140 E. 14, N. Y. 
Haskell, Loney, Orpbeum, Spokane. 
Hatches. Tbe. 304 W. 38. N. Y. 
Hathen, Lakeside Park, Denver. 

E. F. HAWLEY 

Closing Vaudeville Season, 
Bandit's Beat, Ohaxlestown, Mioh. 

Hawley, E. F., A Co., 65 11 Detroit. 
Hayden Family, 11 State, Oshkosh. 
Haynes. Jessie J., 21 E. Boblnson, Allegheny. 
Hayes A Wynne. 434 W. 164. N. Y. 
Hayes, Brent, Alhambra. Brussells. Belgium. 
Hays, Unlcycle, 430 W. 6, Cincinnati. 
Hays Whelock Troupe, 13, Coney Isfand, Cincin- 
nati. 



USE THIS FORM IF YOU HAVE NO ROUTE CARDS 



N»rn* 


Permanent ArlrWaa 




Temporary 


«« 








Week 


Theatre 


City State 
























> 











CARDS WILL BE MAILED UPON REQUEST 



M'hcn answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



VARIETY 



19 



GOING U 



! I ! 



JUNIE McCREE and ALBERT VON TILZER'S Summer Waltz Song Hit 




THE CATCHIEST, BREEZIEST, CLASSIEST SONG EVER WRITTEN 

EVERYBODY WILL BE SINGING IT INSIDE OF A MONTH. THIS SONG WILL MAKE GOOD IN ANY PLACE IN YOUR ACT. FOR SINGERS OF COMEDY SONGS, WE HAVE A FATTER 
CHORUS PRINTED ON THE PROFESSIONAL COPY (with Muaio to it can be Easily Learned), THAT WILL MARE IT A BIGGER HIT THAN ANY COMEDY SONG YOU EVER HAD. 

the: most sensational slides ever made 

DE WITT C. WHEELER, IN ILLUSTRATING "TAKE ME UP WITH YOU, DEARIE," USED A GENUINE AIRSHIP IN POSING THE SLIDES FOR THIS SONG. THIS IS THE FIRST TIME A 
REAL FLYING MACHINE HAS EVER BEEN USED TO ILLUSTRATE A SONG, AND THEY WILL PROVE A SENSATION. BE THE FIR8T TO U8E THEM PRICE, $6.00 PER 8ET. 

REMEMBER THIS IS THE ONLY SUMMER SONG HIT 



PROFESSIONAL COPES AND ORCHESTRATIONS, ALL KEYS, TO THOSE SENDING LATE PROGRAMMES. 

YORK IVIUSIO 



NO CARDS 




VOIM TIL 



1367 BROADWAY, COR. 37tK St., NEW YORK 




, Mgr 



After a pleasant and 
profitable year with 

COHAN a™ HARRIS 

Jerome - Schwartz 

Have Signed with 



THE 



Jerome tl. Remick 

COMPANY 

Everybody seems satisfied. 



Hayman ft Franklin, Gibbons Tour. London. 

Hassard, Lyase ft Bonnie, 201 E. 31, Chicago. 

Heaston, Billy, Cbarlerol, Pa. 

Helm Children, Orpbeum, Harrlsburg. 

Helaton, Wbally ft Lottie. 1908 Columbia, Phlla. 

Hemingway ft Morreselle, 33 E. 3, Covington. 

Henshaw, Edward. 80 E. 110. N. Y. 

Henry ft Youug, Shcilpot Pk., Wilmington. 

Henry, Jack, 41 Lisle. Leicester Sq., London. 

Herbert, Bert, Hart's Bathing Girls Co. 

Herbert BroH., 235 E. 24. N. Y. 

Herbert & Vance, 1345 John, Cincinnati. 

Ilerrman, The Great. 108 Rue Folie. Merleourt. 

Paris. 
Herrmann. Adelaide. Gllsey House. N. Y. 
Heuman Troupe, Coles Bros.', C. R. 
Heuman's Four, Elgin, 111. 
Hewlettes, The. Empire, Springfield, 111. 
Hiqkman. Wills ft Co., Llppodrome, It lea; 14, 

National, Rochester. 
Hickman. Lee, 305 East 42. X. Y. 
Hill, Cherry ft Hill. 210 Bay 23. Bath Bench. 
Hill ft Whltaker, Empire. Hull. England. 
Hill ft Edmunds, 202 Nell son, New Brunswick. 
Hill ft Sylvlanny, 1553 Broadway. N. Y. 
Hlllman ft Roberta, 339 So. 13, Saginaw. 
Hobsons, The Famous, Ringllng Bros.', ('. R. 
Holden ft Harron. 953 71. Bay Ridge, Brooklyn. 
Holman, Harry, Acker's. Bangor. 
Holmes ft Holllaton. 218 Elm, W. Somervllle. 
Hodglnl, Daisy, Ringllng Broa.'. C. R. 
Hoerleln, Lillian, 418 Strand. W. C. London. 
Hoffmans, Cycling. 8 North Clark, Chicago. 
Holmen Bros., 207 B. 14. N. Y. 
Holt, Alf. 41 Lisle London. W. E.. Eng. 
Horan, Eddie, 1553 Broadway. N. Y. 
Horton & La Trlska. Young's Pier. Atlantic City. 
Hotallng, Edward C, 557 So. Division, Grand 

Rapids. 
Howard, Sam, 87 Springfield, Newark. 
Howard, Harry ft Mae, Marice Baths, Hot Springs. 
Howard ft Co., L., 421 E. 137, N. Y. 
Howard ft Co., Bernlce, 3007 Calumet, Chicago. 
Howard ft Howard, Orphenm. Brooklyn. 
Howard, Ed.. 1020 E. Berks. Philadelphia. 
Howard ft St. Clair, Vaudeville Club, London. 
Howard ft Harris, Vaudeville Club, London. 
Howe. Laura, 298 Harvard. Brookline. 
Howell ft Scott, Moss ft Stoll Tour, Eng. 
Hoyt ft McDonald, National Hotel, Chicago. 
Hubbert, Laura, 4311 Calumet Ave., Chicago. 



Huegel ft Qulnn, 118 E. 24, Erie. 
Huehn, Musical, Celeron Pk., Jamestown. 
Hughes, Johnnie & Mazie, Orpbeum, Frisco. 
Hughes Musical Trio, 13, Orpbeum, Butte. 
Hughes, Johnnie, Theatre, Great Falls, Mont. 
Hughes, Mr. ft Mrs. Gene, 001 W. 135, N. Y 
Hulbert, Laura, O. II., Cannonaburg, Pa. 
Hurley, Musical, 152 Magnolia, Elizabeth. 
Hurst, Minola, Cardinal, Baael, Suisse, Ger. 
Hurwood, W. O., Lyric, Paris, Texas. 
Hyatt, Larry H., Lyric, Greenwood, S. C. 
Hyde, Rob ft Bertba, Camp Rest, Clifton, Me* 
Hylands, Three, 22 Cherry, Danbury. 



Ingram ft Hyatt, 1314 Edmondaon, Baltimore. 

Ingrama, Two, Box 823 Ames, la. 

Ioleen Sisters, Bijou, Kalamazoo; 14, Majestic, 

Battle Creek. 
Irving, Thomas R., Palm, Syracuse. 
Irving, Musical, 80 Boaton, Newark. 
Irving, Cliff W.. 303 W. 146. N. Y. 
Ivy ft Ivy, 2237 E. Second, Brooklyn. 



Jackson Family, Ringllng Broa., C. R. 

Jackson, Alfred, 225 Fifth Ave., N. Y. 

Jack, Tom, Trio, 1536 Broadway, N. Y. 

Jacobs ft Sardel, Cole Bros.' Shows, C. R. 

Jacobs, Theresa, 5616 Prairie, Chicago. 

Jacobs ft West, Ideal, Tltusville, Pa. 

James ft James, Cay forth, Columbus. 

James ft Prior, 912 Second Ave., Seattle. 

James, Byron, Bijou, Flint. 

Jenks ft Clifford Ringllng Bros., C. R. 

Jennings ft Jewell, 3302 Arlington, St. Louis. 

Jennings ft Renfrew, Keith's, Phlla. 

Jennings, Arthur, Majestic, Houston; 14, Majestic, 
GalveBton. 

Jerge, Aleene, ft Hamilton, 392 Massachusetts 
Ave., Buffalo. 

Johnson, R. Melvln, Johnson Hotel, Lafayette, Ind. 

Johnson, Carroll, San Francisco. 

Johnson, Musical. 377 Eighth Ave., N. Y. 

Johnson ft Pelbam, Moulin Rouge, Rio de Janeiro. 

Johnson Bros, ft Johnson, 635 Rayden, Camden. 

Johnson ft Wells, Orpbeum, Oakland. 

Johnstone, Lorlmer, Ontario Hotel, Chicago. 

Jones, Florrle, 221 W. 42. N. Y. 

Jones & Sutton, 224 W. 17, N. Y. 

Jones, John, 450 Sixth Ave., N. Y. 

Jordan, Brauneck ft Chullta, Cascade Pk., New- 
castle. 

Jordens, Five, 4803 Ashland, Chicago. 

Josselyn, Wm. II. ft E. B., Unlonville, Conn. 

Julian ft Dyer, 69 High, Detroit. 



Kalma ft La Farlon, 1337 E. Ill, N. E., Cleveland. 
Kalino. Cbas., ft Ada, Ringllng Bros., C. R. 
Karrell, The Magician, 112 Clark, Chicago. 
Kuufman Bros., 1553 Broadway, N. Y. 
Kuufman ft Sawtelle, 4815 Calumet, Chicago. 
Kuufman ft Kenllwortb, 32 W. 131, N. Y. 
Kaufman, Reba ft Inez, Foliea, Paris, France. 
Keane. J. Warren, Bijou, Winnipeg; 14, Bijou, 

Dulutb. 
Kcastl's Circus, 153 West 0, So. Boston. 
Rentes, John V., 70 W. 100. N. Y. 
Keeley, Lillian, 134 Wadsworth, E. Boston. 
Kreley ft Parks, Orpbeum, Mansfield. 
Relfer ft Chapman, 2435 S. 17. Phlla. 
Keith & De Mont. 722 W. 14 PI.. Chicago. 
Kelcey Sisters ft Billy Cummings, Kroadwav, 

Middle ton. 
Kelly, Harry. New York Roof, N. Y. 
Kelly, Walter C, Palace, London. 
Keller, Major, roll's. Waterbury. 
Keltners, Three. 317 Carlisle, Dallas. 
Kennedy ft Plltier, Family, Kane; 14. Lyric. 

Jamestown. N 
Kennedy ft Kennedy, 211 E. 14, N. Y. 
Reno. Joe, Globe, Boston. 
Kenton, Dorothy, Hnusa, Hamburg;, Orr, 
Klbney, Brlcknell ft Schroeder. Yarbor City, Tampa. 
Klefer ft Kline. 2001 Mulberry, Toledo. 
Kimball ft Donovan. 113 Northampton, Boston. 
King. Violet, Alhamhra, N. Y. 
Kiralfo, Gus, 710 Third Ave.. Evansvllle. 
Kirk. H. Arthur, Lillian, Arcade. Mlnot, No. Dak. 
Klovllle, Jack, 1553 Broadway, N. Y. 



Knight Bros, ft Sawtelle, Orpheum, Los Angeles. 
Knight, Harlan, Temple, Detroit. 
Kobers, Three, 66 13, Wheeling. 
Koppes, The. 215 E. 86. N. Y. 
Kohl, Gus ft Marion, 911 Fourth, Milwaukee. 
Kolb ft Miller, 928 Sixth Ave., Dayton, Ky. 
Kolfage, Duke, Crystal, Elk wood. 
Kooper, Harry J., Buster Brown Co. 
Krafft ft Myrtle, Academy, Charleston. 
Kramer, Bruno, 104 E. 14, N. Y. 
Kraton, John, 149 Schenectady, Brooklyn. 
Kratona, The, Empire, Birmingham, Eng. 
Kretore, Orpheum, Harrlsburg. 
Kretscbman, 1119% Broadway. Camden. 
Kurtls-Busse & Dogs, Pantages', Seattle. 
Kyasyss, The, C. O. Performer, London, Eng. 
Kyle, Tom E., Gourney, Vaud., Owen Sound, Out., 
Kyle ft Co., Ingram O. H., Klttannlng, Pa. 



Lacey, Will, 629 Que., N. W., Wash., D. C. 
Lakola ft Lorain, Palace Hotel, Chicago. 
Lamblottes, The, Mt. Vernon, O. 
Lamb's Manikins, Empire, Milwaukee. 
I.ampe Bros., 1553 Brosdway, N. Y. 
Lampe, Otto W., Washburn's Circus, C. R. 
Lane, Eddie, 300 E. 73, N. Y. 
Lane ft Adell, 332 Genesee, Rochester. 
Lane ft O'Donnell, Theatre, Orange. 
Langdons, The, 110 E. 14, N. Y. 
La Blanche, Great, 723 Third, Baltimore. 
La Centra ft La Rue, 2461 Second Ave, N. Y. 
La Estrelllta. 1553 Broadway, N. Y. 
La Fayette, Lamont Co., 2909 Cormany. Cincinnati. 
La Marr, Harry, Wm. Tell House, Boston. 
La Moines, Musical, 332 Fifth, Baraboo, Wis. 
Iji Pearl, Harry, Barnum ft Bailey. C. R. 
La Ports, Aerial, Hotel Hurley, Pbila. 
La Rose Bros., 107 E. 31. N. Y. 
La Tina, Mile., 4001 Brooklyn Ave., Kansas City. 
I*a Toska, Phil, Pantages', San Francisco. 
1m Tour, Irene, 78 Burnet, Newark. 
La Toy Bros.. Van Buren Hotel, Chicago. 
La Velle ft Grant, 14. Thentre, Beddeford, Me. 
Lamb's Manikins, 1553 Broadway, N. Y. 
I^avall Sisters, 143 Golden Gate, San Francisco. 
Lnndln. Edward. Majestic, Little Rock. 
Lang. George. Crystal, Bedford, Ind. 
Lansford. Jeanne. 401 Klngsland, W. Nutley. 
I* Van ft La Vnlette. Majestic. Pittsburg, 
i La Rex, Wonderful. Clara Turner Stock Co. 
Lanet ft Ardell, .'{32 Genesee, Rochester. 
Lawrence & Healey. Sherman House, Chicago. 
Lawrence & Dale. 2 New Castle Court, Boston. 
La Fleur. Joe, 57 Hanover. Providence. 
La Ford, Cbas.. St. Charles Hotel, Muncle. 
La Gray, Dollle, Bijou. Racine. 
Le Hlrt, Mons., 700 Clifford. Rochester. 
La Lole. Ilelene. Grand. Portland. 
Ln Mnr & Gabriel. Hotel Norniandle, N. Y. 
I<a Raub & Scot tie. 3.13 I-ocnst St., Johnstown. 
Le Roy, Clias., Alrdome. Ottawa, Kan. 




Folly Theatre, 
Olympic " 
Star 

Oayety " 
Newark " 
Qayety " 



Brooklyn 

M 



44 



44 



Newark 
Pittsburg 



Star & Garter Theatre, Chicago 



EX 



TEMPLE BAR BUILDING, 
BROOKLYN, H. T. 






Le Roy, The Great, Colonial, Erie; 14, Lyceum, 
Meadvllle. 

La Vine. Clmeron Trio, Eastcbester Rd. ft Rhine- 
lander Ave., N. Y. 

Le Clair, Harry, Bell, Oakland. 

I* Clair ft West. Riverside Pk., Ashevllle. 

Le'Clalra, Two, Poll's, Merlden; 14, Poll's, New 
Haven. \ 

Le Dent. Frank, Orphenm, Portland. 

I* Fevre ft St. John, 1553 Broadway, N. Y. 

I*e. Sallle. 025 Eighth Ave., N. Y. 

La Zar ft La Zar. 168 Dearborn Ave., Chicago. 

Le Witt ft Aabmore Co., 296 No. State, Chicago. 

licahy Bros., De Rue Bros.' Mlnatrela. 

Leathers, Gladys, Novelty, Fresno. 

Leigh, Lisle, i4o Arnold, River Side, R. I. 

Leigh, Grace. New York Roof. N. Y. 

I.clghtons. Three, Orpheum, Seattle. 

Lee. James P., Cnlque. Los Angeles. 

I*eech, Al. ft Rosebuds, Alhambra, N. Y. 

Ix>eds ft Iji Mar, 1553 Broadway, N. Y. 



COPY THIS FOR YOUR ROUTE BOOK 
and PASTE IT IN YOUR HAT 

PHIL HUNT 

NOW in 

L JOE WOOD S OFFICE 

Room 416, Long Acre Building, New YorK 

New York Representative HOWARD ATHENJEUM, Boston, Mass. 

BOWDOIN SQUARE THEATRE, Boston, Mass. 
ORPHEUM THEATRE, Brockton, Mass. 
BELMONT AMUSEMENT CO. THEATRES 





"When annxecring advertinemrnti kindly mention Variety. 



20 



VARIETY 



In Vaudeville under direction of PAT CASEY 




Br Rind permission Messrs. HLAW ®. ERLANGER and FLO ZIEGFELD, Jr. 

WeeK June 7, Shea's, Toronto 






NITTY NOTES 




• 




"LET'S GET THE 
UMPIRE'S COAT" 



The udi«0M cry for it lik* bablea do for 
Mtl. Winalow's Soothing Syrap. 

IT CERTAINLY IS THESE 

The best "Ball Boor" we ere* wnte If 
you want a Ball loaf get a ltOt model. 
Don't go oadilaolng aronnd In on* of those 
aid time runabout*. GRAB A REGTJLAR. 
This is it. We require no answer. 

Tw, aad "HARVEST MOON" also. 

Published by REMICK 

"We're glad we're married." 



Lena, LUy, 14, Orpbeum Butte. 
Leonard A PblUlpo, 701 W. Erie, Chicago. 
Leonard, Grace, St. Paul Hotel, N. T. 
Leonard A Drake. 1000 Park PI., Brooklyn. 
Laonard, Gas, Majestic, Dallas; 14, Majestic, 

Horns ton. 
Leonard, Edward, 1122 Green, Pblla. 
Leonard A Louie, 810 No. Park Are., Cblcago. 
Leo, Arthur. 1688 Blchland, Baltimore. 
Leo, Jolly, 736 Carmen, Camden. 
Leslie, George W.. 180 W. 44, N. T. 
Leslie, Bert, K. A P. Oth Are.. N. Y.; 14, Poll's, 

Buffalo. 
Lester, Nina, Scenic, Woonsocket; 14, Olympic. So. 

Boston. 
Levitt A Falls, 716 Orange. Syracuse. 
Lewis, Phil J., 121 W. 116, N. Y. 
Lewis, Phil, 121 W. 118, N. Y. 
Lewis A Young, 265 B. 78. N. Y. 
Lewis Walter A Co., 877 Washington, Brookllne. 
Lewis, Harr A Co., 131 W. 16, N. Y. 
Lewis A Lake, 2411 Norton, Kansas City. 
Lewis A Manson, 74 Orchard, N. Y. 
Lindsay, Stilling A Wllber, Pointer's Cafe, San 

Francisco. 
Link, Harry F., 170 Altbea, Providence. 
Linton Tom, A Jungle Girls, Stone's, Flint. 
Lisla A Adams, Gem, Meridian. 
Livingston, Murray, 830 B. 163, N. Y. 
Livingston, David A Co., Cambridge Hotel, 

Cblcago. 
Livingston Comedy Trio, Rlngllng Bros.', C. R. 
Lockwood A Bryson, 2 Lankersbelm Bldg., Los 

Angeles. 
Lockwoods, Musical, 1S36 Broadway, N. Y. 
Logan, Bruce, 80 No. State, Chicago. 



M. 9TRAS9/VIAN 

Attorney, Ml Broadway, Wew York, 
Theatrical CQalaa. 



Lobse A Sterling, 39% Lowell, Rochester. 

Lois, 1636 Broadway, N. Y. 

Lloyd, Herbert. 36 Great Wilson, Leeds, Bag. 

Long, John, Family, Erie. 

Loralne, Oscar, 124 Tuznell Pk. Rd., London. 

Lublns, Dancing, 021 North Warnock, Phila. 

Luce A Luce, Orpbeum, Altoona. 

Lacier, Marguerite. Hans A Nlxe Co. 

Luclers. Four Musical, Box 55, Onset, Mans. 

Lundy A Wilde. 222 West 141, N. Y. 

Lynne A Hazard, Grand, Missoula. 

Lynotte Sisters, 352 State, Cblcago. 

Luttringer Lucas Co., 586 Valencia, Frisco. 



Mab, Queen, A Mr. Weiss, Lit. Bldg., Pblla. 

Mack A Phelps, Green Room Club, N. Y. 

Mack Boys, Those, Theatre, Hutchinson. 

MacDonald, Cbas. A Sadie, 18 W. 100, N. Y 

MacDonough Etbel, London Pavlllion, London. 

Magnanls, The, 884 Union, N. Y. 

Makhow, Geo. F., Empire, Milwaukee. 

Mallla A Bart, 123 Kensington Rd., London. 

Maltese, Frank A Co., 288 W. 147, N. Y. 

Mandel, Eva, 206 State, Chicago. 

Mauley A Sterling, 111 Schiller Bldg., Chicago. 

Manning Sisters, 67 So. Clark, Chicago. 

Mantell'a Marionettes, 3413 So. Colby Are., 
Everett, Wash. 

Manning A Dixon, 41 W. 117. N. Y. 

Manning A Ford, Electric Pk., Kanaaa City. 

Marchl A Raab, 230 Franklin, Johnstown. 

Marcbands, The, 160 E. 88, N. Y. 

Marcus, Harold M. 113 W. 114, N. Y. 

Mardo Trio, Rlngllng Bros., C. B. 

Mardo A Hunter, Bijou, Phila. 

Marlowe, Plunkett A Weston, Gordon Pk., Cincin- 
nati; 14, Hippodrome, Lexington. 

Marlon A Lillian, 1536 Broadway, N. Y. 

Mario Trio, West End Pk., New Orleans. 

Marsh, Joe. 244 E. Ohio, Cblcago. 

Marshall Bros.. 335 Plymouth, Abingdon, Mass. 

Marshall A King, Folios, Mexico City. 

Marsh alls. The, Orpheum, Oswego. 

Martells, Two, 141 Mi Third, Potland. 

Martha, Mile.. 258 W. 26, N. Y. 

Martin A Crouch. 007 S. 12, Springfield, 111. 

Martlnei A Martinez. Boom 30, Walker Theatre 
Bldg., Los Angeles. 

Marvin Bros., Electric, Fairmont, W. Va. 

Mathiesen, Walter, 80 W. Ohio, Cblcago. 

Mason A Doran, Bijou. New London. 

Manrer, Francis A Borys, 1301 Great Northern 
Bldg., Cblcago. 

Maurice A Perrln Co.. 113 Chestnut, St. Louis. 

Marvelous, Ed., 627 Cass, .Toilet. 

Marzello A Wolfe, 125 Camden, Newark. 

Max A Schef tells. 420 15, Columbus. 

Maxim's Models, White City, Chicago. 

Maxwell A Dudley, 106 W. 08, N. Y. 

Maj fairs, The. 2028 Frankfort, Phila. 

Mayhew, Stella, Room 8, 418 Strand, W. C, Lon- 
don. 

Maynard, Clarice, Proctor's, Newark; 14, Keith's, 

Mase, Edna, 087 Jackson, N. Y. 

McConnell A Simpson, Proctor's, Newark; 14, 
Keith's Pblla. 

McCann, Geraldlne A Co.. 706 Park, Johnstown. 

McCaskey & Howell, 806 Philip, Missoula, Mont. 

McCauley, Joe, Gayety, South Cblcago. 

McDowell, John A Alice, Lafayette, Detroit. 

McGregor, Lulu, Grand. Altoona, Pa. 

McCune A Grant, 636 Benton, Pittsburg. 

McCree, Davenport Troupe, Rlngllng Bros., O. R. 

McGee, Jos. B.. Geo. Van's Minstrels. 

McGrath A Paige, 58 Washington, Mlddletown. 

McGrath A Yeoman. Hacel Pk., Haielton. 

McKay A Cantwell, Keith's, Boston; 14, K. A P. 
6th Ave., N. Y. 



Facts Beat Arguments 

And the fact that the BAL FIBRE TRUNK Is much lighter than any of the heavy, old-fashioned, 
canvas-covered wood trunks is something that any scale will prove; and tbe fact that they are also far 
stronger and more serviceable, all traveling salesmen who use thorn exclusively, will prove. These 
men, who are tbe bardeat users of trunks on earth, passed up the wood trunk as not tbe goods yeara ago. 

IS THE BEST TOO GOOD FOR YOU ? 

WILLIAM BAL. Inc. 



D FOB CATALOGUE Y. 



BUILDERS 07 



210 West 42nd Street, Ntw Ttrk 



TlAl kmam 

jLHl/Tma 

instobrino advertise* 



McNutt Kopeland Troupe, O. H., Tonawanda. N. Y. 

McPbee A Hill, 311 3d Ave., N. Y. 

McVeigh, Grace, 745 Amsterdam, N. Y. 

Meecker, J. Matt. 1553 Broadway, N. Y. 

Mells, The, Rlngllng Bros.' C. R. 

Melnotte Twins A Clay Smith, Orpbeum, Los 

Angeles. 
Melrose Bros., 133 Park, Bridgeport. 
Melrose, Elmer, 1415 Pennsylvania, Allegheny. 
Melville, George D., Hippo., N. Y. 
Mendel, 18 Adam, Strand, London. 
Menetkel, 104 E. 14, N. Y. 
Merkel, Louis, 200 Summit, West Hoboken. 
Merrltt, Raymond, 178 Tremont, Pasadena. 
Merta A O'Neill, 880 Walnut, Chicago. 
Metbren Sisters, 18, Arcade, Toledo. 
Miacos A Fundland, 780 Eighth Ave., N. Y. 
Mignon, Helene, 129 E. 14, St. Paul. 
Mlddleton, Gladys, 530 Drury, Kansas City. 
Milch Sisters, 10 W. 10, St. Paul. 
Miller A Princeton, 88 Olney, Providence. 
Miller, Grace, Phillip's, Richmond, Ind. 
Millers, The, Fairyland, Bristol, Tenn. 
Miller, Harry, Majestic, Galveston. 
Miller, Theresa, Criterion, Cblcago. 
Miller, Frank, Daman Shows. 
Mlllette, Rlngllng Bros., C. R. 
Millman Trio, K. A P. 5th Ave.. N. Y.; 14, 

Brighton Beach, N. Y. 
Miles A Dewey, 48 Howard, Boston. 
Milmars A Baby, June, A. Y. P. Exposition, 

Seattle. 
Mills A Moulton, 58 Race, Buffalo. 
Milton, Chas. W., 1301 Gwlnette, Augusta. 
Milton A Co., Lola, Van Buren Hotel, Chicago. 
Mitchell A Grant, Box 188, Townsend, Mass. 
Mimic Four, 350 W. 42, N. Y. 
Minstrel Four, Jefferson, Portland. 
Monetta Five, 42 G. O. H. Bldg., Cblcago. 
Montague, Mona, 2050 TIrain, Denver. 
Montgomery, A. R., A Healey Sisters, 2818 W. 

17, Coney Island, N. Y 
Montgomery, Geo. P., Hot Springs. 
Montambo A Bartelll, 35 Field, Waterbury. 
Montrase, Edith A.. 150 W. 44, N. Y. 
Montray. Edward. 814 Western, N. S., Pittsburg. 
Mooney A Holbein, 1553 Broadway, N. Y. 
Moore A Young, Colonial, Richmond. 
Moore. Lou W., Sells-Floto Shows, C. R. 
Morgan A McGarry. Forrest Pk., Chicago; 14, 

Ingersoll Pk., Des Moines. 
Moreland, Chas., 734% Central, Hot Springs* 



FRANK M0RRELL 

"The California Baby" 

Weeks June 7 and 14, 5th Are., New York, 



Morris, Billy A Sherwood Sisters, 508 Pontlac, 

Dayton. 
Morris A Daly, 54 Harmon, Jersey City. 
Morris, Billy, 508 Pontlac, Dayton. 
Mortlock, Alice, Majestic, Houston; 14, Majestic, 

Galveston. 
Morton A Elliott, Moss A Stoll Tour. 
Morton, Hugh, Mocart, Elmlra. 
Moto Girl, Empire, Hull, Eng. 
Mowatts, Juggling, Thalia, Elberfeld, Germany. 
Moy, Hazel A., 1117 7, 8Ioux City. 
Mozarts, Tbe, 1653 Broadway, N. Y. 
Mulligan, May, 120 D. 13, Covington. 
Mulvey, Ben L., 287 Richmond, Providence. 
Murray, Eddie, Fisher's, Los Angeles. 
Murray Sisters, Shea's, Buffalo. 
Murray. Elisabeth M., 13, Orpbeum, Frisco. 
Murray A Mack, G. O. H., Los Angeles. 
Murray A Alvln, Great Alblnl Co. 
Murphy A Wllllard. Falrhaven, N. J. 
Murphy A Drexel, 410 S. Broad, Pblla. 
My Fancy, 12 Adam, Strand, London. 
Myers A Rosa, Pearl River, N. Y. 
Mylle A Ortb, 1553 Broadway, N. Y. 



Nambus Four, Gollna Bros., C. R. 

Nealon A Titus, 611 Brown, Pblla. 

Neff A Starr, Majestic, Dallas; 14, Majestic, 

Houston. 
Newton, Billy S.. 1653 Broadway, N. Y. 
Nichols, Four, 610 Deuber, Canton. 
Noble, Billy A Jeanne Brooks, Saratoga Hotel, 

Chicago. 
Nlblo, Victor, Empire, Mlddleeborougb, Eng. 
Nickel. Earl, 846 E. 40, Cblcago. 
Nlrro A Le Roy, 1325 Page, Allegheny. 



Will Marion Cook 

THE ORIGINATOR. 

Former acts— "Clorindy and Memphis Stu- 
dents." 

New acts — Original, Sensational, Melodious. 

"ROSE LAND" 

Negro Sketch — 88 People. 

"HAWAIIAN ROMANCE" 

Musical Drama of the South Sea Islands, 

AB6Y MITCHELL 



IV COOK SONGS, 



NIW YORK CHICAGO 

IS* West 37th Street 67 ClarM Street 



Noblette A Marshall, 1012 Hempvllle, Ft. Worth. 
Nonette, 154 Henry, Brooklyn. 
Normans Juggling, Orpheum, Lot Angeles. 
Norton A Lawrence, Gayety, Indianapolis. 
Norton A La Ttlska, Young's Pier, Atlantic City. 
Norton, C. Porter, 6842 Klmbark, Chicago. 
Norrls, Leon, A Co., 68 W. 7. Mt. Vernon. 
Norrlses, Tbe, 517 Walnut, Hamilton. 
Norton, Mina. Dime. Walla Walla, Wash. 
Nooses, The Six, 165 W. 46, N. Y. 
Nugent, Wm. F.. 11 W. 118, N. Y. 
Nugent, J. C, Tbe Oaks, Canal Dover 



O'Brien. John J., Unique, Philadelphia. 
O'Dell A Hart, 2063 Stroud, Green Lake, Wash. 
Odell A GUmore, 370 W. Monroe, Chicago. 
Odell A Klnley. 3405 Col ling wood Ave., Toledo. 
Ogden, Helen, 270 Cly bourn, Cblcago. 
Okabe Family, 20 Charing Cross Rd., London. 
Olbons, Four, 26 Hamburg. Paterson. 
Omega Trio, White City Pk., BInghamton. 
Onlaw, Gus, Room 8, 418 Strand. London. 
Onken. Al, Tbe Chutes, San Francisco. 
O'Neill, Emma, Saratoga Hotel, Chicago. 
O'Neill, W. A.. Orpbeum, Oakland. 
O'Neill Trio, Celeron Pk., Jamestown; 14, Walde- 

mere Pk., Erie. 
Olivette Troubadours, O. H., Pittsburg; 14, Keith's 

Phila. 
Opp, Joe, 1530 Broadway, N. Y. 
Orbassany, Irma. Altkenbead Rd., Glasgow. 8cot. 
Orletta A Taylor, Bergen Ave., Rldgefield Pk. 
O'Rourke. Eugene, & Co., 1220 Tlnton. N. Y. 
Orpheus Comedy Four, Empire, Denver. 
Ortmann Trio, Clrco Bell, Mexico City. 
Otto Bros., Hippodrome, Birmingham, Eng. 
Overlng Trio, 140 W. 144. N. Y. 
Owen A Co., Garry, Alrdome, Chattanooga; 14, 

Airdome, Charlotte. 
Owens, Billy A May, 1421 Adams. N. S., Pittsburg. 
Owerr A Hoffman, Bijou, Mason City; 14, Bijou, 

La Crosse. 
Ozays, Tbe, Kinsley. Kenmore, N. Y. 



Pacbeo Family, Rlngllng Bros., C. R. 

Palmer A Lewis, 233 Tremont, Boston. 

Palmer Sisters, 545 Hsrt, Brooklyn. 

Pamahaslke, Prof.. 1037 E. Dauphin, Pblla. 

Parker, Palmer A Co., Pickett Casino, Montgomery. 

Parker A Sbaw, 187 Hopkln's, Brooklyn. 

Peterson's Bronze Studios, 610 Lark In, Frisco. 

Pattens. The Three, Star, Mgneasen, Pa. 

Pearce Sisters, 725 Lane, Sd&grle. 

Pepper Twins, Llndssy. Ont., Can. 

Pearson A Garfield, 229 W. 88, N. Y. 

Peck, Roy. Vogel's Minstrels. 

Pederson Bros., 635 Greenbusb, Milwaukee. 

Pelot, Fred A Annie, 161 Westminster, Atlantic 

City. 
Perry, Frank L., 747 Buchanan, Minneapolis. 



When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



VARIETY 



21 



SULLIVAN, PASQUELENA S CO. 



<■ 



PRESENTING 

A CO. D. Package 



it 



MEETING WITH TREMENDOUS SUCCESS ON THE ORPHEUM CIRCUIT. WILL CLOSE OUR SEASON AT DETROIT WEEK JULY 5. 

THEN TO OUR BUMMER HOME AT LAKE GEORGE, N. T. 



OPEN SEASON 1909-1910 at WASHINGTON, D. C. AUG. 23 



EDW. S. K 



, Representative 




EDWARD DOYLE 

Manager "The Orpheum Stock Co." aaya: 
"Lonr Live the Taylor Trunk." 
"WHY!" 

Write for our Now Professional Cata- 
logue— FREE. 

C. A. TAYLOR TRUNK WORKS 
CHICAGO i 37 E. Randolph St. 
NEW YORK: 131 W. 38th St. J 

Pertina, 44 Cartwrlgbt Garden, Eaiton Rd.,. Lon- 
don. 

Peters, Pbll A Nettie, 1563 Broadway. N. Y. 

Fetching Bros., 16 Packard, Lymanavllle, B. I. 

Phillppo Sisters, 140 W. 86, N. Y. 

Phillips A Bergen, 373 Charles, Boston. 

Phillips, Mondame, Bijou, Huron, S. D. 

Phillips, Samuel P., 316 Classon, Brooklyn. 

Piccolo Midgets, Box 23, Phoenica, N. Y. 

Pike A Cslame. 973 Amsterdam, N. Y. 

Pinard A Manny, 270 So. Fifth, Brooklyn. 

Pllcer, Harry, Princess, Chicago. 

Plamondons, Two, 1114 Qulncy, Topeka. 

Plunkett A Rltter, 816 Main, W. Ererett. 

Polk A Polk, 325 W. 21, N. Y. 

Pope, J. C, A Dog, 240 Franklin, Phila. 

Potter A Harris, 701 Leland, Chicago. 

Ports, Ernie A Mildred, Camp Potts, Bush Lake, 
Minn. 

Powell, Eddie, 2314 Chelsea, Kansas City. 

Powers Trio, 6 Washington, Somerrllle. 

Powers' Elepbsnts, Danisn Shows. 

Price, Rob, Star land, Montreal. 

Probssco, 420 Monroe, Rochester. 

Prosit Trio, Rlngling Bros., C. R. 

Pry or, Billy, 63 Dsrt mouth, Boston. 

Puces, Jolly, 10 Porter, Boston. 

Pucks, Two, 166 B. 80, N. Y. 



POWERS BROS. 

nr a nsK story. x 



Quigg A Nlckerson, Pontages', San Jose. 

Qulllln, L., Germsn Village, Columbus. 

Quinn A Mitchell, 20 Bay 26, Bensonhurst, L. I. 



Racketts, Two, 2000 Eighth Are., N. Y. 
Radford A Valentine, Vaudeville Club, London. 
Rae A Brosche, 13, Washington, Spokane. 
Rainbow Sisters, 840 14, Ssn Francisco. 
Ramsey Sisters, Star, Seattle. 
Rsnkln A Leslie. 413 W. 30. N. Y. 
Rstelles, The, 687 Letorneaux, Montreal. 
Raymond A Harper, Wigwam, Martinsville. Ind. 
Raymond A Hall, Orpheuin. San Francisco. 
Raymond, Clara. 141 Lawrence, Brooklyn. 
RaymundeH, The Throe. Mattoon, 111. 
Rector, Harrv, Clrco Trevlno. Monterey, Mer. 
Red Eagle, Room 8. 418 Strand. W. C, London. 
Redding, Francesca, A Co.. 204 W. 133, N. Y. 
Reod & Earl, Princess, Lorain, O.; 14, Arcade, 

Toledo. 
Reed & St. John. 454 Manhattan. N. Y. 
Reeves, MUle. N. Y. Theatre Roof, N. Y. 
Relck A Howard, 123 Greenwich, N. Y. 
Reid Sisters. 45 Broad, Elizabeth. 
Rlesner A (lores, 128 Roanoke, San Francisco. 
Rellly, Frank. 927 Communlpaw, Jersey City. 
Remington. Mayme, Hotel Gerard, N. Y. 
Renshaw, Rert. Majestic, Sioux Falls. 
Reynolds. Walter, Unique, Phila. 
Rex Comedy Circus, Hippodrome, N. Y. 



RICE f CADY 

West End Heights, St. Louii. 



Rice, Frsnk A True, 5004 Harvard. Osk Pk., 111. 
Rice, Willy, Rlngling -Bros., C. R. 



Rickrode, Harry B., Pantsges' Theatre Bldg., 
Seattle. 

Rich Duo, 660 No. Western, Chicago. 

Rich A Howard, 311 W. 13, N. Y. 

Richard Bros., Empire, Portland. 

Richarda, Great, Meyer's Lake Pk., Canton: 14, 
Rock Sq. Pk., E. Liverpool. 

Richards, Wm., Dlngman's Ferry, Pa. 

Richards A Montrose, 450 So. First Ave., Mt. 
Vernon. 

Richards A Grover, Wigwam, San Francisco. 

Richardson, John S., 18 Grauyer PI., Buffalo. 

Rlchardsons, The, Bush Temple, Chicago. 

Richmond, Bob, 374 Central Pk. W., N. Y. 

Riley A Abern, 831 W. Hancock, Detroit. 

Rlngling, Adolph, Buffalo Bill, C. R. 

Ripp, Jack, Clark's Alrdome, Jacksonville. 

Ritchie, Gertie, 297 Walnut, Buffalo. 

Rltter A Foster, Pavilion, Glasgow, Scot.; 14, Em- 
pire, Oldham, Eng. 

Rivers, A Rochester, 249 W. 23, N. Y. 

Roads A Engel, 223a Chauncey, Brooklyn. 

Roattino A Stevens, 114 E. 11, N. Y. 

Roberts, C. E., A Rats, Psntages', Tacoma. 

Roberts Children, 320 Point, Providence. 

Robisch A Childress, Lakeside Pk., Dayton; 14, 
Collins Garden, Columbus. 

Robledlllo, Mlgerd, Rlngling Bros., C. R. 

Uockway A Conway, Fountain Ferry Pk., Louis- 
ville; 13, East End Pk., Memphis. 

Bobbins A Trenaman, Elite, Atlanta. 

Robinson A Grant, 408 James, Utica. 

Robinson, Alice, 407 Orchard, Chicago. 

Roberts Family, 320 Point, Providence. 

Roberts, Signs, 619 23, Merced. 

Roltare, Chas., 215 W 23, N. Y. 

Romaln, Manuel, A Co., 12 Seattle, Boston. 

Romsin, Julia, Airdome, Alton; 14, Lyric, B. St. 
Louis. 

Romanoffs, The, Grand, Nashville. 

Ronaldos, Three, R. D. 0, Stark, Mich. 

Roode, Claude M., Sells-Floto, C. R. 

Roof, Jsck A Clara, 700 Green, Phila. 

Rose, Elmer A., 218 Polllam, Atlanta. 

Rose, Julian, 17 Green, Leicester Sq., London. 

Ross A Lewis, Touring South Africa. 

Ross Sisters, 60 Comberford, Providence. 

Ross, Eddie G., Hillsdale, Mich. 

Rose, Adele, 242 W. 48, N. Y. 

Rosenthal, Don Harold, 210 W. First, Oswego. 

Rosey, C. W., Fsirvlew Pk., Dayton. 

Rossi, Alfredo, Buffalo Bill, C. R. 

Rossleys, The, 1003 Broadway, N. Y. 

Rowland, 400 Sixth Ave., N. Y. 

Rowley, Sam, Bijou, La Crosse. 

Boy si Doll Princess, 162 W. 86, N. Y. 

Royal Musical Five, 249' So. Ninth, Brooklyn. 

Roy, Rob, Polk Alley, Elisabeth, Pa. 

Russell Bros., Elmhurst, L. I. 

Russell A Davis. Idle Honr, Atlanta. 

Russell A Church, Majestic, Kalamasoo; 14, 
Bijou, Battle Creek. 

Russell, Bertha Noes. 172 W. 77, N. Y. 

Russell, Tenle, 102 W. 27, N. Y. 

Russell, Jessie A Co., 017 So. Seventh, 8t. Louis. 

Rutledge A Pickering, 133 W. 40. N. Y. 

Ryan A Rltch field, Box 36, Sayvllle, L. I. 



8 

Sable, Josephine, Folies Marlgny, Paris, Frsnce. 
Salmo. Juno, May, Albambra, Paris, Frsnce. 
Salvail, Saratoga Hotel, Chicago. 
Sandberg A Lee, 711 Orchard, Chicago. 
Sanders Troupe 309 E. 14, New York. 
Sampson, Harry, 5411 Addison, W. Phila. 
Samuels A Chester, Box 110, Melrose Pk., 111. 
Sanford A Darlington, 2422 So. Adler, Phila. 
Sanford, Jere, Majestic, Butte; 13, Washington, 

Spokane. 
Santell, Great. Oxford Hotel. Chicago. 
Schuster A Cole, Majestic, HirmlE)gham. 
SeiiTH, Gladys. Reck Springs, Liverpool, O. 
Senrab, Billy, & Mae, Cairo, Mich. 
SveiiKalo, Original, Watertown, N. Y. 
Shannons, Four, Saratoga Hotel, Chicago. 
Sharp & Sharp, 201) E. 13, N. Y. 
Shcdmun's Dogs. Luna Pk., Scranton. 
Shaw A Shaw, O. II.. Kastport, Mo. 
Sheer A Burton. 212 Woodward Ave., Detroit. 
Sherlock A Van Dalle. 514 W. 135. N. Y. 
Sherman & Itlce, 440 W. 31. N. Y. 
Sehnch A McVeigh. 745 Amsterdam, N. Y. 
Scharr. Wheeler Trio, 8130 Commercial Ave.. 

Chicago. 
Shefels. Male. 1018 Third. Appleton, Wis. 
Slddcns A Karle. 028 Main, Phila. 
Sllva A Sllva, 215 W. 38. N. Y. 
Slneay's I)o«s A Cats, Folies, Mexico City. 
Slrlgnmo'a Banda Roma. 11 E. 110, N. Y. 
Schrode. Billy. New York Roof, N. Y. 
Schuster, Milton. Palace. Boston. 
Scott, Edward, Grand. Reno. 
Scott A Wright. 530 W. 122, N. Y. 
Seamon. Chas. F., Keith's, Cleveland; 14, Colonial, 

N. Y. 
Senion Duo. The. Grand, Hamilton. O. 
Seurah, Billy A Mae, Orpheuin, Virginia, Minn. 
Seymour A Nestor. 501 W. 17<t. N. Y. 
Shannon, Harry, Ludlngton, Mich. 
Sharp A Sharp, 200 E. 13. N. Y. 
Sherry, Joseph V.. Sparks' Show, C. R. 
Shlhart, Anson, Crystal. Detroit. 
Sllveno A Co.. 2029 Liberty. Ogden, Utah. 
Simpson, Cora. 718 No. Maine, Scranton. 
Simpson, Cheridah. Orpheum, San Francisco. 
Slneay's Dogs A Cots. Folies, Mexico City. 
Slater A Finch, Trousdale Bros.' Minstrels. 
Smlrl A Kessner, 438 W. 104, N. Y. 



Smith A Heagney. 272 So. 11, Newark. 

Smith A Brown, 1324 St. John, Toledo. 

Smith, Al, 123 Irving, Brooklyn. 

Smith A McNamara, 49 No. Englewood, Phils. 

Smiths, Aerial. Rlngling Bros.. C. R. 

Somers A Wible, Box 24, Colllngswood, N. J. 

Soper, Bert. Stor, Altoona. 

Spsuldiug A Dupree, Box 285, Osslnlng. 

Sperry A Dogs, 8 W. 7, Jamestown. 

Spissel Bros. A Mack, Pavilion, Glasgow, 8cot. 

Springer, Jack, Fairyland, Bristol. 

Stadium Trio, Novelty, Vsllejo. 

Starr, Mabelle, Banning'!, Belfontslne, O. 

Stautons, The, Electric Pk., Pen Argyl, Pa. 

St. Alva. Addle, 205 E. 100, N. Y. 

St. Clair, Anne, 2910 Armour, Chicago. 

St. Leon Family, Luna Villa, Coney Island, N. Y. 

Stafford, Alice, 218 W. 80, N. Y. 

Stafford, Frank, Stone, Marie, Keith's, Boston; 14, 
K. A P. 0th Ave., N. Y. 

8tsnhope, Paul A., 407 W. 123, N. Y. 

Stsnley A Wathon. 240 W. 38, N. Y. 

Stanley, Mae B., O. H., Douglas, Alssks. 

Stanley A Co., Harry, 1008 Broadwsy, N. Y. 

Stsrr A Goldin, 126 W. 110, N. Y. 

Stead, Wslter, 105 Prospect, Cambridge. 

Bteeley A Edwards, 698 8 Ave., N. Y. 

Stelnert, Thomas, Trio, 469 Lenox, N. Y. 

Stephenson, Chas., 2 Sumach, Toronto. 

Sternad's Shop Girls, Msjestlc, Galveston. 

Stewart, Cal, Wigwsm, Frisco. 

Stewsrt, Harry M., 160 Schaeffer, Brooklyn. 

8tevens A Washburn, Eureka, Lethbrldge, Can. 

Stevens, Psul, 823 W. 28, N. Y. 

Stevens, Kitty, 182 Lincoln, Chicago. 

Stlrk A London, Highland Pk., York. 

Stoddards, The, 317 Klrkpstrick, Syrscuse. 

Stone, Betb, 111 W. 104, N. Y. 

Strlcklsnd, Rube, Cascsde Pk., Newcastle; 13, 
Idora Pk., Yonngstown. 

Stusrt. Dorothy. Hotel St. Psul, N. Y. 

Stosrt, J. Francis, 2448 Martin, Phila. 

Stusrt A Keeley, 822 College, Indianspolls. 

Stuhblefleld Trio, 164 B. Randolpb, Chicago. N 

Stutsman A Msy, 1003 Broadway, N. Y. 

Sugimoto Jspanese Troupe, Electric Pk., Balti- 
more. 

Sullivan Bros., Four, So. Hlgb, Mil f red, Mass. 

Sullivan, Pssquelena A Co., Orpheum, Portland, 
Ore. 

Sully A Phelps, O. H., Newport, N. H.; 14, O. H., 
Ludlow, Vt. 

Sully, Grsce, 394 B. 41, N. Y. 

Sundy A Wilde. 222 W. 141, N. Y. 

Sunny South Co., Orpheum, Oskland. 

Sntcllffe Troupe, 49 Againcourt Rd., London. 

Sutton A Sutton, Palace Hotel, Chicago. 

Swam A Bambsrd, 110 W. 96, N. Y. 

Swicksrds, The. 800 Bstbhurst, Toronto, Can. 

Sylow, H., Barn urn A Bailey, 0. R. 

Sy moods, Jack, Family, Fargo; 14, Arcade, Mlnot, 
N. D. 

Symphony Quartet, 1020 26, Washington. 



Tancan A Clayton, Island Pk., EaBton. 

Tangley, Pearl, Grand, Syracuse. 

Tannean, Julius, 252 W. 76, N. Y. 

Tasseman. Robt. B.. Star, Buffalo. 

Taylor, Viola, 236 Harrison, Boston. 

Taylor, Mae, Majestic, Galveston. 

Teed A Lazell, 4247 Lorain. Cleveland. 

Telegraph Four. Unique. Minneapolis. 

Temple Quartet, 14, Shea's, Buffalo. 

Templeton. Robert L.. Moss A Stoll Tour, London. 

Templeton. Paul Francis, 1420 10, Oakland. 



4 REAL HITS 4 

"Any Old Place In Yankee 

Land Is Good Enough for Ma" 

A oorkar for opening or cloning. 

"DOWN AMONG 7NE SUGAR 
CANE" 

The sweetest of sweet songs. 

"You're In The Right Church 

But The Wrong Pew" 

Still the season's sensational ooen seag*. 

"RED, RED ROSE" 

Real Song for Real Singsra. 

OOTHAM-ATTUCKS MUSIC CO. 

136 W. 37th Street New York 



Ten Eycks, The, Delhi, N. Y. 
Texas Comedy Four, Alrdome, Charlotte. 
Trolley Car Trio, 1142 Tunnell. Milwsukee. 
T rumble, Francis, Gerard Hotel, N. Y. 
Thardo, Claude, Majestic, Houston. 
Thomas, Norman, 304 Manhattan, N. Y. 
Thompson, Harry, 112 Covert, Brooklyn. 
Thompson Sisters, 334 E. 41, Cbicsgo. 
Thornton, Geo. A., 1003 Broadway, N. Y. 
Tleches, The, 114 B. Second, East Liverpool. 
Tierney A Odell, 1103 Broadwsy, N. Y. 
Till, John A Louise, 808 Salem, Maiden. 
Toledo, Sidney. Vaudeville, Vlncennes, Ind. 
Tompkins, Cbsrlotte J.. 2041 Lafayette Denver. 
Torcat A Flor, D'Allsa Clrcous Parish, Madrid, 

Spain. 
Towner Sisters, 26 Water, Bingbamton. 
Townsend, Charlotte A Co., 601 W. 130, N. Y. 
Tom Jack Trio, 102 E. 14, N. Y. 
Toms, Tumbling, 2760 Fulton, Brooklyn. 
Toons, Mile., P. O. Box 654, Denver. 
Tops. Topsy A Tops, 617 W. School, Cbicsgo. 
Touhey, Pat, Eaat Haddam, Conn. 
Toys, Musical, Peerless, Brsdford. 
Travers, Belle, Trocadero, Phils. 
Trebor, 466 Virginia, 8t. Paul. 
Tripp A Veiling, Rlngling Bros., C. R. 
Tscbernoff's Animals, Albsmbrs, N. Y. 
Thardo, Claude. 33 W. 05, N. Y. 
Thurston, Leslie, 80 Lexington Ave., N. Y. 
Tunis, Fay, Dragon Inn. Detroit. 
Turner, Bert. Airdome, Sioux City. 
Tweediey, John, 242 W. 43, N. Y 



Urma, Hetty, 104 E. 14, N. Y. 



Viigges. The, Barnum A Bailey, C. R. 
Valndons, Lea, 407 Thames, Newport. 



Wanted- "LID LIFTERS" 

(Eastern Wheel) 

BURLESQUE PEOPLE who can sing and act. COMEDIANS, TEAMS 
and CHORUS GIRLS. Address H. S. WOODHULL, 

Gayety Theatre Building, Broadway and 46th St. (Room 315), New York. 

Office Hours: 10 to 11 A. M. 

IN 

With his " RUBBERNECK WAGON** going bigger than ever. OPEN TO PRO- 
DUCE NEXT SEASON ORIGINAL BURLESQUE— something that is new and 
funny. BURLESQUE MANAGERS CONSIDER. 

WEEK MAY 31st, YOUNG'S PIER, ATLANTIC CITY. 





X5hQ EMPIRE THEATRICAL EXCHANGE 

SUITE 1026-7-8 KNICKERBOCKER THEATRE, BUILDING. NEW YORK 
SUITE 306-7-8 LOWNDES BUILDING. ATLANTA, GA. 

WE WANT VAUDEVILLE ACTS of all descriptions— DRAMATIC PEOPLE in all 

Lines, at all Times. Write, Phone, Wire, Call. 



Jos 



Kell 



Croat Novelty CycTiat Act. 



HENDFR80N S. CONEY ISLAND, WEEK MAT II. 



P, 



MANAGERS, IF YOU'RE IN TOWN, aee thie act. 



When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



22 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



RETURN 






>> 



Late Stars of "Tony the Bootblack 



a 

n 

d 



Genaro and Bailey's OWN fancy dancing has proven as big a bit as our original cake walk, introduced by us into vaudeville. 
We are now studying out offers received for next season. More anon (That's\ood enough to use; anybody can have it). 





ALF. T. WILTON, Exclusive Agent 



VaMar 4 Varno, Hagenbeck-Wsllsce, C. R. 
Valder's Pony Cyders, BeMle, Proctor's, Newark. 
Van, Billy, Orpheum, San Francisco. 
Van Boren * Close, 2200 W. 00, Clevelend. 
Van Eppes, Jack. 10 W. 64, N. Y. 
Vandergoold, Chsrlerol, Pa. 
Vardaman, Alhambra, Chicago, 
▼lsco, 41a Acre lane, London. Eng. 
Vaaco ft Co., 1418 Beaver, Allegheny. 
Vanghan, Dorothy, Sherman House, Chicago. 
Vaundetta Musical Duo, 247 Pratt. Ravenna, O. 
Vedmaro, Rent. 740 Amsterdam. N. Y. 
Venetian Street Musicians, 82 Alaska, Chicago, 
▼era. lflle., 787 De Kalb Are., Brooklyn. 
Vermette-Capotti Trio, 401 Breboenf, Montreal. 
Victortne. Myrtle. Norelty, Vallejo. 
Vincent Slaters, 48 Centre, New Bocbelle. 
Vincent * Rose, 820 Olive, Indianapolis. 
Viola, Otto 4 Bro.. Crescent, Schenectady. 
Yloletta, Jolly, 104 B. 14. N. Y. 
Vivians, two. Bast End Pk., Memphis,; 14, In- 

gersold Pk., Des Moines. 
Volta. 1008 Broadway, N. Y. 
Von Dell. Barry, 1008 Broadway, N. Y. 
Von Serley Sisters. 486 B. 138, N. Y. 
Vynos, The, 866 W. 31, N. Y. 



TCsde * Beynolds, 610 Second. Louisville. 
Wahlund a Tekla Trio, TreTlno, Circus, Mex. 









(1688) 
Telephone 1 1584 5 Bryant 



VARIETY 



TIMES SQUARE 

NEW YORK CITY 

Cable Address "VARIETY, New York" 



ADVERTISING RATE CARD 



SPACE OR TIME RATES 

1 Line $ .20 

1 Inch (14 Agate lines) 1 time 2.80 

1 In. 3 months (13 times) in advance.. 35.00 
1 In. 6 " (26 times) •■ M .. 66.50 
1 In. 1 year (52 times) " •■ ..120.00 

1 Page (672 Agate lines) 125.00 

% Page 65.00 

% Page 32.50 

Front Page (portraits of women only) .. .100.00 

5000 Lines 1 ( .18 

10000 Lines >To be used within one yesr < .17 

20000 Lines ) ' .18 

PREFERRED POSITIONS 

1 In. across Page $15.00 

£ ID, e • * e • e • * e e o e e o e e o s mI *v\f 

10* ••••••••••••••••••••• WiW 

l Page 150.00 

IN ROUTE SHEET 

1 Line one time $ .30 

y^ Inch one month 8.00 

1 Inch " " 15.00 

ARTISTS' RATE CARD 

Under "Representative Artists" 

(For Artists Only) 

% Inch single column 84.00 monthly net 

1 Inch •• " 7.00 " •• 

% Inch double " 8.50 " M 

1 Inch " " 12.50 

2 Inches single " 12.50 " " 

2 Inches double " 22.50 " " 

% Inch across page 15.00 " " 

1 Inch across page 25.00 " 

2 Inches across psge 50.00 " " 

3 Inches serosa page 75.00 " " 

LARGER SPACE PRO RATA 

Discount 3 months, cash in advance, 5% 
Discount 6 months, cash in advance, 10% 
Discount 12 months, cash in advance, 15% 

(Advertisements under "Representative 
Artists" not accepted for less than one month.) 

No Preferred Positions Given. 



1 



Advertisements forwarded by mall must be 
accompanied by remittance, made payable to 
Variety Publishing Co. 



Ward ft Harrington, 418 Strand. London, Eng. 
Ward * Hart. 1908 South 11, Pblla. 
Wartenberg Bros.. 104 E. 14, N. Y. ' 
Walker, Mabelle, 208 Pottinatonlne, Leavenworth. 

WALSH, LYNCH •« CO. 

ting "Huomrs mmr." 



Wagner, Paul, 8280 Morpratt, Chicago. 
Wagner, Peter, 140 W. 127, N. Y. • 
Waller * Magill, 102 Seventh Ave., N. Y. 
Walsh, May, 28, Bedford Court Mansions, London. 
Watson A Baker, 8824 Reno, W. Philadelphia. 
Walton, Irvln R., Empire, Hoboken. 
Walton, Bert ft Lottie, 208 E. 14, N. Y. 
Walton, Fred * Co., Lambs' Club, N. Y. 
Ward. Billy, 128 Myrtle Ave., Brooklyn. 
Ward, Tom, 162 Lexington Ave., Brooklyn. 
Wardell, Harry. 1008 Broadway, N. Y. 
Warren, Faust. 242 W. 48. N. Y. 
Warren, Bob, Palace, Stenhenvllle. 
Warren, Bert, Keystone Bldg., Pittsburg. 
Washburn ft Douglas, 434 Third, Brooklyn. 
Washer Bros., Box 100, Oakland, Ky. 
Waters, Jamea B., Cascade Pk., New Castle; 14, 

Spring Grove Pk., Springfield. 
Watson, Sammy, 888 St. Paul'a Ave., Jersey City. 
Watson * Little. 428 W. 140, N. Y. 
Wayne, Ethel, 142 W. 49, N. Y. 
Weadlck * La Doe, Gen. Del., Rochester. 
Weavers. Flying, 1008 Broadway, N. Y 
Webb, Romalo, Troupe, Celeron Pk., Jamestown. 
Weber, Chas. D., Gayety, Brooklyn. 
Welch, Jos. A Cecelia, 248 Fulton, Buffalo. 
Wells, Maxlne, O. H., Birmingham. 
Wenrick ft Waldron, Richmond Hotel, Chicago. 
Wentworth, Vesta A Teddy, Crystal, St. Joe. 
Werden, W. L., it Co., Thalia, Chicago. 
West, Frsnkle, 218 W. 46, N. Y. 
Wharton A Mohler, 203 Kensle, Chicago. 
Whitman, Frank* Ingersoll Pk., Des Moines. 
Whiteside A Picks, Ethel, Union Pk., Dubuque. 



JOHN W. WORLD 

AND 

MINDELL KINGSTON 

Week June 8, Orpheum, Butte. 

Whittle, W. E., Whittle's Farm. Caldwell. 
White A Revelle, 210 W. 38, N. Y. 
Whitehead A Grlerson. 2466 Eighth Ave., N. Y. 
Wblteley A Bell, 1463 Broadway. Brooklyn. 
Whltford, Annabelle, New York Roof, N. Y. 
Wilbur, Carl, 08 Charing Cross Rd., London, Eng. 
Wilbur, Clarence. Hotel Albany, N. Y. 
Wilder, Marshall P., 80. Atlantic City.. 
Wllklns A O'Day, 1553 Broadway, N. Y. 
Williams, Chas., 2652 Rutger, St. Louis. 
Williams A Gordon. 2232 Indians, Chicago. 
Williams, Cowboy, Los Angeles, Los Angeles. . 
Williams A Segal, 37 E. Robinson, Allegheny. 
Williams ft Stevens, Pekln Stock Co., Chicago. 
Williams A Van Allen, 601 Queen, Portsmouth. 
Wllllsrd's Temple of Music No. 1, Psllsades Pk., 

N. J. 
Wllllsrd's Temple of Music No. 2, Dresmlsnd, 

Coney Island, N. Y. 
Wilson Bros., 1300 S. Sixth, May wood. 
Wilson A Wilson, 302 Fourth Ave., Troy. 
Wilson, Tony, Heloise A Amoros Sisters, 104 E. 

14. N. Y. 
Wilson ft Frssler, 145 E. 48, N. Y. 
Wilson, Mae, Lulu, Butte. 
Wilson, Trio, Jack, Alhambra, N. Y. 
Wilson. Louis, 26 Sheppard, Lynn. 
Wlnanc A Cassler, Devil's Auction Co. 
Winkler ft Kress Trio. 252 W. 38, N. Y. 
Winter, Winona, La Salle, Chicago. 
Wise, Jack. 89. Pittsburg. 
Wlxon ft Eaton, 30 Tecumseh, Providence. 
Wolford ft Blugard, 150 W. Congress, Chicago. 
Woodall, Billy, 317 First, So. Nsshville. 
Woodford ft Marlboro, Gem, Meridian. 
Wood, Maurice, Bennett's, Hamilton, Can.; 14, 

Shea's, Toronto. 
Wood Bros., 14, Bijou, Winnipeg, Can. 
Wood, Ralph, Lyric, Ft. Smith. 
World, John W., ft Mlndell Kingston, Orpheum, 

Butte. 
World's Comedy Four, Alrdome, Alton; 14, Temple, 

Chicago. 
Woodward, Ed. ft May, Lyric, Chatsnooga; 14, 

Bijou, Atlanta. 

Wormwood's Dogs ft Monkeys, 14, Keith's, Phlla. 



Worton, Bessie, 029 W. 180, N. Y. 
Woyche ft Zell, Colombia, Cincinnati. 
Wright, Lillian, ft Boys. 435 W. 46, N. Y. 



Yacklay ft Bunnell, Lancaster. 

Yalto Duo, 229 W. 89, N. Y. 

Yamamoto ft Koyoshl, 168 W. 60, N. Y. 

Ybur, Princess, Unique, Des Moines; 14, BIJoa, 

La Crosse. 
Yeoman George, Unique, Minneapolis; 14, Unique, 

Superior. 
Young, E. F„ 407 W. 128, N. Y. 
Young. Ollle. ft Bro., Orpheum, Seattle. 
Young. O. M.. Kitty Fhyo ft Co. 
Yale A 81mpsoo, Park, Dayton; 13, Indlanola Pk., 

Columbus. 

Z 

Zalno, Joe, 41 80. 02, Philadelphia. 

Zanks, Brcasesle. Ms jest ic, Chicago. 

Zanalgs, The, 806 W. 40, N. Y. 

Zasell, Vernon ft Co., Benalsaance, Warsaw, 

Russia. 
Zeds, H. L., Midland Hotel, Pueblo. 
Zlnn's Musical Comedy Co., Memphis. 



CIRCUS ROUTES 



Barnum ft Bailey, July 8, Sheldon, la.; 9, Sioux 
City, la.; 20, Waterloo, la.; 24, Rockford, 111.; 
Aug. 0, Easton; 7, Scran ton; 8, Wllkes-Barre; 
9, Sunbury; 10, Wlllismsport ; 11, Oleans; 12, 
Warren; 14, Cleveland; 10, Marlon; 16, Toledo; 

17, Detroit; 18, Jackson; 19, So. Bend 21, 
Milwaukee; 22, Tomsk, Wis.; 28, St. Paul; 24, 
Minneapolis; 26, Little Falls; 26. Duluth. 

Campbell Bros,, June 0, Gracevllle, Minn.; 7, 

Fargo, N. D. ; Aug. 4, Eureka; 5, Redfleld; 6, 

Woonsocket; 7. Plankerton; 9, Chamberlain; 10, 

McKensle; 11, Ksdoka; 12, Bapld City, 8. D. 
Cole Bros.' Show, June 7, Utlca; 21, Geneva, O. ; 

July 4, Morris; 0, Genesee; 6, Iowa City; 7, 

Vinton; 8, Northwood, la.; 9, Owatonna; 10, 

Northfleld. 
Cosmopolitan Circus, June 6, Clinton, la.; 13, 

Atkinson, Wis.; 20, Neenab, Wis.; 27, Rlpon, 

Wis. 
Dodd Fish Show, June 0, No. Field; 7, Blooming 

Prairie; 8. Spring Valley; 9, Austin, Wis.; 10, 

Albert Les, Minn. 
Gentry Bros.', June 7, Belle Plaine: 8, Webster 

City; 9, Blue Earth; 10, New Ulm; 11, Man- 

kato, la.; Aug. 22, Warrenton; 23, Culpepper; 

24. Charlottesville; 25, Lynchburg; 26, Danville; 

27, Clarksvllle, Vs.; 28. Oxford; 30, Raleigh; 

31, Greenboro; Sept. 1, Reidaville; 2, Lexington; 

3, Mt. Airy; 4, No. Wllkesboro; 6, High Point; 

7, Mocksvillc; 8, Salisbury; 0, Concord; 10, 
Charlotte; 11, Mooresville; 13, Taylorsvllle; 
14. Ststeavllle 10, Newton; 16, Hickory; 17. 
Morgsntown; 18, Asbevllle; 20, Marion; 21. 
Rutherfordton, N. C. ; 22, Lancaster, S. C. ; 
23. Rock Hill; 24, Gastonis. N. C ; 25. Gaffneys, 
S. C. ; 20, Spartanburg; 28, Greenville; 29. 
Anderson; 30, Abbeville; Oct. 1, Newberry; 2, 
Columbia; 4, Charleston; 6, Orangeburg; 7, 
Aiken, 8. C; 8, Augusta, Ga.; 9, Barnwell: 

11, Savannah, Ga. 

Gollmar Bros., June 5, Groton; 7, Lemon, S. D. 

Hagenbeck* Wallace, June 7, Columbus; 8, Grand 
Island; 9, Kearney; 10. Gothamburg; 11, North 
Platte, Neb.; 12, Denver; 15, Greeley; IB, 
Cheyenne; 17, Laramie; 18, Rawlins, Wyo.; 19, 
Ogden, Utah. 

Howes' Show, June 11, Wllliamstown; 12, Ludlow, 
Ky.; 13, Cincinnati. 

Miller Bros.' 101 Ranch, June 7, Little Falls; 

8, Amsterdam; 0, Troy; 10, North Adams. 
Mass.; 11, IMttsfleld; 12, Springfield. 

Pan-American Circus, June 7, Ainsworth; 8, 
Valentine; 9, Gordon; 10, Cbadron; 11, Craw- 
ford, Neb. 

Ringling Bros., June 7, Lynn; 8, Salem; 9, Law- 
rence; 10, Manchester, N. H.; 11, Lowell, Mass.; 

12, Worcester; 14, Woonsocket, R. I.; 10. 
Providence; 16, Wattuppa; 17, New Bedford; 

18, Brockton; 21. Hartford; 22. Waterbury; 
23. New Haven 24, Bridgeport; 20, Stamford; 
26, Brewster. 

Bobbins' Circus, Frank A., June 7, Plymouth; 8, 
Ablngton; 9, Qulncy; 10, Dedham; 11, Clinton, 
Miss. 

Sells-Floto, June 7. Cleslum; 8, Ellensburg; 9, 
No. Yakima; 10, Rltsvllle; 11-12, Spokane; 

19, Paloose; 21, Lewiston, Wash. 



LETTERS 



Where C. O. follows name, letter la In Chi- 
cago Office. 

Advertising of circular letters of any de- 
scription will not be listed whan known. 

Letters will be held for one month. 

P. C. following nam* Indicates postal card. 



Aotwell, Dot. 
Adams ft White. 
Allison, Jack. 
Allison. Patty, Mlsa. 
Avery, D. 
Anderson. Albert. 
Asbcroft, Ralph W. 
Arado, D. 

Aces, The Three (0. 0.) 
Augers, The. 
Adglc'a Lions. 
Adsms, Isabel. 
Ainsworth, Virginia. 
Ave* to, Elmer 
Arlington, Billy. 
Armstrong, P. C. 
Alvin Bros. 
Armstrong, Msx. 
Aldls, Agnes. 
Abbott, Annie. 
Adlr, Bobyn. 
Accomsndo Nicola. 
Astrella Sisters. 
Anderson, Fred. 

Benson, Belle. 
Blood, Adele. 
boyd ft Morsn. 
Barnes ft Lee. 
Burdlck, Buth. 
Bragg, Archie (0. O.) 
Bell, Alfred J. 
Bagley, Charlie (C. O.) 
Baldwin, Kitty. 
Best, Louis P. 
Brlgnola, B. (O. O.) 
Beck, Carl (0. O.) 
Belmont, Freda. 
Bertram, Helen (CO.) 
Bellvue, Ed. (C. O.) 
Burton, Steve W. (O. 0.) 
Baggesen, Carl. 
'Bllyck's Scale. 
Butler, M. J. 
Bell, Floas (C. O.) 
Brlndemour, Great. 
Bowles, George. 
Boyle ft O'Brien. 
Bulger, Irlne. 
Binder, Grace (C. 0.) 
Bush, Frank. 
Barlow, Nelson ft Dens- 
more. 
Barnes, W. H. 
Burn, Andy. 
Bowers, Fred K. 
Bennett ft Dsrllng. 
Bordeaux, Sim. 
Beatrice. Mile. 
Brady, James. 
Bedors, Corlets. Miss. 
Blondell, Mysterious. 
Burns, Charlie. 
Burns ft McCone. 
Bowen. C. F. 
Bidden. Rose. 
Bateman, Tom. 
Berry, Alice K. 
Berg's Merry Girls. 
Bragg, Jack B. 
Bohanan ft Corey. 
Belmont, Madeline. 
Benedict, Lew. 
Behr, Carrie. 
Burke, Dan. 
Burton A Burton. 
Brown, Mary Ann. 
Braham, Michael. 
Busley, Jessie (C. O.) 
Bowser, Charles. 
Burns, Eddie. (C. 0.) 
Bush ft Peyser. 
Brooks, Hsrvey. 
Boyce, Jno. 
Beverly, Bill. 

Cslllgoon, Harry A. 

Cllve. Henry. 

Casedy, Msbel (C. 0.) 



Cuttys, Musical. 
Campbell ft Galla. 
Cunningham, J. 
Crouch, Rosie, Miss. 
Carroll, Reoa (C. O.) 
Clifford ft Lane (a O.) 
Clayton, Webb A. 
Calvert, Albert (C. O.) 
Carroll, Tom (0. O.) 
Campbell, Flossie. 
Cameron, Francis. 
Crosse, Dr. Margaret 
Curtis. Bea. (a O.) 
Constantlne, W. J. 
Crumbaker, Edwin. 
Crewe, Anna (C. O.) 
Caldwell, J. 
Craven, Sidney (C. O.) 
Clayton, Webb A. (0. O.) 
Cbllders, Grace. 
Cllne, Vivian. 
Carlisle. May. 
Carlotte. 
Carroll, 0. 
Carrlllo, Leo. 
Cummlngs, Grace, ft Co. 

(C. O.) 
Cooper ft Robinson. 
Coy, Gilds Mse (C. O.) 
Curson Sisters. 
Cooper, Irving. 
Commlngs, Jlmmie. 
Cooper, Lee S. 
Collins, Fred. 
Co Eds, Four. 
Cullen, William. 
Currle, George. 
Csmpbell, Muslcsl. 
Clark, Eddie. • 
Calder, Lee Chas. 
Csrr, Alexander (P. C.) 
Curry, L. V. 
Covington, Zellalla W. 

Democls, Jske. 
Doberty Sisters. 
Dumond, M. 
Davis, Warren. 
Dandy George Duo (C. 

O.) 
Dornton. Harry. 
Dietrich, Ray O. 
Dudley, Alice Cbeslyn 

(C. O.) 
Daum, Geo. A. (C. O.) 
Dietrich, Mrs. <C. O.) 
Darrell A Hodges (C. 0.) 
Dunston. Oscar. 
Desmond. Lily. 
De Lee, Lillian. 
D'Arcy. D. Y., Miss. 
Dressier, Msrle. 
Des Roche. Gertrude. 
Dsgnesu, Clara. 
Dupree, Malda. 
Davey, Dancing (C. 0.) 
Dllger. W. H. (C. O.) 
DUffln-Redcay Troupe. 
Dobba, Wilbur. 
De Msln ft Rochete. 
Deinarstln, 1,00. 
Dell. Bert (Fonda, Dell 

ft Fonda). 

Engleton, Nan. 
Everett, Agnes. 
Ksrle, Edwsrd. 
Evans, Billy. 
Blverson, Earle. 

FlelsU Roger. 
Florence 81sters. 
Fuller. Ethel, ft Co. 
Fee, Msy ft Ford. 
Feathers, Leesle (C. 0.) 
Facclattl, Tom (C. O.) 
Traacons, Menotl (0. O.) 
Fsccenda, Alberto (CO.) 
Fischer, Msdalyn. 



When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



VARIETY 



23 








NEARLY ALL THE GOOD ARTISTS ARE HERE-JOIN THEM 



SPECIAL RATES 

TO 
PROFESSIONALS 



Jfoe/wcm 



Hotel 



CHICAGO. 



J* K. oEBREE, 

President 

ROY S. SEBREE, 

Gen. Manager 

LOUIS A. JUNG, 

Asst. Manager 



DINE IN OUR BEAUTIFUL RESTAURANTS 



POPULAR PRICES. 



SERVICE AND FOOD THE BEST. 



Fitsgereld A Wilson (0. 
O.) 

Falrehllri, R. D., Miss. 

Fisher, Susie (C. O.) 

Flannery, W. L. (C. O.) 

Fastell, A. E. 

Forrest, ITarry. 

Fay, John J. 

Foo Ling Chlng. 

Farlardo. 

Fennel 1, Annie, Mrs. 

Fadettes, Woman's, Or- 
chestra. 

For A Clark. 

Forrester, Chas., Mr. 6 
Mrs. 

Ferraris, The. 

Frey Trio. 

Fords, Four. 



Gaffney, Belle. 
Golden, Sam. 
Center ft GUmore (C. O.) 
Gibson, Bstelle. 
Glllen, Edward. 
Gould. Jay (0.0.) 
Garrett, B. 
Greenfield, Caroline. 
Gilbert, Blame. 
Gotch, Frank A. 
Green, George. 
Green, Fells. 
Geer, Bd. 
Granger. Mollle. 
Gleson, SteUa. 
GUllhan ft Murray. 
Gloae, Augusta. 
Gregory, Margaret (0. 

O.) 
Goodwin, Joe. 
Gallagher, Ed. F. (0. 

O). 
Green, Burt. 
Gladstone, Wm. 
Glick, Chas. 

Hughes, Gene, Mr. ft 

Mrs. (C. O.) 
Hsrcourt, Daisy. 
Hale ft Harty. 
Haynes, Al. 
Hall, Alfred K. 
Hogan, W. J. 
Hagen ft Wescott. 
Hyde, Albert. 
Hsnlon, Dlggs ft Blerns 

tC. O.) 
Heald, Frank. 
Hynes, Tom. 
Hesld, Henry D. 
Hendon, A. T. 
Hill, C. W. 

Hsyes. Harrey (C. O.) 
Herrey ft Lee. 
Height, Dean ft Co. 
Harris, W. H. 
Harrison. Charles. 
Hammond, Chas. 
Harrey ft Farrell (0. O.) 
Hart, Henry (0. O.) 
Hyde, Jlmmle. 
Hales, C. W. 
Hartford, Sadie. 
Henrlcl. 
Hoppe, Guy. 
Hlggins, R. D. 
Hoey ft Lee. 
Huntley, J. H. 
Hodges, Jsmes (C. O.) 
Hewitt, Harry. 
Hutchinson ft Lusby (0. 

O.) 

Hawkins, L. 
Hoffman, Max. 
Hopkins, CoL J. D. 
Hsmmer, Clara Mas. 
Haagen, Helen. 
Huntington, Florence. 
Hlbbert ft Warren. 
Howard ft Lewis. 
Healey, Daniel (0. O.) 
Hoffmans, Cycling (CO.) 
Haines, Harry. 
Howard, M. O. 
Hanson ft Howard. 
Hunt. Henry (C. O.) 
Hengler, Flo ft May. 
Halns, Nat (Halns ft 

Vldoc). 
Hennlng, Fred. 
Hadley, Florence. 
Heath, Thos. G. 
Hoy. Hal H. 
Harris, Chsrlle. 
Hayes, Sully. 
Harris, Jack. 
Hlckey, W. H. 
Hanlon, Toma (C. O.) 
Hallen, Fred. 



Hallen, Jack. 
Hill, Arthur L. 
Henry, Dick (P. C.) 
Hart, Mark (P. C.) 
Hart, Nellie. 
Bines, Billy (C. O.) 
Harland & Robinson (C. 
O.) 

Icannou, Panachlotl. 
lahmael, Prince P. 
Irving, Mildred. 

Jerome, Cora B. 
Jamison, Bd. 
Jourdeon, Annette (CO.) 
Johns, Harry (0. O.) 
Jarrow, Bmll (0. O.) 
Johnstone, Gordon. 
Johnson, Otto. 
Jenson, Otto. 
Jones, Miss Gwyn. 
Johnson, Msrk. 
Jackson, Carl J. 
Jolson, Al. 

J arris ft Martin CO. O.) 
JarTls ft Martyn. 
Jennings, Arthur B. 
(C. O.) 

Klrkwood, Jessie (C. O.) 
Klebe, Elsie (0.0.) 
Kelss, Mrs. John, 
Klnsells, Kathleen. • 
Kenney, Mabel. 
Keown, J. (0. O.) 
Knowles, B. G. 
Klars, Katherlne. 
Klelses, Musical. 
Klmbsll ft DonsTsn (0. 

O.) 
Kelly ft Boss. 
Knight, Hsrlan. 
Kirk, Herbert A. (C. 

O.) 

Linton, Harry B. (C. O.) 
LeCall, Bd. (0.0.) 
LaMont, Grace (C O.) 
Low, Oilman. 
La Frenlere, Arthur. 
Latelle, Edward. 
Lord, Eleanor. 
LeTltt Co.. J. M. 
Llnne, Hans (C O.) 
Lenon, Ted. 
Lelbert, Alex. 
Lloyd. J. D. 

La Belle, Marie, Miss. 
Leffler, Bennle. 
Luther, M. H. (C. O.) 
Lyons ft Parka. 
La Thar, Dora (CO.) 
Lane, Mlnella. 
Lamont, Harry. 
Losler, Howsrd. 
Lee Rlcbsrd, Lawrence. 
Lowery, Lutber. 
Luces, 8ydney. 
Leary, Msrtlnl (C. 0.) 
Leslie, Jos. 
Lsughlln M. 
Lorenc, John. 
Lelthold. R. F. C. 
Lerln, Abe. 

La Darro, Frank (C. 0.) 
La Fose, Frank. 
Leonard, James ft 
Sadie. 

McKee Deep Stuff (C 

O.) 
Moore, Marian. 
Mantell, Harry. 
Mexican Trio. 
Millard Bros. 
Miller, Frank. 
Morris ft Cramer. 
McLallen, Jack. 
McDermott, W. J. (C 

O.) 
McMahon. Tom (0. O.) 
Mexican Trio (0. O.) 
Messier. Sadie, Miss. 
Merl. Gallia. 
McKim, Edward. 
Martin, E. J. 
Mueller. Albert. 
Moore, H. L. 
Mullen, Dennis. 
Metcbso, Arthur. 
Mitchell, Hssel. 
Merlin, Helen. 
Mauran, Stella. 
McLaughlin, H. 
Morris, Three (C. O.) 
McDonald, W. (C O.) 
McCarthy, W. T. (0. O.) 
Marcla, May (0. 0.) 



FURNISHED 
FLATS 



The EDMOND'S 

The Only Flats Catering Exclusively to Performers 

606 8th AVENUE, BETWEEN 89th AND 40th. 764-756 8th AVENUE, BETWEEN 46th-47th 8TB. 

776, 778, 780 8th AVE., BETWEEN 47th and 48th STREETS. 

•Phone 2411 Bryant. RATES — flO.OO UPWARDS. 

ONE BLOCK TO TIMES SQUARE. NEW YORK CITY 



OTTAU/A, OIMT, 







CECIL 



Horns \A/Hlt< 



Rats 



ind Profeselon 



The finest Hotel in Canada— bar none. American and European. Absolutely new. NEXT DOOR 
TO BENNETT'S and THREE BLOCKS TO OTHER THEATRES. SPECIAL RATES TO ARTISTS. 

WALTER B. WALBT. Prop, 

NEW ANNEX HOTEL 



Adjoining the New 

ORPHEUM 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Offers Special Inducements to 



Rooms With or Without Baths. 

GOOD RESTAURANT. REASONABLE PRICES. 

D. ULLMAN, Manager. 



HOTEL PROVENCE 

Leicester Square, LONDON 

J. T. DAVIS, Prop. 
H*adqu«rt«r« of lit/hits Rests 

Ti 



IT PLACE TO STOP 

or 

NEW YORK CITY 

from Bread way." 



THE 



. Kl 

168 Watt 84th Street 



Furnished Booms only. Baths— Telephoi 
Eleetrio Light. 

('Phone 8448— Murray Hill.) 

Temms Reasonable 

Under Managem ent Misses POOP and CLINTON. 

FURNISHED BOOMS REASONABLE. 
Near Times Square and Broadway. 

242 W. 43rd ST.. NEW YORK 



We are at the old stand better than ever. 

""MILLER HOTEL 

MOB EMMA WOOD, Mgr. H. 0. MILLER, Prep. 

S. E. Cor. 10th and Raoe Sts., Philadelphia. 

AMERICAN AND EUROPEAN PLAN. 

"THE ACTORS' HOME." 

Cafe attached. Baths and Steam Heat on all 

floors. PROFESSIONAL RATES— 87 double, Sfl 

single. 



"THE CENTRAL" 



221 w 42d Street 
NEW YORK 

(Few Doers below Hammersteln's). 
Large and small, well furnished rooms, with 
board. Prtvste Batbs. First-class French and 
German Cooking. Moderate terms. 

TABLE D'HOTE DINNERS served In the gTOVnd 
floor dining room. 85 CENTS. 

F. MOURBT. 

THE RUOGER 

High olass Rooming and Boarding House, 

261 West 42 d St.. New York 

Opposite the American and near Hammersteln's. 
Bpeclal rates for professionals. 



McGlbney. Viols (C. O.) 
Metcalf, Ken. (C. 0.) 
Moore. Herbert (CO.) 
Mlnton (C. O.) 
Morgsn, Rlsh. 
McVsy, William. 
Marr, Lillian (C. 0.) 
Mancdell, Richard (CO.) 
Marsh. Byrn. 
Manlon, Lucille. 
Masters. Clsrs. 
Msson, H. 
Morton, Jas. J. 
McGIll, Flora. 
Moncrey, Lena. 
Montgomery. Marshall. 
Msnnlng, Helen. 
McCord, Lewis. 
Msnchester, Roy. 
Mack Boys, Those. 
McClusky, Anlts, Miss. 
Mudge A Morton. 
Mack. Esrnest. 
Miller, Arthur. 
Majestic Singing Three. 
Maynard. Dot (C. O.) 
Murray. Tom. 
Monohan A Sbeenan (P. 
C) 

Mozarts, The. 
Mario, Mable. 
Miles. Ben J. 
McNaughtons, The. 
Martyn, Victor. 
MoAlllson. Alice. 
McDonald, Mike. 
Martha. Mile. 



Mid die ton, Chas. B. 
Marcballs, Musical. 
Malcolm, Thomas. 

Neumann, Frans (The 

Vlndobous) . 
North, Hsppy. 
Nlles. Virginia. 
Neal. George. 
Norton, Jack (C O.) 
Neuss, Gus. 
Nichols, Wm. 
Neville, George dlsrlsn, 

Knight A Co.) 
Newton, Val. (C. O.) 

Owley A Randall. 
Omega, Ollle. 
O'Day. Ida. 
Orth, Frank. 
Odell, Tommy. 
Owen, May. 
O'Neal. Jimmy (C O.) 
Otis. Ella Proctor. 



Penn, Jennie. 
Page, John. 
Plankleb. Harry (C 
Pearl A Yoser. 
Peters. Jack J. (C. O, 
Porto Rican Quartet 

O.) 

Perry A Gannon. 
Phillips Bros. 
Phillips. Ooff. 
Prampln, Laura. 



O.) 

.) 
(C. 



Plqns, Barker H. 
Plcaro, Lulgi Trio. 
Perley, L R. 
Parry, Charlotte. 
Piper. Mr. A Mrs. Franco 
Parlsb, David M. 
Powers A Chapman. 
Pope, J. C. (C. O.) 
Plnard, Al. 
Parry Charlotte. 
Pis t el. Lew. 
Perrlgo, Kitty. 

Qulnlan, Gertrude. 
Quentln, Rene. 

Reeves, James B. 
Richards, Elenor. 
Robins, A. D. 
Richards, Chris. 
Rysn, Dan. 
Richmond, Florence. 
Rodrlgues, L. J. 
Rundy, H. A. 
Rosanl. Mrs. Wm. 
Raymond, Melville B. 

(C. O.) 
Relnhardt. Cyrus (C. O.) 
Ray, Elizabeth (C O.) 
Reynolds, Max (C. O.) 
Rice. Felix (C. 0.) 
Redell, Ed. 
Rosen, R. O. (C. O.) 
Renards, The. 
Roberts, J. J., A Co. 
Roberts. Bessie. 
Rice, Sam. 
Roseola, R. 
Rogers. Will. 
Rose A Ellis. 
Rawmm, Guy. 
Rogers, John F. 



Rodolph, Frank (P. 0.) 
R'lves, Gur. 
Rogers A Evans. 
Robyns. William. 
Rackett, Ernest. 
Rence, Slgmund. 
Reed. Fred (Rood 

Birds). 
Robinson, E. L. 

Smith, Lutber. 
Rtreet. Rose. 
Seymour A Hill. 
Semon, Primrose (C 

O.) 
Sbardo, Claude (C. O.) 
8cholts. Mr. 
Schultse. Henry. 
Smarl, Miss. 
Stone, Fred A. 
811ver, Morris. 
Scbenk (Crandnll A 

8cbenk). 
Stolts, Melville. 
Sanns, Herr (C. O.) 
Sallna. Mile. (C O.) 
Satterlee. Gale (C. O.) 
Sullivan, James F. (C 

O.) 
Sutherland A Curtis (C. 

O.) 
Stlnson. J. B. (C. O.) 
8mlth. Richard H. 
Stoner. Grnce. 
St. Clair. Harry (C. 0.) 
Sterling A Cbapman. 
Scott. Grace, A Co. 
Rchllcter. Hubert (CO.) 
Swain A Ostman. 
8trausberg, Loots E., 

Mrs. 
Kchreyer. Dsre Devil. 
Shields A Rodger*. 



Snow, Ray W. 
Shields, Louise. 
Splan, Robert J. 
Somenleitner, Gustov. 
Sargent, Virginia. 
Stross, Antonla (C. 0.) 
Sohlke, Gus (C 0.) 
Simms. Wlllard (P. C) 
Stevens, Will H. 
Smith A Brown. 
Swindell, Archie. 
Stewart, Wlnnlfred. 
Seamon, Primrose, Miss. 
Stanley, Vera. 
Stafford A Stone (P. C.) 
Semon, Primrose (C O.) 
Stross, Antonla (C O.) 
Schoor- Wheeler Trio 

(C O.) 
Shaw, Harold (C. 0.) 

Travere, Belle. 
Thompson, William. 
Trimble. Mand. 
Tate, Harry. 
Thurston, Msy Hender- 



Thomaa A Payne (CO.) 
Tlvoll Qmirtet (C 0:) 
Tenlll, Frank. 
TroTollo. 

Thatcher, Geo. (P. C) 
Townsend, Charlotte. 
Tate, Beth. 
Tropacel, Arthur. 

Ubous, Mrs. Carl. 

Valln, W. Ver. (C. 0.) 
Vivian, Annie. 
Van, Arthur. 
Voaco, Wslter. 



Whltebouee, 

(0.0.) 
Williams, Dot. 
Williams, Frank. 
Walton, Orval. 
Winchester. B. L. 
Wlttscblrk, Frits. 
Wilson, Leslie. 
Williams, Leon. 



Gracelyn 



Woodruff, Henry. 
Wooley, Frank. 
Walker, Thomas. 
Whallen. Mike. 
Wiseman, Geo. H. 
White A Stuart. 
Wilson, Geo. W. 
Wolff, Lulu. 
Warden, Edith. 
Wilkinson. Mrs. 0. J. 
Warren, Dsy A Wl 

(C O.) 
Williams. Msle (C 0.) 
Williams. Arthur (0. O.) 
Walters, Ada (C 0.) 
Wardell, Harry (CO.) 
Wilfred A Lottie. 
Wales, Elsie. 
Weixelbaum, K. 
Werner, Harry. 
Wills, Nst. 
Wilsons. Musical. 
Welch, Rube. 
Weogg, W. 
Williams, R. D. 
Wlllard's Temple of Mn- 

slc. 
Walters. L. E, 
Williams, T. H. 
Whitney, Helen. 
Wlnterbuon, Geo. 
Ward, Helen. 
Welch, Joe (P. C) 
Weston, Sam (0. Ob) 
Whitman, Florence (0. 

O.) 
Wright. Harry (C O.) 

York, Katherlne. 
Young, Florlan. 
Youngson, William. 
Young, James. 
Young, William (C 0.) 
Young, Mrs. Wm. (CO.) 
Young, Myrtle T. 
Yulr, Mse. 

Zara, Toby. 
Zarrow, George. 
Zsrrow, Bd. 
Zlnk, Adolpb. 
Zobedle, Fred. 



Kelly and Kent will appear for a few 
weeks during the summer. Miss Kelly has 
recovered from the illness which caused 
her to rest. Next fall Kelly, Kent and 
Barrett will present a new act. Kelly 
and Barrett have been playing "The Battle 
of Too Soon" this season. M. S. Bentham 
will direct the bookings for the trio. 



Beatrice Moreland will offer a monolof 
next season under the direction of That 
Boy Bentham. Miss Moreland is in Eu- 
rope training for the new course. The 
actress has already chanced several flop- 
ping sketches. 



Keeney's, Brooklyn, closes this week. 
Mr. Keeney may play vaudeville at his 
Third Avenue, New York, all summer. He 
is credited with the ninth wonder of the 
world, through having made the hoodooed 
Third Avenue a winner wilh cheap vaude- 
ville. 



Alf Reeves and the Karno Company left 
New York Wednesday. Mr. Reeves car- 
ried a general invitation to the Vaudeville 
Club of London from the Comedy Club of 
New York, to attend the dedication of the 
latter's new home on West 4C»th Street, 
last Wednesday even ins. Alf wasn't Rure 
whether his boat could make the jump in 
time, but said he would ask I lie captain to 
hurry. 



^Yhcn answering advertisements kindly mention Varikty 



24 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 




Jim 



FRANK 



HARRY 




CITY TRIO 



O'NEAL BROTHERS and WALMSLEY 



if 



IIML-Y GOOD ENTERTAIN 

JUST COMPLETING A 15 WEEKS* TOUR OF THE PANTAGES' CIRCUIT 

ED. LANG DID THE BUSINESS. 



I 9 



"THE BE8T COMEDY ACT IN 'ONE* THAT EVER PLAYED MY CIRCUIT."— ALEX. PANTAGES 
"ONE OF THE BEST COMEDY ACTS IN 'ONE' THAT EVER PLAYED THE MILES. MINNE- 



AI'OLIS."— IKE SPEERS, MGR. 

ADDRESS CARE VARIETY, CHICAGO. 



SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCE, Feb. SI, 'OS. 

"The Garden Cltj Trio, with that highly popu- 
lar class of act, harmony, singing; and dancing 
and comedy, made an unmistakable bit. They 
carry one of the 'CLEVEREST SILLY KID' co- 
medians of any similar act that has played the 
Northwest." 



'WE HAVE NEVER PLAYED HAMMERSTEIN'S, BUT WE HAVE PLAYED SCHINDLERB. 



The Artist Who Made Famous "When the Moon Plays Peek-A-Boo" 




MAUD 




rxi 



N/l 



IIS/1 



"O! IVII 

WILL ROSSITER 
151 LaKe St, CHICAGO 



Popularizing WILL ROSSITER'S SONG "HITS" 




IN/IAL-I 



99 



and W. R. Williams' Latest 



"Gee! But There's Class to a Girl Like You" 



□ GORDON BROTHERS 
%sjsP \ i J i I ■ • vja r*~ I i v j it ^ * 



Under aol© direction JACK. LEVY, 14-0 \A/. 42nd St., New York 




FRONIE 





JOHNNY 



N/l 



rvj 



UNITED TIME. 



ML. BUT HER LAUD, Agmnt Aak Al. Oallaarhs*. 



AIND 



ATLANTIC CITY 4 



GREAT FEATURE 

FOR PARKS 

OPEN TIME JUNE 20 

Address oars VARIETY. 



ILA GRANNON 



VAUDEVILLE'S DEMURE 
LITTLE SONGSTRESS 



Orpheum Circuit to follow immediately 
Sole Direction EDW. S. KELLER, Long Acre B'ld'g, New York 



TEXAS GUINAN 



LONE STAR 
ATTRACTION 



United Time 



M. S. BE NTH AM, Agent 



The 



Stubblefield Trio 



America's Foremost 
Novelty Aerialists 



The FASTEST WORKING TRAPEZE ACT In the world; only aot of its kind doing teeth work. 
001QNO EAST. Just finished a very soooessful season in the west over both the Western States 
Circuit and the SulliTan-Considlne Circuit. A DRAWING CARD in every house. 



Agent, ALF T. WILTON, 



LONG ACRE DLDG. 
NEW YORK 



When answering advertisement a kindly mention Variety. 



VARIETY 



25 



THE COOL SYSTEM 



OF 



Scienti fic Trea tment. 

Our HEALTH HOME and SANI- 
TARIUM situated on Beautiful 
LAKE MUSKEGON, Michigan 

IS NOW OPEN 



All the advantages of a delightful summer re- 
tort are combined with the treatments. Beautiful 
walks, shaded lawns; every opportunity afforded 
for oomplete rest and relaxation. Special attention 
to diet. 

Lake Muskegon is one of the finest fishing re* 
sorts In the country. 

Our CHICAGO OFFICE (Suite 907-908-909), 185 
DEARBORN ST., is open the year round, where 
treatments are also given. 

Direct letters of inquiry to LEW EARL, Gen- 
eral Manager, Chicago, or Muskegon, Mich. 

I. MILLER. Manufacturer 

of Theatrical 

W.25~51^ I •]■ Ballet and 

N.Y.^ H3iV Acrobstlc Shoes 

a specialty. All 
work mad* at 
short notice). 




K 



8107 MICHIGAN AVE.. 
I 



UIN/I ER 

EXCLUSIVE DESIGNS. 

Oostumer for the Leading Stage Celebrities. 
'Phone, Calumet 8408. 

FHOT09. CABINETS, |8.60 per 100. Klret 
Glass. Est. 20 yra. Havs sittings or send pbotoe. 
or negative. JOHNSON, 198 Wsnash A v.. Ctaleaa-0. 

AUDELLA DANCING CLOGS 

Ladies' or Men's Sizes 

Price, all wood sole, 84.00. 
Leather shank, 
85.00, delivered 
free. Patent 
festenlng never 
rips. 

ALBERT H. RIBMER 8HOB CO., Milwaukee, Wis. 

M 

GOWNS 




867 S. 8TATE ST., CHICAGO. 
'Phone Harrison 8660. 

Full line of slightly used Evening Gowns, Opera 
Coats and Street Gowns, all suitable for Stage 
Wear. Soubrette Dresses made to order, all colors 
and styles. Special prices and attention given te 
theatrical profession. Sealskin Coats and Furs of 
all descriptions. 

BARNETT 

SECOND HAND DRESS SHOP 

Street and Evening Gowns. Also SOUBRETTB 
DRESSES and FUB8. 



888 STATE ST. 



CHICAGO, ILL. 



BRIGHTON BEACH 
MUSIC HALL 

OPENING WEEK, 

COMMENCING MONDAY, JVNE 7. 

Matinees Daily at 8:46. Eves., 8:80. 

The Queen of Vaudeville. 

IRENE FRANKLIN 

Assisted by BURT GREEN. 

4 -FELIX and BARRY— 4 

DELAUER-DEBRAMONT TRIO. 

WATERBURT BROTHERS AND TENNET. 

JAMES HARRIGAN. HUGH LLOYD. 

Doherty Bisters. Camille Trio. 

Seats on Bare at Abraham ft Straus, and Ander- 
son's Piano Store, Brooklyn. 

8 — SUNDAY CONCERTS — 8 



it 



HI3T0B" "MP08TID" "B07AL NZSTOB" 



Green Ltbel, 




The Original Egyptian " 




SHORT VAMP SHOES 

(Exclusively for Women). For Stage, Street and 
Bvenlng Wear. Great Variety. Exclusive Models. 



Creator of Short Vamp Shoes. 
007 Sixth Ave., New York. Bet. 80th and Slat St a. 

Bend for Illustrated Catalog ue. 
One Flight Up. Tel. 1000 Madison 8q. 




CORRESPONDENCE 






Unless otherwise noted, the following re- 
ports are for the current week: 



GMIGAGO 



By FRANK WTEBBERG. 

VARIETY'S Chicago Office, 
Chicago Opera House Block. 

MAJESTIC (Lyman B. Glover, mgr.; agent, 
W. V. A.).— If precedence In billing is a criterion 
of value of an act, then "Circumstantial Evi- 
dence," a dramatic sketch new here, should have 
been bestowed that honor. The sketch wss given 
top place in billing, over Marie Dalnton and R. C. 
Hers. For some reason the dramatic piece was 
moved to third place (rot program). "Circum- 
stantial Evidence" is an episode that appeals to 
all. Its success was emphatic. R. C. Hers is 
next in Importance. He gave bis very artistic 
characterisations which always meet with ap- 
preciation. Marie Dalnton is new here. She an- 
nounces what she intends to do and the people 
she Impersonates. Most of the celebrities are un- 
known here. Those who are familiar are not well 
Imitated. She has talent, but It is evidently over- 
rated. "Mack" and "Marcus," two cartoonists, 
offer a novel act called "Evolution." The cari- 
catures are clever and comprehensive. Fiddler 
and Shelton have not played here In over a year, 
and they have improved wonderfully. It is dif- 
ferent from any other colored act seen in years. 
One particular point Is their refinement. They 
scored a deserved hit. Fanny Rice again brought 
to view her miniature impersonations and made a 
very good Impression. Chlnko displayed bis skill 
In Juggling, and Minnie Kaufman whirled grace- 
fully and dexterously on bicycles. Mabel McCane 
is known in musical comedy. This Is ber first 
vaudeville appearance at this house. The first 
three songs are unsuited and uninteresting. She 
proved her ability as a singer and entertainer in 
the last two songs, one named "Days of Old," a 
satire in verse on the popular music erase. One 
or two changes in attire would be of advantage. 
Gladys Lillian Carey Is a violinist. She starts 
with "Poet and Peasant," not a very acceptable 
number. She should by all means sdopt newer 
methods, though probably new in vaudeville. 
"Johnson Students" are club Jugglers, showing 
striking feats. The novelty in the act is the 
dancing, and some of the manipulation. Hal and 
Marlon Munson lm persons ted and sang seversl 
songs. Will Rogers and his lariat interested as 
he always does. The show this week is high class 
vaudeville. 

AMERICAN (Wm. Morris, mgr.; agent, direct). 
— It is not the customary Morris show at the 
American this week. As a whole It is one of the 
weakest bills so far offered at this theatre. The 
house was packed to the doors Monday night. 
Eddie Foy makes his first vaudeville appearance 
for the "opposition." Foy Is a huge favorite 
here, and his eccentric efforts, familiar at the 
other vaudeville houses last season, met with ap- 
proval. It can at least be ssld that at present 
he has the l>est act be ever showed in vaudeville. 
James J. Corbett, for his second week, presents 
"A Thief in the Night." The sketch is of the 
conventional type. Edith Helena displayed ber 
remarkable voice. Eddie Hedway and "Four 
Affinities" and Joe Whitehead and Flo Grlerson 
are under New Acts. Cantleld and Carlton con- 
tributed a good measure of- droll comedy and 
otherwise did well. Wllla Holt Wakefield is held 
over. She opens with a new song, which is as 
good as the others. Her reception and success 
exceeded that of last week. She Is an excellent 
entertainer and could stay at the music hall sev- 
eral weeks. Vic P. Woodward opened with Jug- 
gling and tambourine spinning, and Wilton Broth- 
ers closed with their comedy bar act. 

JULIAN (J. G. Comleiman, mgr.; agent, W1I- 
11am Morris). — Three Mitchells, Glrdellers' Dogs, 
Muriel Window, Four Gardners, Geo. W. Day and 
The Carson Bros. 

NATIONAL (Dr. Reed, mgr.; agent. William 
Morris). — Ada Melrose, Sullivan and Anton. Mora 
nnd Mnlinnl, Rodllnd and Thomas. Beatrice Leon- 
ard, Thatcher and Thatcher, The Murthalcrs, 
Stark and Crawford. 

WHITE FRONT (Johnson Bros., mgrs. ; agent, 
William Morris). — Bradford and Turner, The Mur- 
thalers, Juggling Smith, Ray Loomls, Mile. Emma, 
Two Rabos. 

OGDEN (W. F. Welnrlch, mgr.; agent. William 
Morris). — Ray Loomls, Edward Berry, Stark and 
Crawford, Ed. Gibson, Jeanette Darvllle. 

FAIRY LAND (Mr. Kanter, mgr.; agent. Wil- 
liam Morris).— William O'Herr. Mile. Emma, Ed. 
Berry, Phil. McDonougb, Carmene Jefferson. 

WONDERLAND (Mr. Kanter. mgr.; agent, 
William Morris).— Cbas. Allen. Wllllnin O'Herr, 
Jennette Darvllle, Laura Pederson, Wulter Flem- 
mlng. 

NORTH AVE. (Paul Slttner, mgr.; agent. Chas. 
II. Don trick).— Tom Linton and Eight "Jungle 
Glrlj*." Frozo Trio. Sully Garard and Co., Madell 
and Corbley, Jeannettes, Nancy Rice. 

THALIA (Thos. Murray, mgr.; agent. Chas. II. 
Doutrlck).— Summer Stock Co.. Laurant and Co., 
Davis and Merrill. 

SCIIINDLER'S (L. Sehlndler; agent, Chas. II. 
Doutrlck). — Ahrensmeyer and Co., hypnotists; La 
Delle. aerlallst; and pictures. 

NOTES.— Henry Dlxey. In "Mary Jane's P«." 
clones at the Chicago Opera House June S. The 
house will probably remain closed for the sum- 



"CHABLEY CASE'S FATHER" 

Written by Charley Case, comedian. Send P. O. 
order for 25c. to Csse Publishing Co., Lock port, 
N. Y. 

AT LIBERTY 

WALLY HIL8TON 

Singing, Dancing, Acrobatic Comedian, 
for Musical Comedy Extravagansa Burlesque or 
good partner. Also play Unimals. 
Address 1908 Columbia Ave., Phila., Pa., or cars 
White Rats. 

P. 8.— My wife, Lottie Helston, has retired per- 
manently. 

FOR SALE. 

FIVE TEARS' LEA8E OF THEATRE 
IN GREATER NEW YORK. 

Capacity 800. Cheap rent. Now open. Fully 
equipped. License paid to Aug. 1st next. Popula- 
tion to draw from, 160,000. Immediate posses- 
sion. Address B. J., VARIETY Office. 



mer. "The Land of Nod" was to have been re- 
vived there for the summer. — Among those en- 
gaged for tbe new Cort Theatre, scheduled to 
open tbe middle of November, are Amelia Stone 
and Joseph C. Mlron. — The Columbus is doing 
well with vaudeville under new management. 
Tbe bills are placed by Coney Holmes. The best 
seat In tbe house is 10 cents, while any number 
can be bad for a nickel. That's one of tbe reasons. 
—Ben Bornstein, representing Harry Von TUser, 
expects to return to New York in about a week. 
He has been here about two months. — The Millers' 
National Federation "bought" the house at the 
American last Thursday night and only members 
and friends were admitted or able to secure 
Keats. The box office closed up for the evening 
performance as far as purchasing tickets was 
concerned, and those who came with the expect- 
ancy of seeing tbe show bought their tickets for 
other performances. The box office as a result 
bad a good run for advance sales that evening, 
and Ernie Young and his assistant were kept 
busy banding out the tickets until a late hour. — 
A. E. Meyers, tbe vaudeville agent, Is now book- 
ing tbe Joliet Theatre, Juliet, 111., and Grand 
Opera House, Aurora, 111. Both are first-class 
theatres. 

— Vaudeville Is now offered at the People's, on 
Van Buren Street. It Is a dramatic stock theatre. 
Last week an opera company appeared. — A new 
vaudeville theatre Is being built at Ashtabula, 
Ohio, by C. E. Zelie.— David Beebler will prob- 
ably locate In the New York offices of the Or- 
pheum Circuit next season. Mr. Beehler was 
manager of the Orpheum Theatre in Sioux City. 
— The Dominion, Winnipeg, closes for tbe season 
this Saturday. Morris vaudeville has been Im- 
mensely successful there — Mrs. A. S. Taft, sister- 
in-law of President Taft. owner of the La Salle 
Theatre property, which is held under an injunc- 
tion by Mort Singer, is said to be determined 
to fight tbe alleged verbal lease which tbe 
Singers claim they have. The present rental of 
tbe theatre is $8,500 a year. Harry Asklu, 
Singer's former business associate, Is after tbo 
house and willing to pay $24,000 a year. The 
La Salle is closed for the summer, "The Golden 
Girl" having been moved over to the Princess. — 
The Pekln Theatre, the first and only playhouse de- 
voted to colored stock productions, reopened after 
a short season of vaudeville. The theatre is under 
the management of Robert T. Mott, who in- 
troduced this style of entertainment to Chicago. 
Harrison Stewart Is the principal comedian, while 
several others of tbe original company are en- 
listed, with a big chorus of dusky damsels. 
"Sambo" Is tbe name of the musical play. It Is 
a western drama, with specially written songs. 
The plot resembles "The Danltes." There Is a 
villain, a hero and the customary comedians, 
with a bunch of Indians to add local color. Tbe 
place Is cozy and comf»rt«hle. 



HEADLINERS NEXT WEEK. 



"Swat Milligan," Columbia. 
CJus Edwards, Alhambra. 
Pauline?, Colonial. 
Richard Golden, Orpheum. 
James J. Corbett, American. 
La Belle Amerieaine, Hammerstein's 
Roof. 

BOSTON. 

James K. Ilackett, Orpheum. 
Vesta Tillev, Keith's. 

CHICAGO. 

Kddic Voy, American. 

('artcr De Haven and Leone Pnm, Ma- 
jestic. 



MADISON WROTE IT 

"Howard and Howard smashed a record for 
applause with their parody song about 
Weber and Fields, entitled -There Never 
Was a Psl Like You,' st Hammerstein's."— 
ZIT, In the N. V. EVENING JOURNAL. 

FURTHERMORE- 

Within the past four months, I've also 
written for the following vaudeville stars: 
JOB WELCH. ANDREW MACK. JOE MOR- 
RIS, AL LEECH, BEN WELCH, ED 
WYNN, HAPPY FANNY FIELDS, AL 
CARLBTON, BARNEY FERGUSON, EMER- 
ALD AND DUPREB. MILLS AND HEW- 
ITT. MY REFERENCES. Any of them. 

JAMES MADISON 

Publisher of Madison's Budget. 

VAUDEVILLE AUTHOR 
1493 BROADWAY 

Boom 617 Long Acre Bldg., 44th te 45th St. 
Hours 10 a. m. to noon and by appointment. 



No I THE TRIPPING STICK 




No 2 

THE PNEUMATIC CLUB 



No 3 
THE TRIPPING LOOP. 



The Metchnikoff weapons— the Russian thrillers 
and laugh-producers— oan now be leased, but only 
by experienced amusement managers and profes- 
sional strong men (wrestlers, boxers, eto.) 

A complete entertainment in themselves, and 
for a vaudeville act. They probably draw larger 
audiences at smaller cost than anything ever on. 

Write or call any week day S to 4 P. M. 
STEWART, 1039 BERGEN ST., BROOKLYN, 
N. Y. 




MA. 




JOf A 

HAfuWI 



After Big Success on 
tbe Sulli van-Considi ne 
and Interstate time, 
can be addressed, care 
of Oen. Del., Hot 
Springs, Ark., until 
July 5th. 



SNAKES FOR SALE, 

For "Salome" and all other kind of acts. 
snakes are broke to handle; all kinds snd 
on band. 



J. 



Animal Importer, 
16 H. St, 



Philadelphia. 



Comedy Talking Acts. S Monologues (sure nrs). 
Several First Parts and Burlesques, and Tws 
Complete Musical Farce Comedies. Address 

RAUL QUIININ 

(Qnlnn and Mitchell), 

20 Bay 86th St., Bsnsonhorst, 

Long Island, B. T. 

BL00DG00D 

(COSTUMER) 

104 WEST 44th STREET 

NEW YORK CITY 

Telephone: 8206 Bryant. Hear 6th Ave. 

Is a Plsoh, use ALLEN'S FOOT-EASE 

Ladles can wear shoes one sice smaller after 
using Allen's Foot-Earn'. It makes tight or new 
shoes feci cany; gl\es Instant relief to corns and 
bunions. It's the greatest comfort discovery of 
the sgc. Cures swollen feet, blisters, callous and 
sore spots. It U a certain relief for sweating, 
Hred, aching feet. At all Druggists snd Shoe 
Stores, 25c. Don't accept any substitute. For 
FKEK trlsl package, also Free Sample of the 
FOOT- E ASK Sanitary COKN-I'AD. a new Inven- 
tion, address Allen S. Olmsted, \ai Hoy, N. Y. 

SHEER "d BURTON 

Singing and Talking Comedians. 
Invito otters. Address care VARIETY. 



When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



26 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



rr 



v T^ 



GRANT 



. • 



GARDNER "STODDARD 



MARIE 



Presenting "VAUDEVILLE FRIVOLITIES ** 

Tremendous Success in England 



< 



OPENED on the MOSS-STOLL Tour in LONDON, MAY 1 7th. 

Agent H. W. WIELAND, 16 St. Martins St., London, W. C. 



RE-ENGAGED AT ONCE FOR THE ENTIRE TOUR. 

(REGARDS TO ALL FRIENDS) 



JAMES » LUCIA COOPER 

TALKING ACT XV "ONE." 
EEZOK 4 PLUNXETT, Agents. Gee, Bluteh made m* lang n. 



BESSIE WYNN 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



DALY m O'BRIEN 




Those "Tanglefoot" Dancers. 
Watch for the "JUNGLE SHOP" Special Scenery Effects in "One." 



WILFRED CLARKE 

Presenting KU Bketohes 
"NO MORE TROUBLE" and "WHAT WILL HAPPEN NEXT?" 

Address, MO W. 44th fit., New York City. 



HARRY TATE'S Co. 

FISHING MOTORING 



lNe\A/ York 

England 

Australia 



Virginia Sargent 

"THE GOtL FROM THE BLUE ORAM." 
A Dainty Singer ef Onalat Sengs ever wham nil Use critics in meet enthusiastic 



is/iirvi 



' 




ME S 











ETHEL 



COMEDY MUSICAL ACT. " 
■OLE DIRECTION. BARNEY MYERS 



is/iujsicz^i 



"I LOVE MT FIDDLE, BUT OH YOU 'CELLO." 




Pearson 



d 



a 



Joell 4 Musical Cates 4 



IN \//HJDE\/ILLE 



il 



Presenting Their Originnl Comedy Playlet Entitled 

A CHINESE NUGGET " 

In Three Characters: IRISH, CHINESE, ITALIAN 
Address BERT LEVEY. 2053 Sutter Street, Ssn Francisco 



NEW ACT, BUT GOOD. 



■us GERTIE de MILT 



AND 

DANCING 

BEAUX 



Opened HENDERSON'S, Coney Island, MAY 24. 
Permanr it address, 1456 Bedford Are., Brooklyn. Phone, 1881-R Prospect. 



America's Most Meritorious Musical Act 




BEST Cornet Soloist 
BEST Saxophone Soloist 
BEST Saxophone Quartette 
BEST Xylophone Team 



Address oars VARIETY. 



MAX 



SADIE 



JUST 



LON HASCALL 



Jaok Singen's "Ben man Show." 



COMEDIAN 



BROOKS and VEDDER 

AT LIBERTY for BUMMER PARES and NEXT SEASON. Both Play Parts, 

68 Smith St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
14 MINUTES of oomedy, talking-, singing and dancing in "ONE." 



IEUX 



In astounding feats on the bounding; wire. 
Permanent address, 201 E. 14th St., New York. 



LARRIVEESLEE 

"The Candy Kid and the Girl." 
16th week on J. J. QUIGLEY CIRCUIT. 



WORKING IN "ONE" WITH GRAND PIANO. 





HENRY 

NOW PLAYING FOR WESTERN VAUDEVILLE ASSOCIATION 



PARSONS 



LATE Off* ORIGINAL "NIGHT WITH THE ff=»OETS»» 

HEATH McWILLIAMS 

WEEK JUNE 14, SHEA'S, BUFFALO. 
WEEK OF JUNE 81st. TEMPLE, DETROIT. Managed by EDWARD S. KELLER, Leao Acre Bldg., New Yerk 

When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



VARIETY 



27 



PALL NICHOLSON ™° 












American Music 
Chicago, June 7 



Hall, 
and 14 



MISS NORTON 



BOSTON 

By KBJTE1T L. WAITT. 

VARIETY Office, 89 Summer St. 

ORPHKLM (Lludsay Morieon, mgr.; agent, 
direct).— Billy Clifford, headlined; Llnd, excellent 
act; Maude Lambert, velvet voice, applause; 
Kohler Trio, mualcM treat; Wataoo, Hutcblnga 
and Edward*, aketcb In which eccentric dance In 
beat feature; Watermelon Trust, two men excel- 
lent, two women awkward; Neuman, mind read- 
lug! W. 8. Harvey, strong man with excellent 
comedienne aaalstant. 

KEITH'S (Geo. Clark, mgr.; agent, U. B. O.). 
— Bert Lealle and Co., headlined, excellent; Stuart 
Barnes, fair monolog; Chas. and Fanny Van, 
held over; Paul Klelat, musical novelty; Big City 
Four, good; Willy Pantaer Troupe, nothing better; 
The Daleys, on rollers; Jennings and Renfrew, 
good itongs; the Salvaggls, novel dancers. 

GLOBE (R. P. Jeanette, mgr.; agent, direct). 
— Patchln Bros., Lawrence and Grace, Miller 
and Princeton, Jack Clay, Jack Clahaue, and 
Mlsa Mann with m. p. 

NEW PALACE (I. H. Moaher, mgr.; agent, 
direct). — Rollins and Carmen Sisters, Laura 
Beane, the Campbells, and Kelly and CatUn. 

NORUMBEGA PARK.— Manhattan Newsboys' 
Quartet; Three Dancing Durands, Ascot and 
Maxmlno, Musical Bells, and Rem Brandt. 

NOTES. — Fred C. Curtis, who has had charge 
of the bookings for Wm. Morris and the bouses 
In his Suburban circuit, has been taken Into the 
New York Morris office to handle bookings there. 
Fred Mardo, for some time with Qulgley here, 
succeeds Curtis. — Morris' Orpheuin closes after 
next week. During the summer an 8-story build- 
ing will be erected over the Washington Street 
entrance. — Gaiety Theatre closed this week, also 
Columbia. Howard closes next week.— J. W. 
Gammon, advertising manager for Waldron's Palace 
Theatre, has been retalued by Manager Mosher 
on bin new venture. 



PHILADELPHIA 

By GEORGE X. YOUNG. 

KEITHS (II. T. Jordan, mgr.; agent, U. B. 
O.).— Rattling good summer weather bill. An- 
nette Kellertnan bad It on the others and It 
looked as If the audience as well as some of 
the actors In tbe show would have been willing 
to do a "slater act" with "The Diving Venus." 
The majority of the acts were familiar here 
and divided houors with the new ones. 
Frank Morrell was glveu a tough place to fill, 
just ahead of Miss Kellerinan, but the big fellow 
won them over with bis singing and then banded 
out a lot of "gags" which sounded new here, 
and be got them over iu first class style, scoring 
a substantial bit. lmro Fox, tbe magician, 
has been absent a long while and offered a series 
of tricks, many of which were new here. He 
was well liked and bis breesy talk helped. Mr. 
and Mrs. Jimmy Barry aud Co. offered their 
capital rural Bketcb, "At Hensfoot Corner"; 
Selblnl and Grovlnl held down tbe opening spot 
in good shape with their varied assortment of 
gymnastic feats. Kelly and Rose did nicely with 
a straight singing act. Tbe Helm Children won 
their share of the applause and laughter, and 
Wilfred Clarke ami Co. kept tbe house amused 
with the capital comedy sketch, "What Hap- 
pened Next." The Hopkins Staters have something 
new and odd In the "sister" line, and went very 
good. 

TROCADERO (Charles Cromwell, mgr.).— Sec- 
oud week of the summer stock company and two 
old burlesque pieces were used. "Hotel Topsy 
Turvy" was billed as the first part, but there 
was very little of the material used that re- 
sembled even this well-worn piece. Carroll Henry, 
who was cast for the principal role, was unable 
to appear In the first part owlug to a severe 
hoarseness, and this left John Hart, Abe Leavltt 
and Charles Raymond to get through as well as 
possible. They seemed to be working ad lib, with 
Hart getting through with fairly good results 
with the use of bis "dope" stories. There were 
not enough numbers to keep the pace up to a re- 
spectable gait. Belle Travers put over a couple 
that were well liked, and Eleanor GUmore and 
one or two others got to be near-principals with 
a couple of lines and leading numbers. The censor 
must have lost his Job, for things ran pretty 
wild throughout tbe show, and the chorus pulled 
a kissing number in which the girls worked all 
through tbe house In a decidedly care-free manner. 
Eleanor GUmore, Annie Welsner, who used to be 
Lou Route's prise "coocber" put most of tbe 
ginger Into tbe numbers. Annie Is still giving 
that "wiggle-walk" and awful battle. Belle 
Travers opened the olio with a singing turn and a 
boy helped her a lot singing from the balcony. 
Carroll Henry and Nellie Francis scored the hit of 
the show with their familiar specialty. The 
Boyce Brothers did some ordinary bag punching, 
and tbe Misses GUmore and King put over a 
sister act with mild results. Henry worked In 
the afterpiece, which was an old timer, and while 
he was working under a severe handicap managed 
to get over a lot of laughs, though he was not 
always strictly polite. John Hart bandied two 
bits In good shape and Abe Leavltt added his 
share. Only a couple of numbers were used here, 
and Annie Welsner again got the spotlight and 
banded out one of the funniest things In the show, 
a song with an Irish brogue. "Zallah," the 
dancer, was sgaln held over as the big drawing 
card. Tbe house was fairly well filled on a hot 
night. 

ELEVENTH STREET OPERA HOUSE (James 
Simpson, mgr.). — William Gane, of New York, 



opened his new picture and vaudeville house on 
Monday with an entertaining bill beaded by BUUe 
Seaton, billed as "Eva Tanguay's only double." 
The Bradley Minstrel Sextet, Morton and Morton, 
I'hlllips Sisters and Rowland were the others, 
with several changes of pictures. The house has 
been fitted up aud repainted and looks like a new 
place. There will be a continuous show given, 
starting at eleven in the morning and closing at 
eleven at night with a ten-cent admission. Con- 
sidering the hot weather and the street-car strike 
which has crippled business generally, the opening 
was a satisfactory one. 

LUBIN'S PALACE (George Botbwell, mgr.; 
ngent, William Morris). — Bill above the average. 
Sakeld, Wiufleld and Wilmer, Louis Granat, Fritz's 
Dogs, Dixie Comedy Four, Frederic Trio, Muslco, 
Johnson Bros, and Johnson, Murphy and Chapman, 
Lillian Murtha, in. p. 

UNIQUE (R. J. Barry, mgr.; agent, W. S. 
Cleveland).— De Voy Trio, Bissett and O'Brien, 
The Mandys, Yackley and Bunnell; Rose Mel 
v«>rne, Fraley, Graham and Fraley, Johnnie O'Brien 



fair opportunity. Tbe management baa settled 
all of Its difficulties with the street car company 
and the transportation service Is now as good as 
to any park. 

CENTURY (P. 8hort, mgr.).— After the house 
had been dark for nearly a month, Lew Dock- 
stader momentarily revived the Century season by 
playing four performances beginning Sunday after- 
noon. He gave a first class minstrel show. 
Nelll O'Brien, Rees Prosser, Al Johnston and a 
half-hundred others support Lew. 

FOREST PARK HIGHLANDS (J. D. Tlppett, 
mgr.). — Mazle King and her dancers are the head- 
liners. Mabel Keith, the Sousa girl, and John 
Lelck, cornetlst; Keeney, McGraban and Piatt, 
singers; tbe Hughes Trio, another musical feature; 
Alvo and Copeland, horizontal bar acrobats, and 
the Havelocks, comedy jugglers, complete one of 
the biggest and best bills of the Highlands season. 

MANN IONS (Mannlon Brothers, nigra.).— The 
World's Comedy Four, a quartet; Tbe Glockers, 
novelty jugglers; DolUe Bremser, songstress; 
George and George, European acrobats, and Allen 



Though the management of Delmar Garden In- 
vited tbe Lambs to gambol there and offered the 
free use of one of tbe two theatres, the In- 
vitation as extended while the Lambs were In 
Chicago arrived too late to make arrangements. — 
Carrie Reynolds qualified her statement that she 
would wed after leaving the West End Heights 
company. She says she will wed In the fall, 
and has gone to finish the summer with the Aborn 
Opera Company. 



ATLANTIC CITY, B. J. 
YOUNG'S IMER (Agent. U. B. O.).— Harry 
L. Tlghe and Co. (New Acts); Austin Walsh, 
very funny; Emma Janvier (New Acts); Volta, 
electrical wizard; Fred IMipnz, parodist, well 
IJked; Swan and O'Pay, clever; Princess 

Susa-ia, tiniest wire walker, good. SAVOY 

(Harry Brown, mgr.; agent, direct). — Raymond 
iiml Soitonla, very good; Jack Mendelsohn, 

good; Caryl Monroe, good. STEEPLECHASE 

TIER (E. L. Ferry, mgr.; agent, Rudy Heller). 



GET THE ORIGINAL SONG BY ARMSTRONG and CLARK 

I LOVE MY WIFE, BUT 

p I WW IIIW I 

The sia'ement of the writers about the priority of this song on every professional copy 

" I Wait to <io to tie Bill Oime" 

The Real Baseball Bong of the Season. 





While Love and Life Shall Last" 

A Beautiful Semi-Classic Ballad, by HARRY D. KERR. 

"JUNGLE MOON" 

PERCY WENRICHS Masterpiece. He wrote "Under the Tropical 

Moon," "Rainbow," etc 

VICTOR KREMER CO., 152 Lake St., Chicago, III. 



GEO. WALTER BROWN 

Formerly connected with Helf A Hager, Ted Snyder Co., is now 
Manager of our Professional Dept., and would be pleased to hear from 
you. 



(the latter a new singer who will remain several 
weeka replacing George J. Offerman). 

GRAND OPORA HOUSE (Geo. Metzel, mgr.; 
agent, M. W. Taylor).— Webber Family; La Belle 
Marie. Woodford's Circus. Four Musical Barbers, 
Johnstone, cyclist ; Roesser and Georgette, pictures. 

LIBERTY (R. II. McFarland, mgr.; agent. 
!'. B. ().). — Parshley, xylophonlst; Misses Shew- 
hrooko and Berry, the Leanders, pictures. 

DARK (Thoa. Dougherty, mgr.; agent, M. W. 
Taylor). --Diet urea and vaudeville. 

GIRARD AVENUE (Miller A Kaufman, nigra. ; 
agent. M. W. Taylor). — Pictures and vaudeville. 

PEOPLE'S (Fred Leopold, mgr.; agent, M. W. 
Taylor). — Pictures and vaudeville. 

1UJOIT (Sam Dawson, mgr.). — The stock com- 
pany put on two lively burlesque pieces with 
lli«' original Billy Watson and Billy Speneer as 
principal comedians and with "La*Neta" billed 
as the original "Girl In Red" the added feature. 
There were several specialties aud a liberal 
sprinkling of catchy numbers throughout the 
show. Business was unusually good considering 
the weather. 

GAYETY (Eddie Shayne. mgr.).— Change of bill 
this week with Suits Moore and Julia Sinclair as 
principals. Manager Shayne had his benefit 
Tuesday night. It was one big success. 



and Cromter, singing comedians, make up the first 
MM of the season at Maunion's, which opened 
Sunday. The surprise of the bill is Miss Bremser, 
whose voice has developed wonderfully since she 
wss last heard here. 

NOTES.— tilery's Band is playing in the Coli- 
seum palm garden. — William T. Brooks, former 
proprietor of the Crescent Roller Rink, has or- 
ganized a company to build an $80,000 theatre 
at 4021-23 Olive Street, opening In September with 
a stock company.— Mile. Esmathilda, violin vir- 
tuoso, known to vaudeville patrons on almost 
all circuits and In private life as Miss Esmeraldo 
Herri, 1124 Morrison Avenue, St. Louis, was mar- 
ried to Dr. J. F. Mayes on June 2. The Musicians' 
Union furnished a brass band, as tbe bride Is u 
member of the organisation. She was a soloist 
with Souss's Band one season.— Nearly $200,000 
has been subscribed for tbe new German theatre 
to be built on Delmar Avenue, near Grand. — 



— De Mutha (New Acts); Bob and Bertha Hyde, 
good; Ted Primrose, good; Carlln and Musch; 

m. p. CRITERION (W. A. Barrltt. mgr. 

agent. I/mla Wesley >. — Lou Auger, went big; 
Grace Cameron, very good; Criterion Stock Play- 
ers. In "The Circus Girl." NOTE8.— Million 

Dollar Pier will discontinue vaudeville fur two 
weeks owing to the electrical convention holding 
forth theie. — George Fuller Golden, who has 
I»eeii here for tbe past two months, left for 
Harnuiic Lake with his family. — The Criterion 
Is running "The Circus Girl," which Is clearly 
the "Arabian Nights" with a new name. Lou 
Auger and Grace Cameron are playing between 
the acts to strengthen the show. It baa almost 
been decided on to play vaudeville at the Cri- 
terion this summer, booked by Ixmla Wesley. 
Vaudeville will be given there the weeks of 
June 21 aud 28, booked by him. 

I. B. PULASKI. 



ST. LOUIS 



By FRANK E. ANFENQER. 

DELMAR (Dan S. Flshell, mgr.; musical the- 
atre). The summer garden war began in earnest 
Sunday , when the last but not least notable con- 
tingent, the Delmar Opera Co.. took the field In 
"Florodora." with Edna Wallace Hopper In her 
original role of I*ady Ilolyrood. Tbe original 
sextet was not there, but It was not missed, for 
the production Is quite the classiest St. I-ouls 
ever had In the way of summer musical show. 
Ann Trasker vies with Miss Hopper, having the 
role of Dolores. Though unknown here previously 
Miss Trasker scored an instantaneous success. 
Dorothy Web, Will II. Sloan, Carl Haydn, Carl 
Gantvoort and Edward S. Metcalfe are some of 
the principals who more than make good. Tbe 
chorus Is a revelation. 

WEST END HEIGHTS IS. N. * Jacob Oppen- 
heliner, mgrs.). — Rice and Cady are back In their 
element this week, presenting "Fiddle-Dee-Dee," 
the Wchcrflcld melange and "Do Hurry," a 
travesty on "Du Barry." Gertrude Hutcheson and 
Phrynette Ogden and others of the Heights com- 
pany who arc now established favorites have a 



MOT CONNECTED WITH ANT OTHER B00KIN0 OFFICE. 

LONG ACRE CIRCUIT 

521-590 Long Acre Building Timet tqoare, New Y«rk 

ACTS WANTED for Family Vaudeville Theatres. Put your name on the books. If you make 
good, we can keep you workirg. « 

L. N. SNEDEN, General Manager. 

Mr. FRED MARDO 

(Formerly manager John J. Quigley's Agency) 
is now MANAGER of the 

BOSTON BOOKING OFFICE OF 

WILLIAM MORRIS, Inc. 

MANAGERS AND ARTISTS: Address ORPHEUM THEATRE 

BUILDING, BOSTON, Mass. 



When answering advertuementt kindly mention Vahiett. 



28 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



= 




GUY RAWSON 



AMD 



PRANCES GLARE 



JUST KIDS 



•• 



DICK « ALICE McAYOY 

44 Herald Squaro Jimmy" 



King of the Newsboys. 




BOOKED SOLID TILL 1911 OM THE UNITED TIME. 

PEARL TAN6LEY 

"THE EGYPTIAN MENTALI8T." 
CHAS. E. WELCH. Mgr., Suit* 401, 67 B. Clark St., Chicago, 111. 




VELDE TRIO 



la their 
(The original. 



Equilibrial Acrobatic Combination, including the "LOOP-THE-LOOP" 

Mi a oojry). For Parks aad Tain address Mies Ethel Bobtnsoa. Weston 

Permanent addraat, aara VARIETY, Ghioage 



m 



Valerie Bergere 

AND HEE OWN COMPAJTY. W/0 



Preseatlag a roaorlolre of Playlets 



M 



•• 



TIME ALL FILLED 

In her ORIGINAL 



HULA-HULA-DANCE 



BILLY 




"r>AK/V 

a> mud 



HAWAIIAN TRIO" 

BY U SITED BOOKING OFFHS. 



AND 




JESSIE 



Tka Clerar EnglLh Couple that SPEAK "Engliah." "Bai Jots, goblimy!" Tlmo all filled. Address VABIETY. 



WILL HALLIDAY and PETE CURLEY an HOT playing "The Battle of "Too-Soon." Their aew 

▼ehiole it a iconic comedy production. 

Halliday and Cu rley 

AT THE NORTH POLE 



-IT- 



FRANK KENNEDY 

SCENERY PROM THE LEE LASH STUDIOS. 

Rube Dickinson 



EX-JU8TICE 07 THE PEACE. 
Pew. Addran, WHITE, RATS 



I 



UNK 



sam - GORDON and SHAKEN - emma 

Eccentric Singers aad Dancers. 
Direction B. A. MYERS, Knickerbocker Theatre Building, Haw York. 



Three Marvelous Mells 



(1 Woman and t Man) 

SENSATIONAL GYMNASTS (Original). 
Open for Vaudeville, Parka, Fairs aad Burlesque, 



Addraas ©are VABIETY. 




K1ETY 



ISM BROADWAY, HEW YORK CITY. 

CARDS OF ARTISTS 

UNDER THE HEADING OF 

" REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS " 



1 -1 Inoh eJngle ool., 94.00 monthly, net 

I Inch ■ 7.00 

1-t Inoh double ool., ISO 

t Inoh " 1 2.60 



AT FOLLOWING RATES: 

2 Inchea double ool., S22.S0 monthly, not 
1-2 Inch aoroee page, 18.00 

1 Inoh * r 26.00 - ■ 

2 Inchea " 60.00 " ' " 






I*ara>r Ipaca Pro Rata. 

He advertisement under this heading accepted for less than one month and no preferred position 

given. Remittance must accompany advertisements forwarded by mail. 

Cash discount for 6 and 18 months. 



MACK 




N 
D 



• •' 



IV/I 



rsj 



vA/'irvj 



99 



ORIGINATORS OF "HEN AND 
HENRY," "MAKING THE WATCH" 
AND THE "ISTHMUS." OTHERS 
PLEASE LEAVE THESE ALONE. 
THEY BELONG TO US AND ARE 
COPYRIGHTED. 

Maaaioaaoat 

ALF. T. WILTON 




"■ KENNEDY 



Week Ma\y 81. Alhembra, New York, Closing the Show 



Pat Cssey, ASenl 



When sanoerisf * 4v e rUim* ent$ himdhf mention Variety. 



VARIETY 



29 




WONDER WORKER 




Fifth Avenue Theatre, New York, indefinite 



ALF T. WILTON, Agent 



BALTIMORE, MD. 
MARYLAND (Fred. 0. Shannberger, mgr.; 
agent, U. B. 0.; Monday rehearsal 10). — One 
of the best bills of the season, headed toy Elfle 
Faj, usual bit; Al Leach and the Three Rose Buds. 
amused; Lock wood and McCartjr, pleasing; Howard 
Trueadale and Co., laughable; La Petite Mlgnon. 
excellent; Carnelll and Eddy, good slap-stick act; 

Van Brothers, musical, pleased. FORD'S 

(Charles B. Ford, mgr.; agent, Knickerbocker 
Amusement Co.). — Edward Wright and Co., clerer 
company In good musical sketch; Pauline DeVere, 
comedienne, very good; Harry Batchelor, musical. 
pleased; Boyd and Moran In "On the Battlefield." 
good; Fred Lytel and Daisy Chaplin, sketch, good; 

Charles Brunner, xylophonlst, won favor. 

ACADEMY OF MUSIC (Harry Henkle, mgr.; 
agent, M. W. Taylor). — Countess Rossini, clever 
songs; Cycling Brunettes, good; Tony Baker, black 
lace, pleased; the New York Newsboys' Quartet, 
good harmony; Ceclle Darnelle, excellent songs; 

Gall and. Alberta, aerlallsta, good. VICTORIA 

(Pearce A Scheck, nigra.; agent, Wm. Morris).— 
"The Mystery of Babylon," clever illusion; Nellie 
Lytton, good; Three Dancing Lees, pleased; Wil 
ton and West, Hebrew parodists, good; Melrose 
Brothers, acrobats, very good; Musical Woods, 
fair; Margie Addis, good; Gramlich and Hall, 
in "The Affinity," good; Henry P. Nelson, 
German comedian, good; Lee * Harris, monologlsts, 
won favor; Grace King, "coon shouter," good. 

HOLLIDAY STREET (George Rife, mgr.).— 

Todesca- Keating Trio, cyclists, very good; Amer- 
ican Four, good voices; Frank Dobson, blackface, 
good; Melville and Bushnell, "sister act," won 

applause. LUBIN'S TWIN THEATRES (E. C. 

Earle, mgr.). — Vaudeville and m. p. ELEC- 
TRIC PARK (Max Rosen, mgr.).— Polar, "The 
Man Up a Pole," wonderful feats at a giddy 
helgbt; Matsuda Japanese Troupe, good; Newell- 
Sberbett Trio, aerial, astound; Rlccl's Band. 

large crowds. SUBURBAN PARK (August 

Fennemao, mgr.; agent, William Morris).— Vaude- 
ville. GWYN OAK PARK (John Farson, mgr.). 

— Marrou and Heins, singing comedians, pleased; 
Charles Treen, good; Broadway Boys' Quartet, hit; 

Stirk and London, good. FLOOD'S PARK (John 

Flood, mgr.).— Vaudeville and burlesque. 

GAYETY (Wm. L. Ballauf, mgr. ) .—"Jersey 
Lilies."— MONUMENTAL (Monty* Jacobs).— Second 

week "Octoroon Burlesquen. " RIVERVIBW 

PARK (Michael Fltssimmons, mgr.). — Band con- 
certs, m. p. and vaudeville. BAY SHORE 

PARK (United Railways Co., mgrs.).— Boston 
Ladles' Orchestra. 



BUFFALO, N. T. 

SHEA'S (N. 8bea, mgr.; agent, U. B. O.; 
Monday rehearsal 10).— Vesta Tllley. hit; Empire 
Comedy Four, good; Nelson and Otto, pleased; 
Three Melvln Brothers, excellent; Campbell and 
Yates, floe; Keeley Brothers, great; Ryan and 
White, good dancers; Mldgley and Carlisle, special 
feature, good. ACADEMY (E. J. Wilbur, 



FOR SALE 

4 BUNGALOW 
LOTS 

Stony Brook, L. I. 

Adjoining the beautiful summer homes of 
Mr. and Mrs. Ved Monroe, Hyams and 
Melntyre, MoFarlane and Oilette, Bam Curtis, 
Kdgar Atchison Ely, Eugene O'Rourke, and 
others. 

Lots axe on a high bluff — fine shade— with an 
unsurpassed water view of SO miles across to 
the Oonaeotlout shore. 

BUT VOW AMD BUILD YOUB BTOOALOW 
WHILE LAYIHO OFT. 

I will be there oommenoing Saturday, ^une 
6th to show property. Trains leare Hew 
York, West Mth street, Long Island E. B,, 
at • and 11 a. m., and Sundays 9:60. Take 
oarriage at depot for O. W. Baylls' oottage, 
where I oan be found. 



Perkins Fisher 



mgr.). — Josie Flynn, applause; Geo. H. Adams fit 
Co., funny; Iro Close, good; Maramba Band, sec- 
ond week, fine; Hallet aud Stock, pleased; 
Damondy, excellent; Elsie Folk, cleve r; Whltwell 

and Pearson, pleased. LAFAYETTE (Chan. M. 

Bagg, mgr.). — Lafayette Stock, good bill. 

LUNA PARK (R. H. McBroom, mgr.).— Kudaras 

Jap. Troupe and vaudeville, good. NOTE. — 

Ringling Brothers' Circus, July 2. 

J 8. DICKSON. 



BUTTE, MOHT. 

OBPHEUM (Martin Beck, gen. mgr.; agent 
direct).— Week Msy 22: Laddie Cliff, boy comed- 
ian, scored a bit; Eight Original Madcaps, good; 
The Three I^lghtons, very good; OUle Young and 
Brothers, clever; Lissle Evans and Jefferson 
Lloyd, "Turning the Tables." fair; Max Witt's 
Singing Colleens, good; Cartell Brothers, comedy 

skating. EMPIBE (L. M. Quinn, mgr.; agent, 

W. 8.).— Week 23: Amy Got lob and Co., "Gov- 
ernment Bonds," clever plsylet; Lynne and Bon- 
nie Hsassrd, musicians, very good; Verne and 
Verne, s. aud d., good; Leo St. Elmo, musical 

Germau, fine; Sid Glrsux, tenor, good. 

FAMILY (Newton Crawford, mgr.; agent, 8. * 
C. direct).— Week Msy 22: Ramsey Sisters, fair; 
The Kregers. slack wire, clever; Joe Noll, female 
Impersonator; Jack and Bertha Rich. 

H. T. ASH LOCK. 



CINCINNATI, 0. 
By HARRY HESS. 
VARIETY'S Central Office, 

107 Bell Bloek. 

CONEY ISLAND (G. Wellington Engelbretb, 
amusement director; agent, direct). — The Island 
opened with the biggest crowd in its history and 
an Improved and enlarged vaudeville stage. Lewis 
and Harr, headlined, excellent; Tan Arlkl Troupe, 
Japanese, very big; Roblsch and Childress, eccen- 
tric musical comedy, big; Cbas. Gano, blackface 
comedian, good; The Abrens, acrobats, very good; 
Vardamau. Impersonator. 

CHESTER PARK (I. M. Martin, mgr.; agent, 
William Morris). — McDonsld and Huntington, ex- 
cellent; Campbell and Brady, jugglers, clever; 
Ramso aud Arno, comedy acrobats, funny; Amer- 
ican Newsboys' Quartet, bit. The new attrac- 
tion la the Winnebago Indians. 

GORDON PARK (W. Canfleld, mgr.; agent, Gus 
Sun). — Geo. Hussey and Co., ventriloquists, good; 
Mllano and Alvln, sketch, good; Warda, imper- 
sonator, good; Camlllle's Posies, good; Fern Verne, 
ill. songs, good. 

WALNUT.— Olive Helene Greatrex, whistler, 
clever; Julian and Dyer, comedy acrobats, well 
received; Fred Helder, good; Pat Crawford, black- 
face, fair. 

HEUCK'S (agent, B.C.).— George E. Austin and 
Co., wire, clever; J. C. Crelgbton. roosters, very 
good; Dick and Pearl Foote, good; Bud Framan, 
good. 

GRAND (agent, Casino Co.).— Marie Bergerle. 
imitations, clever; De Haven and Whitney, comedy 
sketch, good. 

ROBINSONS (Harold Moran, mgr.; agent. 
Casino Co. Monday rehearsal 10). — Electra, fine; 
Musical Gerdes, good; Smith and Brown, good; 
Albert Erts, good. 



DALLAS, TEX. 
MAJESTIC (T. P. FInnegan, local mgr.; Inter- 
state Amusement Co., props., direct). — Willie 
Harris and Joe Nlemeyer offer a very tuneful 
and amusing bit of musical comedy; The Gar- 
nellas. In tbe comedy sketch, "My Brother 
Johnny," good; Chester and Grace, Juvenile s. 
snd d., excellent; Will Dockray, the Jersey Boy, 
monologlst. pleased; Haywards-Plstel Co., "The 
King of Blackwellls," first-class comedy, scored 
heavily; Mae Taylor, songs, well received; Hugo 
snd Co., lifting snd catapult work, thrilling. 

SHANNON FIFB. 



ELMIBA, N. Y. 

RIALTO (F. W. McConnell, mgr.; agent, 
same). — Campbell and Flnley, Loretta F n un, 
Minnie Fayette, Margaret La Vaun. Bessie Shaf- 

fier, Nellie Penrose and Max Bruno, good. 

HAPPY HOUR (Ira Van De Mark, mgr.; agent, 
same. — Coyne and Tlnlen, Rogers and Dormnn, 
Francesco Doneganl, Burt Ferguson, good. 

J. M. BEERS. 



ERIE, PA. 

COLONIAL (C. R. Cummins, mgr.).— Vesta 
Wallace, good; Harry De Coe, very good; Margaret 
Hauck, pleased; McGrcevy and Brown, good; 

Teed and La Zell, very good. WALDAMEER 

(E. H. Suerken. mgr.; agent. U. B. O.). — Almo 
and dog, good; Gorman and West, good; Memphis 
Students, good; E. C. Strickland, very good; 

Lester-Creigbton Troupe, acrobats, very good. 

FOUR MILE CREEK PARK (H. T. Foster, mgr.; 
agent, U. B. O.).— Bobln, good; Leeds and LeMar, 



good; Mary Davis, well received; the Kramers, 
very good; Webb-Bomslo Troupe, very good. 

M. H. MIZBNER. 



EVANBVJXLE, DID. 

OAK SUMMIT PARK (8weeton & Raymond, 
mgrs.; agent, W. V. A.). — First week success. 
Second week Herald Square Opera Company. 
Park three miles from city snd no street csrs 

running due to strike. ORPHEUM (Cbss. 

Sweeton, mgr.). — Heading, Griffith Thelma Co., 
Jail breaker; Bd. and May Woodward, good 
comedy sketch; Kimball Bros. 

OBBRDORFER. 



FALL RIVER, 

BIJOU (L. M. Boas, mgr.; ageut, direct).— 
M. p. with the following vaudeville: Standard 
Four, a bit; Hall Sisters, s. snd d., good; James 
laindy, comedian, good; Collins and Carmen 
Slaters, novelty banjolsts, excellent; Kelly and 
Catlin, comedians, good; Laura, vocalist, good; 

Fay Davis, ill. songs, very good. PREMIER 

(L M. Boss, mgr. and agent). — M. p. with vaude- 
ville: Annie Morrlss, comedienne, good; Lom- 
bard Bros., comedlsns, very good; Cooper, ventrilo- 
quist, excellent; The Campbells, comedy sketch. 

good; Lou Belmont, HI. songs, very good. 

LINCOLN PABK (I. N. Phelps, mgr. and agent). 
— This theatre open for Msy 31 only with the 
following bill: May 8teele, soubret, very good; 
Fleming Bros., acrobats, excellent; P. Pbalen, 
tramp specialty, good; Leonard and Edwards, 
comedy sketch, a hit; Bert Jackson, coster 
singer, good; Dennis Bros., ladder set, very good. 

EDWARD F. RAFFERTY. 



Barry," a picturesque composition, good; Char- 
lotte Parry and Co., in "The Comstock Mystery," 
excellent portrayal of the protean art; World 
and Kingston, tbe globe trotters aa jolly as ever; 
Agnes Mahr, dainty danseuse; Herbert and Will- 
ing, blackface, in "O. Man." laughable; Tbe 
Blessings, equilibrists, good; Bauks-Breaseale Duo, 
dainty Instrumental musicians; Ed Morton, good 

new songs. MAJESTIC (B. J. Rellly, mgr.) 

— Julia Romalne and Co., in a comedy sketch; 
Joe Marsh, cartoonist; Happy Doc Holland, In 
blackface; Alferetta, tbe aerial queen, and Spoors. 

NOTE.— This is the last week of the regular 

vaudeville season at the Grand, which has run 
three weeks longer this summer than during any 
other previous season. Following the close of 
high-class vaudeville the bouse will be used for 
motion pictures. JOE S. MILLER. 



JAMESTOWN, V. Y. 

CELERON (J. J. Waters, mgr.; agent, U. B. 
().). — Opened 81 with Three Luclfers, acrobats, 
fine; Cunningham snd Marrlon, comedy, good; 
Jordan, Brauneck and Cbullta, comedy pleased; 
Orpbeum Comedy Four, fine; Corn Youngblood 
Corson Sextet, musical, excellent; and pictures. 
LYBIC (H. A. Deardourff, mgr.). — Four Brag- 
dons, Bill Rogers, Besn and Hamilton, Grace 
Goodwin, and pictures, drew well. 

L T. BERLINER. 



HAEBISBTJBO, FA. 

ORPHEUM (C. F. Hopkins, mgr.; agent. U. 
B. O.). — Sevan and Warren, comedy acrobats, 
very good; Lee Brothers and Allen, s. and d., 
made a bit; Luce and Luce, musical act, enter- 
taining; John Dunn, Wllhelma Francis and Co., 
playlet. "The Hold Up," hit of bill. HIPPO- 
DROME (A. L. Roumfort A Co., mgrs.; agent, 
M. Rudy Heller). — Ed. Rarto, comedian; Three 
Wetsels. singing act; The Variety Trio, songs. 

PAXTANG PARK (Felix Dsvls, mgr.).— Amy 

Allyn, singing comedienne; Demonlo snd Bell, s. 
and d.; John Rouney. monologlst; Antrim and 
Peters, comedy skit. "A Tsrry In Tsnktown"; 
Colemsn Bros., borlsontsl bsr. J. P. J. 



JOHNSTOWN, PA. 
GLOBE (J. G. Foley, mgr.; Assoc! s ted Booking 
Agency of Pittsburg).— 27-29: Ruby Caldwell, 
child toe dancer, fair; Lyonel and Lever ton, 
"Troubles in a Flat"; Tbe Hillmans, colored, 
good. SI -June 2: Adair, De Armond and Co., 
"Hla Last Race," good; Bt. Clair and Brink, 
slater act, good; Phil Young, blackface, splendid; 
Kaufman and Sawtelle, comedy musical act, 

good. LUNA PABK (Bd. Stanford, mgr.).— 

Opened its stock company. The Carroll Stock Co. 

THE AUDITORIUM (A. W. Thornley, mgr.). 

— Opened May 29 with m. p. and 111. songs by 
Jack Howard, billed as "late of Keith's." He 
Is Jack Lelbfrled, of this city, who probsbly 

never ssw Keith's. NOTE.— Bsrnura A Bailey, 

May 28. did an Immense business. 

JESTICAM. 



INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 

GRAND (Shafer Zlegler, mgr.; agent. U. B. 
O.). — Flske O'Hara and Co., Irish comedian and 
singer, with company of players, in "Capt. 



MILFORD, MASS. 

LAKE NII'MUC PARK (Dan J. Sprague. mgr.; 
Maurice Boom, booking agent). — Musical Fred- 
cricks, dne; Von Mltzel and Maynard, excellent; 
Jennie Edwards, fair; Fred and Eva Mosart, bit; 

Prof. C. H. Hotopb. clever. NOTB.— Joe 

Hughes, of Golden and Hughes, is at bla summer 
cottage here. CHAS. E. LACKEY. 



AU REVOIR 



NOT GOOD BYE 



RETURN TO ENGLAND FOR SUMMER DATES OF 

FRED KARNO'S 
COMPANY 

WITH THE 

Two Great Everlasting Features of Standard Vaudeville 

"A Night in an English Music Hall" 
"A Night in the Slums of London" 

Special Note to Proprietors, Managers, Agents, 
Artists, and others interested: 

MESSRS. HOUSE, GROSSMAN & VORHAUS will protect our copyright 
interests to the full extent of the law during our absence. Our just claims have 
been legally upheld by the Supreme Court of U. S. 

All communications: ALF REEVES, Manager, n Vpughan Road, Camberwell, 
London, England. 



When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



30 



VARIETY 



■ " ' i i 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



FRED KARNO'S Comedians 



NOW PLAYING LONDON, ENGLAND 



'Night in an English Music Hall* 
'Night ii Slums of London"' 
Address all Communications to ALF. REEVES, Manager, 27 Vaughan Road, Camberweil, London 



WILLA HOLT WAKEFIELD 



■OHO EXADDTOS. 
WILLIAM M011II 0I10UIT. 



Lillian Hale and Co. 

Presenting "THE PHANTOM RIVAL/ Written by 

SAGIR DEAN 



II 



II 



CHARLOTTE TOWNSEND 

Tke ORIGINAL Metal Switokkeard OirL 



UNITED 



Mana* 



CARBREY BROS 



SIMULTANEOUS DANCERS. 
UNITED TIME, 



ELLA CAMERON 



AuliUd by Okaa, F. Imm and 0*. la the Laufhln* laooaaa, 
"III V V T I T FAMILY." 
Direotlea JOE 'WOOD 

IN VAUDEVILLE. 



MOW PLAYING. 




HILDA HAWTHORNE 

fiisiitiio 

A Horel Slagta* and Ventrlloqulal Act. It MJnutea Is "OMI." 
lilt Jamaica Avenne, Richmond Hill, M. T. 



MANGEAN TROUPE 

Lady and Gentleman Novelty Acrobats Introducing the First and 

Only Lady Doing Double Somersaults 

I From a Jeter Board to Shoulders 

Closed New York Hippodrome May 29, have eomo open time. 



a 



MEPHISTO 



AT 
THE 



PIANO 



II 



I 

Management SIC. WACHTER 







■VI 

Direotion JACK LEVY, 140 Weat 42d Street, New Yerk 



ALL BIGHTS COPYRIGHTED. Fhone 2164 Bryant. 



THE EVEBETT PIANO USED. 



HILL m SYLVIANY 



Permanent Addreee— ISM Broadway, Haw York. 



Refined Unicycle Act 

Sensational— Daring— Unique 

WM. MORRIS Circuit 



*ta 



THE MAM WHO MADE "THE MASCOT" FAMOUS. 



HARRY BROWN 

IN HIS BIG SUCCESS "THE VILLAGE DOCTOR" 



Supported by 

HUBERT HTZ8EMLD 

And A Clever Co. 

Will JUNE 7tk 

AHIIKIAR. N. T. C 



A Beautiful Novelty 

Original Singing, 
Posing Aot 



LUCILLE SAVOY 



ALWAYS A HIT 

MOST ARTISTIC ACT 

IN VAUDEVILLE 

PAT CASEY, Agent 



GILD AY presents 




111 "Cohen and His Ward" 

e 

BIG SUCCESS 

Direction B. A. »#YtRS 



EUGENE ELLSWORTH and EDNA EARLIE LINDON 



In Harry Jackson's acr< 



kiAftt farce, " HIS DAY OFF.'* Weok June S-9, Ideal, Cripple Creek, Col.; Jane 10- It, Opera Houie, Canon City, Col. 

When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



VARIETY 



31 



THE NEW YORK OFFICES OF 






The Music House of Laemmle 

NOW located at 1416 BROADWAY (Room 708) 

MELVILLE GIDEON, In Charge 

Executive Offices : 67 South Clark Street f Chicago 

HOMER HOWARD, Manager 




ITALY'S LEADING PAPER 

FOR THB 

Animated Pkture .nd Pl.ono$fipl BisImss 

PUBLISHED FORTNIGHTLY. 
tt-M large pages. Right earnings fu •MMwm 

mm. 

E Al fct S Tf9f l *n i Frof. GUALTHRO L VABBBI, 
M. TU «al ■— tn, S» Bla (Italy). 



Chester Jones, impersonator, sod Hill and 

Stewart. OLYMPIC PARK (K. W. Alles, 

mgr.). — Ostrado, In aerial feats; Mauvollo. equili- 
brist; Tbe Bennett Trio, cotnedy acrobats, and 

Irwin's Performing Leopards. IIILLSIDK 

PARK (W. H. Thaller, mgr.).— Attractions 
beaded by Jobnny Mack, the aeronaut, in balloon 
flights and parachute drops; also Scbreyer, In bis 
cycle dash; Demarest's Wild West Show la mak- 
ing good as usual. ELECTRIC PARK (C. A. 

Dunlap, mgr.). — Ilerr Grenada and Alma Fedora, 
on tbe high wire In an elephant make-up, are a 
hit; Williams and Darmody, "In Africa." At 
the Park Theatre are Walker and Barretts, 
Chinese orchestra; Gregolre and Emellne, Jane 
Homer, George Hoey, Jr., and Co., in a farce 
called "Gay Climbers." JOE O'BRYAN. 



Marie Hedlicka, fine; Ella Garrison and Co., laugh- 
able; Adams and Mack, good; Arthur Elwell, 

HI. song, very good. STAR (agent, S.-C). — 

Makerenko Troupe, beadllners, fine; Billy Win- 
dom, monologist, bit; Leo. Cooper and Co., strong 
skit; Virginia Grant, excellent; Kelley and Reno, 

yery cleyer. CITY.— McCree Bros., fine; "Bob," 

"talking dog," clerer; Frank Healy, Yery good. 



MXRXDEV, 00**. 
HANOVER PARK THEATRE (R. L. Lee, 
mgr.; agent, Park Booking Circuit).— Wm. F. 
Shortelle, planolog, fair; May Hartlng, vocalist, 
fair; Young Krleger, magician, very good; Roe 
tain and Butler, Street Musicians, hit of bill; 

Laurie Sisters, "kid" act, pleased. POLI'S 

(H. S. Carr, mgr.).— Gypsey Four, female quar- 
tet, good; plcturea, good; H. S. Carr, III. songs, 

good; Rowland, handcuffs, fair. CRYSTAL 

(E. J. Heelau, prop.). — M. p. and ill. songs by 

Mercedes Groffrlon and Andrew Penders. 

8TAR (R. T. Halllwell).— M. p. and HI. songs; 
Ladlea' Imperial Orchestra, pleased. 



MEW OBLEAVS, LA. 
. W.HITB CITY (W. H. Labb, mgr.; agent, Will- 
iam Morris). — Vaudeville by candle light was the 
order of- things on Monday evening. About fifty 
candles were placed on the stage of tbe theatre, 
and the bill ran without a hitch. Tbe house 
was about two-thirds filled. No one left. Tbe 
Oxavs opened with a pot-pourri of Juggling and 
comicalities. La Toy Bros., acrobats, pleased; 
La Petite Lawrle (New Acts); Beauvals, Marl- 
dor and Co., "Wlldfiowcr," liked; Aztell and 
Heinle, would fare better If Axtell eliminated part 
of tbe monolog now in use; Bossnquet is an ex- 
cellent violinist. 



MONTREAL, OAK. 

BENNETT'S (R. A. McVean, mgr.; agent, U. 
B. O.).— Blllle Burkes Big Show following Alice 
Lloyd last week has a difficult spot to fill, but 
makes good In every detail. The features are: 
"Uncle Tom's Cabin," tabloid version, made a 
big bit; Frank McRae, very popular; Carney and 
Wagner, well liked; T. B. Kyle and Co., sketch, 
good; Maurice Wood. Impersonations, very clever; 
Tom Dempsey, monologist, fine; Clarence Wilbur 
and bis ten funny folks produced screams; Pot- 

ter-Hartwell Troupe. great. PRINCESS.— 

"The Bohemian Girl," played by the Robinson 
Opera Co., Is delighting large crowds at every 
performance. BILLY ARM8TRONG. 



ONEONTA, V. T. 

ONEONTA (Fred Glllen, mgr.).— Nclusco. 
magician, fair; Michael Braham and Co., sketch, 
"He, She and It"; "It," an unusually clever dog, 
saves this act; Welsh and Welsh, s. and d., pass- 
able; Frankle Grace and Co., sketch, fair; m. p.; 

Mrs. Norton, ill. songs, fair. NOTE.— L. H. 

Shepherd returned this week from Canajoharle 
where he recently opened the Wagner Opera 
House for summer months to a bill of moving 
pictures and 111. songs; re|torts excellent busi- 
ness. DELONO. 



BFOKAVE, WASH, 

ORPHEUM (Martin Beck, gen. mgr.; agent, 
direct).— Week 23: "Futurity Winner" tons, good; 
Frank LeDent, Juggler, opens; Mack A Williams, 
s. and d., favorably received; Frauleln Vera Ber- 
liner, violinist, very good; Clark A Bergman, some 
good singing; Sullivan, Pasquelena and Co., In 
"A C. O. D. Package," fair; James Thornton, 
good monolog, appealing to the upper pact of 

the house. PANTAOES' (B. Clark Walker, 

mgr.; agent, W. 8.). — Wise and Milton, first 
honors this week; Jack Hawkins, Jumper, good, 
but act a little slow; W. D. Gllson, singing, good; 
Ylng Lee, Bobby Atbon and Co., pleased; De 
Chantal Twins, a. and d., fair; The Wheelers and 

Cooper and Brown complete. WASHINGTON 

(Geo. Blakealey, mgr.; agent, B.C.). — Rial t a and 
Mltz, good singing and clever posing; Dumitscro- 
Vermette Troupe, acrobata, very good; Slater 
Brockman, impersonator, nothing atartllng; Frank 
Bacon and Co., fair; Seymour and Hill, acrobats, 
pleased. NOTR8. — Norrls A Rowe Clrcua com- 
pelled to cancel date on account of tbe scarlet 
fever epidemic. — The Sells-Floto Shows also noti- 
fied that they could not show. — Tbe Auditorium 
has been dark since tbe Jessie Shirley Stock Co. 
disbanded. — On sccount of the crowds of people 
going to the Sesttle Fair thla summer, It Is 
probable that the vaudeville bouses will not close 
at all. R. E. M. 



MUNCIE, TED. 

STAR (Ray Andrews, mgr.; agent, Gua Sun). — 
Tbe Great Otora Troupe, Japanese acrobats and 
contortionists, hit; Frank Gray, HI. songs, good; 
Mr. and Mrs. J. II. Cosaar, "Our Honey Moon,'' 
hit; Billy Hemingway, alnglng comedian, hit; 
tbe Chicago Newsboys' Qusrtet, msde s big hit. 

GEO. FIFER. 

NEWARK, K. J. 

PROCTOR'S (R. C. Stewart, mgr.; agent, U. 
B. O. ; Monday rehearsal 9). — Irene Franklin 
and Burt Greene, repeat former success; Hattle 
Pelaro and Co* "Tbe Sleep Walker"; Hall and 
Carney, comedians; Swan and Bambard, eccen- 
trics; Henry Clive end Co., up-to-date magic; 
Ida O'Day, banjolst, clever; Colby and May, ven- 
triloquist sketch, pleased; The Zannettos, Juggling, 
and The Kemps, helped to mske up a very good 

bill. ARCADE (L. O. Mum ford, mgr.; Monday 

rehearsal 10). — One good show here this week to 
big business. Thomas and Edwsrds, second week, 
big hit; Harlan and Stanley, vocalists; Ned 
Woodley and Co., "A Jockey's Luck," featured 
and made good; Mile. Alvera and Rats; Tbe 
Shaefers, musical artists; Le Grand, Juggler; 
Klrby and Wright, comedians; Phoebe Snow and 
Violets; Chas. Blalsdell, monologist. and Stella 

Fox. s. and d. BIJOU DREAM (Fred. Mackey, 

mgr.). — Corbett and Forester, playlet: Mathon 
and Le Mae, s. and d.; Will Lacey on bis wheel; 
Rostaln and Butler, comedians; m. p. snd ill. 

songs. BMPIRB (Leon Evsns, ragr.; Mondsy 

rehearsal 10). — Settles and Settles; Wilson and 
Dale, mnslcal artists; Msude Clements, sweet 
singer; Margaret Scott, ill. songs; Kramer and 
Blerman, comedians; Rose Sisters, s. and d. ; 



FLAQUEHTJTE, LA. 

GOLDEN RULE (Rourke A Delanolx. mgrs. ; 
agent, O. T. Crawford).— Week 24: Chas. M. 
Fulton, bag puncher, hit; Chloie Brown, ill. 

songs (locsl). WHITE STAR (Edw. Achee, 

mgr.; agent, direct). — Marx Kahn, Impersonator, 
went big. 



SAVANNAH, OA. 

ATHENEUM (John P. Taggart, mgr.).— Lydell 
and Butterwortb, blackface artists, exceptlonslly 
good; Edna Farlow, singing comedienne, very fair; 
Cornalla and Baker, comedy acrobata, fine; Tracy 

and Carter, songsters, good. AIRDOME (Frsnk 

and Hubert Bandy, mgrs.; agent, Empire Theatri- 
cal Exchange). — Rita Mayoux, balladlst, good; 
Sterling Brothers, Roman ring set, excellent; 
Clarke Clifton Trio, comedy sketch, very good; 
Clarke and Lindsay, trick piano act, headltner. 

ORPHEUM (Jos. A. Wilenskl, mgr.; agent, 

Inter-State Circuit). — Eddie Burns, comedian and 
headllner; EIkIc Tiirll, diameter change artkt. 
very good; Wendell Phillips, blackface comedian, 
great; Nadell and Bell, musical comedy, fine; 
Sandhcrg and Lee. comply frivolities, good; Ilnrrv 

Austin, tenor, good. SAVANNAH (W. T. Klrby, 

mgr.; agent, Jake Wells' Circuit).— Al White 
mid his four dancing belles, h<>ndllner; Bouhh n 
snd Qulnn, comedy musicians, fine; Billy Evans, 
the Jolly sailor, good; Kraft and Myrtle, b. and 

d. team of merit. NOTE.— The Superba Is 

running baseball matinees In connection with the 
regular program of pictures snd songs. 

R. MAURICE ARTHUR. 



TORONTO, ONT. 

SHEA'S (J. SHEA, mgr.; sgent, U. B. O. ; 
Mondsy rehearsal 10). — Bert Coote and Co., 
sketch, good; Charles F. Semon, funny; Mlllman 
Trio, sensational; Redlnl and Arthur, fine; Mel- 
ville and lligglns, good; Pearl and Yosca, fair; 

Wormwood's Dogs and Monkeys, amusing. 

GAYETY (ThoB. R. Henry, mgr.).— Tbe flnsl 
show of the season was given by tbe Rial to 

RounderB. HANLAN'S POINT (L. Solman, 

mgr.). — Melvln B. and Edith Howard were the 
beadllners of a good bill; The Howards are won- 
ders on the high wire; Tbe Holsteln-Ssngster 
Show Is a collection of curious people of different 

parts of the world. SCARBORO BEACH (J. 

D. Conklln, mgr.). — Tbe feature at the Hippo- 
drome was Rex Comedy Circus, Mile. Omega 
and Strong Bros., comedy cyclists. 

HARTLEY. 



COMING ! 

Selig's Great Picture 

"THE 

MOONSTONE" 



Code Word MOON. 
Length, 1,000 Feet. 



Released June 1 0, 1 909 

ORDER QUICK FROM YOT/R FILM 



DON'T MISS IT! 

RenssBser It Is a Sellg 
Posters with Every Picture, 10c. 

SELie POLYSCOPE CO 

4J-47-49 Be»4*le>h St., Chlcatf*. U.S. A. 



man, prop, and mgr.).— Alice Patten's Ladles' 
Orcbestru; Violet Reed, Daisy Hunt, Oil and 
Lawler, Ed. Wilson. D. J. C. 



UTICA, N. T. 

RIIITIiERT (Fred Merger. Jr., mgr). Runth 
and Itudd, comedians, excellent; La rose and Augus- 
ta, wire act, good; l^amhert and Williams, s. and 
d., very good; Golner and Brown, comedians, 

good. HIPPODROME (P. F. Clancy, mgr.).— 

l'e Main and Rochtc, comedy sketch, excellent; 
DuIm>c'k Anlmnls. very good; Jos. Qulnn, HI. 
songs. LITTLE CONEY ISLAND (Louis Hy- 



WORCESTER, MASS. 

FRANKLIN SQUARE (John Burke). Opened 
hy the Franklin Ho.iuirc Stock Co., playing "The 
Man on the Box." ■- -UNCOLN PARK (Oeo. 
Scott, mgr.). --The new $12, 000 theatre was 
opened by "The Girl From Paris." WORCES- 
TER THEATRE (John Burke).— M. p. and vaude- 
ville. Charles Hayes, trick cyclist, good; Evelyn 
WIltKce, fall ; Johnnie Hoey and Jeanette Mosal, 
dancers, very good; Jluinilc Hussey, In "A Yid- 
dish Hiirryup." good. PLEASANT STREET 

(Fred Dean, mgr.). M. p. and HI. songs; pictures 

good; business big. NEW PARK THEATRE 

(S. Grant). -M. p. and III. songs; pictures good; 
hiisinehs big. --■ NOTES.— The Gordon Amusement 
Co.. of Worcester, which now controls a number 
<>f picture houses, has Just l>ought the Tauuton 
Opera House and will open It with m. p.. HI. 
songs and vnudevllle by the first of July.— 
Hlngling Bros.' Circus comes here June 14 for 
one day. M. M. SHERMAN. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 

OKI'IIEI'M (Martin Beck. gen. mgr.; agent, 
direct). — Sisters GHsch. great; Elisabeth Murray, 
good; Adelaide, good; Cnmllle D'Arvllle, headllner, 
excellent; Masus and Mazette, scream; "When 
Dreams Come True." hit; Ernest Yersas, postngs, 

ordinary. FANTAOES* (agent, direct).— Four 

Bards, beadllners and hit of bill; Terry Twins, 
very good; Prof. Roberts' Rats, remarkable; 



" HURRAY FOR OUR BASE BALL TEAM " 

Greatest novelty "Ball Game" Sorg ever published. WUI stir up every live FAN. A terrific- 
hit wherever sux«. HAS 8 Varies and the last verse "Rings" in loading player from every team. 
A chance to work in tame of player or city wherever singing same. 



A TYPICAL SOUTHERN LOVE BONO. 
NOT AN ORDINARY MOON BONO. 



"DIXIE MOON" 

BEND FOR ORCHESTRATIONS AND PROFESSIONAL COPIES FREE. NOW READY. 

CHARLES I. DAVIS 

Ellastone Bldg. CLEVELAND, OHIO 



BERTHA NOSS-RUSSELL 



Engaged Season 1909-10 
As Feature Act and to 
play title part in 



Thtnki 



tnd Appreciation to WILLIAM MORRIS' 
Office for offers of EUROPEAN TIME 



"LITTLE 
MISS MUFFET" 

A Musical Comedy of College Girl 

Life. Management HARRIS 11 WELLES 



When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



32 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



Netta Vesta 

snronro comedienne 



Diroctioa JENTE JACOBS. 

1«M 



Broadway, N ow York. 



Mr. and Mrs. 



Gene Hughes 

F«r. tldW M $ * W. 131th St Now York. 
'Phono, SOSO Morninfftld*. 



WIGGIN'S PARM 

Apply to THE CHADWICE TRIO. 



BUSH and PEYSER 




Addross car* VARIETY. 



"THAT VERSATILE FELLOW." 
57 VARIETIE8 OF VAUDEVILLE. 



IVI 



Worfclaf I T— , bat hmv 14th opaa. 



74 W. Klrt St., Bow York Pity. 



"THE NARROW FELLER." 

THE PIOTTIS 



"THE ITALLAB ABD HIS SWEETHEART." 
Oiw VARIETT. Patag Wall 

Two Racketts 

"Fits In ETonin» Dim" 

Permanent address — 1900 Eighth At*., o/o R. J. 
Coia. 

Nan K.ur Carl ia VARIETY 



■«■'« MANLEY «■ 

oour STERLING 

AM takinc a root at their summer home. 
"I lore my wifo. but, oh, you Safe.' 



Addro— t KJucstUU, Ont. 



ORAOE 



Ritter and Foster 

ACROSS THE FOBS. 
Address oar* VAUDEVILLE CLUB, 

•I Chariot; Croaa Road, laa S— . En#. 

Harry R. Fields 

The Sinffor af the Ghetto, 
It Minutes la "Om" of 



Address BEET LEVEY. 



ANOTHER "SURPRISER" FROM THE WEST 



HUFFORD 



AND 



CHAIN 



SINGING AND TALKING 



SOLE DIRECTION 

JACK LEVY 

140 W. 42d St.. New York 

Phone: 2164 Bryant 
Cable Address: Jaclev 



I 



I 



irvi 



WIRFINE 



The most sensational and daring slack wire per- 
formance ever shown. For particulars address 

B. A. MYERS, 

KNICKERBOCKER THEATRE BLOC. NEW YORK 



RICHARD 




IIBDTIIO 

A NOVEL COMEDY GYMNASTIC ACT 



DIRECTION 

B. A. MYERS 

EMCEBBBOCEM THEATRE BUILDING 
NEW TORS CITY 

BOOKED SODD 



■VI 



I'M COMING WITH A REVELATION IB VEBTRILOQUIAL ART. 

JOHNS 

rvjTFRIL-OCaLJIS 



O IM 



i 



ILL BE THERE ALSO. 



L. T.JOHNSTON 

VENTRILOQUIST 



JACK « 

SINGERS 



BEHMAN SHOW 



91 



Presents MOLLIE WILLIAMS and LON HASCALL in the 2-Act Musical Melange " PALM BEACH' 9 

Book and Lyrics by BALLARD McDONALD Music by LEO EDWARDS 

Playing the COLUMBIA AMUSEMENT CO. Theatres 

Po So — Can use 10 Experienced CHORUS GIRLS. Will Buy or Rent any kind of Big Stage Novelties. Mechanical Effects, Illusions 
and Etc. Address JACK SINGER, care of TANNER & CO., Room 220. Knickerbocker Theatre Building, 1402 Broadway, New York City. 





SAILING IIM JUN 



Not to Europe but in my own new cruising yacht "EDE" for the summer. *f 

Have just finished 50 consecutive weeks on Orpheum, Kohl & Castle. Interstate and other weeks for the W. V. A. 
KINDEST THANKS TO ALL MANAGERS AND AGENTS CONNECTED WITH THE W. V. A. 



When answering advertisement* kindly mention Variety. 



VARIETY 



33 



SEND IN OPEN TIME FOR NEXT SEASOI 

WitK Rotate Booked. Can Arrange Convenient Jumps 

WILLIAM MORRIS, Inc 

Acts desiring immediate or later time abroad, forward particulars and photos at once. 

PARK MANAGERS, WILLIAM MORRIS, InC. Can furnish ynu with all the best acts you want 

MUlC^mtKULI^BUIUIK. NEW YORK LONDON OTOCC 4 . . ST. AMD. W. C. 167 DEARBORN ST., CHICAGO 

ItMOOtfOOb 











Mists' Benevolent ; Protective Order of America 

250 W. 42* STREET, NEW YORK CITY 

This la a General Booking Office, not confined to the handling of taJent win are m«nbm of oar order only, bat tho theatrical profession in general, 
firing as extraordinary facilities for procurinr the bott talent available, 

MANAGERS of Parka, Theatres, Fain, etc, will do well to consult as and mako o«r offices year boadqnartera wbon in How York. 

PERFORMERS, send in your open time. All performers weloome. 

MEW YORK REPRESENTATIVES for VEB BECK * FARRELL. Booking time in Pennsylvania, Ohio, Vow York and Illinois. Nothing too large 
or ■'■all for as to handle. Address WBL H. STANLEY, Bus. Mgr. 



Members of V. A. B. A P. 0. of A. send yonr dues to this office. 



'Phone— 4468-Bryant. 



STAGE DRESSES 

Made in Boston by WOLFF, FORDING A 00., are the standard of excellence In fit, style, quality and 
workmanship. They are not sold anywhere else. 

Send for onr "BOOKLET OF FASHIONS" for ladles, wblcb fives you a whole lot of INFORMA- 
TION for NOTHING. 

WOLFF, FORDING A CO., 01-65 Eliot St., Boston, Mass. 



SURE 



YOU 

CAN 



Got yonr RAILROAD TICKETS on tho LEHIGH VALLEY A 
DELAWARE, LACKAWANNA A WE8TERN R, B, at the VAUDE- 
VILLE STEAMSHIP AGENT. 

Write, call or telephone. My representative will deliver tho 
tickets to yon. I .have always served yon well. 
Going to Europe 1 Tiokets on all Steamship Linos. Lowest rates. 
PAUL TATTOO, IN E. 14th St, Vow York, German Savings Bank Building. Telephone SOW 8tuyvesant. 



THE ENGLISH PROFESSIONAL JOURNAL 

Circulation guaranteed to bo larger than that of any English Journal devoted to tho Dramatio 
Vaudeville Professions. Foreign subscription, 17a, 44, par annum. 





VEW YORK AOEVTA— Paul Tauslg, SJ-S4 Wont ltd Street, and Samuel Froneh A tons, Si-tO 
west Ham Street. 

Artiota visiting England are Invited to send particulars of their act and date Of opening. 
■TAGS Letter Box is open for the reception of their mall. 

16 YORK STREET, COVENT GARDEN, LONDON, W. a 



Vow booking Summer Parks and Vaudeville Theatres in California, Ariiona, New Mexico and T« 

Managers Write or Wire. 

JO THEATREI 50 

THAT INDEPENDENT VAUDEVILLE AGENT 






LEVEY 



2053 BUTTER STREET, 



INDEPENDENT VAUDEVILLE CIRCUIT. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



HAMMERSTEINS 
VICTORIA 



AMERICAS MOST 
FAMOUS VARIETY 



Open the Year Around 

VAUDEVILLE HEAD1INERS 

«■ GOOD STANDARD ACTS 

If yon hsro an open week yon want to flu at 
short notice, write to W. L. DOCKSTADBB, 

CarrlcR Theatre. Wilmington. Rol. 

Can close Saturday night and make any city east 

of Chlcsgo to open Mondsy night. 

ERNEST EDELSTON 

VARIETY AND DRAMATIO AGENT. 
I 7 Oroon St., Leloosfor Square. LONDON 



Sols 
John Tiller's Companies. 
Little Tick. 



WANTED -BIG COMEDY and NOVELTY FEATURE 

Aots to write or wire open time. Now hocking for North Avenue, Schindler's and Thalia Theatres, 
Chicago. Also other houses (n Illinois, including Castle, Bloomington; Grand, Joliet. 

CHICAGO BOOKING AGENCY 

CHA8. H. DOUTRICK, Manager. Room 29, OS La Salle St, Chioago. 

OPERA HOUSE MANAGERS 

Let me book yonr theatres for the summer with vaudeville sod motion pictures. Write for particulars. 

CASINO VAUDEVILLE BOOKING AGENCY 

Repuhlie Beileiag, Room MM, Chioago, HL 'Phono Harrison S060. COVEY HOLMES, 



ARTISTS' REPRESENTATIVE. 
Booking YandovWe Aots Everywhere, Can always arrange plenty of 

Ben d y our open time. 

(BUTTE 1UM11S) ■CHILLER BUTLDINO (OARRICX THEATRE), CHIOAGO. 



ork for good aots. 



JA/ A MTC W\ GOOD ACTS at mil times. Booking houses in New York, 

WW#«ll^ ■ ™ " ' Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia, Maryland and Michigan. 

Address : ASSOCIATED BOOKING AGENCY. 404 Schmidt Bldg., PITTSBURQ. Pa. 




My LIMITED— EXCLUSIVE— PERMIT— PARODIE8 at $1 eaoh are enlisting for me an army of PER- 
MANENT CUSTOMERS. Write Letter for Descriptive List and Testimonials. No more Sketohes till 
August. Hsve all I oan handle at present. Gaiety Theatre Buildina-, New York City. 



BALLOON MEN and OUT DOOR ACT 

Send epea time, address, and description to PRANK Q. DOYLE, Fourth Floor 1S1 Washington St., 

OS La Bane sv, Chioago. CHICAGO VAUDEVILLE MANAGIatS IKCHANGI 



Walter C. Kelly. 
Pragson. 

Always Vacancies for Good Acts 




CIRCUIT 



The COLONIAL 
The ALH AMBR A 
The 0RPHEUM 
The CRESCENT 



New York 
Barleai 

Brooklyn 
Brooklyn 



The NOVELTY Williamsburg 
Tho GOTHAM East New York 
The GREENP0INT Brooklyn 

Addreii all PERSONAL lelten te 
PERCY 0. WILLIAMS, Loaf Acre Bldg., 
1505 Broadway, New York 



THE AUTHOR WITH THE GENUINE SUCCESSES 

Ask Mark Murphy, Pred Bowers, Oracle Em 
mett A Co., Harry First A Co., Coombs snd Stone, 
Charles Bounell snd Mable Craig, Dave and Percle 
Martin, The Chadwick Trio, Sommers snd Storke, 
and over One Hundred snd Fifty others. Order 
your new material for the coming season now 
from the Author who bss the real successes to 
his credit. CHARLES HORWITZ, Knickerbocker 
Theatre Bldg., 1402 Broadway, V. Y. Room til. 



VAU DEVI LLE AGTS OP ALL KINDS WANTED 

LEO GIRGUIT 

JOSEPH J. LEO, Dewey 14th St., Now York 

THE COLUMBIA 




• It 



KLYN, N. Y. 

VAUDEVILLE 

N. S. EP9TIN, Manager. 

One place where all managers either see acts personally or get reports. 

Booked Through United Booking Offices. 



Variety's Chicago Office 



IS IN THE 



Chicago Opera House Block 

Advertisements and subscriptions received at regular rates. 

News items may be forwarded there, and will be promptly transmitted. 

PRANK WIESBERG, Representative. 



When answering advertisement $ kindly mention Variety. 



34 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



THE VEBTBILOQUIST WITH A PB0D1TOTI0B 



ED. F. 



REYNARD 

Presents Beth Dewberry and Jawn Jawnson in 
"A MORNING in HIOXSTQXB." 

Direction JACK LETT. 



MOVE 




Slogan of Vaadorilla 



BERT COOTE 

Greenroom Club, W. 47th 8t., Bow Tork. 
addreee, lit Oxford ft, W. 




All thoee theatrically Interested an wondering If 

WALTER STANTON 

" TBI GIANT ROOSTER •» 

and "Only Bird Impersonator In tha Universe" 
(Vida Frasa), has had anything to do with tha 

eenomenal run of "Jack and Jill," whioh boats 
at rvrnr^ 

Address dlreot, or WE MORRIS, Agent 

Barry Wolford 

Tha Typical Topical Tiokla Singer*. 

Boakad Solid until July 1, 190». 

THIS WEEK. ORPHEUM, BROOKLTH, 

Week Jnna 7, Alhambra, New Tork. 

REICH A PLTJNKETT, Smart Agents, 




STUART BARNES 

Direction GEO. HO MAE A 

FLYING WEAVERS 



Care WHITE EATS. 



JACK WILSON 



AND 
CO. 



X. A P.. INDEF. 



It Isn't tha name that makes the 
It's tha act that makea the 




THE ETNO OF IREXAED, 

JAMES B. DONOVAN 

MM 

RENA ARNOLD 

QUEER OT VAT7DEVILLE, 
DOUG WELL, TH AEK YOU. 

SEYMOUR 
and NESTOR 

EovELTY tnroxvo ACT. 

Address Ml Want 170th ft, Eew York. 

•Phone nil Audubon. 



THE 

BARREL 




BUMPERS 
E (ASWftl 



AMD 



ARNOLD 



HOLD 
AN AMERICAN EECOED IE PARIS. 

44 ENOAOEMENT8, COMPRISING St 
MONTHS IE 26 MU8IC HALLS AMD CIR- 
CUSES, IE ALL 960 PERFORMANCES IE 
THE FRENCH CAPITAL. 

BAEEY MYERS, American Representative. 



Italy Atkinson 

"Tha Australian Orphans." 

On tha United Time. 

PAT CASEY, Agent. 

RAYMOND » HARPER 

"KTEO AED aUEEE OF HARMOET LAKE." 

MARSHALL P. WILDER 

ATLANTIC CITY. M. J. 

Boll Phoao, 104. 

ROBERT HENRY HODGE 



East season ta 

"HIS NIGHT OFF." 

BOB RICHMOND 

In his now monologue upon Current Topics. 
Address 074 Central Park West, Eaw Tork. 



GartelleBros. 

Introducing Singing, Dancing and 
8KATORIALI8M 

Direction, REICH A PLUNKETT. 



HOMER ft. 



MARGUERITE 



Mason s Keeler 



Direotion MOST H. STEOEE, 

Frinoeoa Theatre, Chicago. 




GAVIN, PLATT 
and PEACHES 

Presenting "THE STOLEN BID." 
Address 4417 trd A** (Bronx), Eew Tern. 




Cheer up, boys, this is the only life to lead; 
we've tried them all. 



CRIFF 




Haa started on Western 
Tour, commencing Mon- 
day, June 7th, at Ram one 
Park Theatre, Grand 
Eapids, Mich. Yes, 

MICH. (German for me). 
I'll let you know what 
I think of it Let London 
wait 



SAMJ.CORTISSCO. 

Address all communications to my Personal 
Representative, 

BERT COOPER 

Mark Stern Building, 
101-104 W. 88th St., Eew York. 

FRIEND and 

DOWNING 

Care VARIETY'S London Often. 

WEST and WILLIS 

THE PROGRESSIVE PAIR IE 
"WANTED, A PARTNER." 



"Tha Coney Island Girl." 
WITH OMEGA TRIO. 



BILLIE REEVES 



at 
P 



3 

o 

a 

o 




i 

! 



s 

9 



"FOLLIES OF 1000." 



E. T. 



r, 

•OO-'OO-'IO. 
Theatre Boof for 



EZEeiEXD. JE. 



the Sammer. 



Tha notorious 8AMPTEB made someone's brain 
boil with anger. I wonder why bo Is getting so 
pop ular and why they make him sot 

BIOS A PEEVOST are a grant act They oar* 
tainly are favorites with the audleaoa. They are 
tha bit of tha show. Tha olowa in funnier than 
over. Why don't be do tha chair trioksl Lota 
of people like the stunts. 

I am making good. The rest of the bill is One. 
All headliners are working in harmony axoopt 
LESTER, who is jealous of mo, whioh, of course, 
gives me mora oradit 

HOLD OVER ANOTHER WEEK. 




FRAES BTRON, JR., Introducing 

i Great Lester 

Casey has also got some good acta. 
Mr. Hammeratein anook banda and congratu- 
lated me for my act FBAEK BTBOE, JE. 



HABIOE 



TIOTOEIA 




Dlreetlaa AL BTJTHEBLAaTP. 





The cleverest singing nnd m osloa l novelty of 
the world. Booked on the SULLIVAN-CON- 
8IDENE time. 

Direction of NORMAN JKafTRICS. 



Chat. 
and Jotlt 



QUINN 



"The Girl and the Gawk." 



June 



Week June 7, Criterion, Asbury Park. 
14, Criterion, Atlantio City. 

GOEDON A 80LOMOE, Agents. Gaiety Theatre 
Bldg., New Tork. 



;d\a/. 



MADGE 



CURRAH *nd MILTON 



"THE CITY 8IRL AID THE COUNTRY BOY" 

Wish to inform nil Managers nnd. Agents that our oomedy 
"kissing scene ' is fully protectedTr 

WILL CONSIDER OFFERS for MUSICAL 
COMEDY or BURLESQUE for next season. 

(OOMEDIAE AED SOT/BBETTE). 

PERMANENT ADDRESS CARE VARIETY. 



When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



■■;* ''"',-". ', ' ' :-v* '■■■'■* -- : ' ' V.- r':>-Y""-' ,r ""\V- *-■'■■!' ^^i-V ■>.'-■« 



VARIETY 



-;r< 



+ r 



..v ■■■.;-.■ ^ -*; ■-,*-■■ ; ^.. -^ 

y • ■ ■» . ■■.-., 

"'■': ••■•-- ■ *■■ . ' ■>. .v. . -**■.:< 

-\' # M .*V-V-f' *•'■-■' ''V "-:•',"►* ■"*-- .■',"£- "i 







H EI 







• 



This Week (May 31) at Htb Orpbeum 





OIM 






' 



. 







■ • 



V 











fi 



Introducing His Latest Sensational Qance, 









A DREAM OF THE FIVE SENSES 



II 













• A. MYERS, Knickerbocker Theatre Bldg., New York 







•■*£ a 

T 



•S COMEDIENNE 









, 



Direction B. A. MYERS 







* 




FILMS 




Tt»A» Mark 





' " . 
















1 




Ml £ ' I 

v?i- 1 •- 1 

1 H| B| -' j ■ - . 








1 ' ■" " : 


I 




! "^aiP '-"?*-'""' 








Released June 7th, 190 







e Violin Maker of Cremona 



M 






POWERFUL INFLUENCE OF THE GREATER LOVE. 

This subject is particularly high quality aa to story, acting and photographic quality, the story being 
intensely interesting and acted in such a convincing manner as to place the picture in a claaa to itself, 
while the protographic effects are marvelous. The scene is laid in Cremona, Italy, the home of the violin, 
and shows the self-sacrificing love of a crippled violin maker, an expert in the art, Who rather than 
make the girl he loves unhappy, smashes to bits the result of his handiwork, thereby yielding the hand 
of the girl to the one she loves. Despairing at his loss, he is contented with the thought that he had 
made her happy. 






LENGTH. 963 FEET 



i 



/ „ ;*! THE TIOLTtf 



MAKER Of GREM0WA. 

sleased Jun 



m lOth, I: 






"THE LONELY VILLA" 

A very thrilling picture in which a band of crooks by trick get the man of the house out of the 
way, leaving the wife and children alone, and then proceed to- depredate the home. An accident to the 
man's anto fortunately intercepts and apprehends the thugs, who are locked up. 



LENGTH. 750 MET 






AIMEvNA/ 



1 • — • ♦ 

This 1s a very funny Short comedy showing how two Rah! Rah! boys regained a stolen purse for 
a pretty young girl, by a very clever scheme. 

LENGTH. 223 FEET 




THE LOMELY YTIXA. 



»* 



RELEASE DATS OF BIOORAPH tTTBJZOTS MONDAY AMD THURSDAY OF EACH WEEK. 



SET OH OUR MAIL LIST AND KEEP POSTED 




■t 






Licensee of the Motion Picture Patents Co. 



WRITE FOI OUR DESCRIPTIVE CIRCULARS 

COMPANY 

11 E. 14th STREET, NEW YORK CITY 



•dvtrtUementi kindly mention Variety .'»*• 



•j- •< 






:'■*» "t- 



=V»T' 



v V *&"~r t : £i> 



WX^j 






* 



• - ■? 



■ : '' i- V v^. ; ■ ■";■ ;,"V •-:., ■■„•■ . ^ '••.''•,' •' '■■:■" .'■•■. 



V S ; .^^^ : 



*r-^'. a.:. 




WARNING TO EXHIBITORS! 

Do not be intimidated by the latest trust circular, this time in the form of a letter, issued by a firm of attor- 
neys to give it the semblance of legality. The trust must issue a circular every month in an endeavor to for 
the exhibitors to submit to its dictates, which up to the present time it has found impossible. 

The trust knows full well that IT dare not interfere with 




• 



- * 



- ■ 

International Projecting & Producing Co. 



film, and exhibitors and exchanges need have no fear as far as our film is concerned 



* 






To those handling other films we cannot guarantee protection, but we will legally defend an Interfer- 



ence with International Prelecting and Producing Company film.) 









i 












■u 



Advise us promptly if any attempt is mils by trust agents to intimidate users of OUR GOODS in any way 

• • • 















■ 



• <» 



* 



International 



. 



Producing C 






SCHILLER BUILDING, CHICAGO, ILL. 



-' ' v.. 



» ;. 



.itf 



Ji.- 



'■Jt 



Tf T^B 



■ 41',. 



w^m*?-. 



[,'■ ,-' •"• ■>. ;'$<ff) »4; 



e ■ i 



• "a' 



.t*u-,- 



i&'&wi', 



^HSF^^Sl^KKtS 



mm 



■ 






TEN CENTS 



f& 







f-vr ■• 



tf 



I 



I 



% 



<-.««.v 



'?A i .1 . v- 



. • 






VARIETY 




— 



— i 



I v 



■'>•'•■; v 






■ 



— S 



■ 



CwBP •* » Letter Mat to H r. J ULIAN 
■OSI by labbi A. A. GRIEN of Harna- 
•toad SjrB*f>g»«, ■•■sjhsgtisl fail 
■•ai 9 Wttt End Lane, Landon, M. W 






i"iifj 






« 






Boas: 



IT Inglawood Road, 
West Hsmpstead, N. W., 
Jany. 80tb. 1000 



• 






I thoron^iily enjoyed yoar clever performance 
teat sight. I waa aaxloaa to w* It becauae, aa 
yoo are wall aware, we Jawa aire aoffered ao 
mash from stage mi a rs artetm tatlon that we hare 
got Into a etate of " uan e e " la regard to any- 
thing spoclflcaHy Jcwleh In the way of ehar- 
acterlaatlon. 

But your performance la that of » finished 
artlet aad a gentleman. > and only represents a 
type that doaa exiat aad. la eaally recognlaable 
la your capable hand*. Mo easier oan feel 
wltt Mr. 



Sated with Mr. 
Lauder aad ao 



I particularly watched the audience and found 
that they appreciated yoar humour. Tours 
Tery truly. (Signed) A. A. QREEN. 

Julian Base, Ban,. 



Qlugow (Seetlaaa) New* 

THE PAVllioir. 
The management of the Pavilion are agalu 
forward this week with, a delightfully Tarled 
and hlghtly attractive programme. Sfach In- 
terest waa centred la the appearance of Julian 
Rosa, America's Hebrew comedian, who made 
his debut to a Scottish atfnience last evening, 
aad the reception accorded him waa moat flat- 
tering. He baa a style that Is Inimitable, with 
a flow of patter that Is Irresistible, and he kept 
the audience la roars of laughter throughout bii 
performance. Ha slags snatches or parodies 
set to popular airs. It waa with reluctance that 
ha waa allowed to retire after baring been be- 
fore the footllghta for over half an hour. 

ManohtsUr (Eagtarf) Guardian 

THB PALACE.— Mr. Julian Rose has per- 
fected a queer technique all hla own. Be cornea 
on as a bald, vultorisb Jaw in a grey frock 



coat, and smirking dreadfully serosa the foot- 
lights starts bis calculated surprises .mf humour. 
We say humour, though they are more la the 
nature of verbal ahocks, aa when wa ate told 
of the Irishman at the wedding that "I fainted; 
he feinted— feinted with bis left, and hit ate 
in the eye with hla right." That set the house 
rocking. The house, ladeed, rejoiced to the Jew 
comedian aa a novelty, much aa a child is 
pleased with a rough penny yon can read, in 
a heap of smooth. Like moat good »*low" co- 
mediaps,' Mr. Rasa Is s mirthless begetter of 
mirth; he stands at ill and broods over the in- 
strument he plays so cleverly, and only now Stlfl SS IN LAI D 
and than is his face crossed by aa oily grin. 
That la whan the laughter goes into a second 
edition, as to apeak. Then the comedian will 
shout shrilly "Ton Jth* ;*.hat?" Wa thought 
Mr. Roaa too grotesejvS as we really fanny, hut 
not so the audience; tbV could not hear enough 
of the farcical • atory of the Jaw'a wadding, 
jerked out la sentences like that quoted. Mr. 
Rosa la certainly a master of the staccato style. 



JULIAN 
ROSE 









NEXT SEASON 









* 



' 




- 






& ERLANGER 

IN MUSICAL COMEDY 







Successful at the EMPIRE, London, without the aid of the "Claque." 




F"OR HOME JUNE Sth 









' 



• 



. 









Special Representative, NORMAN JEFFERIES 



a • 



■ 

































Late Stars of " Tony the Bootblack " 






■ 

■ 



* 







Genaro and Bailey's OWN fancy dancing has proven aa big a hit aa our original cake walk, introduced by us into vaudeville. 
Wa are now studying out offers received for next season. More anon (That's good enough to use; anybody can have it). 






. 






« 



.. 






— — 



ALF. T. WILTON, Exclusive Agent 





SUCCESS 




J I7YI 




w M m m m 






8 








O 








u 










b 










CO 









SUCCESS 



SUCCESS 



SUCCE8S 
• •■ HARJRY 



SUCCE8S 






TRIO 



oo 



■J ■■ "P~ 7 



Sal 



> I i I ■ 



O'NEAL BROTHERS and WALMSLEY 



u 



" OERTAINLY GOOD ENTERTAINERS" 
JUST COMPLETING A IS WEEKS* TOUR OF THE PANTAGES' CIRCUIT 

ED. LANG DID THE BUSINESS. 



"THB BUT COMEDY ACT IN 'ONI* THAT BVBR PLAYED MY CIRCUIT."— ALEX. PANTAGES 



00 "ONE OP THB BEST COMEDY ACT! IN 'ONE' THAT BVER PLAYED THB MILB8, MINNE- 
APOLIS."— IBE SPEERS, MGR. 

8UCCESS 



SEATTLE POSTINTELLIGENOE, Pet. SI, 'OS. C 



"The Garden Olty Trio, with that highly popu- 
lar class of act, harmony, stnglag and dancing 
and comady, nada an unmistakable hit. Thay 
carry ona of the 'CLEVEREST SILLY BID* co- 
medlana of any almllar act that baa pi ay ad tha 
Nertbwest." 







rr 




- 



CHICAGO. "WI BAVE NEVER PLAYED SOBINDLER'S. BUT BATE PLAYED SCHXNDLER'S. 

SUCCESS SUCCESS SUCCESS SUCCESS 



ww sew •aeaP'Cs.fis^ 

'^"^ti,'"^'*''.--^ ■■> 



■ v* 1 

kindly mention 



' -■« -wff ..•'»•■ ■>*$" 









i«. '^;W ... 



•«*•> 



-.^ 



■■ '.^» , 



> 



TEN OENTS 




VOL. XV., NO. 1. 



JUNE 12, 1909. 



PRICE TEN CENTS. 



THE OPPOSITION LINE-UP 

SO FAR FOR NEXT SEASON 



The Morris Circuit Has Thirteen First Class Houses. 

Cincinnati Goes Independent, and St. 

Louis Looks Possible. 



Cincinnati, June 10. 

The Times-Star is authority for the 
statement tliat I. M. Martin, who signed a 
contract last Saturday to erect his new 
Orpheum Theatre on McMillan Street, has 
placed the booking for the house with 
William Morris of New Yrok. 

The paper ways the arrangement was 
made lietween Martin and Morris when 
Morris visited here some time ago. 

The Orpheum will be a very large the- 
atre, with a roof garden. 

It has Ikjpii common talk about that 
the management of the Columbia here, 
who also manage the drand Opera House, 
Indianapolis, have made frantic efforts to 
keep Morris out of this city. The Or- 
pheum will chiefly oppose the Columbia. 

Were some of the offers made to Morris 
for this end. according to report, confirmed 
and printed there would probably follow 
many explanations among the clique of 
men who are supposed to jointly and har- 
moniously control the large western first - 
class vaudeville houses. 

At the Morris headquarters in the 
American Music Hall Building, the report 
of the Morris-Martin Cincinnati booking 
was confirmed. The contract was entered 
into about three months ago, it was said, 
for Martin's new Orpheum, which will 
seat 2,400. 

A vaudeville man having intimate rela- 
tions with the Morris faction when asked 
au outline of the Morris line-up for next 
xcason after it had been explained to him 
t hat the Morris-Martin agreement had 
been withheld for three months, said: "It 
can't be given. There are so many 'deals,' 
'negotiations' and so forth going on that 
I myself don't know how many houses the 
opposition will have. I do know, though, 
• hat if it had not l>cen for the activity 
«>f the Shuberts in grabbing up theatres, 
Morris would probably have had at least 



twenty-two theatres by this time. He 
may that many now for all I know. 

"You can tell how little leaks out. Last 
week I didn't know that Morris was on 
the point of taking the Bijou, Pittsburg, 
just as Klaw & Erlanger stepped in and 
purchased the property until the K. & E. 
purchase was published. 

"Morris has thirteen theatres for next 
season everyone knows about. They arc 
his Americans at New York and Chicago, 
IMa/a, New York; Orpheum, Boston; 
Lyric, Newark; Fulton, Brooklyn; Ma- 
jestic, Toronto; Orpheum, Cincinnati; Or- 
pheum, Atlanta; Jefferson, Memphis; 
(ircenwall's, New Orleans; Dominion, 
Winnipeg, and Miles, Minneapolis. 

"I suppose Morris' Chicago office will 
have at least three or four theatres in 
its ofiice among the many smaller houses 
in the middle-west that will turn, out to 
be large enough to handle the best acts or 
enough to place the houses in the second 
grade of first-class time, anyway." 

St. Louis, June 10. 

According to both principals, no sale of 
the control of the Columbia Theatre and 
the Grand Opera House has been consum- 
mated. Both Louis Cella and Tate & Mid- 
dleton admit the biggest theatrical deal 
of vears in St. Louis is in the air. John 
ITavlin is in St. Louis, and a meeting is 
scheduled for this week which may result 
in Cella taking over the Middleton hold- 
ings or a controlling interest in the two 
houses and operating them. 

There are two reasons why reports that 
the Garrick goes into the Morris column is 
unlikely to be true. One is that Cella 
certainly would stipulate that Morris be 
barred from tin- Garriek. so as to leave 
the Columbia without opposition. An- 
other is that the Garrick is too. small to 
pay the high-salaried acts Morris usually 
plays. 



BRIGHTON WARMING UP. 

Vaudeville at Brighton Beach had a 
warming-up gallop on Monday. In the 
afternoon, as the matinee at the Brighton 
Beach Music Hall waa about to comence, 
Arthur Hopkins, the manager, waa in- 
formed by Fire Department officials that 
some necessary repairs had not been at- 
tended to. 

Mr. Hopkins declared off the matinee 
for that day, and set workmen on the 
job. Before the night show, about 1,000 
seats had been removed or replaced, and 
other alterations attended to. The even- 
ing show opened and ran through without 
further interruption. 

At the same time Mr. Hopkins was get- 
ting his'n, David Robinson, manager and 
promoter of the New Brighton Theatre, 
the opposition to the Music Hall, was 
poring over an order to show cause why 
he (Robinson) should not be punished for 
contempt of the Supreme Court of Kings 
County in annexing "Brighton" to the 
title of his house. The Supreme Court 
had previously decided upon a preliminary 
injunction issued at the instance of the 
Music Hall, that the word "Brighton" 
could not be infringed upon. This was 
when Mr. Robinson said his new house 
would be named "The New Brighton Beach 
Music Hall." 

A "GEORGIA CAINE" IN "10-20." 

Philadelphia, June 10. 
At the I'ark this week, where "10-20" 
vaudeville holds sway, there is billed 
"Georgia Caine." It is some time since 
the young woman of similar name and 
Hroadway fame appeared over here, but 
it's almost certain that the Park Georgia 
is not the (Jeorgia of the seven auto- 
mobiles and three count rv homes. 

"THE BACHELOR" ALL THROUGH. 

Chicago, June 10. 

•'The Bachelor." which saw the light 
first at the Whitney, will be withdrawn at 
the end of this week. 

It did not enthuse Chicagonns. 

LABOR PROBLEM SKETCH. 

Krank Finney and J. A. Sternad are 
about to produce a new dramatic sketch 
written by Mr. Kinney, dealing with labor 
problems. The piece calls for four male 
parts, and is purely dramatic. 



TWO MAKE LONDON HITS. 

(Special Cable to Variety.) 

London, June 10. 

Bert Levy reopened at the Palace Mon- 
day, again making a hit with his unique 
sketching. 

The Belleclaire Brothers at the Coliseum 
scored a hit also, a reappearance for them 
over here. 

Willard Simms and Co. in "Flinder's 
Furnished Flat," making a debut for Lon- 
don at the Empire, did but fairly. Some 
one picked the wrong house for this act. 



BOSTON'S "CLEAN-UP" MAYOR. 

Boston, June 10. 

Boston's little old "clean-up" Mayor, 
Mr. Hibbard, after telling what he 
thought about some of New York's big- 
gest box office successes of the season, 
now says he will visit the picture shows 
about town as a Censor Committee of One. 
Anything of an off-shade color seen by 
our Chief Executive will catch his wrath. 

Mayor Hibbard named "The Easiest 
Way," "The Blue Mouse" and "The Girl 
From Hector's" as the shows New York 
has, but Boston couldn't sec. Those who 
have seen these pieces are going around 
telling others that Mr. Hibbard is the 
wise old boy and acted just right. Some 
say they are sorry Mr. Hibbard didn't 
catch "Salvation Nell" while in the 
metropolis. The others haven't anything 
on that show for the Boston blacklist. 



LESLIE AND DAILEY AGAIN? 

There is a proposition confronting Bob 
Dailey and Bert Leslie which may again 
draw the former partners together, this 
time in a production under the manage- 
ment of Henry B. Harris. 

The piece selected by Mr. Harris for 
the two comedians is entitled "The Poli- 
tician," written by Aaron Hoffmann. 
Harry Von Til/.er has composed the music; 
Vincent Bryan the lyrics. 



FIGHTS LIVE ROOSTER. 

Sydney. Australia, May 9. 

Walter Stanton, "the giant rooster," in 
the pantomime ".lark and Jill," creates a 
1 in ore nightly 111 his tight with a live 
game enck. It is intensely humorous. 

Mr. Stanton carries a crate <»f ix bird.-'. 
t<» tight him. 



VARIETY 



PAULINE? AT $2,500. 

A contract was entered into this week 
l,v Pauline?, the hypnotist, and the Will- 
iam Morris Circuit for the hypnotist to 
play twenty -one weeks of Morris time at 
a figure which will average Pauline! 
$2,000 weekly for the engagement. 

Pauline? opens June 21 at the American, 
New York, for a stay of three weeks. For 
this engagement he will receive $2,600 
weekly. Commencing next season, the 
agreement calls for the hypnotic worker 
for the first twelve weeks at $2,000 a 
week, with $1,750 each for another six 
weeks to follow. 

B. A. Myers was the agent acting be- 
tween Pauline? and the Morris people in 
what is a remarkable contract of this 
vaudeville season, in point of salary. 
Pauline? after playing for the United 
Booking Offices for a year or so, all out- 
side New York City, entered Hammer- 
stein's recently for his first Metropolitan 
appearance at a weekly salary of $420 
gross. 

His figure leaped to $1,000 from that, 
and it is understood he is appearing at 
the Williams houses now for that amount. 
Pauline? is in Ws third consecutive week 
at the Colonial. Next week he finishes his 
United time at the Williams Orpheum, 
Brooklyn, which will also close for the 
season with him. 

It is said the United attempted to pur- 
suade Pauline? to defer signing with 
Morris until Percy G. Williams returned 
from Europe, but the hypnotist asked for 
immediate action, which was not forth- 
coming. 



TAKGUAY AGAINST JEFFRIES. 

Montreal, June 10. 

The William Morris show at the Acade- 
my, with James J. Jeffries at the head, 
was sent here under the belief, it is said, 
that the program would have a clean 
sweep, as Bennett's was booked to close 
last Saturday. 

Bennett's did not close, however. On 
Monday Eva Tanguay headlined the bill 
there, having been secured on short notice. 



"DEARIE" GOING TO LONDON. 

The writer of "Dearie" and "Egypt" has 
been engaged to appear upon the vaude- 
ville stage of London before New York 
has seen her. The booking was made in 
this, city. 

Clare Kummer is the writer. Miss Rum- 
mer is a pianologiste, who has often 
played and sung for society people. 

She is well known by name and reputa- 
tion among the swagger set of London, 
according to L. Johns^ the Moss-Stoll New 
York representative, and through that 
will open at the London Hip|>odrome Au- 
gust 2 for a stay of three weeks. 

The composer is of the Kemick & Co. 
staff. 



REVIVING "SPIRITLAND." 

"Pocahontas" will be the "Kpiritland" 
revived. Louis F. Wcrba, the producer 
of the spectacular pantomime, which 
played three weeks of Tinted time a few 
months ago. has arranged 1o again pre- 
sent the act in its new form of a musical 
comedy, carrying fourteen people. 

The opening of the 'Oft-'IO season will 
find the number in the field, with M. S. 
Bcnthnm at the booking helm. 

The Morris office is booking the vaude- 
ville upbearing at Revcfy Beach, Boston. 



WAITING FOR WILLIAMS. 

With the return of Percy Williams 
from his European trip yesterday it was 
said the United Booking Offices would 
commence entering up bookings for next 
season. 

There have been no important nor many 
bookings on United time for next season. 
The delay lias been through Mr. Williams' 
absence, according to report, though no 
one put forward any explanation why 
contracts or binders for the many acts re- 
quired on the smaller United time have 
not been given in the quantity hitherto 
customary about this time of the year. 

The smaller United managers have taken 
no concerted action regarding their next 
season's bookings as far as known. 



A "DRY" EXPOSITION. 

Seattle, June 10. 

This is a "dry" exposition being given 
here. No liquor is allowed sold within two 
miles of the grounds. The reason is the 
grounds used are owned by the University 
of Washington. A bill passed some years 
ago prohibited the sale of liquor within a 
two-mile radius. 

The first day's attendance (00,000) was 
half as big as the Chicago Fair opening. 



MAY DRAW 4*00. 

Chicago, June 10. 

Next week at the American Music Hall, 
J. H. Gilmore and Co. will present "A 
Southern Dramatic Tragedy" for one 
week only, by special engagement. 

Mr. Gilmore is the head of the Chi- 
cago Musical College with 4,000 pupils un- 
der him. He was formerly leading man 
for Viola Allen. 

The Morris management will be satis- 
fied if Mr. Gilmore can draw each one 
of his pupils to the American during the 
week. 

WESTERN MANAGERS GO HOME. 

Most of the western managers who 
came to New York to confer regarding 
legitimate bookings for next season have 
returned to their wild and western homes. 

It is said that though they assiduously 
sought A. L. Erlanger during the time 
they were in New York, Mr. Erlanger did 
not see them. 

The boss of "The Syndicate" is reported 
as having said that any manager could 
book with whom he pleased, but if Shu- 
bert attractions were played he need 
not look to Klaw & Erlanger afterward. 



PROSPECTING IN PROVIDENCE. 

Providence, June 10. 
Last Saturday, from 1 in the after- 
noon until 1 in the morning, Felix Isman 
and George Leventritt, who are connected 
with the Morris Vaudeville Circuit, were 
in the city looking over the theatres. 
What other business, if any, brought the 
men here did not appear. 

LUCY WESTON AS THE WIDOW. 

Lucy Weston will play the widow in 
"The Candy Shop" when that piece opens 
at the Studebaker, Chicago. It closes at 
the Knickerbocker to-night ('Saturday) 
cutting the proposed New York run by 
several weeks. Ijouisc Dresser, who origin- 
ated the role has had some offers for 
vaudeville, but will not likely play during 
the summer. Jack Barry more will be re- 
placed in the show for the Chicago en- 
gagement by Fred Henderson. 



COMBINATION MEETING TUESDAY. 

On next Tuesday is scheduled to take 
place the tinal meeting in the combination 
of small time. 

The Mozart, Feiber & Shea, M. R. Sheedy 
and J. J. Quigley circuits are in the mer- 
ger. The combination takes over the 
charter of the Independent Booking Of- 
fice, re-electing new directors representing 
each concern interested upon the present 
I. B. O. board of directors resigning. 

The agreement includes the adoption 
of the WhRe Rats form of contract and 
exchange of bonds between the circuits 
and the organization for the guarantee 
of faithful performance of all contract!, 
between artist and manager. 

A location for a central booking office 
for the combination will be selected. 



STOPS WORK ON THEATRE. 

Seattle, June 10. 

The Building Superintendent has or- 
dered all work stopped on the new Ameri- 
can Theatre, claiming the specifications 
filed have not been followed. Legal action 
will be taken by the promoters of the 
house unless they decide to abide by the 
superintendent's ruling. 

The American was to have opened last 
Monday with burlesque and vaudeville. 



WHEN CRITICS DISAGREE. 

Chicago, June 10. 

Richard Carle and "The Hurdy Gurdy 
Girl" started the summer season at 'the 
Colonial. The local critics did not all 
agree that it is good entertainment. 

One paper calls the piece common, plot- 
less, monotonous, tedious and coarse. It 
further said that if Carle could whip the 
show into a success he would be the mas- 
ter wizard of the business. Others said 
there was hope for it. 

The production is an expensive one. 



"HEART BREAKERS/' ROSSITER'S 
LATEST. 

Chicago, June 10. 

Will Rossi ter, the music publisher, has 
added another act to his list. The new- 
est venture is a "girl act" called "The 
Heart Breakers." 

Mr. Rossiter owns the act known as 
"The Girl with the Angel Voice." It 
opens at Brighton Beach Music Hall, New 
York, June 21. All Mr. Rossiter's other 
productions are booked in the middle 
west. 



EXPECT ANOTHER IN SYRACUSE. 

Syracuse, N. Y., June 10. 

It has been printed by the papers that 
the Alhambra, the big meeting hall of 
this town, will be a vaudeville theatre 
next season, playing in opposition to the 
Grand Opera House, a B. F. Keith stand. 

C. W. Andrews, the local agent for th » 
Mutual Life Insurance Co., which owns 
the building, will not commit himself fur- 
ther than to say the Alhambra is on the 
market, and may be had for show pur- 
poses. 

Mr. Keith's Grand is encountering very 
strong competition from the picture places 
in town, especially The Savoy, a new 
house recently opened on Warren Street. 
The Savoy has packed the people within 
its doors, and made such inroads upon the 
Grand that the admission there has been 
reduced to five and ten cents. The Grand 
management calls it a "summer season 
of vaudeville." 



GRAUMAN UP FOR MAYOR. 

San Francisco, June 10. 
, D. J. Grauman, pfoprietor of the Na- 
tional Theatre, stands a good chance of 
being San Francisco's next Mayor. Mr. 
Grauman is up for the nomination on the 
Republican ticket. According to the 
present outlook he will win in a walk. 

The Grauman policy is for a "wide 
open" town. He has a multitude of 
friends who swear by him. 

"Pop" Grauman has been a manager 
for thirty-four years. He took the first 
"nigger minstrel" show ever out on the 
road directly after the Civil War. The 
troupe was known as "Grauman's Georgia 
Minstrels." Mr. Grauman opened the 
Unique Theatre on Market Street 13 
years ago and was the first to introduce 
ten-cent high class vaudeville on the 
Pacific Coast. 

Later he had Grauman's Theatres in 
Sacramento, Stockton, San Jose, Fresno 
and Frisco. The National was opened by 
him three years ago, immediately after 
the earthquake. It has brought him a 
fortune. 



WRITING SONGS AGAIN. 

Again collaborating on songs after three 
years, Geo. Evans and Ren Shields placed 
two of their latest numbers with Charles 
K. Harris last Monday. 

The song-writing team, who have l>ccn 
responsible for many of the big popular 
hits of past years, have six or eight new 
songs by themselves which \v : M shortly 
be placed on the market by the music 
publishers, neither Mr. Shields nor Mr. 
Evans being under contract to any one 
publishing concern. 

CITY LEASES TO SHUBERTS. 

Denver, June 10. 

The Shuberts have leased the Denver 
Auditorium for a season of 20 weeks, the 
city reserving the privilege of naming the 
prices. The Auditorium seats over 8,000. 
The prices will range from 25 cents to $1. 
Those who are on the inside in theatricals 
say that the contract made by the city 
will hurt attendance at the other theatres. 

The Shuberts also have the Curtis The- 
atre here, where the smaller attractions 
will appear. 




TOOTS PAKA. 

TOOTS PAKA sails on Juno 2Nth for Honolulu. 
IihvIiik concluded n NUcoonsful wwkoii of fori* 
weeks for Hie UNITKI) HOOKINU OFFH'K. 

She Ih Appearing at the Fifth Avenue. New 
York. thlH week, meeting with gratifying aueeess. 

Minn Paka will return in the fall with a large 
company and an entirely new production. 



VARIETY 







THE HARPOON FOR OCTOROONS. 

Baltimore, .Tune 10. 
Down to their last dime, hungry and 
disappointed, twenty-five octoroons, mem- 
bers of . the "Octoroon Burlesque™," who 

have l>een appearing at the Monumental 
for the last two weeks, besieged police 
headquarters Sunday in an effort to have 
the strong arm of the law fall on the. 
shoulders of one Al Mayer, their manager, 
who, they alleged, deserted them Satur- 
day night in company with their salaries. 

At the fall of the final curtain Satur- 
day on the afterpiece (entitled "The 
(.host in a Pawn Shop"), the company 
were radiantly happy in the anticipation 
of the walking of the real ghost, but 
found to their dismay that the "ghost," 
impersonated by Mayer, had already 
walked. Whither he walked, none can tell. 

The company are left penniless and are 
without clothes, their personal effects 
having been attached by the l>oarding 
house keepers. 

Unless Mayer is soon found or help from 
other sources arrives the girls of the com- 
pany will star in a new production, "Hack 
to the Laundrv." 

SKATING FAD IN AFRICA. 

Cape Town, South Africa. May lf>. 
The roller skating fad has taken a linn 
grip on the public in this part of the 
world. Every town has its rink, and in 
Johannesburg there are eight establish- 
ments, each running at a handsome profit. 



BERNSTEIN PINCHED IN JERSEY. 

The dogs of war got to Freeman Bern- 
stein last Sunday night. They came in 
the form of police officers who informed 
Bernstein he was under arrest for giving 
a Sunday show at Washington Park, New 
Jersey. 

Monday morning Mr. Bernstein was dis- 
charged in police court. Hereafter on the 
Sabbath he will offer sacred moving pic- 
tures as the onlv entertainment in the 
park theatre. 

Freeman mav reduce the costs of the 
weekly bills over there also, as the loss 
of the Sunday receipts are apt to largely 
indent the week's gross. 

I^ist week at his theatre, Bernstein had 
James J. Jeffries as the headlincr at a 
salary of $2,500. There were others on 
the bill, and when the blow fell, Bernstein 
tried to figure how he would break on tin- 
week, with that four-figured salary on the 
sheet. 

Jeffries is a Morris office act, and was 
sublet to Washington Park. The supposi- 
tion is that Mr. Bernstein, having grown 
up with vaudeville, had a stand-off agree- 
ment with the Morris office on the Jeffries 
salary before the champion opened. 

Anyway Bernstein was clean shaven on 
Monday, always a good sign when the 
(Joddcss of Prosperity is flirting with him. 
The (loddess nearly turned Freeman down 
a couple of times, mire tor the black 
mustache of "John. the Capitalized 
Barber," but Freeman won her Imck before 
John knew it. 



DEIMLING'S DIDN'T OPEN. 

The opening of Deimling's Music Hall 
ii t Hockaway Beach last Sunday started 
but did not finish. The i>olice broke up the 
matinee by placing the manager under ar- 
rest for operating his theatre without a 
license. 

On Monday morning in the Far Rock- 
away Police Court, Magistrate (iilroy dis- 
charged Mr. Deimling. Alex, ('a it and his 
company of two were also placed under 
arrest tor violating the Sunday law. They 
are to appear at the same court to-day 

(Saturday) for a hearing. 

Deimling held a receipt for payment of 
the fee on his application for a P.MM) li- 
cense for the newly remodeled music hall, 
but the license had not been officially 
issued. 

The police stood .upon the ground that, 
as the house was practically new in all re- 
spects, only the certificate could answer, 
although all the (Jreater New York the- 
atres have been since May 1 without ihe 
formal official permit. 

Morrison's Theatre at Hockaway gave 
two shows last Sunday to large audiences. 
Deimling's was crowded at the afternoon 
show, with a large advance sale for the 
exeliillg. The box office receipts Were re- 
turned :it night. 

Shows will be given at Deimling's to dav 
and tomorrow. The regular season there 
and at Morrison's (mens June k 2i\. The 
houses oppose each other. 



"YAMA" GOING TO CHICAGO. 

Philadelphia, June 10. 

Alfred Aarons' musical show "The (Jirl 
from Yania," which has Im'cii running five 
weeks at the Walnut, will close Saturday 
night, and it is reported the show will be 
taken to Chicago for a summer run. 

According to the report the production 
will be recast with several Chicago 
favorites in the principal roles. Violet 
Colby. Daisy Leon, Nellie Daly, Clarance 
llaivey. W. VY. Black, Jack Kearney and 
Frank Wakefield have the principal roles 
at present, and it is said several of them 
will go west with the piece, ami of courso 
Aarons' "Dancing Dolls." 

An offer has lieen made to house the 
.-.how at the Whitney in Chicago, but if 
the original report is true, another theatre 
will secure it, with support from "The 
Syndicate," which will guarantee a big 
production. 

Trixie Frigau/a has Immmi making a big 
hit as a special feature with the show- 
here for the past three weeks. 

B00KS GUERRERRO FOR ROOF. 

The enirauement of lin-ario (Iuerrerro. 
the foreign dancer. wa« i-ahled to !ii«. New 
York office this week li\ William \b»i ri*. 
who is OII the ol her ->'nle. 

(Iuerrerro wi' ::>|i: ■>,>: i. the new Amer- 
ica n IJoof . i| ih * " « • | •• • i Im:;. '! 



( ie.i. M . t 'nllilli li.'l 

Mr. r .!-.i! !!,■'■'■■!■ 

I |.e H::: i V-'* . • '■ i ! ' r. / 



...\ . i-'i i »i" a pill. 
in j :lii- p.INt on 
:• 1 ill That Will." 



VARIETY 



MORRIS BOOKING FOR P. F. SHEA. 

Some casHftSnt was occasioned early in 
the Week upon the variety crowd hearing 
thai the William Morris office had booked 
the shows for this week into the Worces- 
ter Theatre, Worcester, and the Gilmore, 
Springfield, Mass. 

Both theatres are known as "P. F. Shea 
houses." They are operated by Mr. Shea 
in conjunction with Julius Cahn and M. 
R. Sheedy. Since opening as combination 
vaudeville and picture theatres at the 
olose of the regular season, M. R. Sheedy 
has placed the four or five acts used 
weekly in each. The former Joe Wood, 
Inc., did the first booking. When the dis- 
solution of that agency happened, Sheedy 
eoatiitaed until last week. No reason is 
assigned for the change to Morris. 

The removal of the duet of bookings 
from Sheedy leaves that manager with 
eleven small-time theatres of his own in 
New England. 

It is said that the Julius Cahn Circuit 
of legitimate theatres stretching from 
Maine to Ohio may have twenty-five or 
more of its houses playing combination 
vaudeville next season, converted espe- 
cially for that purpose from the former 
legitimate policy. It is causing some 
speculation as to where the booking for 
this time will be placed in view of the 
transfer of the two Massachusetts the- 
atres to Morris. 



SKETCHES WITH THRILLERS. 

Al Sutherland, the agent, has entered 
into an agreement with Loudon McCor- 
mick, the writer of many melodramatic 
plays in the past, to turn out for vaude- 
ville a series of sketches, each to have a 
thrilling climax. 

Mr. McCormick has written two, shortly 
to be placed in rehearsal by Mr. Suther- 
land, who will produce them. The climaxes 
may be thrilling in action or effect, but 
the grand finale in y every McCormick pieee 
is guaranteed with the label. 



MAUD LAMBERT AND BILLY CLIF- 
FORD. 

Maud Lambert and Billy Clifford, the 
co-stars of "The Girl at the Helm," the 
Chicago music comedy success, are play- 
ing their fourth and last week of a return 
engagement in vaudeville at the William 
Morris American, New York. Pictures of 
the two singers are on the front page. 

Miss Lambert and Mr. Clifford are 
as popularly known in New York 
as they are to play-goers through- 
out the country. Each appears in 
vaudeville as a single number, Mr. 
Clifford having established himself as 
a singing comedian of a high order before 
taking to the legitimate. He has dropped 
the "Single" from hm name, and is now 
plain "Billy Clifford." Mr. Clifford says 
there is no underlying reason why the 
"Single" hIiouM disappear. 

Next He«Hon Mjhh Lamlwrt and Mr. Clif- 
ford will again Htar in "The Girl at the 
Helm," having acquired an interest in the 
production. The piece will open in 
August at St. Louis, traveling west, reach- 
ing Seattle during the ending Exposition 
days. 

In about a month the couple will wend 
westward, looking over Clifford's own and 
exclusive theatre at Urbana, O., built upon 
the very spot when, as a boy in his home 
town, Billy gave "a show" with the ad- 
mission set at ten pins per person. 



SUNDAY CASE DISMISSED. 

The cases against Billy Gould and 
Valesca Suratt for violation of the Sun- 
day laws fell down Monday in the Court 
of Special Sessions when the artists and 
the manager of the Colonial Theatre, 
William Massaud, were discharged. 

All three had been held in a police 
court for the action of the higher criminal 
court. The offense alleged occurred in 
April. The police sought to show that 
they had been guilty of violation of the 
Sabbath observance laws. House, Gross- 
man A Vorhaus, the attorneys appearing 
for the act, demurred against the complaint 
on the ground that it did not set forth the 
commission of a crime under the New 
York charter and that :t charged two of- 
fenses. Judge Olmsted and his two as- 
sociate justices sitting in the Special Ses- 
sions Court concurred in dismissing the 
complaint. 

In an opinion written by Judge Olm- 
sted is laid down the principle that the 
section of the Greater New York Charter 
providing for the punishment of artists 
taking part in a forbidden theatrical per- 
formance was superseded by the Doull 
ordinance, and a prosecution cannot be 
pressed under this dead issue. This is 
practically the point upon which several 
of the city's suits for revocation of a 
theatre license have been dismissed. 



CHILD ACTRESS, PARTNER. 

Chicago, June 10. 

Another child actress was the cause of 
the arrest of H. E. Rice, manager of the 
Sans Souci Park theatre, and Morris 
Pember, the stage door keeper, for vio- 
lating the labor law. 

The girl is Lola Lamon. She appeared 
with Virginia Harned in "Anna Karen ina" 
last week. 

The manager told Judge Frye, who will 
hear the case the end of this week, that 
the girl is a partner in the production. 
This is the plea which Adolph Marks, the 
attorney, raised in defense of a similar 
case two weeks ago. 



Ceo. Thatcher, Harry Jolson, Bowman 
Bros., Billy Beard and the Six Nelson 
Comiques have been engaged as the black- 
face comedians for the Eddie Leonard 
Minstrels next season. Rehearsals will 
commence for the show about July 1. 



PANTAOES TAKES TRISCO SITE. 

San Francisco, June 10. 
A site at 7th and Market Streets, ad- 
joining the American Theatre, has been 
purchased by Alexander Pantages for the 
location of the new Pantages' Theatre )n 
this city. 



FISCHER'S GIVES UP BURLESQUE. 

Bast Pvaaaiaco, June 10. 
Fischer's Thaatrv will grta up its pres- 
ent policy of burl — f a n*aa» weak, revert- 
ing to a combination vaisaevills and pic- 
ture entertainment. 



MORRIS STARTS COLUMBUS. 

Columbus, O., June 10. 

William Morris vaudeville made its ap- 
pearance at the Colonial Theatre here 
Monday. Over the summer a bill of four 
or five acta playing three times a day will 
be the attraction, the performance being 
filled out with moving pictures. 

At stated weeks during the warm 
weather a ten-act show will be booked in 
to test out the Morris Music Hall scheme. 
In July one of these weeks will find the 
bill headed by James J. Jeffries. Prices 
will be advanced for such occasions. 

B. F. Keith operates a first class vaude- 
ville theatre here. 



THEATRE IN TEMPLE. 

Indianapolis, June 10. 

After much speculation as to where the 
Shuberts were going to locate in this city, 
it has finally been announced that they 
are to take the beautiful theatre of the 
Mystic Shrine Temple, now in course of 
construction. T. A. Winterrowd, city 
building inspector, declared last week that 
he would not approve of the plans of the 
building if the auditorium was to be used 
as a theatre. Changes will be made imme- 
diately to comply with the city ordinance. 
The plan of the Shuberts is to open it 
Christmas. The lease is for ten years, 
with an option for ten more. 

The new house will be known as the 
Murat Theatre, with a seating capacity 
of 2,200. 

Murat Temple will reserve the use of 
the theatre for two Sundays and the 
third Monday in each month. 

The Shuberts will make it a. week 
stand. 




FRANK ODELL AND ROSE KINLEY AT HOME. 

FRANK ODELL and B08E KINLEY arc spending a vacation at their home on Colllngwood Are.. 
Toledo. O., ne:«T the Farm Theatre. 

They recently finished with pronounced succe** this season's routing over the Ornhcnm Circuit and 
time Ixwkcd by EDWARD C. IIAYMAN of the Western Vaudeville Association. 

The above Is a family group, from right to left -MB. AND MRS. KINLEY, ALBERT KINLEY. 
HOHE KINLEY and FRANK ODELL GORDON. 



-FOLLIES" SHAPING UP. 

Atlantic pity, June 10. 

"Shaping up" has been the order of 
things in the "Follies of 1909" since the 
show, intended! for the summer at the 
New York Roof, opened last Monday at 
the Apollo. 

Most of the attention has been given to 
the second act. That showed up crudely 
in comparison to the first at the premiere. 
The first act was one succession of spec- 
tacles, uproaringly concluded with a 
"battleship' 1 scene. An effect is obtained 
of moving battleships through small 
models attached to choristers' heads, etec* 
trically lighted in a darkened house, the 
girls swaying back and forth. 

There is a "Hammerstein scene" dur- 
ing which Norah Bayes enters. Every- 
thing looks like Hammerstein, even to the 
negro attendant. Miss Bayes sang a 
parodied medley of operatic and popular 
selections, bringing home a hit. 

In another, "The Heart of the Jungle," 
with Jack Norworth as Kermit Roosevelt, 
Mr. Norworth sings "Dear Old Father." 
Harry Kelly as the only Teddy is a 
scream in this scene. The dancing of the 
many "animals'* was much liked* 

A travestied "hypnotic act" is intro- 
duced with William Bonelli as the hyp 
notist. Welch Mealy and Montrose did a 
funny bit from their vaudeville turn. 

Miss McMahon, a find from burlesque, 
gave her wonderfully clever "scarecrow" 
act with Billie Reeves working with her, 
Reeves getting all kinds of funny falls 
in. Sophie Tucker, another burlesque re- 
cruit, received little chance. 

Bessie Clayton scored with her dances. 
Lillian Lorraine led several vocal num- 
bers. 

Work and play should make this '•Fol- 
lies." 

Commencing Monday at Hurtig A Sea- 
mon's 126th Street Music Hall, the sum- 
mer burlesque company now appearing 
there may be billed as "The Follies of 
1910." The show is at present called "Tin; 
Girls of the Moulin Rouge," having taken 
the title when Tom W. Ryley contracted 
with the Whirlwind Millers to appear in 
his "Queen of the Moulin Rouge," while 
the Millers were under contract to Hurtig 
A Seamon. 

A similar cause will bring about the 
change in name of what was originally 
known as "The Trans- Atlantic*," except- 
ing the Millers did not play under Ryley 's 
direction. 

In the latent phase of contract break 
ing, the "Scarecrow girl" from "The Girl* 
of the Moulin Rouge," a chorister reeeiv 
ing her first engagement from Hurtig & 
Seamon and under a three years' contrart 
to the firm, is now a member of F. Zieg 
fcld, Jr.'s, "Follies," without the perm in 
8 ion "of her first managers. 

It was said during the week by a mem 
her of the Hurtig A Seamon firm that 
legal proceedings would probably he in 
btituted to prevent the girl opening with 
the Ziegfeld production on the New York 
Roof Monday night. 

There was an argument thin week on 
an injunction asked for by Ryley agsinst 
Hurtig A Seamon continuing with Un- 
title "The Girls of the Moulin Rouge.' 
Decision was reserved. 



The Reiff Brothers, dancers, have scp 
arated. 



Variety 



RIETY 



A- Variety Paps* for Variety Peaple. 
PaMlakaa *nn ■alalia? ay 

the Variety publishing co. 



Tl 



USI 



*«v Twk OMy. 



Jaterei — s«ws * ofs si naftar Dfomljy 22. 
astf* **• art o/ Coafrset •/ JTervft t, 1870. 



OHXOAOO OFTICB, 



). 



LOVDOV 01TICB, 

ill •taaai 

(Otal*, "J-afm, Imtm ") 

J. nnui, la 



■am rmivonoo omos, 

MM tatWr it 
JOKV J. O'OOWOB, Bumw tUtt v. 

snrra omos. 




raw omos, 



EDWAAS A 




0. M. HOT, 



is omos, 

laaUaieatl. 
■•■ XJBBA&Y. 
; Btprattatattvs. 



ADYKETIlXMXOTf. 

RaU oaid may to fovaA 1b aartrtlaiaf Motion 
of this laano. / 


■VMOUHIOJI EATM. 




Six and thro* noata* la proportion 
ttiiiglo copies 10 casta. 

VARIBTT wlU to atallod to a parawaaat ad- 
drc»a or aa par roata, aa d— trad. 


AdTartlaMBtnta forwardad 07 nail Beat to ac- 
companied by romlttaaco, mada payabla to Varlaty 
Publishing Co. 


Copjrlcat, IMS, by Varlaty PabUaalag Co. 


Vol. XV. JUNB 12. No. 1. 



Foster and Foster have signed with the 
Morris side next season. 



Both Frank Morrell and Prescelle hold 
over next week at the Fifth Avenue. 



A decree of divorce has been granted 
to Frank Wilson, of the Wilson Bros. 



Harry Fisher (Fisher and Fisher) was 
married in Philadelphia, May 28, to Mil- 
dred Gilbert. 



Henry £. Dixie is reported married to 
his former leading woman in vaudeville, 
Marie Norstrom. 



Nat Brown is the present partner of 
Aver, late of Morrisey and Ayer. Al 
Sutherland has the new act. 



The Lyceum, Far Rockaway, opened for 
the season last Saturday night, with Rico 
and Cohen the headline attraction. 



John C- Peebles, formerly manager of 
the Bijou, New Brunswick, is in charge 
of the Grand Opera House, Syracuse, for 
the summer season. 



J. J. Barrett, of Kelly and Barrett, was 
married in Bridgeport, Conn., late last 
week to a local girl. Ben Deeley acted as 
best man at the wedding. 



Lamber^i, the musician, will open at 
(he London Hippodrome, August 2, en- 
gaged through L. Johns, the Moss-Stoll 
New York representative. 



John Ford, formerly of Ford and Swor, 
opens in a new act at Henderson's next 
week, having the Clark Sisters, late with 
Geo. Whiting, for his partners. 



"The Follies of the Day" closes at the 
Lincoln Square, New York, to-night 
(Saturday), and will next be heard of at 
the Savoy, Atlantic City, July 12. 



It looks as though Henderson's, Coney 
Island, could give any show about New 
York a run for the money next week and 
win out with the Island program. 



Joe Meyers, formerly on the office staff 
of Joe Wood, is now booking manager of 
the Atlas Booking Circuit in the Knick- 
erbocker Theatre Building, New York. 



Quinn and Mitchell are considering a 
proposition to enlarge their sketch, "The 
Lemon City Land Agents," into a musical 
comedy in which they will be featured. 



Will J. Cooke has acted as the general 
director of the White Rats bookkeeping 
department this week, the regular staff 
man for the job being on the sick list. 



"The Deciding Game," and "Too Much 
Money," are two new sketches Gene 
Hughes will produce for next season. The 
first piece will have four players; the 
second, two. 

Yorke and Adams' new piece for next 
season will be called "In Africa.'' 
"Shapiro" will publish the music. The 
show will be under the management of 
Forrester Attractions. 



Irwin's Isle, May Irwin's summer home 

among the Thousand Islands on the St. 

Lawrence River, is to become a hotel this 
summer, managed by Miss Irwin, who 

wrote a cook book once. 



Eva Tanguay has signed to appear at 
the London Coliseum on August 2 next 
iBank Holiday) for a stay of four weeks. 
Miss Tanguay's salary abroad will be a 
very large one for England. 



The Criterion, Asbury Park, opened with 
vaudeville last Monday, under the man- 
agement of W. T. Barrett, who also has 
the Criterion at Atlantic City. Louis 
Wesley books for both houses. 

Rice and Prevost play their first week 
on the Morris Circuit, commencing June 
14, at the American, New York. The act 
has been booked over the Morris time for 
next season through B. A. Myers. 



Alick Lauder, brother of Harry Lauder, 
and who made his American debut Mon- 
day afternoon at Keith & Proctor's Fifth 
Avenue Theatre in a sketch, was closed 
after the Monday night performance. 



Sam Sidman has taken out a copyright 
upon the catch line he uses in "The Fol- 
lies of the Day" at the Lincoln Square, the 
first recorded iustance in which this course 
has been taken to protect such material. 



Yonne Lanior, an English elocutionist, 
has arrived in New York to play six or 
seven weeks over here in vaudeville. M. S. 
Bentham is after the time. Miss Lamor 
if. said to resemble Ida Renee in style of 
work. 



Mrs. Walter J. Plimmer has returned 
home, 753 58th Street, Borough Park, 
Brooklyn. Following two severe opera- 
tions, Mrs. Plimmer spent five weeks at 
the Sunshine Sanitarium, Bath Beach, to 
regain her strength. 



"Back Again" "opened at Newark last 
Monday night. In the cast are Ned Nye, 
Amelia Summerville, Henry Norman, 
Genevieve Finlay, Henry Coote, Constance 
Farmer, Gertrude Des Roches, George 
Shields, Lizzie McCaul and Robert Pitkin. 



"The Yankee Mandarin," Comstock & 
(Jest's musical comedy, Opens at Provi- 
dence Friday, June 11, commencing a run 
at the Majestic, Boston, Monday. In the 
show are Ada Lewis, Ed Garvey, Will 
Danforth and Maitland Davis. No one is 
starred or featured. 



James J. Jeffries will finish out next 
week, after the Pittsburg stand on Tues- 
day, in Philadelphia, Bridgeport, New 
Haven and Hartford, playing in each town 
one day. The following few weeks have 
also been laid out for the champion. 

Mr. and Mrs. Morris Gest left New 
York Thursday for a honeymoon in 
Europe. While abroad Mr. Gest will ar- 
range with Gertrude Hoffman, who is al- 
ready there, to star the dancing imitator 
next season under his firm's (Comstock & 
Gest) management. 



Al Sutherland was called upon this 
week by Jean Wallace, a pretty little San 
Francisco girl, who was a contestant in 
the Charles Frohman recent amateur con- 
test. Miss Wallace has decided upon 
vaudeville in a sketch, coming across the 
continent for a New York opening. 



Jack K. Magee, of Murphy and Magee, 
has sufficiently recovered from his acci- 
dent at St. Paul last March to perambu- 
late about the city with the aid of 
crutches. Mr. Magee is going to his home 
at Dingman's Ferry for the summer and 
expects to be in working condition by the 
opening of next season. 



Through Al Sutherland, Frank Fogerty 
has contracted for a return engagement 
over the Orpheum Circuit, commencing in 
October next. The agreements were 
signed Ix'fore Mr. Fogerty completed his 
present trip on the Orpheum. "The Dub- 
lin Minstrel" refused an offer of four 
weeks at the Palace, London, this summer. 

At the annual meeting of the National 
Association of Theatrical Producing Man- 
agers, held at the Hotel Astor on Tues- 
day, Henry B. Harris was elected presi- 
dent; Charles H. Yale, vice president; 
Jules Murry, secretary, and Sam A. 



Scribner, treasurer. Mr. Harris suc- 
ceeded Henry W. Savage, the association's 
first president; Mr. Murry replaced Hoi lis 
K. Cooley. Mr. Scribner was reelected. 

A second paralytic shock struck Harry 
Walters last week at his home, 20 Ruth- 
ven Street, Roxfoury, Mass. Mr. Walters 
was just recovering from the first, which 
happened early last winter in Chicago. 
The second stroke will confine the stricken 
man to his bed for some time. He has 
been obliged to smother his pride in an 
appeal to friends for assistance. Sam 
Sidman has taken the matter of aiding 
Mr. Walters in hand. 



Harry C. Hay ward, president of the 
T. M. A., Spokane, Wash., denies that local 
theatre attendance has been cut down by 
an epidemic of scarlet fever among the 
children of the city. "It is not true that 
100,000 persons are under quarantine. 
There have at no time been more than 
200 cases under quarantine," says 'Mr. 
I fay ward, "and the number is now 118 and 
constantly decreasing. There has been no 
noticeable falling off in attendance, al- 
though the rule against admitting children 
has been rigidly observed." 



Kid McCoy has opened a boxing club in 
Paris where bouts are held for the amuse- 
ment of the wealthy Parisians. Many 
American fighters will be exported to the 
other side, it is said, by a well-known 
theatrical management lately returned 
from there, where he arranged with Mc- 
Coy to supply the Paris club with the 
In'st of America's fistic exponents. 



"Billy Brown" is a new song especially 
written for Carrie De Mar, who will sing 
it upon returning to the stage. It is a 
character number, Miss De Mar playing a 
little girl, and having dialog between 
verses with her imaginary playfellow, 
Billy. 



The suit of Sherek & Braff, London 
agents, against "That" Quartet for com- 
missions on engagements in England se- 
cured by the agents, but unplayed by the 
act, was decided in favor of the plaintiff. 
Three hundred dollars was the judgment 
rendered. 



C. B. Maddock, connected with B. A. 
Rolfe, the producer, was married June 1 
at Cleveland to Paulette Antoine, of Buf- 
falo. Mrs. Maddock is the granddaughter 
of the late Couut de Champey, of France. 
The newly wed couple sail for Europe 
June 19. 



Hugh Mack and M. J. Sullivan will play 
with "The American Idea" next season, 
Mr. Mack's second year with the piece. 
Messrs. Mack and Sullivan are of the 
original Olympia Quartet which played 
for thirty years (77 to '07) intact. An- 
other member, Peter Kendall, has died. 

It is likely that IM. Gallager will re- 
turn to the stage next season. lie has 
received offers to ag»iin stng»- his "Battle 
of Bay Itiiin" military Iravsty, played 
this season !>y ('.iilin und Oito wilder Gal- 
lager's lllH!:.!L'<'Mi--!!t. { J !> ' ' ;■ K'T. wllO is 

now in T h« • :! , :< , n ,, v ln)--'M"->- In New York, 
may <!,, i!< -'..nl: wi'h :i i-artner. 



8 



VARIETY 



DREW & CAMPBELL LEASE THREE. 

Chicago, June 10. 

Tin- Dine burlesque shows owned by 
Drew A Campbell have been leased for 
next season to other parties, who have 
taken over the respective routes sched- 
ule<l over the Empire Circuit (Western 
Burlesque Wheel). 

The "Avenue Girls" will be under the 
management of Sheppard Camp, who will 
also head the company. The "Tiger Lilies" 
will 1m' piloted by Will Drew, and the 
"Colonial Belles" has l>ecn turned over to 
Harry M. Strouse, who last season had 
"The District Leader." 

The shows remain the properties of 
Drew & Campbell, but the firm will not 
be financially interested in the equip- 
ments or tours. 



TO REPLACE ACADEMY. 

Pittsb;:rg, June 10. 

II. W. Williams' Academy is to be re- 
placed for opening at the beginning of the 
1010-11 season. The present Academy 
will remain as it stands for next season. 

In May, '10, it will be torn down and 
on the same site will be erected a modern 
office building, with the interior occupied 
by an auditorium. The Western Wheel 
Burlesque shows will continue there. 



SIM WILLIAMS FIRST. 

Sim Williams takes exception to the 
statement that 'The Sam T. Jack" Show 
(Western Wheel) will be the first Wheel 
organization to get under way next season. 
He has made all arrangements to start out 
II. W. and Sim Williams' "Imperials" 
over the Western time July 27. 

The show will take two days each in Al- 
toona and Johnstown, Pa., to break in that 
week and play its first regular stand be- 
ginning Saturday, July .'U, at the Acad- 
emy, Pittsburg, continuing through the 
following week. 



Rose Jeanette (Brooks and Jeanette) 
has a new gown called "the five-hundred- 
button dress." It was worn by Miss Jean- 
ette at the (irand Opera House, Syracuse, 
last week, for the first time. 




PHILLY, THE "C00CH" BURG. 

Philadelphia"? June 10. 

The recent invasion of "eooeli" dancers 

and the race for supremacy among the 

rival burlesque houses has resulted in a 

real conflict. The "Girl in Blue' was 

heavily billed and advertised to appear 

with Hilly Watson's show at the Bijou 
this week, but at the opening performance 
Manager Dawson announced she had 
broken her word and was appearing in 
New York. .Manager Dawson proved a 
good speech-maker, and his offer to refund 
money was not accepted by a single 
patron, the house remaining crowded. 

In place of the "Girl in Blue" Watson 
< ngaged Princess Verona and Millie Milo 
and the latter turned loose a real "cooch." 
On Tuesday flaming bills and posters an- 
nounced the appearance of "The Girl in 
Blue" at the Gayety (Eastern Wheel) for 
next week. 

There were reports that manager Eddie 
Shavne had "called out" "The Girl" from 
the Bijou to boost his own business, but 
Shavne declares there was a previous con- 
tract existing which demanded Miss De 
Leon's api>earance in New York. Billy 
Watson announces he will have four 
"eooehers" next week to play against 
"The Girl in Blue," and the Trocadero 
(Empire Circuit) joined in the scrap by 
bringing back Zallah for her fifth week 
there. The outcome listens good for the 
Ulievers in the "cooch," and the dancers 
are wiggling with delight. 

Mille De Leon was arrested on Tuesday 
by the police of West 123th Street for 
the dance shown by her at Ilurtig & 
Seamon's Music Hall this week. Bail was 
given and the hearing adjourned. 



FREDERICK V. BOWERS 

Who tins ninilc a Mr hit In n single net nt 
YoiitiK'fl 1'Iit, Atlnntlr City, this week. 

Mr. IIhwith Is phivliiK six weeks of Imiiiciliatf 
vaudeville eiijrntreinents, tiefnrc st nrtlnn on liU 
HtiirrhiK Imir In '•<'HM.MKNCKMK.NT HAYS," 
under the direction <>f JOHN ('OUT. 



"C00CHER" LEAVES TOWN. 

Chicago. June 10. 

Peace has l>cen declared at "Luna Park," 
where Cleo, •'The Girl in Red," has been 
the chief attraction for one week. The 
cooch dancer was featured at one of the 
concessions and attempted to show how 
strong she could "wiggle" last Saturday 
night, while a "spotter" from the city hall 
watched her performance. 

It seemed too much for him, for he im- 
mediately ordered her to leave the prem- 
ises, and she did, taking an early morning 
train for Ccutralia. 111., where a carnival 
show was awaiting her. "Cooch" dancers 
arc U'comiiig more extinct every day, at 
least in Chicago. 

THE COHAN & HARRIS SHOWS. 

The Cohan &, Harris Minstrels open 
August 9 at Atlantic City. The program 
of the show will be new. Mr. Cohan has 
written the afterpiece, named "The Fire- 
man's Picnic." 

Raymond Hitchcock goes out on the top 
of a Cohan musical comedy, opening 
August 27 at Rochester. 

Edna Wallace Hopper will be at the 
head of "The Harrigan Girl." produced 
by the firm. 

Mr. Cohan will go to the Pacific Coast 
with "The Yankee Prince." returning to 
New York in time to rehearse his new 
play to be presented on Broadway next 
Washington's Birt Inlay. 

Trixie T'rigan/a will again lead in "The 
American Idea." making a far western 
tour. 



CHARGE VIOLATED AGREEMENT. 

Pittsburg, .Time 10. 

There is likely to be a complaint tiled 
with the Executive Committee of the Kin- 
pi re Circuit Co. (Western Burlesque 
Wheel) growing out of the appearance here 
ot Fred W. Stair's "Big Review" at R. M. 
Gulick & Co.'s Alvin Theatre. 

"The Big Review" was booked into the 
Alvin by Gulick himself for the week of 
May 1W, one week after The Academy, the 
regular Western Wheel stand, had closed. 
There was no Western burlesque show ex- 
cept the "Review" playing in Pittsburg so 
that the Stair show was not in the posi- 
tion of playing in opposition to an organ- 
ization of its own circuit, but the Acad- 
emy people declare that theij booking con- 
tract with the Empire Circuit Company 
{rives them an exclusive franchise for West- 
ern Wheel shows in Pittsburg and that it 
Ls specifically provided that any violation 
of this clause shall be punishable by a fine 
of $1,000. Whether or not the rule will 
be declared to be in operation in case the 
enfranchised house were closed when a 
Western show played in the town could 
not be learned. 

The Empire directors were in session at 
the Hotel Imperial the first two days of 
the week, but no announcement of its de- 
liberations was given out. 



LOUISVILLE'S MANAGER SELECTED. 

Louisville, Ky., June 10. 

Geo. Harris, a member of the Hurtig & 
Seamon staff, has been chosen for the 
manager of K. K. Hynicka's new Gayety 
in this city. Its opening as an Eastern 
Burlesque Wheel house is set down for 
the commencement of the fall season. 

The Gayety is practically completed. 
Mr. Hynicka says he has not the least 
doubt of the theatre opening on the set 
date, and is not at all worried over past 
or possible future complications. 



NO BURLESQUE AT SQUARE. 

The Lincoln Square will not play bur 
lesque next season, according to one of 
the Charles E. Blaney stair. "No bur- 
lesque house could stand the rental of 
the Square," said he. "It is $40,000 a 
year, and we would not play on a per- 
centage." 

The Lincoln Square will l>ecome a "dol- 
lar combination house," taking its attrac- 
tion from the Stair & Haviland or the 
Shubert list, with the chances in favor of 
S. & H. supplying the theatre. 

"ACTS" WHILE YOU EAT. 

Xew Orleans, June 10. 
Vaudeville is being introduced into the 
restaurants here. The original Fabacher's 
the one at the Uoyal, and Iberville, known 
to almost every show person in the coun- 
try, had Julia White as its hcadlincr last 
week. Next week the top-liner will be 
a brack face comedian, William Cooper. 



Mrs. Win. Annis and Co. are to be the 
feature act the Maryjand, Baltimore, next 
week, the fourth show placed in the 
theatre by Edw. S. Keller. 

Bay Cox sails to-day, to open at th<> 
Coliseum, London, Julv .1. 



SCRIBNER'S OWN RECORD. 

In the general offices of the Columbia 
Amusement Co., over which Sam A. Scrib- 
ner presides, there is a notice tarked upon 
the wall detailing the choice dates of the 
past season, and where Mr.. Seribner's 
'Big* Show" played, on those days. 

It reads: 

■'" "NOTICE ! 

Don't kick about your holiday week. 

We have our own bad weeks. 
The Seribner Show.: 

Thanksgiving, Euson's, Chicago. 

Xmas, Albany and Holyoke. 

New Year's, Boston. '. 

Lincoln's Birthday, Providence. 

Washington's Birthday, Springfield and 
Albany." 

"In Boston," said Mr. Seribner, "tkey 
don't observe New Year's. In Providence 
they didn't know who Lincoln was, ant' 
Albany, Holyoke and Springfield for any- 
thing! 

"If there's anyone on the Wheel with 
anything on me for picking dates, he's got 
to line up with that list to show." 



CHANGE SHOW'S NAME. 

"Queens of the Jardin Paris" will be 
the title under which Jacobs & Jermon's 
Eastern Wheel show "Greater New York 
Stars" will travel next season. An en- 
tirely new set of principals will accom- 
pany the organization for the 1909-10 
tour and the fresh title is given to give 
it a clean sweep. 

Among the show's features will lie the 
Four Minars, whirlwind daiwrs formerly 
connected with "The Queen of the Moulin 
Kouge," the Thomas Hyley musical com- 
edy. Other principals engaged for the 
.Jacobs & Jermou attractions are Mon 
Molasi, Swan and Bambard, Ida Crispi 
(formerly of Guyer and Crispi and Nye 
and Crispi), "Our" Quartet, Billy Arling- 
ton, Minerva Brown, La Tour Sisters ami 
others. 

Pat Reilly, last year's feature of the 
"Golden Crooks" Co., will not be under 
Jacobs & Jermon's management next 
season. 



SIM COLLINS GROWING WEALTHY. 

Boston, June 10. 

Sim Collins, of Collins and Hart, has 
Uen saving his money since returning to 
vaudeville from the "Little Nemo" show. 
This week Sim bought an automobile here. 

Sim's driving the machine about the 
town, asking evervone not to tell Barnev 
Myers in New York he purchased it. 
'Sim says he is going to tell Barney he 
borrowed the auto. 

Mr. Myers is Mr. Collins' agent, and 
also his sate deposit vault. Since makini; 
Myers a depository, Collins has real estate 
a cat, three new hats, two suits of clotho 
and a wife, all in his own name. 



MARRIES WEALTHY AUSTRALIAN. 

Sydney, April 22. 

Betty Ohls (Ohlshauser), a petite 
American comedienne, who replaced Car- 
rie Moore in "The Merry Widow" at Her 
Majesty's Theatre, has married Captain 
MtQuadc, one of the family owning a 
great bulk of city and country real 
estate. 

Miss Ohls was a general favorite here. 



Ada Overton Walker, colored, and six The Chirks, ban joists, and Brown and 

nirls arc out in an act named "The Ban- Nevarro open at the American, New York, 
danna Girls." June 14. 



VARIETY 






ARTISTS' FORUM 



ConfliM yoar letter* te 180 words and write «n -mm aid* «f payor only. 
Anoayawuo comiMMlfotlono win rot bo printed. Nooio of writer oiast bo olsnod sad 
bo bold In strict coafldract. If dorired. 

Lotion to bo yoblithod la this ooltuna moot br wrtttra oxolulvoly to VARIETY. Doyliootoi 
lotton will oot bo printed. Tbo writer who dopllootos o lottor to tbo Fomn, oitbor boforo or ofter 
it oppoon btro, will not bo pormittod tbo prlriloto of it ocolo. 

Philadelphia. Juno 7. moriul service arranged by Harry Mount- 
Editor Variety: tord. 

In answer to the offer made me through lletwecn the two parts an olio was 

Variety last week by J. Burnstein, man- given. Among the volunteers were Ed 

a gee, would say that I'll l>e glad to play Morton, The Quartet, Geo. Whiting, Aud- 

the Wonderland Theatre, St. Johns, N. F., rey Pringle, Bowman Brothers, Eddie 

lor the twenty-live dollars a week, pro- Clark, Bailey and Austin, Victor Vass 

viding there is a truck farm attached to and L. C Piotti. 

the theatre and he will allow me the priv- The only other sketch on the program 
iloge of working out the difference l>e- was- "A Scene from the Under World" by 
tween that and $750. 1 feel sure that if Junie McCree and Ken Shields. Mr. Mc- 
Dorothy Hussell considers it worth $1,000 dee played the type of man known to 
a week as milker of the cow that lives New York from "The Apache Dance." 
on the roof, on top of the theatre that Frank North (Howard and North) played 
Hammersteiu built, and Valeska Suratt the woman. It was of a story brought to 
is willing to give up her Kurope trip and New York by Mr.« McOee and ''drama- 
cut the salary to $000, that I should have tized" for the festive occasion, with a 
the truck privilege. laugh almost every second in the lines 

I am taking into consideration that Ix-sidcs a howl for the "snapper" finish, 

manager Burnstein says, "it is a nice Not the least important item of the 

healthy climate" and the fact 1 am a evening was the impromptu orchestra 

vegetarian, and believe that ••everything composed of Frank Orth, J. Royer West, 

will be satisfactory" to guarantee my Ed Waterbury, Archie Nicholson, Ed Olb, 

stay of four weeks or more. Fred Hylands, Ernest Tenny, Lamberti, 

1 also realize that twenty dollars in St. Eddie Klein and Al Ott. 

Johns l>eats forty dollars in New York The musicians "crabbed" no one, and 

and that forty dollars is a lot of money without offering the excuse of "first per- 

in any one place. Have another week as tormance," could have furnished informa- 

the feature of Alfred Aarons' "The Girl tj on f or a ny vaudeville orchestra around, 

from Yama" in this city, and if 'every- The "Scamper" of the Hats was "stag." 

thing is satisfactory" will be glad to hear Several non- members were present, but 

from manager Burnstein. no manager or agent, excepting Geo. F. 

Trix'u: Friyanza. Brvne. 

The various committees in charge of the 

Wheeling, W. Va., June 4. highly enjoyable proceedings were: Stage 

Editor Variety: K*' n Shields, June McCree. M. Thor 

The Musical Johnsons are using their (props); Reception— Harry Mountford, 
right name and not infringing on any- Tim Cronin, Walter W. Waters; Refresh- 
body's name or act, whatever. We, too, ment— Will J. Cooke, Bob Cunningham; 
have traveled some, but never in Europe. Invitation Tom Wilson. Mr. Shields also 
(Faydai and Jack Johnson.) acted as announcer. 

The cast of "Speared At Buffalo" was: 

Mattoon, III., June 5. ,Iii«1k«* Kliiwlmmmcr James Tcnhrooke 

.„ ,. ,, Attorney Mailman Ken Sblehls 

Edllor VARIETY: Attorney Flasuiiian Will J. Cooke 

Be it known that there is a pirate in nvrsonai Friend of Judge.) 

jh it Kiii'ttii iimi- i William UntrlM'tMtnn Hube Welch 

and around Chicago known as Jack Bran- k,,|, p H i»iy Edwin Kcough 

V ii i ...I... <Tln> KIhk of Vaudeville.) 

nigan, working the smaller houses, who Mav>r J||v A|| |Iam Frank . Hr , PI1 

will help himself to any part of your act Martin Speek .„.. - -y-y — -^^; 

he happens to like and use it. S<ene -Judge Klawhnnimt-r'ii Court. 

I am a victim. He took six minutes Jl^ UefVn^-V^t^s^r. 

of my original "kidding patter" away. 

Oh, you chooser. Now get wise, old XHE WAY TO LIVE. 

boy, and get away from it, for you will 1JY JACK K MAGEE . 

never be funny. Knock? 

,1 r i n- l No. wh.it 's the good? (Jreat world If we would 

C. Jack Rich. • * . ,,,.,,, 

I'rulse each other a work all the time, 
(Rich Duo.) Knoeking Is an awful prime: 
■ So 1m>osI. 

FROLIC AT SCAMPER. steal? 

„,, , ., , . . .• • i a. e l„ a f N». u>e your brains. Other ehap. In- takes piiins 

Thoutrh it was late in the night of last • ' 

1,, ""6" , * B # To write or buy. Its his stuff alone. 

Saturday or early Sunday morning when Sil .. k(M . p ulT lllP BI . 11SS " K ,. t yil „ r nw „ : 

the White Rats gave their version of the originate. 

demise of the Voss Bill and its attending 1>rink v 

Circumstances, the Crowded meeting room Yes, In moderation, nothing In Inebriation. 

of the Rats had not lost a customer. T« k «' « " M ' , « l «»■*" " r « w "- 

~ . -^ rm. i .. *t A l - He careful, don't get past "the few": 

"Speared at Buffalo" as the travesty was ^ (>HU|1()US 
called "held 'em in" and brought laughs 

ranging from a Snicker to a yell. Sure, put some away, hound to have „ rainy day; 

Junie McCree and Ren Shields wrote j ukv nimut s i«..-kiiigs. 'smnethinn to sh..u." 

the satire. It was played in a court When >niii<- broke, it won't «..: 

room setting. The program listed several H "" k lt - 

will-known vaudeville people, with the smile? 

, . . . * ji,„„, Cert, all the while, imllilnt: like a miiiiiv >mile; 

pincers made up to represent them. • K 

* * * S' pre ii 1 1 some sunshine many miles, 

There were two parts to the skit, the Xlllll , I1(f su ,,.„. r ,„„,, „,„,,„ llf , m „,. s: 

first opening the show. It was a me- j.«ugh. 



STUDYING NEW COPYRIGHT LAW. 

Uiwyers interested in copyrights are 

just now studying the new statute on 

this subject, signed by the President 

March 4, and which goes into ell'ect July 
1. The new regulations, f rained after ex- 
haustive arguments among the numerous 
interests affected, contain a numl>cr of 
items which will greatly change the pro- 
cedure of infringement suits. One of the 
most important of these is Section 28. 

"Section 28," said Denis F. O'Brien 
(counsel for the White Rats) this week, 
"will have a far-reaching influence upon 
piracy. The presence of an important 
provision in that section is due to the 
efforts of the artists' organization. I 
refer to that clause which states 'That 
any person who wilfully and for profit 
shall infringe any copyright secured by 
this act, and who shall knowingly aid or 
abet such infringement shall be deemed 
guilty of a misdemeanor and upon con- 
viction thereof shall be punished by im- 
prisonment not exceeding one year or by 
a fine of not less than one hundred dol- 
lars nor more than one thousand dollars, 
or both in the discretion of the court." 

"If I interpret this rightly, the new 
matter, 'wilfully aid or abet such infringe- 
ment,' may be invoked by an artist in 
protecting his copyright. It will make it 
possible for any artist to bring a crim- 
inal proceeding against the owner or man- 
ager of a theatre in which a pirated work 
is or has been given. This was not pos- 
sible under the old laws and I look to see 
the revised law help the artist vastly. 
A manager who receives notice that he is 
a party to a piracy will pay some atten- 
tion to the warning when he knows that 
the victim of the piracy may put him in 
jail. Previously the manager of a house 
could not be proceeded against and the 
only way a victim of a piracy could get 
aid from him was to appeal to his sense 
of honor and decency. 

"Sub-division (b) of section 25 specifics 
the penalty which may be recovered for 
an infringement of a dramatic work as 
'one hundred dollars for the first and 
fifty dollars for each subsequent infringe- 
ing performance,' assessed, of course, 
against the person committing the in- 
tringement." 

Mr. O'Brien called attention to a curi- 
ous paragraph, oddly located in tin* early 
pages of the law. It provides that the 
owner of a copyright who licenses a 
maker of mechanical musical instruments 
to use his compositions must record lhat 
fact and failing to do so forfeits the 
right to bring any suit against anyone 
who infringes his copyright. 

"In framing the bill," said Mr. O'Brien, 
"it was so arranged that an owner of a 
musical composition, if he licensed the 
maker of anv mechanical musical device 
to use his (the owner's) copyright, must 
permit all other mechanical instrument 
makers to use the work. This was de- 
signed probably to prevent the formation 
of a trust holding contracts for the ex- 
clusive use of musical compositions. It 
occurred to the sponsors of the bill, pre- 
sumably, that many music publishers 
might give permission to one maker of 
instruments and keep the transaction 
secret. To obviate such a possibility, I 
dare say. the section referred to was in- 
corporated in the new law. 

"This is a good provision, but I fear 
that many music publishers will ovcr- 



a ioC." RIVALRY OUT WEST. 

Indianapolis, June 10. 

The rivalrv lietwecu the ten cent vaude 
ville houses in this city is becoming in- 
teresting. It is hard to predict the re- 
sult. The Gayety, formerly occupied by 
the Columbia Amusement Company with 
burlesque, has been operated since last 
fall by the Dixie Amusement Company 
and is probably the most successful house 
in town. 

The Casino Company has entered on its 
fifth week at English's and is doing well. 
With the close of the Holden Stock at 
the Park, two weeks ago, vaudeville and 
pictures were installed and are doing 
fairly. The Orpheum is playing pictures 
and the Family, the smallest in the city, 
is drawing good. The Majestic with 
"pop" vaudeville closed Saturday after 
two weeks. • 

The Park announced its opening with 
an advertisement reading: "First the- 
minnows, then the Whale." Up to date 
it has displayed no whale symptoms. 

This fight has started all the managers 
booking good attractions. As a result the 
public is seeing plenty of good amuse- 
ments. The theatres are running this 
summer in opposition to three amuse- 
ment parks, two bathing beaches and 
al>out twenty five-cent picture houses. 

It is also rumored that the Grand, the 
Orpheum house, will soon open as a ten- 
cent house with Geo. K. Spoor's pictures. 



BUYS COLORADO RANCH. 

Denver, June 10. 

Remaining over in Denver before leav- 
ing for the northwest, where she is to ap- 
pear in the other Orpheum Circuit houses, 
Lily Lena, the English singer, has pur- 
chased a live -acre tract of land on the 
South Golden Itoad, just outside Denver. 
Miss Lena says she will make it her sum- 
mer home. 

Miss Lena appeared at the Orpheum last 
week. 



STANGE WRITES ANOTHER. 

Julie King is the recipient of the latest 
vaudeville sketch written by Stanlius 
Stange expressly for her. It is named 
"Margory Daw" and will be presented by 
Miss King next season, under the booking 
direction of Al Sutherland. 

look it and by failure to file a record 
lose all royalties." 

All the matter in the new law referring 
to royalties for the use of musical com- 
positions on mechanical instruments is in- 
teresting. The gist of it is that the owner 
of a copyrighted musical piece mny for- 
bid its use in mechanical instruments. 
Should he agree to its use by any one 
maker of mechanical instruments, such as 
phonographs or mechanical pianos, any 
other person may make similar use of the 
work upon payment of a royalty of two 
cents for pach record manufactured. The 
copyright proprietor may require and the 
manufacturer must furnish a report under 
oath on the 20th day of each month 
showing the tolal number of mechanical 
records made timing the thirty day p'-riod 
just pasM-il. 

Much of tin- |;iw. Mi (I'I'.rii'n said, 
would be b«'t!«-r uinlcr-t "■ <l wli.-ii I In* 
court** in tli' 1 c«'in»r '<t' i i i .l 1 .: t i'lM i -I u«-i 
dat cil a ii<1 ii.( ■ i |»i i ! '■♦! i: . 









* 



10 



VARIETY 



London' June 2. 

B. A. Rolfe and his band opened at 
Wembley Park May 31 and made good 
with the crowds that were out that day. 
Mr. Rolfe, besides leading the band, ren- 
dered a cornet solo that went very well. 
The band will probably play all summer 
at this park. On July 12 Mr. Rolfe will 
place Mabel Keith, "The Girl With the 
Baton," in to lead the band, as his "Para- 
dise Alley" opens then in London. 



Dave Montgomery has arrived and will 
spend the rest of the summer in London 
and on the Continent. 



Ted Marks is again among the London- 
ers, and is looking much better than on 
his last visit. The weather, it seems, has 
a lot to do with Ted. 



Friend and Downing are back in London, 
having finished their bookings on this 
side. The team may go into the country 
for a few weeks before returning to the 
States. 



Reports from Glasgow say that Joe 
Welch, who opened at the Palace this 
Monday, did very big. 



It was a kind of a laugh the other 
night at the Canterbury on the stage to 
hear the singing and dancing soubret say 
to the booking manager, who happened to 
be back that night: "Say, Jack, I would 
like a couple of weeks off in 1011 if you 
could manage it." And she was in earn- 
est, too. 



Gardener and Stoddard complete their 
Stoll time in the latter part of June. As 
yet they have entered no booking over 
here beyond that time. 



The Sousloffs were to go over to the 
States for William Morris this summer, 
but there seems to be a difference in the 
value of the act — between the dancers and 
Mr. Morris. 



At the Palace on Saturday last Yvette 
Guilbert was an awful riot, and Walter 
Kelly, who followed, had his troubles. It 
didn't last long, however, as the Judge 
had things all his own way after the first 
story. The "riot" for Miss Guilbert 
seemed to be forced in certain parts of 
the house. 



Vasco returns to the Empire next week 
after an absence of about a year. 



Williard Simms and Co. open at the 
Empire next week. Opening there ought 
to start an argument. It seems a pity 
that when an agent on this side books 
an act to open, he shouldn't take into 
consideration the nature of the house. It 
is a safe bet that Simms and his act 
would be a big laugh at most any 
music hall in London. The Empire will 
possibly take to the act as well, but there 
are at least five halls in the West End 
more suitable for the act to open in. 



Carleton showed his "Mysterious Cross" 
at the Pavilion last Saturday matinee for 
just one performance. The "Cross" is 
placed in a cabinet, with four curtains for 
the sides. The cabinet is raised. Carle- 



LONDON NOTES 

vARm-rs lohdon office. 

4ii itsavd, w. c. 

(Msfl for Americana and Europeans In Europe if addreeaed care VARIETY, •■ abore, will 
be promptly forwarded.) 



ton straps a young man to the Cross, 
drawing the curtains. They are opened 
almost instantly, and the audience sees 
a young girl in the man's place. After 
the pair are changed again, the trick is 
exposed. A small trap is shown, and it 
is worked in full view of the audience. 
The illusion is a good one, and the ex- 
posure gives it novelty. 



For a good-looking girl who lets every- 
one in the house know she is there, one 
Queenie Finnis needs a lot of beating. 
Hand Queenie two good songs, and never 
mind the rest. She has everything that 
a single turn should have, and, possibly, 
a little more. Miss Finnis is now at the 
Pavilion. 



At the Cavour the other day P. G. Will- 
iams, Mannie Warner, H. Wolheim, B. 
Obermayer and 'Clifford Fischer sat at the 
same table. At another table a book was 
made as to who would pay the check. 
Percy Williams did. Not a bettor had 
picked him, so the bookie made a proper 
clean. 



Julian Rose is at the Holborn this 
week and receiving $675 for his services 
there. Julian is in big demand, getting 
the top figure wherever playing. He leaves 
for New York the first week in July to 
commence rehearsals for Klaw & Erlanger 
in the new Mclntyre and Heath show for 
next season. 



Kadie Furman, after all, will remain 
over here for at least another year. She 
had made all arrangements to sail for 
home during June, but at the last min- 
ute entered into contracts to play Euro- 
pean engagements extending well into 
1910. She is at the Hippodrome, Man- 
chester, this week. 



George Auger, the giant, is on the 
Broadhead time over here. 



The big skating rink at Nottingham 
was totally destroyed by fire last week. 
Fred Ginnet was one of the directors in 
the concern. 



Iloudini is at the Palace, Chelsea, this 
week. "The Star Bout," after several 
weeks of idleness, is at the Oxford. 



Bob Fitzsimmons has made arrange- 
ments to sail for Australia in August. In 
all probability Jimmie Britt will accom- 
pany him on the trip out. Hugh J. Mc- 
intosh will have the handling of the 
"strawberry beauty." Britt will take on 
a few of the lesser Australian lights of 
the prize ring during his tour. 



George Lask leaves for Paris next week 
to spend a few days. 



Lots of the stage people have had a 
good laugh at the Coliseum bill, the top 
of which is divided by "The Naked 
Truth" and Ruth St. Dennis, the barefoot 



dancer. These two 'billings side by side 
have caused many a smile in town. 



Hugh a J. Mcintosh, the Australian 
fight, promoter, needs a lot of watching 
these days. He has opened offices on the 
Strand and will break into theatricals 
very soon. Already "his offices are in 
communication with "The Chorus Lady" 
management with the idea of taking the 
play to Australia. 



Wizard Stone leaves for Copenhagen 
this week and will make a three months' 
tour of the continent before returning to 
England. 



Dave Carter, who just returned from a 
visit to the States, opens at the Hippo- 
drome, Portsmouth, this week. 



At the Coliseum this week there is a 
crowd of American acts showing in a 
bunch. Oissie Loft us, "Naked Truth," 
Alexander and Scott and Leipzig make up 
the party. 



At the Palace next week the bill might 
be described as an international race for 
applause. For France, Yvette Guilbert 
is there. England's representative is Mar- 
garet Cooper, and America has Clarice 
Vance and Walter C. Kelly. 



EUSTON PALACE. 

London, June 2. 

Last week's offering at the Euston hall 
brought forward a goodly proportion of 
laughing numbers, chief among which 
were Harry Tate and Charles Austin. 
Tate showed his screaming farce "Fish- 
ing." Of late the comedian has been clos- 
ing the shows around town, selected for 
that task by reason of his growing popu- 
larity. The various managements have 
loarned that he can hold his audiences in 
at the tail end of a good bill as few 
others can. 

Charles Austin's offering was "Parker, 
P. C." It is doubtful if the sketch ever 
went better. Applause at the finish held 
the show up for several minutes. Austin 
has a delightful free style, and his ex- 
temporized nonsense is most laughable. A 
member of the little company who plays 
the part of a police inspector is uninten- 
tionally a rival of the comedian. The 
part was written- without comedy, but 
the inspector makes it one of the funniest 
parts of the act. 

Jack Charman opened the show. That 
statement sums up the impression he 
made upon last week's audiences. Jack is 
billed as a comedian. 

Master Bernard Crook played several 
selections on the piano very entertain- 
ingly Beside that he does an imitation 
of a "fresh kid." How much of it was 
imitation and how much Master Bernard 
himself remained a question. 

Hilda Mascot is a very likeable young 
girl. She is pretty and has a decidedly 
agreeable voice. Adele Moraw is another 
single singing turn. She warbles in both 
English and German, and her eccentric 
mannerisms entertainingly fill out. 



Phil Ray gets a laugh on his appear- 
ance. More laughs aasae with his talk, 
although seme of sua mm^taUk^m off color. 
Ethel Newman took up a Mi ~aao aanch 
time with her monolog. Toward the end 
the house showed a disposition to josh 
her. Adam Tomlinson has done a vast 
deal of "choosing." He deals out a se- 
lected list of our very oldest and most 
popular yarns. In addition to being of 
questionable quality Tomlinson's stories 
are poorly delivered. 



HOLBORN EMPIRE. 

London, June 2. 

A bright, lively bill ran off well at the 
Empire last week, aided greatly by a 
couple of big comedy numbers. The three 
Prestons, two men and a woman, contrib- 
uted their share to the gaiety. One of 
the men is genuinely funny at times in 
the sketch called "The Village of Shift 
'Em." One of his most laughable scenes 
concerned the theft of a whole ' village 
from the back drop. The woman retarded 
rather than advanced the action of the 
piece. She did not make her appearance 
until the act had been running for some 
minutes, and her entrance might profit- 
ably be delayed even longer. 

"Her First," Caryl Wilbur's new com- 
edy sketch, received its initial presenta- 
tion. The piece develops a neat comedy 
situation. A football player becomes so 
thoroughly "soused" as to require the 
services of a doctor. One is accordingly 
summoned. The medico turn* out to be 
a woman. The football player's brother 
takes note of her attractiveness and plays 
sick in order to enjoy her professional 
services and incidentally to do a little 
courting. An amusing series of incidents 
grows out of the situation, Mr. Wilbur 
being the designing brother , and the 
sketch promises to make a valuable 
laughing number. 

The Four Jumels, musical, opened the 
show. The act is of the sort that always 
go well in halls of the Empire kind, and 
would have been displayed to much better 
advantage in a later position. Tom 
Lloyd followed, doing but indifferently. 
Rob Wilton, comedian, came alone two 
numbers later. He has a good, smooth 
delivery, and with half a chance ought to 
start something. The Sisters Marion are 
a good looking couple of singing ami dan- 
cing girls. One injures an engaging man- 
ner by an appearance of affectation. Under 
the title of "The Serenaders" a mixed 
quartet of singers did very nicely. The 
singers are Italians, and easily get past 
on the score of real musical merit. Hay- 
man* and Franklyn were back again and 
scored their usual hit. 

"A Second Caruso" is the program 
promise for Signor Orduna, a Spanish 
tenor. Orduna has a tremendously power- 
ful voice. When he reaches for a high 
"C" the roof bulges. The audience last 
week liked him. 

Ray and Calden make up a man and 
woman comedy team. The man, inten- 
tionally or not, is a great imitator. He 
does not use anyone else's material, but 
recalls the style of both Clark, of Clark 
and Hamilton, and Jack, of Jack and 
Evelyn. 

"Slaterstein, Ltd.," is the vehicle of 
Joe Peterman, a pretentious comedy num- 
ber, reminding one somewhat of the Fred 
Kerno act. 



VARIETY 



11 



WHAT'S DOING IN LONDON. 

BY WILLIAM GOULD. 

London, May 29. 

I have taken a tour of the halls and 
musical comedy theatres. There are only 
two good musical shows in town; "Our 
Miss Gibbs" (Gaiety) and "The Arca- 
dians" (Shaftesbury). 

As for music halls, the Tivoli and Ox- 
ford seem to be doing the best business. 
The Tivoli has Lauder, along with*Wilkie 
Bard, whom I consider the best, the clev- 
erest and most unique comedian over 
here. Always clean. More of his song 
successes are sung in America than the 
rest of English songs combined. Now he 
has a new one which they are whistling 
over here, "Don't Put Me Near a Suffra- 
gette." Fragson is also on the bill, and 
a big hit, but I don't think he would be 
successful in America. Hal Godfrey and 
Co. are on a little too early (about 9 
p. m.) but the sketch goes very well 
indeed. 

Harry Tate in "Motoring" hnd a hard 
spot, closing the show. The humor of 
the Tate act appeals so strongly, how- 
ever, that nearly the entire audience re- 
mained. 

There is a noticeable improvement in 
Daisy Woods (Lloyd) every time I see 
her, and the more often I see her, the 
better I like her. 

At the Oxford Marie Lloyd is the su- 
preme headliner. They certainly love 
Marie at this house. It's real enjoyment 
for me to watch this clever woman work. 
Clarice Miayne and Jim Tate were on 
at 10, and going splendidly. 

Geo. Robey was there also. George is 
very, very spicy and lays it on quite 
thick. Jordan and Harvey close the show 
and do very well, having a parody on 
"Harrigan" called "Solomon," a big hit. 

Red ford and Valentine at the London 
Pavilion are a large slsed hit before an 
awfully cold audience. The Pavilion has 
the coldest audience I ever law. 

Clarice Vance is one big "knockout" at 
the Palace, singing Ave songs, and as far 
as the audience is concerned, she could 
have remained on the stage for an hour. 
Yvette Guilbert and Walter C. Kelly 
opened at the Palace Monday night. 
Guilbert drew in a very olassy audience 
and pleased very much, but it remained 
for Kellv to do the trick. He is a riot, 
and a bigger hit this time than ever 
before. 

Valeska Suratt is in Paris with Ethel 
Levey, buying gowns. 

Saw Joe Welch, Paul Murray, Sam 
Collins. Geo. Abel and wife s.t the Derby; 
also William Morris in a box. Collins 
and I had a bet on the King's horse. I 
never saw such a sight in all my life. 
The crowd surged to the course, up to 
the King's box and sang the national 
anthem. 

The King led his horse, shaking hands 
with rosters and every one who extended 
the mitt. 

I leave for Berlin with Ike Rose to- 
night. 



TESTING "TWO WEEKS CLAUSE." 

The New York State Supreme Court 
will shortly be called upon to determine 
how far the "two weeks notice clause" 
in most theatrical contracts can be made 
to operate. House, Grossman & Vorhaus, 
the lawyers, represent Cliff Leigh in an 
action to recover salary under a contract 
containing this stipulation. 

Leigh signed a contract with John Cort 
to play in the Florence Roberts Co. in 
the northwest this season. The contracts 
carried the "two weeks cancellation 
clause" common to a great many theatri- 
cal contracts. Before the tour started, 
it is alleged, both parties to the contract 
agreed that the clause should be inopera- 
tive. That is that neither party would 
invoke the clause to terminate the en- 
gagement, which was to be for the entire 
season. 

One of Cort's representatives discharged 
the actor by giving a two weeks' notice. 
The plaintiff in seeking to establish his 
claim advances the assertion that the clause 
was rendered of no effect by mutual agree- 
ment and the courts will be called upon 
to determine whether a verbal agreement 
entered into after a contract has been 
signed, and modifying that contract, can 
supersede the original instrument. There 
is said to be no decision in New York 
jurisprudence covering this circumstance. 
The trial will come up in New York with- 
in a few davs. 



(Stk 



PARIS NOTES 

BY EDWARD 0. KENDREW. 




William Kalitz, the Philadelphia band- 
master, died in that city June 7. He was 
70 years old and had wielded the baton 
for thirtv vears. Kalitz was the first 
band leader to go out with the Adam 
Forepaugh Circus. 



TRIPLE SUIT AGAINST INDEPEND- 
ENT. 

Grace Cameron has instructed her at- 
torneys, House, Grossman & Vorhaus, to 
bring suit against William Morris, Inc., 
to recover for salary under three separate 
contracts. Two contracts were for in- 
dividual weeks in New York. The man- 
ager asked Miss Cameron to postpone 
these weeks to a later time. She refused, 
reported for rehearsals and when instruc- 
ted that she was not to play, placed her 
claim with the lawyers. 

The third case grows out of a contract 
calling for 12 weeks consecutive which 
Miss Cameron declares were not played. 
After playing out five weeks of this time, 
she was laid off, she says. Miss Cameron 
then made arrangements to join the De 
Wolf Hopper Co., playing "The Pied 
Piper" at the Majestic, New York. She 
played three weeks here and demands 
$1,800 for the remaining four weeks under 
the Morris contract, failure to play which, 
she says, caused her a loss to that amount. 

At the Morris office no reason could be 
assigned for Miss Cameron's suit. It was 
said there that Miss Cameron's last con- 
tract calling for five consecutive weeks 
had been fulfilled. 



FIRE BURNS PROPERTY. 

A number of artists lost all their 
possessions and effects in a fire which de- 
stroyed the theatre at Norumbega Park, 
Auburndale. Mass.. late last week. The 
place took fire in the early morning of 
June 4 and was entirely razed. The vic- 
tims were the Musical Bells (loss claimed 
to be $3,000), Three Imrans, Rembrandt. 
Manhattan Quartet, and Ascott and Max- 
ima. The apparatus of Fox and Foxie's 
cirrus was also lost. The equipment was 
stored in the house. The animals, kept 
at the hotel, were saved. The managers 
e>liniate their loss at $.'{0,000. The 
theatre will l>e rebuilt immediately. 



Paris, June 1. 
"Luna" Park, the new pleasure garden 
of the gay city, opened May 29. A 
"house warming" was given the previous 
evening. This play ground (it is hardly 
a park) occupies the site of the Printania 
Music Hall, sold by Paul Ruez last year 
to a syndicate in London. It has been 
in the hands of the workmen since De- 
cember last, and is said to have cost 
$656,000. The present managers are Henry 
lies, who conducted a small weekly musi- 
cal journal in England, called the "British 
Bandmaster," and Gaston Akoun. The 
place has been very creditably arranged 
in wood, plaster and painted canvas — 
there are nearly 50,000 square yards of 
the latter. The chief attractions are the 
scenic railroad, the "mysterious river," 
the water-chute, "Johnstown flood," "in- 
fernal wheel" and other side shows at the 
"White City" in London last year. The 
builders have profited by every inch of 
space, but 1 am afraid the Paris "Luna" 
is too small, although almost certain of a 
oig success the first year. By liberal ad- 
vertising and a judicious change of at- 
tractions each season, there is no reason, 
however, why it should not become a 
permanent summer resort of the French 
capital. 

With the change of weather to rain the 
Folies Bergfcre and Olympia have both 
been playing to capacity this week. Con- 
trivances have been fixed for keeping the 
auditoriums cool, for they do not propose 
to close up for a fortnight. Mr. Bannel, 
at the Folies Bergere, has employed the 
method formerly used by placing blocks 
of ice, prettily decorated with real flow- 
ers, throughout the theatre. At the 
Olympia a powerful ventilator has been 
installed. — I hear that Mr. McArdle, who 
owns and shows the monkey "Peter," has 
refused an offer of over $50,000 for the 
animal from Alfred Butt, of the Palace, 
London. It was said two years ago no 
one would buy "Peter" for $12,000 when 
then offered for sale. 



group from the London Olympic, may 
also fall through. 



At last Olga Desmond, the ' German 
danseuse and comedienne, is to play in 
Paris, booked by Borney & Desprez for 
their Folies Marigny, to open June 27, at 
a reported salary of $3,860 per month. 



Henry Morton, who guarantees to free 
himself from any kind of binding, a la 
Houdini, is the headliner at the Jardin do 
Paris.-— Polin. the French military comic, 
the joy of Parisians, but not much ap- 
preciated by foreign visitors, is the star 
of the Alcazar d'Ktc. Mav 31, "Whit 
Monday.*' being a public holiday in 
Frame, extra matinees were given. 

Mr. Haras* ford i-, meeting with some 
difficulty in finding a suitable 1 Site for 
his proposed skating rink, which he 
would like to open here in partnership 
with Mr. Parkinson. Nothing definite 
cull be settled, and it is possible that 
one proposition near the Hippodrome may 
fall through, although it was thought 
formalilie« were straightened out and the 
lease w;is even on the point of being 
signed. There is also a rumor that the 
promised rink up Passy way. by another 



The Hippodrome closes this week for 
the summer season. The halls now shut 
down for the hot weather are the Al- 
hambra, Casino de Paris. Gaie'te Roche- 
cbouart, Hippodrome and Scale, with the 
Folies Bergere 1 and Olympic soon to fol- 
low. 



Messrs. Max Illy and Balazy have taken 
over the Eldorado for the summer seaspn. 
They entered into possession on June 1. 
Report says offers are being made for 
the Moulin Rouge, and that M. Joseph 
Oiler has even expressed a desire that a 
certain well-known manager should take 
it over, but the latter wants the key with 
a fixed rent and not any bother after- 
wards with the people holding the pro- 
gram, bars, cloak rooms and other con- 
cessions which are so often farmed out 
here. 



MORRIS' THREE-A-DAY CONTRACT. 

An unexpected clause in the contract 
issued by the William Morris office for 
next season calls upon the act engaging 
to play three shows daily if requested 
while at the American Music Hall, New 
York City. The clause relates to that 
"American" only. 

The mystery of the "three-a-day" has 
evoked discussion among acts receiving 
contracts. A number thought it meant 
that a scheme of two shows nightly would 
be given in the Morris New York music 
hall each Saturday and Sunday. 

At the Morris headquarters this week, 
a Variety representative was informed, 
upon asking the significance of the un- 
usual clause in a contract calling for first- 
class time, that the third show, if required, 
would be given in the Wintergarden on 
top of the building. 

The Wintergarden, it was said, will be 
the summer roof garden enclosed. The 
alterations and improvements now going 
on for the opening of the American Roof 
about July 1 will include a steam heating 
plant and all the appliances of a first-class 
theatre. 

During the week the Wintergarden will 
be to let for private entertainments or 
social functions, but no dates will be en- 
tered for Saturday and Sunday. 

During the past season the American 
has turned away large crowds at each of 
the night shows the last two days of the 
week. This suggested to the Morris Cir- 
cuit the idea of providing the third show 
to hold the turn-aways. if it should be 
found that the condition repeats itself 
next season. 

Joseph E. Keefe, a well known actor, was 
buried on Wednesday in New York. Ar- 
rangements were carried out by the Ac- 
tors' Fund. The veteran died late last 
week at the Actors' Home. One of his 
notable dramatic works was the creation 
of the part of the minister in Stuart IJob- 
son's "The Henrietta " Oin- of the de- 
ceased's daughter- i- Ha/»d Sanger. 

William Morn- may -ail t'"i New York 
thi- Smi'l.n. airixiii'j H he Hlils) next 
Thin -da v oi I'rida \ . 



12 



VARIETY 



SUE "GOV." ROBINSON. 

Several witnesses have been called from 
New York to attend the trial of an ac- 
tion brought in Cincinnati to force "Gov." 
John F. Robinson to render an accounting 
for certain trust funds left in his charge 
for his children by their mother at her 
death. The suit is now being heard by the 
Ohio courts. 

Before he acquired the Robinson Ten 
Combined Shows by purchase from "Gov.** 
Robinson, his father, "Young" John G. 
Robinson was the plaintiff in a similar ac- 
tion. Upon the transfer of the circus 
property to the younger Robinson, how- 
ever, he retired from all litigation. The 
•"Governor's'' son-in-law, Stevens by name, 
Jiad formerly been engaged in the manage - 
;ment of the show, and it is said was dis- 
regarded in the change of ownership. It 
is fcf» wife and one of her sisters who are 
concerned in the present litigation. 

Cincinnati, June 10. 

The Robinson suit, in which two 
daughters seek to get an accounting from 
their father, "Gov." John F. Robinson, in- 
volves $260,000. It is on trial here be- 
fore Judge Hunt in the Common Pleas 
Ceurt. The "Gov.," accompanied by his 
wife, who was formerly his nurse, has 
been in court most of this week, as was 
also John G. Robinson, Gil Robinson, of 
New York, and Charles Robinson. 

The defendant claims that the stock 
in question was his property but was 
transferred to his wife during her life 
•and held in trust. When she died it was 
not transferred back to him and all 
records of the transaction being lacking, 
the property reverted to the children for 
whom he is holding it in trust under 
binding contracts. 

Testimony is still being taken. Caroline 
Robinson Stevens, one of the plaintiffs, 
was deeply moved while on the witness 
stand and wept violently for several 
minutes. 



LILLIE IN COMMAND? 

According to a story in circulation about 
New York this week, Maj. Gordon W. Lil- 
lie holds a pretty thorough control of the 
"Two Bills' Show." One who is in a posi- 
tion to know declares that Maj. Lillie, in 
addition to holding somewhat more than a 
half interest in the property, purchased from 
the Ringling Hros. while the show was 
at the Garden all the stock and equipment 
in the show. This included the cars and 
all the draught horses. These holdings 
are said to give Maj. Lillie a commanding, 
interest in the show. 



Among the stands signed for by Eddie 
Arlington, contracting agent for Miller 
Bros. "101 Ranch" Wild West during the 
eastern trip appear Rochester, Syracuse. 
Little Falls, Amsterdam and Troy X. Y. 
<>oing into New England the show plays 
Pittsfield, North Adams, Springfield and 
Boston, Mass.. returning thereafter to ex- 
hibit at Fort Morris, White Plains, Yon- 
fcers, I'eekskill and Schenectady. These 
stands between June 1 and August 1. 



The Ringling Circus is understood to 
have spent a profitable week in Boston. 
This was the first circus to show on the 
Franklin Square Depot ground, which ha\l 
been converted into a circus lot at a cost 
reported at $10,000. Friday of the Boston 
week brought bad weather and attendance 
.was poor on that day of last week. 



GIRGUS NEWS 



NEW CIRCUS IN AUSTRALIA. 

Sydney, April 22. 

The recently returned St. Leon acro- 
batic troupe opened their big canvas last 
week at Liverpool, N. S. W. Honey and 
Cherry, American bar performers, are 
also with the show. 

Given a fair amount of luck, the new 
venture should prove, after a time, to be 
a worthy rival to Wirth's organization. 
The latter is now practically the only 
circus of note in Australasia. An efficient 
opposition would be a great boon to fre- 
quenters of the tented field. 

Wirth Bros.' show leaves the city next 
week, and will inveigle the dollars from 
the country folk during the next four 
months. The new outfit will be minus all 
the European acts engaged some fifteen 
months ago. The circus will carry several 
of the old favorites, working new acts. 

It was announced in New York this 
week by Frederic Thompson, manager of 
"Polly of the Circus," that Ida St. Leon 
of the St. Leon Family, the circus troupe 
over here and connected with the Aua- 

« 

tralians, would play the leading role in 
the show next season, when it goes on 
tour. 

Mr. Thompson's wife, Mabel Taliaferro, 
has been the star of the production for 
two years. The St. Leons have traveled 
during that time with "Polly" as a fea- 
ture act in the circus scene. 

The press department of the. Thompson 
enterprises relates that little Miss St. 
Leon understudied Miss Taliaferro, taking 
the role about three months ago for one 
performance on short notice. Her imme- 
diate success in the part determined the 
manager that the young girl should be 
his wife's successor. 

The St. Leon Family is riding at Luna 
Park this summer, their second season 
there. Ida is an acrobat and bareback 
equestrienne, sometimes doing a "double- 
riding act" with her sister, Elsie, a star 
among the horsewomen of the sawdust. 



AFRICA'S "PAWNEE BILLS." 
Cape Town, South Africa, May 15. 
In Bloemfontein, Orange River Colony,- 
South Africa, there is- an open-air exhi- 
bition running under the billing of "Paw- 
nee Bill's Wild West," The show paper 
declares that the performance faithfully 
depicts "life out west." Thris will prob- 
ably be news to Maj. tjordon W. Lillie, 
the American Wild West showman. 



CIRCUS LABORER LYNCHED. 

Frankfort, Ky., Jta* 10. 

The Howe Greater London Srasws, of 
which Jerry Maggivan is the executive 
head, has had a rough time of it im the 
mountain counties at this State. Business 
has been reasonably good, but the country 
is rough and the show people have suf- 
fered a deal of inconvenience. 

The climax of the tour in the SlWe 
came about a week ago* when John MhKlsv 
a negro laborer, shot Bert Bower, super)n> 
tendent of the workmen. Soon after the 
shooting a gang of colored laborers belong*- 
ing to the show tried to take Maxie away 
from his captors and lynch him. He was 
rescued from his fellows ami brought to 
the jail here. He had been in the prison 
only a short time, when a mwb of white 
men organized, took him from his cell' 
and lynched him from a nearby bridge over' 
;he Kentucky River. While the body was- 
p-ospended the white-masked raiders rid- 
dled it with bullets. 

The jail is only a stone's throw away 
from the home of Governor Wilson. After 
the Tynching the State executive was called 
from bed, but refused to act in what he 
4-anerf a local matter. 



Both the Cole Brothers and the Kins- 
ling shows are billed for Utica. .V. Y. 
The Cole outfit shows June 21 and th*» 
Ringling* June 2!). (iollmar Brothers are 
in Butte. Mont, June 14, and the Hagen- 
beck-Wallace Show is there June 23. 




TIM Mk-MAIMN'S SIMMER HOME AT BARRETT BEACH. 

HAIUIKTT TWACM. N. J.. «n th.« Atlantic Const. n*ar Montnotith. In pictured above with Tlni- 
MfMnhmi mi the extreme rk'ht. In the pony rart tin- MKS. MeMATrON (RPYT11K CIIAI'I'KI.I.K) thold- 
Injr the IihIi.vi ami the nurse, b»s|,|es TIM. JR.. "Snowdrop." f* at tlw pony'* head. Next to her la 
Tim's !>,•"( her. .Ilni. 

Spread over the yard are the nehchhor*' children, with a Mnwtcd atcc#| mid runabout !n the distance. 
Another yo«i. Jack, la In school . 

Mr. VeMfilion siijh llarrett Iteaeh Im the ln><*t hcarti property In Jersey, ami that owing to iK'tSg: 
"pestered" hy real estate nu»:ifs. he Is going to plan* *»»mc of the Iota mi the market. 



fcXlLfcRS AN9» 8XMGLIJIC5 M OPPO- 
SITION. 

ilpringfield, Mass., £une 10. 

Both Miller Bro*.' "101 HtfOrh" Wild 
West and the ftiogling Bros.' Circus are 
billed for an appearance in this place. 
Preliminary announcements just printed 
give the Ringling drfte as June 21. The 
Miller show comes i* June 11. Bota- have 
ttilled the city plentifully and are keeping 
I^ace in the amount fli newspaper adver- 
tising. % The Miller people make their strong 
advertising feature the statement that the 
show is tf genuine Western organization, 
and ft? riders number o«"W, 

The ftiilgling press matter sets forth' 
that the* suow carries 1.2H6 people and. 
l»T>0 horses^ 



WAST 25,000 TICKEH. 

ffilwaukee. Wis., June 11. 
Six hundred! Elks here have made them- 
selves into a committee to dispose of tick- 
ets for the coming Elks* Circus. The per- 
formance will be' given by the Mackay Eu- 
ropean Circus, a Detroit organization, 
which opened there this week. The De- 
troit Elks sold 25.0W) tickets in an advance 
sale. Milwaukee's lodgement will try to 
equal this record. The circus people are 
said to have agreed to come here on a 
contract which permits of cancellation 
after the first show. 



EDWARD CULLEN DEAD. 

Cincinnati, June 10. 

Edward Cullen. veteran circus man; 
died here Sunday evening. For thirty- 
flve years Cullen traveled' with circuses in 
tthr United States. He recently retired 
from the hjg tops and was* interested here 
in* a transportation company. His last 
request was for Col. Jack Wilson, the 
bareback rider, for many years his inti- 
mate friend. 

TEXAS DECISION SATED $250. 

Atlantic City, X. J., June 10. 

The law suit against the Buffalo Bill 
Wild West which, through the defense 
introduced by Major John Burke, resulted 
in- tlte courts of Texas classifying the 
show as an education exhibition rather 
than a circus, saved the organization $2.>0 
in license fees here last Saturday. 

* 

The City Council in May raised the cir- 
cus license from $100 to $300. .When the 
Ringling Circus arrived the management 
was able to show that it had signed con- 
tracts for the lot before the tax was 
advanced and so were charged only the 
old fee. 

Upon- the advent of the "Two Bills" 
aggregation the authorities demanded 
•1300. Major Burke (lashed the opinion of 
the Texas Solons and the show got on* 
with a' charge of $">0. Xo parade was 
given. 

The Cole Bros.' Circus has just; closed 
railroad contracts calling for the expendi- 
ture of $.'{,141 for a series of railway 
jumps in Xew York State. According to 
the contracts filed in Washington the sev- 
eral jumps must be made between June 1 
and July 1. The stops include- LeKoy. 
X. V... East Buffalo, Auburn, Amsterdam, 
Pittsfield, Mass., Hudson. Herkimer, 
Warertown. Oswego. Medina- and Xorth 
T6nan*auda. 



VARIETY 



13 



COLOR DEVICE PERFECTED. 

London, June 2. 

Friese Green, the world- famed photo- 
graphic authority, has at last perfected 
a device for the taking and projecting of 
motion pictures stereoscopically and in 
natural colors. The picture on the screen 
shows faithfully every color in its differ- 
ent shades, and the mechanism is so ar- 
ranged that all flicker is removed. Two 
films are used, allowing of the projection 
of thirty-two pictures per foot instead of 
sixteen. The revolving shutter moving 
around obliterates first one picture and 
then the other, so there is always a 
picture on the screen, and at no time is 
it in darkness. The pictures are taken in 
sequence on alternate films. 

It ia said that Pathe Freres have pur- 
chased the French rights for twenty thou- 
sand pounds ($100,000). This would not 
permit the exhibtion of the pictures, 
however, in any other country. A repre- 
sentative of Mr. Greene has been sent 
to America to dispose of the American 
rights, for which patents have already 
been issued by the American government. 

The combination of this patent with the 
"talking picture" machine promises to 
open an entirely new channel to the 
picture business. 

No public exhibition has been given 
in England, but those who have been per- 
mitted to see the private viewings are 
enthusiastic. 




A POINT FOR "SUFFA." 

New Orleans, June 10. 

Score a point for the local suffragettes. 
The "down-trodden" ones have induced 
Mayor Behrman to have introduced into 
the City Council an ordinance requiring 
that films shall be accompanied with a 
permit from the Inspector of Police, 
vouching for their inability to shock or 
suggest, before exhibition is allowed. 

These permits will probably bear a cap- 
tion, "Guaranteed Tinier the Pure Film 
haw of 1909." 



NEW "TALKING PICTURE." 

' With a capital stock of $1.10.000. the 
American Cinephoiie Co. has been formed 
to take over the American rights to 
"The Cinephoiie," mi English "talking 
picture" owned by Jeapes «& Marker. 
Mr. Barker is Will G. Barker, of the 
Warwick Trading Co., the English picture 
concern. 

Ben Nathan, the well-known London 
theatrical man. has been over here for a 
few weeks. While in New York he has 
arranged for the disposal of the American 
rights to the Cinephoiie, which purpose 
brought Mr. Nathan to this side. 

The phonographic record, which is a 
disc, operates in conjunction with the 
moving picture, making a perfect syn- 
chronism. This is brought about through 
the use of dials, one each on the phono- 
graph machine and picture, allowing a 
novice in the operation of picture ma- 
chines to run the "talking pictures" uni- 
formly and regularly. 

There are said to be over 1.000 Cine- 
phones in use at present in Great Britain. 
Three scenes may be given in the thou- 
sand-foot reels possible of use. and four, 
five or more subjects can be shown. 

It is claimed for the Cinephoiie that it 
can carry an entire play perfectly, and 
will create a new era in the "talking 
picture." 



THE VALUE OF QUALITY. 

At the offices of the Biograph Co. on 
East 14th street this week it was said 
that never had an approaching summer 
indicated a more brisk activity in the 
picture demand than the present one. 

"We don't know what the general out- 

Jook may be," said the Biograph Co. 'a 
representative, "but to us it is excellent. 
We are rushed and there seems to be no 
let-up to the requests for our pictures." 

The Biograph man accidentally selected 
a letter from his desk. It was a com- 
munication from a town in Illinois ask- 
ing if the pictures of the Biograph Co. 
Stock Co. could be forwarded for lobby 
display. 

The importance of this letter, as evi- 
dencing the quality of pictures which 
could create a demand for photos of the 
pantomime principals was mentioned. 

"That is not unusual with us," was 
the reply. "There is hardly a mail which 
does not bring us a letter extolling our 
pictures in some way or another. Here's 
an odd one," said the Biograph man, pick- 
ing up a letter from an exhibitor in an 
Iowa town stating that "The Drunkard's 
Reformation," a recent Biograph subject, 
had caused the town to "go dry" at the 
election which occurred the week after 
the picture was shown. 

"I was visited by a delegation of The 
Wets,'" wrote the exhibitor, "asking if I 
would take your picture off for the 
week. Of course I did not, and the town 
went prohibition by a big majority." 



PICTURE PLANT ON MARKET. 

There is said to be a large moving 
picture plant, owned by a New York 
concern, now on the market to any pur- 
chaser who will pay the price asked. It 
is also said there is a division of opinion 
among the stockholders in the corporation 
as to whether the plant should be sold 
or the business continued. 

Large losses have left the plant with 
an "asset figure" placed upon it which 
frightens ofT any prospective buyer. 

In Flushing, N. Y. (Long Island), there 
is reported to have been a picture plant 
erected within the past eight months 
which will be shortlv operated bv a for- 

* I » 

( ign manufacturing linn. 



NEW PICTURE PLACES. 

Chicago, June 10. 
The following new moving picture the- 
atres are reported: 

(irii>nsl>iiru. Iml. (.Lulled Slates Amusement 
Cn.)\ Slirth.vvlllr. Intl. tSltmv \- Lrvliisom : Ken- 
osha. Wis. lAilnlph Alfery); HowII-ik <;ri'en. O. 
iKrnest Hniltfsuii) : Wheeling. W. Vn. (Alnlome 
Amusement Co.); I.lslxtn. Ih. (Mnrkhnm & Terry I ; 
l'nentello. Malm l\V. \\ . ILwIklnson) : Wnlhalln, 
N. I>. (John Tiler); Wllllnmsport, Vn. <A. R. 
Miller): Chlcimo. III. (Zetnen Nros.t; Norrlstown. 
I'n. (Mr. Snbloskyi : Katon ItupldH. Mo. (<;uy 
WimdruITi: <intlirle. Okln. (HIM Hrooket: I.ottnns 
port. Iml. i Frinl Smytliei; Witrrenstmrir. Mo. iF. 
C. Hrlttt: Chlllleothe. III. i.I. F. Lym-ln: Craml 
ItnpMtt. Wis. (A. Lmiei; Albmpienpm. N. M. i\V. 
('. IbthortHoti) ; Colorado City. Colo. < 1*. I). Hew- 
itt); Ml. I'leHSHnt. Mleh. i Hnmsey Rros. i : Spring- 
field. Mo. idiptnln <•. II. IVjiImmIv i : (Jt-no (Jorilo, 
111. I\V. I. Tiiylon: 'Clmlstn-ie. Mlrli. <\V. II. 
Neeilhnmi; Kviinsvllle. Iml. i Win. Iliirnsi: lliitfcrs- 
lown. Iml. Hiiites Unvlsi: Miu-miili. III. iSkl'iner 
\- Tllolllp" hi) : <;.illnti'i. M->. i.\. <'. MrCnvi: 
Charles City. In. ilterknuci »V- llnvli'ii-r » : Ft. 
S«i»tt. Kan. tlliilton-Itnlley t'<>. i; Anthony. Kns. 
(F. A. .lames): Auhiirn. N'eh. »K<I. M. Mnyt; 
Mason CUy. la. < llelz <& Newell i; Canton. S. I». 
t N'oriniiii Itogrsi; Cnitluige. Mi... I.yrle Theatre. 



PERMIT FOR EACH PICTURE. 

New Orleans, June 10. 

If an ordinance, introduced in the City 
Council here, is passed New Orleans' fifty 
moving picture houses will be regulated 
by blue laws of a pronounced type. The 
ordinance was introduced at the instance 
of the Federation of Catholic Societies, 
and as the Mayor of New Orleans and 
most of the members of the Council are 
Catholics it is very likely to go through. 

The new law will require all moving 
picture theatres to submit to the police 
inspector ("chief of police" in other cities) 
a specimen of every picture to be shown 
and a written application must be made 
for a permit for each. There will be no 
charge for this permit, but the theatres 
will be required to post the permits in a 
conspicuous place in the front of the 
house. 

The penalty for the violation of the 
law is fixed at $25 fine or thirty days' 
imprisonment, or both. 



PHOTOGRAPHING IN AUSTRALIA. 

Sydney, May 9. 

Path6 Freres, the French biograph firm, 
are very busy upon a lot of Australian 
subjects, which they are exporting by 
every mail. 

There is a great field here for scenic 
and industrial subjects. 



PICTURE SHOW ONLY. 

Cincinnati, June 10. 
A picture show only at five cents admis- 
sion opened Monday at the Lyric. News- 
paper advertisements Sunday announced 
that the "International Projectoscope 
Company" would give the shows, which 
run from 12 to 5:30 and from 7 until 
11:30. 



MOVING PICTURE REVIEWS 



"Saucy Sue" (Comedy). 
Dewey, New York. 

"Saucy Sue" is a Lubin product. It 
involves a fairly amusing, although simple, 
series of scenes. A young "SLs Hopkins" 
girl is everlastingly playing rough prac- 
tical jokes upon members of her family. 
Her uncle invites here to visit him in the 
« ity. Sue's pranks are bad enough among 
the rough country people, but when she 
starts to play tricks upon her dandified 
city cousin and her uncle's family Sue 
comes to immediate grief and is uncere- 
moniously packed back home. There is 
nothing especially skillful in the handling 
of the subject, but its rough comedy 
brought laughs from the Dewey audience. 

It nth. 



"The Legend of Sterling-Keep." 
Union Square. 

Whenever one sees an Kdison picture, it 
appears the cameras were placed upon 
a hill far removed from the subjects. 
"Bringing out" is a forgotten item in the 
Kdison list of •'musts" evidently. This is 
especially so with "The Legend of Ster- 
ling-Keep." Instead of a living recital in 
pantomime, the series has more of the al- 
legorical aspect. There is no comedy, not 
much story, and more thau a bit of grue- 



someness, for it relates a tale of. a man 
driven mad through a practical joke. The 
costuming ia pretty and effective, the in- 
teriors well set, but the story and de- 
tails very faulty. While not enticing to 
the young through the glimpse of insanity 
shown, the picture will do well as a whole. 
It teaches a moral on practical joking, 
but the portion containing the announce- 
ment of the death of the bride which 
brought on the bridegroom's madness, 
could have stood a second look from the 
Censor Committee. Sime. 



"Mr. Physical Culture's Surprise Party." 
Union Square. 

There is a futile attempt for com- 
edy in this picture. The scope appears 
large enough, but the points miss fire, not 
having been rightly aimed. In the first 
place as the story builds up, it is dis- 
covered at a late stage that the fiend on 
physical culture (supposed up to that 
moment to be the son of the woman seen 
in the series ) is her husband. The disparity 
in the ages of the two formed the opinion 
originally, and the shock of the truth 
knocks the idea of the picture askew. 
There is not much to it at any point. 
What seems to be a young man is an en- 
thusiast on exercise, converting the parlor 
into a temporary "gym." The wife is in 
formed a party is on its way to surprise 
her husband on his birthday. In vain she 
beseeches him to replace his sweater with 
evening clothes. Retiring to his room, he 
continues to indulge in physical culture 
movements before the mirror, with the 
crowd of visitors watching through the 
transom. Believing he hears burglars, 
the health-seeking man cautiously invades 
the parlor with an Indian club and re- 
volver. The friends reveal themselves, 
and pantomimically go* through his gyra- 
tions. It looks like a good chance gone, 
but at least the director of the Vitagraph 
Co. stock company might scan his char- 
acters. Sime. 

Henry Kuliel. from Chicago, arrived in 
New York this week, probably to attempt 
to enlist eastern people in the Chicago 
string of renters, who lately linel up to- 
gether as an independent opposition of 
their own. Since the line-up they have 
made no noise which reached New York. 

A new moving picture theatre seating 
1,100 will be erected at Mansfield, O., by 
C. L. HelTelman. It will 1m> located on 
Walnut Street, near Third, and will be 
equipped with scenery and other appoint- 
ments. 



The Kastern Amusement Co., Washing- 
ton, I). C, will open a moving picture the- 
atre in that city to cost $10,000. It will 
seat 32.1. 

Lew Coodman, formerly office manager 
for M. M. Thiese, has suddenly Womc a 
vaudeville act. While he followed his 
commercial vocation of keeping the Thiese 
books, nobody suspected that he possessed 
a bent for the si age It was only a week 
ago that he suddenly announced his re- 
tirement from his desk and ledger. 

Fannie Beanc Gilday, professionally 
known as Fannie Beane, died dune S at 
St. Joseph*^ Mondial. New York. Iturial 
was held ii"ni Iht *on's residence. 444 K. 
I \.')\ h M i.-.i I Imr-Iay. 



14 



VARIETY 



NEW ACTS NEXT WEEK 

Initial Presentation, First Appearance or 

Reappearance in or Around Now 

York City. 



[NEW AGTS Or THE WEEK j 



Joe Whitehead and the Grierson Sisters, 
American. 

Lydia Dreams (New Act), American. 

Canada, American. 

Kid Gabriel and Co., Fifth Avenue. 

Bobby Dohn, New Brighton Theatre. 

"12 Merry Minstrel Mimics," Hender- 
son's. 

5 Caprice Girls, Henderson's. 

Indian Musical Trio, Henderson's. 

John Ford and Clark Sisters, Hender- 
son's. 

Gordon Bros., Henderson's. 

Maud Muller, Columbia. 

Crouch and Richards, Columbia. 

Tom and Edith Almond (New Act), Co- 
lumbia. 

Gibson Tlio, Bayonne. 

Foster and Hughes, Perth Amboy. 
J. Sidney Moore and CO., Bayonne. 



Mrs. Wm. E. Annis and Co. (5). 

Musical. • 

13 Mins.; Four (Parlor). 

Hammerstein's. 

Mm. Wm. E. Annis is an accomplished 
pianist and accompanist to the four Meyer 
boys, of the former Royal Musical Five. 
A sixth person has been added to this lat- 
est vaudeville act, Mr. Mario, a singer. 
The music and the songs carry the number 
through. The attraction, of course, is Mrs. 
Annis, a tall handsome woman with au- 
burn hair, a striking picture of beauty in 
a low-cut black dress, seated at the piano, 
and tall and statuesque when standing. 
The importance of Mrs. Annis is that she 
is the widow of the man Captain Peter 
Hains was adjudged guilty of murdering. 
The newspapers wasted a great deal of 
space over the incident. The natural sym- 
pathy for Mrs. Annis, with her repose, 
evident gentleness, and the assistance of 
her assistants, will probably make the 
managers believe they are justified in fea- 
turing her. Sime. 



Kochez'e Monkey Actors. 

M A Night in a Monkey Music Hail." 

15 Mins.; One Stage (Special Act). 

Hammerstein's. 

In view of the possible rush of "monkey 
acts" to yet arrive, since the simians have 
become the ra*e across the pound, the 
first of the foreigners in this class, Ro- 
cez's Monkeys, at Hammerstein's this week, 
ore putting up a very nice comedy perform- 
ance. The setting is a miniature stage, 
with a couple of monks placing the cards. 
Five or six "acts" are gone through, lifting 
weights, pedal juggling, aerial, and conclud- 
ing with a one-monk sketch. It is the 
leader of the monkey orchestra which se- 
cures the most laughs. This monk has a 
habit of quickly turning over a large page 
when the music cue is giren by a 
bell ringing. For an overture, the differ- 
ent monks fiddle or play away for a mo- 
ment or so, each taking its turn. The lead- 
er's chnir is worked from the wings. The 
monk turns around often and rapidly, 
bringing more laughs. A woman is the 
trainer. She acknowledges the applause 
at the conclusion of a good laughing act, 
well worked, and away from the custom- 
ary "mnnkev act." Sime. 



Harry Brown and Co. (a). 
"The Village Doctor/' 
ao Mins.; Four (Interior). 
American. 

"The Village Doctor" is as simple in 
story as its title; perhajas a little more 
so, and ever so much more improbable, 
but as the piece was designed for a com- 
edy sketch in vaudeville, everything goes. 
The comedy, however, does not seem to 
make the appeal that do the mention of 
"mother" and an aged father's forgiveness 
to a "college" son who wears the sleeves 
of his coat creased. The boy loved a girl 
before he left home for Yonkers, where 
there is a college. The boy in his home 
days swung on the gate and told mushy 
stuff to the girl. In college he played 
poker, met "cooch" dancers, and had the 
sleeves of his coat creased by a tailor. 
He came home to visit, full of ordinary 
slang, and delivered it ordinarily. The 
father "called" his son when the latter 
wanted to replace the picture of his 
mother with his affianced "Salomer." But 
a telegram arrived saying his .churn had 
"swiped" the proceeds of the poker game, 
along with the "cooch" dancer, so the col- 
legian experienced a change of heart, and 
let lis hope he married the love of his 
\outh as the finale indicated, for only she 
could teach him that having the sleeves 
ot his coat creased while attending college 
(at Yonkers) is traveling too fast for even 
"The Village Doctor" — in vaudeville. 
Harry Brown, "The Man Who Made the 
Mascot Famous," played the father and 
title role, an elderly "Rube," and gave an 
excellent performance. It's almost a pity 
Mr. Brown did not arrive in vaudeville 
years ago before Creasy "conned" every- 
one into believing his was the only truly 
rural type. Gilbert Fitzgerald was inside 
the coat with the creased sleeves, and 
(•race Kimball was the girl, with the aid 
of a great deal of make-up. If she is 
really young, some of the rouge could be 
held over for the next show. The Ameri- 
can audience liked the finish and ap- 
plauded for two or three curtains. The 
early part of the piece should be hurried 
along. It drags. Sime. 



Alick Lauder and Co. (a.) 

"The Christening" (Comedy Character 

Sketch). 
18 Mine.; Full Stage (Special Set). 
Fifth Avenue. 

Alick Lauder, a brother of Harry 
Lauder, who made his first appearance 
over here at the Fifth Avenue Monday, 
will not go very far witB "The Christen- 
ing." It is very doubtful if he will do 
at all. The only point of similarity about 
the brothers is the exact angle of bow in 
their legs. Alick's legs have rich possi- 
bilities of humor. The rest of him is not 
funny, and his sketch is inexpressibly 
sad. Monday evening Lauder got a re- 
ception. He retired eighteen minutes 
later swathed, clothed and buried in a 
dense, eloquent silence on the part of the 
audience. That tells the tale. The stage 
is set to show the living room of John 
Anderson's home and a part of the front 
garden where real live chickens and a 
sleeping dog are the principal objects of 
interest. John, a stupid Scotchman, 
comes home "under the influence" on the 
evening of his child's christening. There is 
some roughhouse conversation between 
husband and wife (Alvina Mining) until 
the minister (George Adair) arrives. The 
minister taxes John with his failure to 
attend church, while Mrs. John, concealed 
behind a screen, prompts him. The 
Scotchman gets into all kinds of diffi- 
culties. The minister absents himself for 
a minute. John and his wife become 
mixed up in a general row just as he re- 
turns and he "gets his." In the general 
riot John picks up the baby from a cradle 
and shows it to be a "prop" black pic- 
anniny. There wasn't a laugh in the whole 
proceedings nor a flash of cleverness. 
Lauder sang one song which also proved 
he will never do over here as a single sing- 
ing comedian. Rush. 



The Kohler Trio. 

Songs. 

American. 

The Kohler Trio is a foreign singing 

act, like all the others which happen 

along in 'threes." Some are costumed 

and others wear glossy shirts beneath 

black coats. That's evening dress." When 

you wear this and look serious, you must 
sing "operatic." That's what The Kohler 
Trio do. So do the others. And oddly 
enough, they all seem to hit upon the 
same songs. The Kohler Trio sang "The 
Holy City." They are entitled to credit 
for remembering that after the others 
had forgotten it. The tallest member was 
the giant of The Itnlian Trio. The other 
two carry familiar faces. The Kohler 
Trio "made good." All the foreign sing- 
ing acts seem to, but one never hears of 
the circuits fighting for their services. 
They fill in, however, and apparently 
keep on working. Sime. 



Four Banta Bros. 

Musical. 

17 Mins.; Full Stage. 

Henderson's. 

The Four Banta Bros, have a neat musi- 
cal specialty into which they have man- 
aged to squeeze a goodly amount of 
variety. The main work is accomplished 
on the brasses and string instruments, 
although reeds are also employed. The 
Four make a .fairly good singing quar- 
tet, and the couple of selections ren- 
dered are helpful. All four work straight. 
The missing comedy is not a loss by any 
means. The selections are not bad, but 
they could stand some brushing up. A 
fife and drum corps finish, though a trifle 
noisy, is a welcome departure. The imita- 
tions on the drum should be eliminated. 
There is only one imitation that can be 
given on the thing anyway. Anyone who 
can handle the sticks at all can do it. 
Besides no one is particularly crazy 
about hearing the music of a freight train 
going up a hill or an express train going 
down. The Four Banta Bros, make a capi- 
tal act for Henderson's, and scored ac- 
cordingly. Dash. 

Carleton Macy and Maud Hall open at 
the American, New York, Monday. They 
returned from England last week. 



Swat Milligan & Co. (a). 
Comedy Sketch. 
15 Mins.; Two (Special Set). 
Columbia, Brooklyn. 

It's pretty soft for "Swat." His con- 
tribution to the fifteen-minute sketch con- 
sists in ambling silently across the stage 
twice. Swat is a seven-footer, built on 
about the same artistic lines as Dunk- 
horst, the Human Freight Car. The real 
work of the offering falls to a very young 
girl, Veina Bolton, an extremely clever 
"kid." The stage is set to show the out- 
side fence of a league baseball ground. 
Miss Bolton is a young "fan," and in com- 
pany with another tough "kid" is watch- 
ing the game through a knothole. The 
pair have a quantity of capital slang of 
the elaborate sort common to the base- 
ball "fan." A stupid Englishman hap- 
pens to be passing the spot, and becomes 
interested in the conversation of the pair, 
engaging them in talk, serving as a buffer 
for their exchange of highly technical 
slang, which she is unable to comprehend. 
The game is going against the home team 
and the two youngsters become wildly 
excited. "O, gee, if Swat Milligan would 
only get to the bat," squeals the little girl. 
Whereupon Swat strides past on his way 
to the grounds. His mert appearance is 
enough to get a laugh, ami he doesn't 
have to talk. As the game progresses it 
is described by the two youngsters, their 
eyes glued to the knotholes, until Swat 
goes to the bat and saves the game with 
a home run. For the finish the giant 
again walks across the stage *vhile the 
two kid fans fall down and worship. The 
dialog was written by Bozeman Bulger, 
a New York newspaper baseball writer, 
who made "Swat Milligan" famous for 
miraculous feats in his World stories of 
the "phenom," and Mr. Bulger knows the 
slang of the diamond. It is extremely 
bright and is handled with a good deal of 
cleverness by little Miss Bolton. The 
Englishman is a capital device for bring- 
ing out the comedy, and all the subject 
matter is topical. The Columbia audience 
liked the item immensely. While the base- 
ball fever rages, as it does universally 
just at this season, the sketch ought to be 
a first rate card anywhere. Ru*h. 



Dolly Sisters. 
Songs and Dances. 
10 Mins.; Full Stage. 
Henderson's. 

The Polly listers were handicapped at 
their first performance this week through 
being necessarily forced to appear well 
down after their programed position. 
The girls have about the liveliest little 
"sister act" shown in some time. They 
work but ten minutes. During that time 
there isn't a second they are not doing 
something. The sisters open with a cork- 
ing number, made so solely through their 
own efforts. Dressed in the "Yama" cos- 
tumes they put over a bully dance. A 
change to pretty soubret dresses brings 
forth a good "rag" number into which is 
mixed a lively Spanish fandango, done 
with utter disregard for the usual in this 
line. The voices of the sisters are not 
strong but good enough for what little is 
required. Both look well, in fact they 
look so much alike that whatever is said 
for one goes for the other. The specialty 
could l»e turned around to bring the 
"Yama" numlwr last, which would prob- 
ably bring more applause in the proper 
place the finish. Dash. 



VARIETY 



15 



Violet King. 

•uiuiicaL 

1a Mine.; Full Stage (Palace Interior). 

Alhambra. 

"England's greatest violiniste" is the 
program's estimate of Miss King's skill 
on that instrument, an estimate which 
the Alhambra audience seemed inclined to 
accept. A splendidly executed violin solo 
at the finish of the offering won her en- 
thusiastic applause, even more than the 
freak performance of playing a violin solo 
and" its accopaniment on the piano at the 
same time. This trick sounds more elab- 
orate than it really is. A chin rest holds 
the instrument in position without the aid 
of the left hand. When the left hand is 
called upon for fingering the piano is 
silent, but when the open string supply 
the melody the hand is free to produce 
chords on the piano. These passages oc- 
cur every few bars and the illusion of an 
accompaniment, although not continuous, 
is effective. Miss King is a brilliant per- 
former on both piano and violin, and 
while her specialty is most entertaining, 
it partakes too much of the simple parlor 
entertainment to be a really strong vaude- 
ville feature. Rush. 



Fou/ Readings. 
Aatobats. 

14 Mine.; Full Stage (Interior Special 
Setting). 

Brighton Beach Music Hall. 

The Four Readings are tin* renamed 
Four Melvins, with a special set, new 
dressing and almost entirely new feats. 
The set shows 'the interior of a gym- 
nasium with various pieces of apparatus 
strewn about. The men appear in gym- 
nasium suits. Two wear the long trousers 
now more common, and the others short 
running pants. The boys look more like 
the gymnasium brand of athlete than 
trained acrobats, and their appearance is 
a help. The smallest is a nice-looking 
little chap who cannot weight more than 
110 pounds. The work does not depend 
upon his lightness, for most of the dif- 
ficult tricks are performed with one of 
the heavier men. Somersaults, leaps and 
throws into hand-to-hand balances, for 
showiness and execution, go to the front 
rank in a bound. There are a number of 
new and surprising feats uncovered. Each 
is sure to win applause. "Stalling" has 
been left out, and while a little of it at 
times might win more applause, the speed 
and cleanness of the present plan is more 
valuable. The Readings closed a long 
show at the Music Hull Monduv niyliL und 
easily held their audience. The act can 
stand in any house. Dank. 

Heidelberg Four. 

15 Mins.; One. 
Henderson's. 

Dressed in the student garb of the old 
German college the quartet sends over a 
straight singing act that compares favor- 
ably with any others. The predominating 
routine, each man singing a solo, is fol- 
lowed. There are no marvelous voices dis- 
closed, but all are nicely handled. The 
concert work, however, is the winner. 
The men do not manouver extraordinarily 
for effects, and the results are pleasing. 
A new number or two would brighten 
things up a bit, though the present selec- 
tions pass muster. At Henderson's whero 
quartets are very familiar, the act did 
nicely. Dash. 



A. Q. Seamen and Co. (5). 

"The Real Widow Brown" (Farce). 

a6 Mine.; Full Stage. 

Columbia, Brooklyn. 

As talking farces go, this one is well 

up with the procession as regards its 

ability to bring big laughs. In the matter 

of acting, the cast does extremely well. 
The plot is very commonplace. The 
father of two girls has replied to an ad- 
vertisement in a matrimonial paper and is 
expecting a visit from "The Widow 
Brown," whom he has agreed by corres- 
pondence to marry. The two daughters 
learn of the old man's plans. They 
scheme with their two sweethearts, Tom 
and Harry, to defeat the consumation of 
the match. Tom disguises himself as a 
woman with the idea of impersonating the 
Widow Brown and disgusting the old man 
with her. The second sister, unknown to 
the first, plans with Harry to impersonate 
the father and, meeting the widow, force 
her to throw up the engagement. These 
preliminaries are swiftly gotton over with 
and the six people of the sketch get down 
quickly to the comedy. Some of it is 
a bit rough, but at all times the principals 
handle it skilfully and bring real laughs 
from the complications. The real widow 
comes on the scene and after the maze 
has untangled itself everything works out 
satisfactorily. The Columbia audience 
laughed itself out of breath and had en- 
thusiasm enough at the finish to conduct 
a riot of applause. For the smaller time 
"The Real Widow" ought to be a good 
number. Rush. 



OUT OF TOWN. 



Ed. Wynn and Al. Lee. 
"The Billiken Freshman." 
ao Mins.; One. 
Maryland, Baltimore. 

Ed. Wynn, with Al Lee, is back in his 
old act, now called 'The Billiken Fresh- 
man." No excuse can be found for this 
title except several pictures of the little 
god. A fast and furious talking act is, 
however, presented by the pair, and they 
became the hit of the bill. Wynn is still 
using his old laugh-catcher, the ever 
changeable panama hat, and has made but 
few changes from his old act. Another 
team, Wynne and Lewis, have been play- 
iflg the same time this year, using the 
same "business," hat, clothes, "gags" and 
catch-lines. Lee dresses neatlv and makes 
an admirable "straight." 



Frederick V. Bowers. 

Songs. 

14 Mins.; One (Special Drops). 

Young's Pier, Atlantic City. 

Billed as a "College Boy," Fred Bowers 

opened with a snappy "Rah Rah" song. 

His dog, with a pipe, hooked in his mouth, 
strutted back and forth during the num- 
ber. The second was a comic Indian 
number and the introduction of a clever 
pickaninny stripped and bedecked with 
feathers made an excellent finish. In 
singing "Shine On, Harvest Moon," an- 
other novelty was introduced, showing 
two "picks" (in "two") "cooing" in a 
harvest field. Mr. Bowers closed with 
"Good-Bye, Dear Old Manhattan Isle." 
Mr. Bowers is full of snap and novelty, 
with his excellent voice the feature. 

./. It. I'ulaski. 
(Continued on page 17. 1 



BRIGHTON BEACH JfUSIC HALL. 

Auspicious (had the word never been 
coined, there could never have been an 
"opening") was the opening of the Brigh- 
ton Beach Music Hall Monday night. 
Arthur Hopkins, the manager, smiled even 
after a very busy session with the fire au- 
thorities and the disappointment of not 
opening with a matinee as advertised. 

There have been but few changes made 
in the house. Some of the flags and other 
adornments had to be removed, but that 
is about all. The girl ushers are retained. 

A bully crowd was on hand, and they 
enjoyed the bill, which ran off capitally, 
though there were a couple of disappoint- 
ments at a late hour. 

Irene Franklin is the stellar attraction 
for the first week. Miss Franklin made a 
brave and sincere effort to leave after five 
songs, but the house wouldn't have it at 
all. In "Redhead," "The Waitress," and 
"The Soubret," Miss Franklin has three 
numbers that will be associated with her 
as long as she continues to grace the 
stage. "Expressions," one of the singer's 
first successes also turned out a big win- 
ner. Burt Green presided at the piano 
and tore off a couple of rhapsodies that 
gained recognition. 

Waterbury Bros, and Tenny, one of our 
very best comedy musical acts, did all 
that was expected of them. The music 
and comedy go hand in hand. Both are 
quiet and effective. The absence of loud 
blaring on the brasses is not missed. 

The Two Pucka are showing at the hall 
after an absence of a year or so in the 
west. The two children are regular grown- 
ups now. They are a nice, clean -looking 
pair of youngsters and that is just the 
sort of an act they are doing. It is a 
nice, clean pleasing specialty. The boy 
has dropped his Lauder "Daisy" number 
and is using a Scotch song instead, which 
is not an imitation of Lauder. The num- 
ber is very pretty and the pair look well 
in the Scotch costumes. The girl is mak- 
ing four pretty changes and she carries 
them finely. The "tough" finish is re- 
tained, the youngsters doing it in an im- 
proved form. 

Felix and Barry showed the "four-act" 
and the house laughed continuously at the 
funniments of Felix. The pantomime he 
does would make anybody laugh. Lydia 
Barry is wearing one of "those gowns," 
and it is a wonder. The act Monday night 
was stretched out a bit in "one" for the 
benefit of the stage manager to strike and 
set. 

Dclancr-Dcbramont Trio, billed as the 
Dc» ljuir Trio at times, were a sensational 
hit. The house went silly over the high 
note of the girl, about nine blocks above 
the highest on the register. 

The Camille Trio opened the show and 
were the usual laugh. The act improves 
with time. 

The Four Readings, New Acts. 

Hush. 

La Belle Americaine, who rides a horse 
on Hanimerstein's Roof nightly garbed 
only in white tights and a light lace gown, 
r<a»lies the upper part of the theatre (in 
her stage clothes) from the dressing room 
below through the lobby and up on the 
elevator, atl'ording an unlooked-for sight 
to stray loungers. Aaron Kessler is al- 
ways a lobby lounger at this hour, and 
exercises his privilege of escorting La 
Belle in her lonely ride upstairs. 



AMERICAN. 

It's a summer show at the American 
this week, and not an expensive one, 
either. The house Tuesday evening waa 
nearly capacity downstairs. It was a cool 
night, but even with very warm weather 9/f 
the American cannot fall far behind, 
though attendance takes a slump. 

The show did not run any too well, nor 
did it start off any too lively, with the 
"ill. song" turn mixed in among two or 
three acts that gave a long encore each. 

Billy Clifford, who gave the program 
its first big boost in a fast act, was one 
of the show's hits. Clifford is still the 
immaculate English Johnnie, singing 
"Capital 0" and making the audience sing 
with him. He waa the first or one of the 
first to do this, and it is now a trade mark 
with him. But Clifford has added a new 
and funny edge to this portion. He telle 
the audience they will play school with 
him. He is to be" the teacher, and upon 
saying "Good morning, scholars," they 
must answer "Good morning, teacher." 
They do, so what's the use of talking 
about "song plugging" in the conventional 
way when Clifford attempts a thing like 
this, getting away with it. As a laugh- 
able bit it is funny. 

Another single singing turn was Maud 
Lambert, the second after Clifford. Miss 
Lambert could better have been placed 
"No. 10" with The Kohler Trio (New 
Acts) taken from that position to her 
spot. In a salmon colored silk gown, Miss 
Lambert, with her powerful contralto, 
sang three numbers, the second a semi- 
recitative song (as sung by her) perhaps 
named "There's Class to a Girl Like You." 
She did something with "Miss Melinda," 
a song with a slow catchy swing, if the 
singer knows how to handle it. A couple 
of weeks ago at Hanimerstein's a single 
woman act sang this same song with the 
Louse wondering what it was about when 
she finished. "Love Me Just for a Day" 
was Miss Lambert's opening selection. All 
three scored, the young woman's voice 
with her appearance earning her reward. 
Miss Lambert did not rush for the center 
of the stage upon entering, but stood 
nearer the left entrance. 

Balancing and sharp shooting make up 
the act offered by Henry and Alice Ta,y-,^, 
lor. Other than that the turn is too long, 
they did extremely well, without showing 
any one astonishing feat in either line. 
The woman has a couple of new tricks 
with the guns, while the man, besides 
wearing a white bow with a Tuxedo, 
balances fairly well, paying too much at- 
tention to a couple of ladders which might 
remain out, and wasting time with a lamp 
and cigar boxes, holding back the finish 
which should arrive with one of the 
woman's best shots. To the American 
audience there seemed to be some novelty 
to the turn. At least it is well enough 
worked. 

The good comedy was supplied by the 
bicycle act of Campbell and Barl>er. James 
J. Corbett appeared in "A Thief of the 
Night." followed by .Fames J. Morton (sec- 
ond week), who travestied in monolog 
Corbett's sketch. Techow's Cats closed. 

Burnett and Krrol. a "sister act," 
opened, followed by the tiresome "ill. 
songs." The singer seemed to think "I 
Want a Home" was a ballad. Morton and 
Diamond with rough comedy and dancing 
brought some laughs, wlii!e Suirl and 
Kessner got over niee'y. Many Brown 
and Co. 1 New .\«t - . . Sitne. 



16 



VARIETY 



HAMMERSTEIN'S. 

With a couple of new numbers among 
the few changes made in the Roof pro- 
gram from last week, the program remained 
a first-class one for the open air. 

Farmer Wilke and his world-beating 
beard still sticks around, waiting for some- 
one to say something so he can tell about 
the whiskers he grew all alone, and Mrs. 
Wm. E. Annis and Co. (New Acts), who 
were expected to become a "freak" act 
passed the danger point. 

A shift in the programed positions sent 
M A Night in a Monkey Music Hall" (New 
Acts) to the second division, giving La 
Belle Americaine (second week), the "No. 
4" place, rather early for the importance 
of her turn. 

The Four Fords followed the "sight" 
horse exhibition, closing with the solo and 
concert dancing to considerable applause. 
Besides some new steps the boys are 
wearing sailor costumes for their "loose" 
dance instead of the "scarecrow" dress, 
and evening clothes in the finale, while the 
girls are always prettily costumed. 

Lester was placed badly as "No. 3." His 
ventriloquial efforts demand a quietness 
which the early late comers could not 
give. "Windows down" did not help any 
under the circumstances, although the 
"dummy" singing for a finish brought 
Lester the applause. He could still chop 
the act down without hurting it. 

The Seldoms closed the first half, with 
"marble poses." The poses seem to be 
held too long, but several are applauded 
for this as much as for anything else 
The two concluding ones attract the most, 
especially "Reaching the -Winning Post," 
the shortest of all. 

Princess Rajah is among the holdovers, 
taking the next to last spot with her 
"Cleopatra Dance" and holding the house, 
quite a feat in itself for the hour up there. 
The Five Musical Avolos closed the show. 

Near the commencement the Charles 
Ahearn Troupe demonstrated in that po- 
sition the value of their comedy bicycle 
number, while De Haven and Sidney 
again received strong recognition, opening 
the show with novelty dancing. With but 
three acts intervening, the Fords had to 
battle against the good impression left by 
the two-act with those seated at the ris< 
of the curtain. 

In the racing finish of the Ahearn turn 
there is a second man now riding. This 
gives the race a better effect. Mr. Ahearn 
should use more discretion in handling 
the young woman. The laugh or two 
doesn't count. It is not good comedy for 
vaudeville. Simc. 



HBADLINERS NEXT WEEK. 

NEW YORK. 

Pauline?, Orpheum. 
Geo. Beban and Co., Alhambra. 
Mile. Zelie de Lussan, Fifth Avenue. 
James K. Hackett, American. 
Annette Kellerman, Hammerstein's. 
Alice Lloyd > Brighton Beach Music Hall. 
"Bathing Girls," New Brighton Theatre. 

CHICAGO. 

J. H. Gilmore and Co., McWatters and 
Tyson, Rivoli (sharing top line), Ameri- 



can. 



Richard Golden and Co., Majestic. 



Halliday and Curley will appear in a 
new piece next fall. They have played 
"The Battle of Too Soon" this season. 



FIFTH AVENUE. „ 

With the exception of a double flop 
and roll-over in a swing performed by 
Alick Lauder and Co. (New Acts) the 
Fifth Avenue show this week is an emi- 
nently satisfactory one. The Lauder 
catastrophe was shifted to the "No. 2" 
place Monday, so the bill was permitted 
to go on its way without great loss of 
time. The program was rearranged after 
the Monday matinee. Prescelle, now in 
his second week, moved forward from the 
closing place to that occupied by the Mill- 

man Trio about the centre. 

The hypnotist is getting his routine into 
first-class running order. The preliminary 
announcements are reduced to the small- 
est possible compass and the act gets 
down to its real purpose — that of secur- 
ing laughs — quickly. The demonstration 
of a cataleptic trance is now robbed of 
many of its disagreeable features. Pres- 
celle's ridiculous "Salome" dance made a 
capital burlesque finish thanks to the 
clowning of a colored boy. 

The Willy Pantzer Troupe scored the 
applause hit of the bill. The act has been 
much changed since its last metropolitan 
showing. They have an entirely new in- 
troduction and finish, and the smaller of 
the midgets has been advanced to an im- 
portant place in the routine, working for 
comedy until near the finish, when he be- 
comes the top mounter in several striking 
hand-to-hand feats, among the best that 
have been shown in this class. The finish 
is a burlesque fight in which the two little 
fellows are toreadors, and the bull is a dog 
wearing a "prop" .horned head. It was a 
big laugh. 

Frank Morrell has his talk settled into 
a good sure-fire routine. His stories are 
mingled in with semi-personal patter, and 
all go nicely. The one about "Room 13" 
brought a great big spontaneous laugh, 
one of those big, quick ones that none too 
often come to the talking comedian. The 
songs, of course, were strong applause 
getters. Morrell was moved down next 
to closing in the revised order, and got 
away handsomely, although a good deal 
of comedy had gone before. 

Bert Leslie and Co. were the comedy 
sketch, playing "Hogan in Society." The 
breakfast table scene is one of the few 
cases where messy comedy excuses itself 
on the score of being irresistibly funny. 
And some of the stuff is pretty messy, 
too. Monday night a page had to go over 
the stage space in "one" with a broom 
when the curtain dropped. 

The Millman Trio did splendidly as the 
closing act. Little Bird Millman gets 
enough spirit and graceful action into 
her routine feats to supply any two young 
people of her weight, and the dance on the 
tight wire at the finish is a really strik- 
ing performance. The other girl makes a 
pretty appearance and works skillfully, 
while the man fills in the intervals nicely. 

Paka's Hawaiian Trio supplied their 
most agreeable musical and dancing nov- 
elty, drawing down a goodly proportion of 
the applause. Hy Greenway opened the 
show. Some of his talk went cold, but 
the sketching at the finish put him over. 
(Sue Smith failed to start a riot with her 
Italian dialect song. A German number 
went much better and a patriotic song, 
with the singer dressed in an American 
flag, made the finish a burst of noisy en- 
thusiasm. Rush. 



HENDERSON'S. 

There was a goodly number of people 
on hand Monday afternoon when the per- 
formance began. The best that can be 
said of the bill is that they all saw the 
finish. When you sit through the whole 
show at Henderson's with four and 

five-minute waits between each turn, you 
have done something. The bill runs 
.through nicely principally because there is 
not an act on the program that tries to 
get any talk past the foot lights. Sing- 
ing is the main issue, and a couple of 
dancing numbers and an "acrobatic turn 
mixed in just about broke things right. 
As they appeared: The Four Banta 
Brothers (New Acts) started the program 
snappily. The Plymouth Four have made 
a change or two since their first appear- 
ance at the Columbia. The men are now 
wearing the uniforms of the Continental 
soldiers, and look much better than when 
in the Court dress. They also remove the 
white wigs while in the fisherman's outfit, 
now a very pleasing number. The four 
hand out something very good in the sing- 
ing line and the Henderson crowd liked 
them. 

Silvern and Emery (man and woman), 
do a nice trapeze and flying ring number. 
The woman resembles Charm ion, and like 
her, does the undressing, getting something 
out of it. Most of the work falls to the 
woman and she delivers. The finish is 
the same as shown by a similar act seen 
hereabouts lately. The man, while sus- 
pended head downward holds the woman 
by his teeth while she spins at top speed. 
It makes a good closing. 

The "A BCD Girls" have a new routine, 
new costumes and a carload of new hair 
since the act was last seen. There sure 
must be some excess for carrying those 
puffs, etc. A new girl is among the 
things not noted before. She plays the 
piano during most of the proceedings, but 
is in on the good dancing finish. The 
girls are changing their costumes no less 
than six times, and they keep things on 
the jump. The comedienne has left off 
wearing bloomers and appears to better 
advantage in skirts. The act was a big 
success at the Music Hall. 

Ryan and White are doing a good dan- 
cing act but they seem to be going the 
same route that another former good dan- 
cing act traveled. "Our Boys in Blue"* 
made a great showing. There are one or 
two slight changes, but the work in the 
main remains unchanged. A green man in 
the ranks was noticeable on all occasions. 
A big hit was recorded. 

Geiger and Walters did all they knew 
before they could leave. The man has 
several amusing imitations on the violin, 
and with the singing of Miss Walters, 
makes a pleasing act. 

Heidelberg Four, and Sisters "Dolly 
(Xew Acts). 

Tom Malcolm has now wisely cut down 
his songs to three in numl>er, and if he 
will further cut the verses of each of 
those to two, he will be in much better 
shape. Things are not quite the best for 
Tom, but the house took him along with 
the rest and passed approval. Dash 



Harry Pilcer will return to vaudeville, 
"The Prince of To-Night," the Chicago 
musical comedy production Mr. Pilcer was 
with this season having closed. He opens 
as a single act at the Majestic, Chicago, 
June 21. 



ALHAMBRA. 

A really unusual combination occurred 

at the Alhambra Wednesday — rainy 

weather, a June evening and a capacity 

audience. With the other theatres shut 

down, or making a bid for patronage with 
summer features, the Alhambra goes its 
prosperous course undisturbed. There is 
no sensational feature to draw the people 
in, Gus Edwards being the headliner, 
backed by a good comedy bill. 

The Three Hanlons opened the show, 
followed by Violet King, both new acts. 
Jack Wilson and Co. were again in an 
early spot, No. 3. For a good balance 
they could have been further down. In 
any position they are bound to be a big 
laugh. Wilson's side observations and 
quick personalities keep the audience on 
tip toe of interest, and the burlesques 
win large bursts of laughter. He has sev- 
eral up-to-the-minute comments on topical 
subjects, taking the first crack at the 
Bingham-McClellun controversy, later used 
by two other turns. 

Clayton White and Marie Stuart were 
just before intermission, closing the first 
half with another comedy hit. Few 
sketches and few principals could stand 
the amount of repeating in the city that 
has fallen to the lot of the Stuart-White- 
"Cherie" combination. Barry and Wol- 
ford took up the fast pace following the 
intermission, the softest spot on the show 
for their style of act, and gave the bill a 
real boost. They make capital out of the 
shifting fortunes of the baseball pennant 
race. 

Al Leech and His Three Rosebuds are 
still "In School," and promise to remain 
indefinitely in the undergraduate class. 
Leech, however, has something new in the 
singing and dancing sketch. It is a topi- 
cal verse in the ancient song "Gee, 
Wouldn't That Be Great?" which now 
makes a finish in "one." T^he nonsense 
with the drum and ridiculous military 
uniform has disappeared, but all the rest 
of the very familiar material is on view. 
It goes without saying that the number 
was a laughing success, made so by 
Leech's skillful eccentric dancing. 

Gus Edwards has added several mem- 
bers to his staff of assistants. In addi- 
tion to the two girl singers "planted" in 
a second tier box, a tiny youngster walks 
down the orchestra aisle while two more 
arc concealed in the gallery. The Alham- 
bra audience, particularly the upstairs 
portion, showed a disposition to "kid" the 
"planted" singers. Toward the end of the 
act the gallery was becoming disorderly. 
Edwards himself got along splendidly. He 
has the^ voice and can give odds to any- 
one in singing his own songs. The assist- 
ants do him no good. He would be a good 
deal better off without them. 

Tschernoff's Animals made a very 
pretty closing feature. The stage is pret- 
tily set as a stable yard, the dogs and 
ponies coming on from the stable door at 
the back. The animals are fine speci- 
mens and the routine of feats novel. Per- 
haps they are too much like set tricks, 
each being a separate display rather than 
part of an orderly routine. Both ponies 
and dogs go to their work willingly, and 
the trainer appears to wield a sure con- 
trol over them without effort. Rush. 

.The Alrona-Zoeller Trio have re-signed 
with Andy Lewis' "Mardi Gras Beauties" 
for next season. 



VARIETY 



17 



VARIETY ARTISTS' ROUTES 

FOR WEEK JUNE 14 

WHEN NOT OTHERWISE INDICATED. 

(Tho routes here given, bearing no dates, are from JUNE It to JUNE 20, inclusive, de- 
pendent upon the opening and dosing days of engagemeots in different parts of the oountry. 
All addresses below are furnished VARIETY by artists. Address oare newspapers, managers or 
agents will not be printed.) 

"C. R." after name indioates act is with oirous mentioned. Route may be found under 
"Circus Routes." 

ROUTES FOR THE FOLLOWING WEEK MUST REACH THIS OFFICE NOT LATER 
THAN WEDNE8DAY MORNING TO ENSURE PUBLICATION. 



A B C D Girls 329 W 26 N Y 

AballoB U A R 779 Stste Bridgeport 

Abdsllsh Bros Three 1235 Golden Gate Frlnco 

Adsir Art Convention Hsll Chlcksshs Okls 

Adams Edward B 418 8trsnd London 

Adsms «V Kirk 1353 Broadway N Y 

Adams A Msck Psntages Portland 

Adams Billy 740 Shawmut Boston 

Ader Trio 2238 N 3 Phlla 

Adelyn Box 249 Champslgn 111 

Adler Harry Barrlsou Muskegon 111 

Adler Flo 464 Cleveland Chicago 

Ahearns The 290 Colo Av Chicago 

Ahl Ed Bangor Me 

Albanl 1416 Broadway N Y 

Albene & La Prant Lynn 

Alburtus A Millar Grand Hanlvy Eng 

Aldrach Blanche 142 Clayton Athens 

Alexandra & Bertles 41 Acre Lane London 

Alexis & Scball 327 E 25 N Y 

Allen Chas II 481 S Morgan Chicago 

Allen Delmaln-Allen £40 Madison Brookljn 

Allen A D Co 74 Pleasant Montclalr 

Allen Violet & Co 222 E 14 N Y 

Allen Leon & Bertie 118 Central Oshkottb 

Allen & Francis 511 Shot well San Francisco 

Allison Mr & Mrs E Iladdam Conn 

All Hunter & All N Y Av Jamaica X Y 

Alpha Quartette BIJou Lanniiig 21 Alrriome (J rand 

Kaplds 
Alpine Troupe Cole Bros. C R 
Alrona Zoeller Trio 209 Hemlock Brooklyn 
Alvano A Co West Mlddletown O 
Amatls Sisters 104 E 14 N Y 
American Trio 50 Penn Newark 
Ameiicau Newslmys Quartet Klchmond 1 1 1 1 Chicago 
Anderson & Evans Family So Catherine Out 
Angcll Slrttern 712 W New York Indianapolis 
Apollo Hron 349 W 4 N Y 
Apollo Quartet 81) X State Chicago 
Ardo A Eddo 500 E 84 X Y 
Arizona Troupe 351 E 18 X Y 
Armstrong A Verne Union II 1 1 Chicago 
Armstrong & Clark Orpbcnm Seattle 
Arnold & Felix So & Henry Jamaica 
Arthur May 15 Unity Boston 
Arvllle Dorothy 1 \V S3 X Y 
Astalres Hie 42 Eldorado Highland l'k X J 
Atklson Harry 21 E 20 X Y 
Auberts Lee 14 Frobcl III Hamburg Ger 
Auhurns Three 335 Beacon Sommervllle Mass 
Auers The 37 Heyjrate Southend-on-Sea Eng 
Auger Geo 12 Lawrence ltd So Ealing Eng 
Austins The 10 Bakers Lane Itockvlllc Conn 
Avery \V E 5006 Forrestvllle Chicago 
Ayres Ilownnl t>l!» Rltner Phlla 
Aurds The 229 W 3S X Y 

B 

Baader La Vallc Trio 3S3 X Clirl*tlanla Chicago 

Baker Harry .1924 Reno W Philadelphia 

Baraban Kusslan Troupe 100 E 110 X Y 

BarlKT Tom 097 Main Hartford 

P.allnts The 319 E 14 X Y 

Ball A Marshall 220 Lincoln I'l Xorwd Pk Chicago 

Banks Itrcaselle I mo 14 travel; 20 Orpheum Butte 

Barlowc Mollie 370 Washington Boul Chicago 

Barry Lydla 77 Bay 32 Brooklyn 

Harry & diehard* Dlngman's Ferry Pa 

Barnes Reining & Co Star Seattle 

Barron Rube 20 E S8 X Y 

Barron George 2002 Fifth Av X Y 

Barrett Sisters 1964 X 31 Phlla 

Barrett Geo A 211 Missouri Toledo 

Barrett & Bayne 87 Wolcott New Haven 

Barrett Marjorle 4509 F II more Pittsburg 

Bates A Melville 70 Gregory Xew Haven 

Batro & McCue 819 X 2 Reading 

Baxter A La Conda Tumbling Dam Pk Brldgeton 

X J 
Bayes Xora Xew York Roof X Y 
Beam Will 1553 Broadway X Y 
Bean Win C 8 Haddon Atlantic City 
Be Anos 3442 Charlton Chicago 
Beard Billy 1401 Dayton Savannah 
Bcmivals Marldor A Co 274 Indiana Chicago 
Bedlnl &. Sonlu 1(10 S C Bldg Seattle 
Beecher & Maye 1553 Broadway N Y 
Beimel Musical 340 E 87 X Y 



Kitty Morris 

Singing "coon songs" in vaudeville. 
Rooked solid to July IB. 

COMEDY 

NOVELTY VAUDEVILLE ACTS 



IMMEDIATE TIME. 

J. B. MORRIS, Agent 

1416 Broadway, Now ToTk. 



Belly Frank K-Ps Jersey City 

Bel ford Troupe Rlngllng Bros C R 

Bell Tom Smith Ac O'Connor2403 Albemarle Bklyn 

LULU BEESON TRIO 

Weak Juaa 14, Orpheum, Los Angelas. 

Bell Arthur II 488 12 Xewark 
Bellclalr Bros Keith's Cleveland 
Bellmoute H & P 20 W Missouri Kansas City 
Bennett Laura 113 W 70 X Y 
Beunetta Bros 200 W 07 N Y 
Berliner Vera 21 Colonial Chicago 
Bernard 4c Slefert 055 S High Columbus 
Bernlce & Howard 3007 Calumet Chicago 
Bernler & Stella 22 Havwood Provldeuce 
L.erol William 104 E 14 X Y 
Bertram & Co Robt 21 Pantages Sacramento 
Beyer Ben & Bro 1490 Bryant X Y 
Behrend Musical 52 Springfield Xewark 
Bertlna & Brockway 311 Third X Y 
Beverley A: West 202 Delaware Buffalo 
Biff & Bang 178 Bruce Xewark 
BIJou Comedy Trio Electric Pk Detroit 21 River- 
side l'k Findley O 
Bluinnliln & Ilehr O II Augusta Me 
llluiiey-*k Wolfe 257 W 44 X Y 
riinlM.s The Applcton Wis 
Bingham 335 Beacon Sonierville Mass 
Blrnes Jo«» 1553 Broadwny X Y 
Black A: White Trio 405 Columbus X Y 
Black Katheiine HO Hill Chicago 
Black & Jones 113 W 30 X Y 
Black's Marionettes 1009 S San Joaquin Stockton 
Blessings. Pavilion London Eng 
Blondell Mysterious & Co 25 2 X Y 
Boises Sensational Electric Pk Baltimore 
Booth Gordon & Booth 1553 Broadway X Y 
Boley May Port Washington L I 
Borden Zeno & Haydn 21 Empire Sacramento 
Bowers & Bowers 2 Oliver PI Everett Wash 
Bowers Walter & Crooker Shea's Buffalo 
Bowen Bros. 1553 Broadway X Y 
Boyds Two 1200 So Decatur Montgomery 
Boyer & Bell Del Roy lit 1 Cleveland 
Boys In Blue 240 E 21 X Y 
Brachard & Co 124 Bloomlngton Imllanaixills 
Brady Owen 44 State Auburn 
Bradley & Davis 217 E La lock Pittsburg 
Bradfords The 230 W 41 X Y 
Brandons Musical 07 So Clark Chicago 
Bransby & Williams 110 Stockton W Pittsburg 
Brcakway Barlows 201 E 14 X Y 
Brenner Samuel X 2S.10 Tulip Phlla 
Broad Billy 1553 Broadway X Y 
Brochman Slater Orpheum Vancouver B C 
Bingham Anna R 2S Exrh Binghamton X Y 
Brlnkleys. The. 424 W 30 X Y 
Brixton & Brixton 7ns l^xlngton Brooklyn 
Brock Temple \- Co 2S W 31 X Y 
Brooks &. Denton 070 6 X Y 
It rooks A: Jeannette f-01 West X Y 
Brown A: Sheftall 340 W 5!> X Y 
Brown Harris & B Riverside R I 
Browne Harry L Hopkins Louisville 
Browne Botliwell 407 W 12.1 X Y 
Brownies The P R D Xo s Topeka 
Browning & Kellar 2130 E 10 Brooklyn 
Browning Mr Ac Mrs 30 Spruce Corona L I 
Brunettes Cycling 231 Cross Powell 
Buchanan A- Russell Ontario Iltl Chicago 
Burke A- Crllue r,3f. Bn.ld W Phlla 
Buckley John Pmnlly Benulngs Mont 
Buhler C II 13«'»3 Putnam Brooklyn 
Bunchii A- Alger 231JI X Main Louisville 
Burgomaster's Dream Grand Seattle 
Buik>' A- Touhev. East Iladdam Conn 
Burns »V Emerson 1 PI Boledleu Paris 
Burt A- Dautrhler 113 W 45 X Y 
Burton Hughes A- Burton 532 Stanton XUes O 
Burton II 11 Sherman Iltl Chicago 
Bneh Bros Pantaues Vancouver B C 
Buxton Chas Crystal Menasha Wis 
Byers A Herman 3<V4:» Paxton Rd Cincinnati 
Byrne Golson Co Ainlome Gainesville Texas 



Caesar A- Co Continental Iltl Chicago 

Cahlll William 3(>5 7 Biooklyn 

Cameron A- Byrne 01 Bartlette San Francisco 

CnmpOells The 1LM W 101 X Y 

Carbrey Bros Oxford Phlla 

Cardownle Sisters J44 W 30 X Y 

Carle Hilda 12 W Milwaukee Detroit 

Carlln Bol» .113 Prospect P.uffalo 

Canlllo |.«-.i Xyack N Y 

("arrays The l«i perry Pittsburg 

Carson A- Devereaux 410 Lime Evansvllle 

Carol Sisters 310 W 110 X Y 

Carlln Rose 100 W 144 X Y 

Carmelo Fernando Hip Charleston 

( nrlos A'limal Circus 20 Springdeld O 

Carroll Xettle Trio Itanium Ballev C R 

Carroll & Cooko Iltl York X Y 

Caron & Fnrniim 235 E 24 X Y 

Carters The 040 La Salle Chicago 

Carey A: Stiimpe 52 Court Brooklyn 

Casad De Verne A: Walters 312 Valley Dayton 

Caston Dave Grand Augusta; 21 BIJou Atlanta 



Caulfleld A Driver Xormandle Iltl N Y 
Celest 74 Grove Rd Clapham Pk London 
Chadwlck Trio Mt Ephralm N Y 
Chauieroya The Xlpmuc I,ake I' abridge Mass 
Chase J Percy Bijou Oshkosh 
Chase & Carina 2516 S Halstead Chicago 
Cberle Doris 23 E 99 N Y 
Chevalier Co 1553 Bway N Y 
Chlnko Majestic Chicago 

Chapman Sisters Family Kane Pa; 20 Lyric James- 
town Pa 
Clarence 8lsters 360 W 45 N Y 
Clark & Turner 146 W 64 N Y 
Clarke Wilfred Lambs Club X Y 
Clayton F A Woodlawn Rd Bedford Pk N Y 
Clayton Bessie Xew York Roof N Y 
Cleopatra Grand Han Diego 
Clermontas Orange Pk Newburg 21 Wonderland 

Boston 
Cleriae Ethel 303 Livingston Brooklyn 
Cleveland C & M Revere Beach Mass 
Clifford Dave R Casino Keokuk la 
Clifford & Ames 2012 W Gray Louisville 
Clipper Comedy Quartet West End Pk N Orleans 
Clipper Comedy Four O II Passaic X J; 20 Temple 

Rochester N Y 
Clyo & Rochelle 87 Park Attleboro Mass 
Cody & Lynn 230 Powell Brooklyn X Y 
Cogan & Bancroft 19 Majestic Butte 
Cohen Tlllle 8t James Iltl Boston 
Colby. Franklyn 2084 West Lake Chicago 
Colbya The 77 Walton PI Chicago 
Cole Will 15 4 Brooklyn 
Cole & Clements Saymore Iltl Phlla 
Colcys The Elk Club Chicago 
Colonial Quartet 1862 Page San Francisco 
Columbians Five 126 Midland Flndlay O 
Comrades Four 834 Trinity X Y 
Conover & Grant 22 Lenox N Y 
Cooper John W 119 Wyckoff Brooklyn 
Cooper Geo W 47 Douglas PI Chicago 
Conroy I* Malre & Co Majestic Chicago 
Cook Frank Austin & Stones Boston 
Cooke & Myers Lyric Junction City Kas 
Cooper Jeannette halla San Francisco 
Coote Bert Green Room Club X Y 
Corcoran Ac Dixon 23 Truxton Brooklyn 
Corellls Three Barnum At Bailey C R 
Cossar Mr A- Mrs John Majestic Dallas 
Cotton Lola Box 125 Cuba X Y 
Coulter A: Wilson Shubert Utlca; 21 Majestic 

Houston 
Courtney A: Dunn 232 E 18 X Y 
Cowles Family Valley City Xo Dak 
Cowper Jlmmle SO Carroll Binghamton 
Cox Ixinso Ac Co Arcade Brownsville Pa 
Crane Flnlay Co 101 Elm West Haven 
Crawford A: Manning 115 Lawrence Brooklyn 
Crawford Pal 1020 Marlon Columbia S C 
Cree Jessica 501 Klrblv Detroit 
Cieo & Co 14m Borle Phlla 
Crlinmings & Geary 45 Charles Maiden 
Cross A- Co Will II Grand Pueblo 
Cross A- Maye Hip Charleston 
Culver A- I.ynne 4!i E Town Columbus 
Cummlnger A: Coloiiiui Empire Liverpool Eng 



NEW ACTS. 

(Continued from page 15.) 

James Young and Catherine Calvert and 

• Co. (3). 

"When Love Is Young" (Comedy). 

24 Mins.; Full Stage (Interior). 

Majestic, Chicago. 

The fact that Kida Johnson Young 
wrote "Brown of Harvard" does not neces- 
sarily give distinction to this vehicle, 
which was taken from the college play. 
While the best part has evidently been 
concerted with a view of concealing the 
fundaments of the play, there is sufficient 
evidence of the latter, and it is not very 
relishing. The theme has worked itself 
into vaudeville long before the play was 
written. "Cliarlev's Aunt" for one. A col- 
lege chap talks over his love affairs with 
a friend of his. a lisping fellow, whose 
ejaculations are at times indistinct. The 
first gets a 'phone call from his girl. He 



tells her his sister is with him. She 
hurries over. In the meantime he tells his 
friend to impersonate his sister, which he 
does, but grotesquely. The deception is 
carried on until a policeman brings him 
in and places him under arrest for mas- 
querading in public. A dance called 
"Charm d'Amour" is interpreted by Mr. 
Young and Miss Calvert. It is a sort of 
"Apache" and "Soul Kiss" affair. Miss 
Calvert is graceful and accomplished and 
pretty. The sketch is of the inconsistent, 
impossible kind as far as plot and action 
go. Above all there is nothing new in it. 
The audience accepted it for the acting 
and because Miss Cajvert was interesting. 

1 Frank Wieaberg. 



The De Muths. 

"Scenes in a Rathskeller" (Dancing Panto- 
mime). 
12 Mins.; Full Stage (Special Set). 
Steeplechase Pier, Atlantic City. 

The De Muths presented a clever act 
of dancing and acrobatic pantomime which 
they call "Scenes in a Rathskeller." 
Tumbling out of the ordinary was shown. 
The main part of the offering consists in 
acrobatic dancing. This is near the close 
and as they whirl around together the 
various "props" are knocked down. The 
act should shape up well. 

J. B. Pulaski- 

Julius McVicker and Co. (4). * 

"Strictly Business" (Comedy). 
30 Mins.; Full Stage (Interior). 
Shea's Buffalo, N. Y. 

A lively farce is "Strictly Business," 
with swift complications and plenty of 
good comedy. The plot concerns a hus- 
band who would a-riding go with a 
'"widow, a swell blonde." Wifie finds out 
about the flirtation through a mischievous 
brother. Hubbie explains that at the time 
he was accused of being in the widow's 
company he was in reality working on a 
business deal with a friend, now con- 
veniently in Europe where he cannot be- 
questioned. The friend turns up at t he- 
wrong time, and not being prompted,, 
makes a mess of hubby's alibi. In the- 
end the friend amends for his blunder by 
himself marrying the widow. 

Dickson. 




USE THIS FORM IF YOU HAVE NO ROUTE CARDS 



Name 












P^rmanpnt > 


Address 








Temporary 














Week 


Theatre 


City 


State 








■ 
















1 











CARDS WILL BE MAILED UPON Rl-Ol 1ST 



18 



VARIETY 








" The Six American Tumblers " 

Positively six of the Greatest Tumblers ever brought together in one act. 






Booked Solid Until Sept. 20, 1909 



JAMES PLUNKETT, Agent 



Cobb's Corner 



NO. 171. 



SATURDAY, JUNE It, If*. 



'Takt Pleety of Show" 

B? WILL D, OOBB. 
A nmbancd farmor'a aonbornod hb, 

■aid, "Fatbar, I resign; 
This farm thing *roo» for Swoonoj/ 

And It's N«w York town for mlno." 
"Now York, Now York," tho old man oald. 

Bla voice grow aoft and kind. 
"I waa there, goo. In eighty-three, 

Wbon joo get tboro, joo'll And." 

CHORUS. 
It'a a grand old town that Now York town, 

It'o tho farm whoro tho fortnnoa grow; 
All too aood to do la to pick yourself a fow. 
And that follor Boekofollor won't havo any- 
thing on yoa. 
Whon yoar foot elam down on that Amatordam 
town. 
Yon can fill yoar trunk with all tho plnnka 
yoa chooso; 
Bat lt'a a long roam, back home— 
Tako ploaty of shoes, 

THIS IS THERE 

"SHAPIRO'S GOT IT." 

WILL D. COBB, Soiitiiltli 

1410) BROADWAY 



Cunulngham A Marlon 155 B 96 N Y 
Cunningham Bob 1553 Bway N Y 
Curran & Mlltou Keith's Altoona; 21 Globe Clear- 
field Pa 
Curtis Samuel J 2803 At F Brooklyn 
Cuttings The Lampasso Tex 
Cuttys Musical 3034 E Baltimore Baltimore 



Dade Genevieve Woodland Pk Ashland Pa 

Dagwell Natalie A Aurle 103 W 84 N Y 

Dainty Four 242 W 43 N Y 

D'Alvlnl Rocky Point It I 

Daly A O'Brien G O II Wilmington Del 

Dandv George Duo 221 W 42 N Y 

Dare Harry 325 K 14 N Y 

Darrow Stuart 49 Front Oswego N Y 

Darn lev Grace Lagos Htl Fairfield Rd Victoria 

B C 
Davenport Ethel 65 Irving PI Brooklyn 
Davenport Troupe Karmini & Bailey C R 
Davey A Moore 132 E 17 N Y 
Davis Sam 217 R Lalock Pittsburg 
DavlH Mark A Laura Iiljou MoohoJhw Can 
Davis Edwards Green Room Club N Y 
Davis Floyd Temple Boulder Col 
Dawson A Whitfield 340 E 58 N Y 
Day Carlta Star Seattle 
Dpag-on Ed A Klttv Alnlome Augusta Ga 
Leas & Dens 253 W 30 N Y 
De Cotret A Rego 13.13 Broadway N Y 
De Fur A Estes 2319 Bellefontalne IndlanapollH 
De Mollis & Valora Forest Pk St Louis 21 Foun- 
tain Ferry Pk Louisville 
De Lorls Dick BIJou Bralnerd Minn 
De Trie-key Coy Hunt's Htl Chicago 
Deaton Chas W 418 Strand London 
Deaves Harry Automaton Bergen Beach 
Deaves Bowman 14 Webster Med ford Mass 
Delmar & Delmar Circo Bell Mexico City 
Del more Misses 418 W Adams Chicago 
Del more A Oneida Family Col Springs Col 
Del more A Lee 1553 Broadway N Y 
Deltou Al II 538 19 Wllwaukee 
Dcltons Three 2(»1 W 38 N Y 
DemacoB Tho 112 North 9 Phlla 
Demonio A. Pelle 1530 Broadway N Y 
Demiiseys Tlie Htl lirnymount Denver 
Desmond Sinters 005 Milton San DIl>k<> 
Desmond & Co 24 E 21 N Y 
Derenda A Green 14 Leicester Loaioa 



THERE IS ONLY ONE REAL BALLAD 



THIS YEAR. 



II 



WHEN I DREAM IN THE 
GLOAMING OF YOU 

Get It— 6HAPIR0 8 Got It 



» 1 






Derr Sehadt 928 8 9 Allentown 

Deverne A Shurti 957 29 Brooklyn 

I)e Veau Herbert 364 Prospect PI Brooklyn 

De Tellem A Co 419 Rest Buffalo 

De Young Tom 156 E 113 N Y 

De Young Mabel Orpheum Birmingham 

Diamond A Bell 2403 Albemarle Rd Brooklyn 

Diavolino Idle Hour New Bedford 

Dickinson Rube 2910 Vine Lincoln 

Dllla A Templeton Casino Rye Beach N Y 

Dixie Harris A Francis 242 Jefferson Decatur 

Dlxons Four 756 Eighth Av N Y 



4 DIXONS 4 

Henry, Tom; Anna, Nona. 



Dobson Frank Idlewood Pk Richmond Va 
Doherty A Marlowe 296 Broad Brooklyn 
Dolores Mile A Co White City I'k New Orleans 
Dobeley Jed Farm Pk Toledo 21 Celeron Pk 

Jamestown 
Donald A Canon 20 Orpheum Los Angeles 
Donigan John 2538 Cedar Phlla 
Donnelly A Rotall Family Fargo 
Donovan A Mack In 306 W 43 N Y 
Donovan A Arnold Ocean Grove Springfield 
Dora Queen 249 W 30 N Y 

Dore A Wolford Fairvlew Pk Dayton O 21 Cas- 
cade Pk New Castle 
Doves Juggling 1534 Broadway N Y 
Doyle Patsy 1553 Broadway N Y 
Dctson Howard 1553 Broadway N Y 
Douglas A Van 76 Pacific Brooklyn 
Dow A Dow 1921 South 4 Phlla 
I»owney A Willard 41 Lin wood Detroit 
Dragoons Black 129 W 27 N Y 
Dreano Josh 240 W 39 N Y 
Drew Lowell B 4229 Pechln Roxborough Phlla 
Drew Dorothy 377 8 Av N Y 
Du Bols Great 80 N Washington Bridgeport 
Dudley Gertri.dc A Co 243 Madison Brooklyn 
Duffy Thomas H 4026 Nargaretta St Louis 
Duffy Dan D Lincoln Apts Atlantic City 
Dumltresen-Vermette Troupe 46 W 22 N Y 
Dunbar A Fisher 235 Warren Chicago 
Dunbars Four Casting Ramona Pk Grand Rapids 
Duncan Harry Hunt's Htl Chicago 
Dunn Harvey De Rue Bros Minstrels 
Dunn J I,ee 201 E 14 N Y 
Dupllle Ernest A 3017 Boudlnot Phlla 
DuprcE Fred 159 Albany Brooklyn 
Dwyer Trio I-ottie Hathaway'* Brockton 



Enrle Chas Proctors Newark N J Indef 
Kckhoff & Gordon East Haddam Conn 
Kdiiifter Slsurs R F D No 1 Trenton 
Kdwiirds Fred R Bucklen HI Elkhart Ind 
Edwards Geo 3505 Fleming Allegheny 
E<l\vnrds He Clarendon 416 Elm Cincinnati 
Kdylh Rose 3-15 W 23 N Y 
Klircudall Bros A Dutton Majestic Evansvllle 

20 Airdome Alton 111 
El Barto 25.11 N Hollywood Phlla 
El Cola 1144 Broadway N Y 
Ehloii Hi Clifton Bway I»fcaiiHport Ind 
Elite Musical Four WIkwuiii San Francisco 
Elmore & Ray 2442 State Chicago 
Elliotts The O H S S Pittsburg 
ElllH-Nowlan Circus Orpheum San Francisco 
Ellsworth Mr A Mrs 1530 Broadway N Y 
Ellsworth & Linden 1553 Broadway N Y 
Emerald Cor.nle 41 Holland Rd Brixton London 
Emerson & Baldwin 50 Rupert Coventry Eng 
Emery Edwin T &• Co Ix>s Angeles Cal 
Emmet Marry 1115 Paterson Baltimore 
Emmet t High J 0702 Phlnney Av Seattle 
Eminett & Lower Grand Vancouver 
Engel Lew 223n Chauncey Brooklyn 
EtiKlebreth <Jeo W 300 W 5 Cincinnati 
English Belles Wilson Mason City la 
English J A 249 W 30 N Y 
Etiignutrellc 252 Flint Rochester 
Erxleben Bert A Shootover Inn Hamilton City Cal 
Estelle A Cordova Damon C R 
Eugene Trio 258 W 26 N Y 
Evans A Lloyd Orpheum Portland 
Everett Sophie & Co South and Henry Jamaica 
Everett (Jreat Washington Pk Bayonne 
Evcrs (5eo BIJou Huron la 
Exceln & Franks Star Torentum Pa 21 O II 

Wayueshurg Pa 



F.-iden MacBryde Trio 17 8 Troy 
Falk Billy A 40 Allen Rochester 
Falnrde-Mi Doll Irene Htl Rex ford BoMon 
Falkc Hose Carlln 106 W 144 N Y 
Falke Chas 1<H1 W 144 N Y 



Fantas Two White City Bingham ton 21 Central 

I'k Allentown 
Farley A Clare Pant ages Seattle 
Farrell Billy Moss A Stoll London 
Faurant Marie 79 E 116 N Y 
Faust Bros 242 W 43 N Y 
Fay At na Eva Melrose Highlands Mass 
Fay Frank A Gertrude Elk's Club Chicago 
Faye Miller A Weston 20 Forest Pk St Louis 
Fee May A Forbes 153 Chestnut Phlla 
Felmar Rosj 5 San ford PI Jereey City 
Ferguson Frank 489 E 43 Chicago 
Fcrnandei May Duo 207 B e7 N Y 
Ferrard Grace 217 Warsaw Chicago 
Ferry Orpheum Harrisburg 
Ferry the Frog Orpheum Harrisburg 
Fields W C Coliseum London 
Fields Will II Bijou Virginia Minn 
Fields A Hanson Box 181 Belleville N J 
Flnlay A Burke Box 193 Onset Mass 
Finney Chas 258 W 26 N Y 
Flnnle Jack 1911 S Chadwlck Phlla 
Fiske A McDonough 272 W 107 N Y 
Fltsslmmons A Cameron Sherman HI Chicago 
Flemen William Majestic Dallas 
Fleming Mamie Htl Fortescue Atlantic City 
Fletcher Chas Leonard 121 W 42 N Y 
Flynn Earl Pk Chattanooga 21 Pk Cincinnati 
Fogarty Frank Majestic Chicago 
Follett Lounie 105 E 107 N Y 
Ford Frank A La Petite 418 S Franklin Great 

Falls Mont 
Fords Famous 391 Oatea At Brooklyn 
Ferrester A Lloyd Eureka Lethbrldge Can 
Forrest s Musical 508-59 Dearborn Chicago 
Fournott A Davis 307 3 Av Minneapolis 
Fox A Diamond 11 Orandvllle Av C.rand Rapids 
Fox A Evans Harlem Pk Rock ford 111 21 Family 

Lafayette Ind 
Francis Emily A Co Olympic Glaucester Mass 
Franklin A Green Hi Russell, London Eng 
Frederick Helena Orpheum Spokane 
Fredericks Musical 107 B 31 N Y 
Freeman Harry J Washington 
Frey Trio 1534 Broadway N Y 
Frey Fred 301 Grove Scranton 
Friend A Downing 418 Strand W C London 
Freeman Bros 37 Anderson Boston 
Frobel A Ruge 104 E 14 N Y 
Fiillerton Lew J 98 Summer PI Buffalo 
Fulton May 694 Lenox N Y 
Furnam Badlr Tottenham Court Rd London 



Calc Ernie 109 Eastern Toronto 

(;nlletl's. Monkeys 804 Maplewood Chicago 

Gardner A Lawson 1214 2 Av N Nashville 



The Chas. K. Harris Courier 



George Evans and Ren Shields as a song-writ- 
ing team have never been equall ed t heir "GOOD 
OLD SUMMERTIME and "OOBB, TABB A 
TBIP IN BY AIRSHIP," hare both boon famous 
successes — they have been brought together onoo 
more after a separation of two years by Mr. 
Harris and have written two novelty waits song 
successes, whioh will be ready for the profession 
July 1st 

"Nobody Knows, Nobody Cares" 

has reached Ohioago and is growing as popular la 
the Windy City as it is at tho present time in 
New York. 

A novelty piece soon to bo issued whioh will . 
make the natives sit up and take notioa is a rag* 
time affusion, entitled "THE BURGLAR BUCK,'' 
being Buooossfally introduoed by Mrs. Wm. A. 
Annis at Hammersteln's Victoria this week 
(June 7). 

CHAS. K. HARBIS, . 

81 WEST tlst ST., NEW YOBtL 
MEYER COHEN, Manager, 

Chicago, Grand Opera House .Dldg. 



Gardner Georgia A Co 1931 Ken more Av Chicago 

Gardner West A Sunshine 24 Elm Everett 

Garrlty Torn 2f>2 Academy Newark 

Gath Carl & Emma 1553 Broadway N Y 

Gavin Piatt & Peaches 4417 3 Av N Y 

(i ay lor & <Jraff Highland Pk Wlnstead Hanover 

Pk Mcrldan Conn 
Gebhart W A B Virginia Chicago 
Georgia Campers Bartholdi Inn N Y 
dossier Chas 824 Green Indianapolis 
(rlhney Blcknell Majestic Pensacola 
Ullllngwatcr & Co Claude Orpheum Oakland 
Gllroy Mayes A Montgomery Crystal Milwaukee 

21 Bijou Oshkosh 
Glrard & Gardner Amltyville L I 
Gladstone Ida 44") 7 Oakenwald Chicago 
Gleesons & Houlihan 150 N Willow Trenton 
Glendower & Manlon Washington Spokane 
Gljse Augusta 420 135 Adams Chicago 
(iodfrey & Henderson Myers Lake Pk Canton O 

20 Lakeside Pk Akron O 
Goforth A Doyle Academy Lynchburg 
Cnlilflnger Louis 802 E 10S N Y 
Goldie Rube 113 Prince Newark 



United Booking Office Parks 



ELECTRIC PARK, Albany, N. Y. 
SACANDAGA PARK, Gloversville. 
VALLEY PARK, Syracuse. 
CELEROA PARK, Jamestown. 
ELKS PARK, Tonawanda. 
MILE CREEK PARK, Erie, Pa. 

INDIANOLA 



For til 



for tH< 



sbovo, addro 
Ua*lte>ef Bo 



WALDEMEER PARK, Erie, Pa. 
IDORA PARK, Youngstown, 0. 
CASCADE PARK, New Castle. 
FARM RARE, Toledo. 
FAIRVIEW PARK, Dayton. 
SPRING GROVE PARK, Springfield. 
PARK, Columbus, 0. 

■ • JULC DELMAR, 

»MttsB Offlce>s, Lon^ Acre Bldg., N. Y. 



" HURRAY FOR OUR BASE BALL TEAM " 



Greatest novelty "Ball Game" 8org ever published. Will stir up every live FAN. A torriflo 
hit wherever aur.g. HAS 8 Verses and the last verse "Rings" in leading player from every team. 
A chance to work in came of player or oity wherever singing same. 

A TYPICAL SOUTHERN LOVE SONG. 
NOT AN ORDINARY MOON SONG. 



"DIXIE MOON" 



K? "Can't You Wait Awhile For Me, Dear?" 

SEND FOR ORCHESTRATIONS AND PROFESSIONAL COPIES FREE. NOW READY. 

CHARLES I. DAVIS, Ellastone Bldg., CLEVELAND, OHIO 



}\ hm nnstrrring advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



VARIETY 



19 



LEONARDS 



IVII 



After a pleasant and 
profitable year with 

COHAN and HARRIS 

Jerome - Schwartz 

Have Signed with 



THE 



Jerome H. Remick 

COMPANY 

Everybody seems satisfied. 



Ooldln Horace Palace London 

Gordon Belle P O Box 40 N Y 

Gordon & Henry 1T7T Atlantic Av Brooklyn 

Gould A Rice 326 Smith Providence 

Goolmans Musical 8 Matthew* Blnghnmron 

GoH8ai>8 Bobby 400 S Columbus 

Gottleb Amy 440 N St Lewis Chicago 

Graces The 418 Grand Brooklyn 

Graff A Graff Atlantic Garden Atlantic Cltv 

Graham It A, Dime Walla Walla Wash 

Grant WellH 8 408 JamcK Utlrn 

Grant Bert & Bertha 2050 Dcarttoru Chicago 

Grant Sydney 2tl9 W 201 N Y 

Gray & Van Lieu 140(1 Woodlawn Indianapolis 

Green & Weathers O H Leominster Mass 

Grimes Mr A Mrs Thomas 3<»29 Williams Camden 

Grossman Al M2 North Rochester 

Gnertln Louis E Boulevard Pk Med ford Mass 

Gullfoyle Joseph V 22 W 12S N V 

Guild Martin J 100 Boerum PI Brooklyn 

H 

Haggarty A Le Clnlr 120 17* Detroit 
Haggerty Larry 317 Atlantic McKecspnri 
Hallldnr A Curler 1553 Broadway X V 
Hale Lillian & Co 2010 N Marvine Phila 
Hale & Co Jess Alrdome Paris III 
Hamilton Estelle 2041 No 31 Phlla 
Hamilton A Buckley 20 Somerset Boston 

HAMILTON and BUCKLEY 

The beat dressed act in vaudeville. Doing nicely. 
SO Somerset St., Boston, Mass. 

Hamlin A Noyes 1014 1 National Bk Bhlg Chicago 
Hamlin A Lyle Orpheum Oil City 21 Colonial Erie 
Hamlin Hiiro William Tell Htl Boston 
Hammond A Forrester Box 83 Scarsdale N Y 
Handler Louis 1512 Broadway N Y 
Hanlon Jr George 141 Charing Cross Rd London 



Hannon Dlggs A Barns 89 N Clark Chicago 

Hansome Prlncesa Coshocton O 

Hanson Mildred 1643 Dean Brooklyn 

Hanson Harry L Grand Nashville 21 Orpheum 

Eransvllle 
Hanvey A Baylies 247 Palisade Av W Hoboken 
Hara Ayesha Circle Htl N Y 
Hardman Joe A Hot Springs Ark 
Harland A Bollson Crystal Denver 
Harris Harry I 22S2 Wabash Chicago 
Harris Cbas 37 Lio Fall Blver 



HEIM CHILDREN 

119 WASH. AVE., AXTOOVA, PA. 



Harris Sam Vogel's Minstrels 
Harris Hattle New Home Htl Pittsburg 
Harrington Giles W 024 Acklln Toledo 
Harrington Alfred A 320 B 14 N Y 
Hart Bros Hagenbeck-Wallace C R 
Harvey Elsie A Boys 140 E 14 N Y 
Haskell Loney Orpheum Seattle 
Hatches The 304 W 38 N Y 



E. F. HAWLEY 

Bandit* • Beat! Chaxlestown, Miah. 

Hay den Family 11 State Oshkosb 

Haynes Jessie J 21 B Robinson Allegheny 

Hayes A Wynne 434 W 104 N Y 

Hayes Brent 21 Bedford London Eng 

Hays Unlcycle 430 W Cincinnati 

Hays Whelock Troupe Coney Island Cincinnati 

Ilayman A Franklin Gibbons Tour London 

Haszard Lynnc A Bonnie 231 E 31 Chicago 

Heaston Billy Charlerol Pa 

Helm Children 11!) Wash Av Altoona 

Helston Whally A Lottie 1!)0« Columbia Phlla 

Hemingway A Morresclle 33 E 3 Covington 

Hcnnlngs Lewis A I Jennings Bay Lake Erie O 

llenshiiw Edward >-0 E 110 N Y 

Henry A Young Shcllpot Pk Wilmington 

Henry A Jones 1S13 Watts Philu 

Henry Jack 41 Lisle Leicester So, Ismdou 

Herbert Bert Hart's Bathing Girls Co 

Herbert Bros 235 E 24 N Y 

Herbert A Vance 1345 John Cincinnati 

Herrman The Great 108 Rue Foil Merlcourt Parts 

Herrmann Adelaide Gllsey Htl X V 

Hcuman Troupe Coles Bros C It 

lili'kmnn Wills A Co National Rochester 

Hickman Lee 305 E 42 N Y 

Hill Cherry A Hill 210 Bav 23 IC.it ti Beach 

Hill A Whltaker 21 Empire Bradford Eng 

Hill A Edmunds 202 Neilson New Brunswick 

Hill A Sylvlanny 1553 Broailway N Y 

lllllman A Roberts 330 So 13 Saginaw 

Hirschburg Marcus It 30 Opera Blk Xauesville O 

llolisons The Ringllng Bros C It 

IJolden A Harron 053 71 Hay Rldce Brooklyn 

Holmes A Holllston 21 S Elm W S..nier\ llle 

Hodges A Lnunchmnn 133 W 20 St L.uls 

II.Mlglni Daisy Ringllng Bros C It 

lloerleln Lillian 41* Strand W C I .ondon 

HolTnians Cycling 3 N Clark Chicago 

Holmen Bros Capita] Pk Trenton N .1 

Holt Alf 41 Lisle London W C Eng 

lloran Eddie 1553 Broadway N Y 

Ilorton A La Trlska 21 Proctor's Newark 

llotallng Edward C 557 S Division Grund Rapids 

Howard Sam 87 Springfield Newark 

Howard Harry A Mae Marlce Baths not Springs 

Howard A Co L 421 E 137 N Y 

Howard A C«> Bernlce 3007 Calumet Chicago 

Howard A Howard Alhambra N Y 

Howard Ed 1020 E Berks Phlla 



Howard A St Clair Vaudeville Club London 
Howard A Harris 10 St Martins London 
Howe Laura 298 Harvard Brookllne 
Howell A Scott Moss A Stoll Tour Eng 
Hoyt A McDonald National Htl Chicago 
Hubbert Laura 4311 Calumet Av Chicago 
Huegel A Qulnn 118 E 24 Erie 
Huebn Musical 4 Mile Crees 1'k Erie 
Hughes Johnnie A Masle Orpheum Frisco 
Hughes Musical Trio Orpheum Butte 
Hughes Mr A Mrs Gene 001 W 135 N Y 
Hulbert Laura Star Monessen Pa 
Hurley Musical Mechanics Manchester N H 
Hurst Mlnola Cardinal Basel Suisse Ger 
Hyde Bob A Bertha Camp Rest Clifton Me 
Hylsnds Three 22 Cherry Danbury 



Ingram A Hyatt 1314 Bdmondson Baltimore 
Ingrams Two Dreamland Sault Ste Marie Mich 
Ioleen Sisters Majestic Battle Creek 21 Majestic 

Jackson Mich 
Irving Thomas R Palm Syracuse 
Irving Musical P0 Boston Newark 
Irving Cliff W 303 W 140 N Y 
Ivy A Ivy 2237 B Second Brooklyn 



Jackson Family Ringllng Bros C R 

Jackson Alfred 225 Fifth Av N Y 

Jacobs A Sardel Cole Bros C R 

Jacobs, Theresa 5010 Prairie Chicago 

Jacobs A West 200 E 2 Jamestown 

James A James Gayfortb Columbus 

James A Pfior 912 Second Av Seattle 

James Byron BIJou Flint Mich 

Jenks A Clifford Ringllng Bros C R 

Jennings A Jewell 3302 Arlington St Loots 

Jennings Arthur Majestic Galveston 

Jerge Aleene A Hamilton 302 Mass Av Buffalo 

Jerome A Hunter Steeplechase Pier Atlantic city 

Johnson R Melvln Johnson Htl Li fa yet te Ind 

Johnstons Musical 377 Eighth Av N Y 

Johnson A Pelbam Moulin Rouge Rio de Janeiro 

Johnson Bros A Johnson 035 Rayden Camden 

Johnson A Wells Orpheum Oakland 

Johnstone I orlmer Ontario Htl Chicago 

Jollv Four Elite Rome Ga 

Jones Florrle 221 W 42 N Y 

Jones A Sutton 224 W 17 N Y 

Jones John 450 Sixth Av N Y 

Jordan Brauneck A Chnllta 4 Mile ("nek Erie 

Jorden Great Dreamland Coatsvllle Pa 

Jordens Five 4*03 Ashland Chicago 

Josselyn Win II A E B Cnlonvlllc Conn 

Julian A Dvcr 00 High Detroit 



I alma A La Farlon 1337 E 111 N E Cleveland 
Kalmo Chas A Ada Ringllng Bros C It 
Karrell 112 Clark Chicago 
Kaufman Bros 1553 Broadway N Y 
K'liifman A Sawtelle 4*15 Calumet Chicago 
Kaufman A Kenllworth Princess Kingston Ont Can 
K itifman Reba A Inez I'olles Paris France 
K.-niie J Warren Bijou Diilnlh 
b'.-Mstl's Circus 153 *W ft So Boston 
I • ales John V 70 W 100 N Y 
beating Chas 05 Hudson Hartford 
>• eelev Lillian 134 Wadsworth E Boston 
Keelev A Parks 517 E 3 Mt Vernon N Y 
eifer A Chapman 2-135 S 17 Phlla 
elth A De Mont 722 W 14 PI Chicago 



HYDE & BEHMAN'S 

Amusement Enterprises 



Folly Theatre, 


Brooklyn 


Olympic " 


M 


Star " 


•« 


Qayety " 


M 


Newark " 


Newark 


Qayety " 


Pittsburg 



Star & Carter Theatre, Chicago 




EX 





I 



TEMPLE BAB BUILDING, 
BROOKLYN. N. Y. 



Keogh A Francis Summer Mansfield O 
Klefer A Kline 2001 Mulberry Toledo 
Kimball A Donovan 133 Northampton Boston 
King Violet 383 Central Pk W N Y 
Klralfo (;us 7lo 3 Evansville 
Klovllle Jack 1553 Broadway N Y 
Knight Harlan lo Delaware Albany 
Rollers Three 00 13 Wheeling 
Kohl Gum A Marlon 011 4 Milwaukee 
Kolb A Miller 02N Dayton Ky 
Krafft A Myrtle Bijou Atlanta 21 O H Birming- 
ham 
Kramer Bruno 104 E 14 N Y 
K rat on John 141) Schenectady Brooklyn 
K ratous The Empire Liverpool Eng 
Krelschman 1110'/, Broadway Camden 
Ktirtls-BuHse A Dogs Pontages Seattle 
Kyle A Co Ingram O II Waynesburg Pa 



Lacey Will 020 Que N W Wash I) C 
Lakola A Lorain Palace Htl Chicago 
LainhiottcH BIJou Islipemlng 21 Grand Marquette 

Mich 
Lamb's Manikins 124S Sheridan Rd Chicago 
Lampc Bros 1553 Broadway N Y 
I.ampe Otto W Washburn's C R 



THERE IS ONLY ONE BEAL BALLAD 



THIS YEAR. 



It 



eleev Sisters A Billy Cummlngs Grand 
elly Harry New York Hoof N Y 
elly Walter C Palace London 
eltners Three 317 Carlisle Dallas 
ennedv A I'll tier Lyric Jamestown 
ennedy A Kennedy 211 E 14 N Y 
entou Dorothy Hansa Hamburg Ger 



Hamilton 



WHEN I DREAM IN THE 
GLOAMING OF YOU 

Get It— SHAPIRO'** Got It 



» t 



VALADON 



44 



The 
Magician 



** 



At the Colonial, New York, this week (June.7) 

Agent, 



Just returned from a successful tour on the Orpheum Circuit 




"When answering advert 'moment it kindly mention Variety 



20 



VARIETY 



In Vaudeville under direction of PAT CASEY 




By Kind permission Messrs. ELAW (EL CRLANGER and FLO ZIEGFELD, Jr. 

WeeK June 14. Brighton Beach Music Hall 



^WWWWMAAAAMlAMMA 



#«MMMMMM*i 



INIPTY NOTB8 

OF 




"LET'S GET THE 
UMPIRE'S COAT" 

The audiences ory for It Ilk* babies do for 
Mrs. Window's Soothing Syrup. 

IT CERTAINLY IS THERE 

The bMt "Ball Son*" we erer wrote. If 
yon want a Boil Bony rot a 1909 modoL 
Don't vo oadllaoinv aronnd in ono of those 
old timo mnabonta, GRAB A REQULAR, 
Tbia U it. Wo require no answer. 

Tot, and "HARVEST MOOR" also. 

Published by REMICK 

"We're flad we're married." 



Lsncaster & Miller Lyric Grand Island Neb 

Lane Eddie 306 E 73 N Y 

lj»ne & Adell 332 Genesee Rochester 

Langdons The 115 K 14 N Y 

La Bettluu Hip Charleston W Va; 21 Fairyland 

Illnton W Va 
La lilanche Great 723 3 Baltimore 
La Centra & La Hue 2401 2 Av N Y 
La Clair & West Box 155 Sea Isle City N J 
La Estrellita 1553 Broadway N Y 
La Fayette Lamont Co 21)00 Cormany Cincinnati 
La Ford Chan Majestic Muncle lnd 
La Marr Harry Wm Tell Htl Boston 
La Moines Musical 332 5 Bar a boo Wis 
I,a Tearl Harry Barnum & Bailey C U 
l>a Ports Aerial Coney Inland Cincinnati 
La Rose Bros 107 E 31 N Y 
La Tina Mile 4001 Brooklyn Kansas City 
Lu Took a Phil Pant ages San Francisco 
La Tour Irene 78 Burnet Newark 
La Toy Bros Van Buren Htl Chicago 
1m Velio & Grant Beddeford Me 
Lavail Sinters 143 Golden Gate San Francisco 
tansford Jeanne 461 Klngsland W Nutley 
I^anet A Ardell 332 Genesee Rochester 
Lauraut Marie Hlnwutha Pk Mt Vernon O 21 

Collins Columbus O 
Lawrence & Healey Sherman Htl Chicago 

m. STRASS/VtAN 

Attorney, 961 Broadway, Vow York, 



Lawrence & Dale 2 Now Caatk* Court Boston 

La Fleur Joe 57 Hanoroc Providence 

I-aFord Chas St Charles Htl Muncle 

Le Hlrt Mons 709 Clifford Rochester 

La Lole Helene San Francisco 

La Mar & Gabriel Htl Normandle N Y 

La Zar & Lu Zar 108 Dearborn Av Chicago 

Iji Raub & Scottle 333 Locust Johnstown 

Le Hoy Chan Alrdome Sallna 

Le Hoy The Great Lyceum Meadvllle 

La Vine & Clinerou Trio Eastchester A Rhine- 
lander Av N Y 

Le Clair Harry Wigwam San Francisco 

L«' Cluirs Two Poll's New Haven 21 Poll's Water 
bury 

Le Dent Frank Orpheum Salt I^tke City 

Le Fevre & St John 1553 Broadway N Y 

I^e Sallle 025 8 Av N Y 

Le Witt & Ash more Co 200 N State Chicago 

I^ahy Bros De Rue Bros Minstrels 

Leathers Gladys Novelty Fresno 

Leigh Lisle 140 Arnold River Side R I 

I<elgh Grace New York Roof N Y 

1.4'lghtons Three Orpheum Portland 

Lee James P I'nlque Los Angeles 

Lewis & La Mar 1553 Broadway N Y 

Lena Lily Orpheum Butte 

Leonard & Phillips 701 W Erie Chicago 

U'onard Grace St Paul Htl N Y 

I^eonard & Drake 1999 Park PI Brooklyn 

L<M>nar<l Gus Majestic Houston 21 Majestic Gal- 
veston • 

Leonard Edward 1122 Green Phlla 

Leonard & I»uie 810 N Park Chicago 

Leo Arthur 10K8 Richland Baltimore 

Ix*o Jolly 730 Carmen Camden 

Leslie George W 130 W 44 N Y 

Leslie Bert Shea's Buffalo 

lister Nina Olympic So Boston; 21 Scenic Everett 

I^evltt & Falls 710 Orange Syracuse 

Ix-wb* IMill 121 W 110 N Y 

Lewis & Young 265 E 78 N Y 

I^wls Walter & Co 077 Washington Brookllue 

I^wls Harr & Co 131 W 10 N Y 

Lewis & Lake 2411 Norton Kansas City 

Lewis & Ma n son 74 Orchard N Y 

I^wls Jfe Chapln Majestic Ft Worth; 20 Majestic 
Dallas 

Lindsay Stilling & Wllber Ponters Cafe Frisco 

Link Harrv F 179 Althea Providence 

Linton Tom & Jungle Girls 410 E 20 Denver 

Llsla & Adams Gem Meridian 

Livingston Murray 830 E 163 N Y 

Livingston David & Co Cambridge II 1 1 Chicago 

Livingston Comedy Trio Rlngllng Bros C R 

Lockwood & Bryson 2 Lankershelin Bldg Ix>s 
Angeles 

Lockwoods Musical 1530 Broadway N Y 

Ix)gan Bruce 89 N State Chicago 

Idolise A Sterling 39'.. I^owell Rochester 

Lois 1530 Broadway N Y 

Lloyd Herbert 3G Great Wilson I>eeds Eng 

Loraino Oscar 124 Tuxnell Pk ltd London 

Lublns Dancing 921 N Warnock Phlla 

Lueler Marguerite Hans & Nlxe Co 

Luclers Four Box 55 Onset Mass 

Lundy & Wfide 222 W 141 N Y 

Lynne & Hazard Grand Wallace Idaho 

Lynotte Sisters 352 State Chicago 

Luttrlnger Lucas Co 530 Valencia Frisco 



T 
H 
E 



NEW BRIGHTON 



Mafta\#>m«Rt 

David Rtbinson 



THE HANDSOMEST IBAtlDC THEATRE IN THE 'WORLD 

DEVOTED TO HIGH-CLAM VAUDEVILLE 

ARTISTS BOOKED TO PLAY AT THIS HOUSE, KINDLY SEND ALL MAIL TO THE UNITED 
BOOKING OFFICES AND PHOTOS TO THEATRE AT BRIGHTON BEACH. 

The Light Trunk Tops the Pile 

It's always the heavy old-fashioned canvas covered wood theatrical trunks that are used for 
"bunkers" and have all the others piled on them. The lighter a trunk is the better usage it gets and, 
even If the BAL FIBRE TRUNK was not stronger and more serviceable than the others, its light 
weight would make It last longer. 



WILLIAM BAL, Inc. 

D T0B 0ATAL00UZ ▼. BtTCLDHJ OF 

210 Wast 42nd Stmt. N«w T«rk 



"RAP"** 

Mil/Jam 



Mab guei'it ft Mr Weiss Lit Bldg Phlla 

Mark & Phelps Green Room Club N Y 

Mack Boys Those Crystal Alliance Neb 

MacDonald Clias & Sadie IS W 100 N Y 

MacDonough Ethel Pavilllon London 

Maguanis The 834 Union N Y 

Makerneko Troupe Grand Portland 

Maltese Frank ft Co 289 W 147 N Y 

Mulvern Troupe Milwaukee Ore 

Mallla & Bart 123 Kensington Rd Ixmdou 

Maltese Frank & Co 289 W 147 N V 

Mandcl Eva 208 State Chicago 

Mauley A Sterling 111 Schiller Bldg Chicago 

Manning Sisters 07 S Clark Chicago 

Mantell's Marionettes 3413 S Colby Everett Wash 

ton 21 Orpheum Portsmouth 
Manning Ac Dixon 41 W 117 N Y 
Manning & Ford American Chi< ago 
Marchl & Raab 239 Franklin Jo.instowu 
Man-hands The 109 E M9 N Y 
Murdo Trio Rlngllng Bros C R 

Marlowe Plunkett & Weston Hippodrome Lexing- 
ton; 21 Orpheum Portsmouth 
Marlon & Lillian 1530 Broadwav X Y 
Mario Trio West End Pk New Orleans 
Marsh Joe 244 E Ohio Chicago 
Marshall Bros 335 Plymouth Abingdon Mass 
Marshall & King Folies Mexico City 
Marshalls The 754 Fulton Brooklyn 
Marshall* The Bijou Saratoga N Y 
Martha Mile 258 W 20 N Y 
Martin & Crouch 907 S 12 Springfield 111 
Martin Dave At Percie R F 1) No 2 Derby la 
Martinez Ac Martinez Walker I/os Angeles 
Martyne Eddy White City Pk New Orleans 
Mathlesen Walter !K) W Ohio Chicago 
Mason & Dor an Bijou New London 
Maurer Francis Northern Bldg Chicago 
Maurice & Perrln Co 113 Chestnut St I^uls 
Marvelous Ed 027 Cass Jollet 
Mnrzcllo & Wolfe 125 Camden Newark 
Max & Sheftels 420 15 Columbus 
Maxwell Ac Dudley KKl W IMS N Y 
Muyoux Rita 50J* Salem Medford Mass 
Mayfalrs The 292M Frankfort Phlla 
Mayhew Stella 41S Strand London 
Maze Edna G87 Jackson N Y 
McConnell & Simpson Keith's Phlla 
McCann Gcraldlne & Co 7011 Park Johnstown 
McCaskey & Howell 800 Philip Missoula Mont 
McDowell John & Alice 027 Detroit 
McCune & Grant 030 Benton Pittsburg 
McCree Davenport Troupe Rlngllng Bros C R 
McGee Jos B Geo Van's Minstrels 
McGrath & Paige 58 Washington Mlddletown 
McKay & Cantwell 5th Av N Y 21 Keith's Phlla 
McNallys Four Apollo Berlin 
McPhee & Hill 311 3 Av N Y 
McVeigh Grace 745 Amsterdam N Y 
Mears 1553 Broadway N Y 
Meecker J Matt 1553 Broadway N Y 
Mells The Rlngllng Bros C R 

Melnotte Twins & Clay Smith 1133 Broadway N Y 
Melrose Bros 133 Park Bridgeport 
Melrose Elmer 1415 Pennsylvania Allegheny 
Mendel 18 Adam Strand London 
Menetekel Wash Pk Bayonne 
Merkel Louis 200 Summit West Hoboken 
Merrlhew & Raney Prhwess Alliance O 
Merritt Ravmond 178 Tremont Passadena 
Mertz & O'Neill 889 Walnut Chicago 
Methren Sisters Arcade Toledo 
Mlaco Steve Scarbora Pk Toronto Indef 
Mlaeos & Fundland 780 8 Av N Y 
Mlgnon Helene 120 E 14 St Paul 
Mlddleton Gladys 5.10 Drury Kansas City 
Milch Sisters 10 W 10 St Paul 
Miller & Princeton 88 Olnev Providence 
Miller Frank Daman C R 

Miller I»iils E & Co Orpheum Evansvllle lnd 
Mlllette Rlngllng Bros C R 
Mlllman Trio Brighton Beach N Y 21 Keith's 

Boston 
Miles & Dewey 48 Howard Boston 
Mlllmars.A Baby Exposition Seattle 
Mill* & Moulton 5h Race Buffalo 
Milton Chas W 1301 Gwlnette Augnsta 
Milton A Co I^»la Van Buren Htl Chicago 
Mitchell & Grant Box 188 Townsend Mass 
Mimic Four 359 W 42 N Y 
Moran W A 312 Huron Toronto 
Monetta Five G o II Bldg Chicago 
Montague Mona 2959 Train Denver 
Montgomery & Healey 2819 W 17 Coney Is N Y 
Montambo & Kartell I 35 Field Waterbury 
Monlrase Edith A 150 W 44 N Y 
Montray Edward 814 Western N S Pittsburg 
Mooney & Holbein 1553 Broadway N Y 
Moore A Young 3 & Water Gloucester N J • 



Will Marion Cook 

THE ORIGINATOR. 

Former acts — "Clorindy and Mem- 
phis Students." 

New acts — Original, Sensational, 
Melodious. 



"ROSE LAND 



9! 



Negro Sketch — 25 People. 



a 



tlsWdiiio Romance" 

Musical Drama of the South Sea 
Islands. 



NIW YORK CHICAGO 

13* West 37tk Street 67 Clark Street 



Moore Lou W Sells Floto C H 

Morgan Ac McGarry Iugersoll l'k Des Moines 21 

Forest l'k St I»uls 
Monlimd Chas 734' j Central Hot Springs 



FRANK M0RRELL 

"The California Baby" 

Weeks June 7 and 14, 5th Ave., New York. 



Morris Billy & Sherwood Sisters 50S Pontlac Dayton 

Morris Si Daly 54 Harmon Jersey City 

Morris Ac Morton l'roetor's Newark 

Molt lock Allee Majestic (Jalveston 

Morton & Elliott Moss & Stoll Tour 

Moto <;irl Empire Coliseum London Eng 

Mowatts Juggling Thalia Elherfeld tier 

Moy Hazel A 1117 7 Sioux City 

Moznrts The 1553 Broadway N Y 

Mueller & Mueller Saginaw Mich 

Mulligan May 120 E 13 Covington 

Mulvey Ben L 287 Richmond Providence 

Murray Eddie Fisher's Los Angeles 

Murray Elizat>eth M Orpheum Frisco 

Murray &. Alvln Great Alblnl Co 

Murphy & Wllllard Falrhaven N J 

Murphy & Drexel 419 S Broad Phlla 

My Fancy 12 Adam Strand London 

Mvers & Bosa Pearl River N Y 

Mylle &»0rth 1553 Broadway N Y 

N 

Nambus Four Gollmar C R 
Nealon & Titus 511 Brown Phlla 
Neff «c Starr Majestic Houston; 21 Majestic Gal- 
veston 
Newell & Nlblo Alrdome Ft Wayne Iml 
Newton Billy S 1553 Broadway N Y 
Nichols Four 519 Dcubor Canton O 
Noble Billy & Jeanne Brooks Saratoga Htl Chicago 
Nlblo Victor Winter Garten New Brighton Eng 
Nickel Earl 345 E 40 Chicago 
Nlrro &. Le Roy 1325 Page Allegheny 
Noblette & Marshall 1912 Hempvllle Ft Worth 
Nogard Sisters Alrdome Augusta Ga 
Nonette 154 Henry Brooklyn 
Normans Juggling 5804 Marshfleld Chicago 



I THERE IS ONLY ONE REAL BALLAD | 
THIS TEAR. 



II 



WHEN I DREAM IN THE 
GLOAMING OF YOU 

Qet It-eiiAPIIlO'e Got It 



* » 



When answering advertisement* kindly mention Variety. 



VARIETY 



21 



" SPECIAL 
ANNOUNCEMENT " 

(Apologiee to "The Mudtown Rubes") 



WILLIAM REDMOND 



AND 



IAIMI 



Now Singing 

KERRY MILLS' 

Songs 

(Apologies to Kerry) 

Address 



M *\SSSS\SSf ??\ S $ U J\j -JHnr P.S.-Watch 
B I s 1 . 1 1 1 — Jl Next Seas- 



Hf DASI?DRilHT INTO V4 l/O- OWL U, AND HE DASt?DR*$HT OUT A -^ASAf 

(Apologies to Max Silver) 

IVIII_I_S, 122 




Season 

(Apologies to Nobody) 



36th St., New 



rk 




EDWARD DOYLE 

Manager "The Orpheum Stock Co." says: 
"Long Live the Taylor Trunk." 
"WHYI" 

Write for our New Professional Cata- 
logue— FREE. 

C. A. TAYLOR TRUNK WORKS 
CHICAGOt 37 E. Randolph St. 
NEW YORK: 131 W. 38th St. 



Norton C Porter 0342 Kimbark Chicago 
Norrls Leon A Co «3 W 7 Mt Vernon 
Norrlses The 517 Walnut Hamilton 
Norton Mlna f)lme Walla Walla Wash 
Nohhvh The Six 166 W 46 N Y 
Nugent Win F 11 W 118 N Y 
Nugent J C Tin* Oaks Canal Dover O 



O'Dell A Hart 2063 Stroud Green Lake Wash 

Odell A Ullmore 37(1 W Monroe Chicago 

Odell A Klnley 340", Colllngwood Toledo 

Ogden Helen 270 Clybourn Chicago 

Okabe- Family 20 Charing Cfohs Rd London 

Olbons Four 20 Hamburg Paterson 

Omega Trio 1553 Broadway N Y 

Unlaw iius 418 Strand London 

Onken Al Chutes San Francisco 

O'Marr Garry 230 E IS N Y 

O'Neill Kmma Saratoga Htl Chicago 

O'Neill Trio Waldemere Pk Erie 21 Cascade Pk 

New Castle 
Ollvetta Troubadours Keith's Phlla 21 Keith's 

Boston 
Opp Joe 1530 Broadway N Y 
Orbassany Irma Altkenliead Rd Glasgow Scot 
Orletta A Taylor Bergen Kldgeneld Fk 
O'Rourke Engene A Co 1220 Tinton N Y 
Orpheus Comedy Four Empire Denver 
Ortmann Trio Clrco Bell Mexico City 
Otto Bros Hippodrome Leeds Eng 
Overlng Trio 140 W 144 N Y 
Owen A Co Garry Airdome Charlotte Tenn 
Owens Billy A May 1421 Adams N S Pittsburg 
Owerr A Hoffman Bijou La Crosse 
Oem j 8 The Kinsley Kenmore N Y 



Facheo Family Ringllng Bros C R 
Palmer A Le«ia 233 Treniont Boston 



THERE IS ONLY ONE REAL BALLAD 



Palmer Sisters 545 Hart Brooklyn 

Paiuahaslke Prof 1987 K Dauphin Phlla 

Parker Palmer A Co 1553 Broadway N Y 

Parker A Shaw Family Cleveland 

Patersnn's Bronse Studios 610 Larkln Frisco 

Pearce Sisters 725 Lane Seattle 

Pepper Twins Lindsay Ont Can 

Pearson A Garfield 220 W 38 N Y 

Peck Koy Vogel's Mlnstrela 

Pederson Bros 635 Greenbush Milwaukee » 

Pelot Fred A Annie 161 Westminster Atlantic City 

Perry Frank L 747 Buchanan Minneapolis 

Pertina 44 Cartwright Huston Rd London 

Peters Phil A Nettie 1553 Broadway N 

Patching Bros 16 Packard Lymansvllle R I 

Phillppo Sisters 140 W 36 N Y 

Phillips A Bergen 373 Charles Boston 

Phillips Mimdame Bijou La Crosse 

Phillips Samuel P 316 Classon Brooklyn 

Piccolo Midgets Box 23 Phoenica N Y 

Pike A Calame 073 Amsterdam N Y 

I'iininl & Manny 275 S ."» Brooklyn 

Pilcer Harry Princess Chicago 

Plamondons Two 1114 Qulncy Topeka 

Plunkett A Bitter 316 Main W Everett 

Poirler's The Glaustone Pk Shreveport La 

Polk & Polk 325 W 21 N Y 

Pollard Gene 713 Fulton Brooklyn 

Pope J C A Dog 240 Franklin Phlla 

Potter & Harris 701 Leland Chicago 

Ports Ernie A Mildred Bush Lake Minn 

Powell Kddle 2314 Chelsea Kansas City 

Powers Trio 5 Washington Somervllle ■> 

Powers' Elephants Damon Shows 

Probaseo 420 Monroe Rochester 

Prosit Trio Ringllng Bros C R 

Pryor Billy 63 Dartmouth Boston 

Puces Jolly lo Porter Boston 

Pucks Two 100 E 80 N Y 



POWERS BROS. 

IN A FISH STORY. 



Qullllii L German Village Columbus 

giiliin & Mitchell 20 Bay 20 Bensouhurst L I 



Bucket ts Two 2Di>0 8 Av N Y 

Hadford A Valentine Vaudeville Club London 

Bae A Brosch Washington Spokane 

Rainbow Sisters S40 14 San Francisco 

Rankin A Leslie 413 W 30 N Y 

Rntelles The tW!7 I^>torneaux Montreal 

Raymond & Hall Orpheum San Francisco 

Raymond Clara 141 Lawrence Brooklyn 

Raymundes The Mat toon 111 

Rector Harry Clrco Trevlno Monterey Mex 

Red Eagle 418 Strand W C London 

Redding Franceses A Co 204 W 133 N Y 

Reed A Earl Arcade Toledo 

Reed A St John 454 Manhattan N Y 

Reeves Blllle N Y Roof N Y 

Reick A Howard 12.1 Greenwich N Y 

Held Sisters 45 Broad Elizabeth 

Rlesner A Gores 12K Roanoke San Francisco 

Rellly Frank 027 Communlpaw Jersey City 

Remington May me Htl Gerard N Y 

Renshaw Bert BIJou La Crosse 

Rlioades A Kneel Sheedy's Brockton 



Rlcli Duo •!<•... N Western Chlctigo 
Rich & Howard 311 W 13 N Y 
Richard Bros Pantages Sacramento 
Richards Great Rock Sq Pk E Liverpool 
Richards Win Diugman's Ferry Pa 
Richards A Montrose 450 8 1 Mt Vernon 
Richards A G rover Los Angeles Los Angeles 
Richardson John S 18 Grauyer PI Buffalo 
Richmond Bob 374 Central Pk W N Y 
Riley A Ahem 331 W Hancock Detroit 
Ringllng Adolph Buffalo Bill C R 
Rio Bros Forest Pk St Louis 
Rlpp .Ia«k Orplieum Savannah 
Ritchie Gertie 207 Walnut Buffalo 
Hit ti r A Foster Empire Oldham Eng 
Rivers A Rochester 240 W 23 N Y 
koads & Eugel SSSa Cbauncey Brooklyn 
Roattlno A Stevens 114 E 11 N Y 
Roberts C E Pantages Portland 
Roberts Children 320 Point Providence 
Roblsch A Childress Collins Garden Columbus 21 

Arcade Toledo 
Robledlllo Mlgerd Ringllng Bros C R 
Kockwav At Conwav East End Pk Memphis 
Robinson A Grant 408 James Utlca 
Itolillisou Alice 4." Orchard Chicago 
Roberts Family 320 Point lYovidence 
Roberts Slgiia 011> 23 Merced 
Roltare (has 215 W 23 N Y 
Romaln Manuel & Co 12 Seattle Boston 
Romalu Julia Lyric E St Louis 
Romanoffs The Orpheum Evansvllle lud 
Ronaldos Three R D 5 Stark Mich 
Roode Claude M Sells Floto C R 
Hoof Jack A Clara 705 Green Phlla 
Rose Elmer A 218 Pulllam Atlanta 
Rose Julian 17 Creeu I-elcester So, Ixmdon 
Ross & Lewis Touring South Africa 
Ros4 Sisters 05 Cumt>erford Providence 
Ross Eddie G Hillsdale Mich 
Rose Adele 242 W 43 N Y 
Rosenthal Don Harold 210 W 1 Oswego 
Rosey C W Farm Pk Toledo 
Rossi Alfredo Buffalo Bill C R 
Rossleys The 1553 Broadway N Y 
Rowland 450 Av N Y 
Row lev Sam 07 S Clark Chicago 
Roval Doll Princess 102 W ."15 N Y 
Rovnl Musical Five 241» S Brooklyn 
Roy Rob 5 Polk Alley Kllzalieth Pa 
Russell Bros Elmhurst L I 
Russell A Church BIJou Battle Creek 
"Russell Bertha Noss 172 W 77 N Y 
Russell Tenle 152 W 27 N Y 
Russell Jessie & Co 517 S 7 St Louis 
Rut ledge A Pickering 133 W 45 N Y 
Ryan A Rltchfleld Box 20 Sayvllle L I 

S 

Sable Josephine Folles Marlgny Paris France 
Salvall Saratoga Htl Chicago 
Sandberg A Lee 711 Orchard Chicago 
Sanders Troupe .'I0i> E 14 N Y 
Sampson Harry 5411 Addison W Phlla 
Samuels A Chester Box 110 Melrose Pk 111 
Sanfurd A Darlington 2422 So Adler Phlla 



4 REAL HITS 4 

"Any Old Piece la Yankee 

Land It Oood Enough (or Ms" 

▲ oorker for opening or dosing. 

"DOWN AMONG THE SUGAR. 
CINE" 

The sweetest of sweet ■ossfs. 

"You're In The Right Church 

But The Wrong Pew" 

■till the season's sensational ooen songs. 

"RED, RED ROSE" 

Real Bone for Real Sincere, 

QOTHAM-ATTUOKS MUSIC CO. 
130 W. 37th Street New York 



Snnford Jere Washington Spokane 
Santell Great Oxford Htl Chicago 
Sante'.l Great ■ Co Lyceum Chicago 
Schuster Gladys Miehwood E Hampton 



Mass 21 



WALTER 



LIZZIE 



SCHROOE and MULYEY 

June 14, Ingersoll Park, Des Moines, la. 



Sears Gladys Miehwood E Hampton Mass 21 

Revere Boston 
Sugimotl Troupe Caplton Pk TTenton 
Svengala Original Watertown N Y 
Sliuuiions Four Sarntoga Htl Chicago 
Sharp A Sharp 2ul> E 13 N Y 
Shaw A Shaw O II Eastport Mo 
Shedinan W S GI.miii Oak Pk Baltimore 
Sheer & Burton 212 Woodward Av Detroit 
SherhMk A Van Dalle 514 W 135 N Y 
Sherman A Rice 440 W 31 N Y 
Schath A McVeigh 745 Amsterdam N Y 
Schurr Wheeler Trio Nl.'tO Commercial Chicago 
Shefels Male lOlh 3 Appleton Wis 
Slddons & Earle U2H Muln Phlla 
Sllva A Sllva 215 W 38 N Y 
Sin. ay's Dogs Ac Cats Folles Mexico City 
Slrignmo'H Bands Roma 11 B 110 N Y 



VAUDEVILLE ARTISTS. 

THE EMPIRE THEATRICAL EXCHANGE 

With omcet at 1028-27-20 Knickerhocksr Theatre Building, HEW YORK, and 806-7-0 Lowndes Building, 
ATLANTA, OA., can offer you one year's solid booking— INVESTIGATE. 

DRAMATIC PEOPLC 

We can always use good Dramatic people In all lines— consult us. 



THIS YEAR. 



II 



WHEN I DREAM IN THE 
GLOAMING OF YOU 

Get It-SNAPIRO'S Got It 



1 1 



RICE s CADY wilu-iaivi morris, m. 

BOSTON OFFICE NOW BOOKING the New RngUnd Parks and Theatres. 

CONSECUTIVE TIME, SHORT JUMPS. 

Good Comedy and Novelty Acts always wanted. 

FRED MARDO, Boston Representative, Orpheum Theatre Building, Boston, Mass. 



N 
D 

West End Heights, St. Louis. 



Hire Frank & True r,<M>4 Harvard Oak Pk 111 

Itliv Willy Itingllng Bros C R 

Itlekrode Harry E Pantages Bldg Seattle 



iviivjlj 



ERLINGER and his BAND 



Including BEATRICE FISCHER. Prima Donna Soprano 



Opens at Idora Park, Oa 



SOME OPEN TIME 



kland, Call., June 28 - July 17 

Address INDEPENDENT BOOKING AGENCY, INC. 

Suit«e 906*90S Chicago Opera Houm, CHICAGO, ILL. 



When answering advertisements kindly mention Vahikty 



•>? 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



ss 



Sailing for Europe Shortly. Will produce a new 

and gorgeous act next season 






Introducing His Latest Sensational Dance, 



"A DREAM OF THE FIVE SENSES" 



Direction Ba A a RfflYERSj Knickerbocker Theatre Bldg., New York 



w 



IIVJ 



BUN 






WANT GOOD AGENT 



Mows" 

Address CANTON, O., MYERS' LAKE PARK, JUNE 14 



Sctarodc Billy New York Roof N Y 

Scott & Wright 530 \V 122 N Y 

Baarnon Cbas F Colonial N Y 21 Orpheum Hklyn 

Samon IM10 Star Munele 21 Crvstul Anderson Ind 

Saorab Billy & Mae Cairo Mich 

Say ui our &. Nestor SOI W 170 X Y 

Shannon Harry Ludlniiton Mieh 

Sharp & Sharp 200 E l.'i N Y 

gherry Joseph V Spark's C II 

Sllveno & Co 2<>2t» Liberty O^den I tali 

Simpson Cora 718 N .Maine Scranton 

Simpson Cberldah Urpbenm San Francisco 

8later & Finch Trousdale Minstrels 

Smlrl & Keener 438 \V 104 N Y 

Smith & lleugney 272 S 11 Newark 

Smith & Brown i:'.2» St John Toledo 

Smith Al V2A IrvinK Brooklyn 

Smith & McNainara 4h N EiiRlew I l'liila 

Smiths Aerial Rlngllng Bros C It 

Snyder Ac Huckley llunnnels ltix knway I. 1 

Solar Willie Ma Jest it- Kalamazoo Midi 

Somers & Wilde Box 24 Col Millwood N J 

SpauldhiK & Itnpree Box 2sr> Ossdnlnjj N Y 

Sperry & Dogs 8 W 7 Jninestown N Y 

Spraigue & Dixon Shell l'k Wilmington 'Jl Island 

I'k Easton 
Springer Jack Grand Nashville 



Y 



5th Ave N Y 21 

Y 
Y 



Stadium Trio Thalia San Francisco 

Stanton* The Electric I'k Easton Pa 

St Alva Addle 2U5 E UK> N Y 

St Clair Anne 2010 Armour Chicago 

St I eon Family I. una Villa Coney Island N 

Stafford Alice 213 W 85 N Y 

Stafford Frank Stone K & P 

Brighton Beach N Y 
Stanhope Paul A 4<>7 W 12:i N 
Stanley & Wathon 245 W 38 N 
Staidey A: Co llarrv l.">53 Broadway N Y 
Starr tt Coldln 12f. W 115 N Y 
Stead Walter 155 Prospect Cambridge 
Steeley & Edwards 008 8 Av N Y 
Stelnert Thomas Trio 400 Lenox N Y 
Stephenson Chas 2 Sumach Toronto 
Stewart Cal 147 W 95 N Y 
Stewart Harry M 105 Schaeffer Brooklyn 
Stevens &. Washburn BIJou Moos Jaw Can 
Stevens Paul 323 W 2s N Y 
Stevens Kitty 132 Lincoln Chicago 
Stlrk &. London Island Pk Easton Pa 
Stoddards The 317 Klrkpatriek Syracuse 
Stone Beth 111 W 1<V4 N Y 
Strickland Itube Mora Pk ; 20 Celeron Pk James 

town 
Stuart Dorothy Htl St Paul N Y 



Vt 21 Barber Pk 



Stuart J Francis 2448 Martin Phlla 

St unit & Keele.v 822 College Indianapolis 

Strubbletleld Trio Folly Oklahoma City Okla 

Stiit/.miiu & May 1553 Broadway N Y 

Sullivan Bros Four S illpli Milfred Mass 

Snlltbnii Pasipiel.'na A: Co 21 Ingersold Pk Des 

Mollies 

Still v \. Phelps <) II Ludlow 

Bellow Fall-; Vt 
Sulh tJrace .'t!t4 E 41 X Y 
Sundy &. Wilde 222 W 141 X Y 
Sunny South Co Orpheum Oakland 
SutclifTe Troupe 40 Agnliieoiirt ltd London 
Sutton & Sutton Palace 1 1 1 1 Chicago 
Swam & Bambnrd 1 lO W 00 X V 
Swb'knrds The 805 Bathhurst Toronto Can 
Sylow II Barniim A: Bailey C K 
Symonds Jack Arcade Mlnot X D 
Symphony (Quartet 1025 20 Washington 



Taiiean it Clayton l.'.ST St Mark 
Tanneaii Julius 252 W 7t5 X V 
Tasmaiiliin Vandleman Troupe (Jollinat 
Tasseiiiaii UoM B Star Buffalo lndef 
Taylor Viola 230 Harrison Boston 



Brooklyn X Y 
Bros C 



B 



Taylor Mae Majestic Galveston 
Teed it Lazell 4247 I<nrain Cleveland 
Telegraph Four 14 '1 ravel 21 Wash Spokane 
Temple tjmirtet Shea's Buffalo 21 Temple Detroit 



TEMPLE QUARTET 

Week June 14, Shea's, Buffalo. 



Templeton Robert L Moss A- Stoll Tour Ixuidon 

Teinpleton Paul Francis 1420 10 Oakland 

Ten Eyeks Tlie Delhi X Y 

Texas Comedy Four Waco Tex 

Trolley Car Trio 1112 Tunnell Milwaukee 

TruinMc Francis (Jenird Htl X V 

Tliomas Xormnn ."154 Manhattan X Y 

Thompson Harry 112 Covert Brooklyn 

Thompson Sisters '.VM E 41 Chlcngo 

Thornton (ieorge Bennett's Montreal 21 Bennett's 

(Quebec 
Tleches The 114 E 2 K Liverpool () 
Tlerne\ it Odell 1553 Broadway X Y 
Till John A: Ionise 808 Salem Maiden 




And M«r i 

"THE "DENVER POST" said this week: 

"I think in point of merit next to the headliner at tho Majestic came IVA DONNETTE and her 
CANINE PICK. Miss Donnettc is clever and her little dog is a wonder." 



anin 



« 



lok 



99 



THE BILL. 

Little Hip (Baby Elephant), Headliner; May Ward's "Dresden Dolls"; Mr. V. L. Granville 
P-otean playlot; Eva Westcott, Sketch; Ethel Vane, Aerial; Iva Donnette and "Pick" 
Komedy." 



'Kolored 



Just closing SIXTEEN WEEKS over the SULLIVAN & CONSIDINE CIRCUIT. BOOKED UNTIL SEPTEMBER in the South 
making TWO AND ONE HALF YEARS SOLID work. 



"I Love My Wife, But Oh, You Kid" 

Pf AY FAIR AND USE THE ORIGINAL SONG BY 

** ** * £ ** * ^^ ARMSTRONG and CLARK 



r^/i 



"Jungle Moon" 

OREATEST MOON SONO EVER WRITTEN 

" I Want To 60 To The Ball Same " 



A REAL BIQ HIT 



When anxwvring advertisements kindly mention Varikty. 



VARIETY 



23 









NEARLY ALL THE GOOD ARTISTS ARE HERE-JOIN THEM 



SPECIAL RATES 

TO 
PROFESSIONALS 



'an 



Hotel 



CHICAGO. 



J. K. SEBREE, 

President 

ROY S. SEBREE, 

Qen. Manager 

LOUIS A. JUNG, 

Asst. Manager 



DINE IN OUR BEAUTIFUL RESTAURANTS 



POPULAR PRICES. 



SERVICE AND FOOD THE BEST. 



Toledo Sidney Boyd Pk Peru Ind 21 Lakeside Pk 

Dayton O 
Tompkins Charlotte J 2641 Lafayette Denrer 
Torcat A Flor D'Allzn Parish Madrid Spain 
Towner Sisters 26 Water Bingham ton 
Townsend Charlotte ft Co 601 W 130 N T 
Tom Jack Trio 102 B 14 N T 
Toms Tumbling: 2789 Fulton Brooklyn 
Toona Mile P O Box 664 Denrer 
Tops Topsy A Tops 617 W School Chicago 
Toubey Pat East Haddam Conn 
Trainor ft Dale Cascade Pk New Castle 21 Celeron 

Pk Jamestown 
Travers Bell*- Trncndero Phlla lndef 
Trebor 466 Virginia St Paid 3 

Tripp ft Veling Klngling Broa C R 
Tbardo Claude 3a W 00 N Y 
Thurston Leslie 85 Lexington N Y 
Tunis Fay Dragon Inn Detroit 
Turner Bert Richmond Htl Chicago 
Tweedley John 242 W 43 N Y 



Urma Hetty 104 E 14 N Y 



Vaggfs The Barnum ft Bailey C R 

Valadons Let* 407 Thames Newport 

Valdare ft Varno Hagcnbeck-Wallace C R 

Valdere's Cyclers Bessie Proctor's Newark 

Van Billy Orpbeum Oakland 

Van Buren ft Close 2259 W 96 Cleveland 

Van Eppes Jack 15 W 64 N Y 

Van Horn Bijou Jackson 21 Majestic Indianapolis 

Vardaman National Htl Chicago 

Vlsco 41a Acre Lane London Eng 

Vasco ft Co 1418 Beaver Allegheny 

Vaugban Dorothy Sherman Htl Chicago 

Vaundetta Musical Duo 247 Pratt Ravenna 

Vedmaro Rena 749 Amsterdam N Y 

Venetian Street Musicians 32 Alaska Chicago 

Vera Mile 737 De Kalb Brooklyn 

Vermette-Capotti Trio 451 Breboeuf Montreal 

Vlctorlne Myrtle Orphcum Rock ford 111 

Vincent Sisters 48 Centre New Rochelle 

Vincent ft Rose Gotham Brooklyn N Y 

Viola Otto ft Bro Alrdome Stanton 111 

Vloletta Jolly 104 E 14 N Y 

Vivians Two Ingersold Pk Des Moines 20 Temple 

Detroit 
Volta 1553 Broadway N Y 
Von Dell Harry 1553 Broadway N Y 
Von Serley Sisters 436 E 138 N Y 
Vynos The 300 W 31 N Y 

W 

Wade ft Reynolds 615 2 Louisville 

Wahlund ft Tekla Trio Trevlno Circus Mex 

Ward ft Harrington 418 Strand London Eng 

Ward ft Hart 1909 South 11 Phlla 

Wartenberg Bros 104 E 14 N Y 

Walker Mabelle 208 Pottlnatonlne Leavenworth 



WALSH, LYNCH ». GO. 

Presenting "HUOKZVB RUM." 
Addrees caxe VARIETY. 



Wagner Paul Orphcum Portsmouth O 21 Hip 

Charleston W Va 
Wagner Peter 145 W 127 N Y 
Waller ft Magill 102 7 Av N Y 
Walsh May 28 Bedford Court Mansions London 
Watson ft Baker 3024 Reno W Phlla 
Walters ft Walters 748 Dearborn Chicago 
Walton Irvln R 1553 Broadway N Y 
Walton Bert A Lottie 200 E 14 N Y 
Walton Fred ft Co Lambs' Club N Y 
Ward Billy 100 Myrtle Brooklyn 
Ward Tom 102 Lexington Brooklyn 
Wardell Harry 1553 Broadway N Y 
Warren Faust 242 W 43 N Y 
Warren Bob O II Uenova Pa 
Warren Bert Keystone Bldg Pittsburg 
WaRhburn ft Douglas 434 Third Brooklyn 
Washer Bros Box 100 Oakland Ky 
Waters James It Spring Grove Pk Springfield 20 

Indlanola Pk Columbus O 
Watson Sammy 333 St Pauls Jersey City 
Watson ft Little 428 W 145 N Y 
Wayne Ethel 142 W 40 N Y 
Weadlck ft La Due Gen Del Rochester lndef 
Weavers Flying 1553 Broadway N Y 
Weleh Jos ft Cecelia 24« Fulton Buffalo 
Wells Maxlne De I /eon Pk Atlonta Ga 
Wcnrlck ft Waldron Richmond Htl Chicago 
West Sisters 310 Grove Brooklyn 
West Fiankle 218 W 46 N Y 
Wharton ft Mohler 203 Kencle Chicago 
Whitman Frank Majestic Chicago 
Whitman Bros Park Phlla 

Whiteside ft Picks Ethel Bush Temple Chicago 
Whittle W E Farm Caldwell N J 
White ft Revelle 213 W 38 N Y 
Whitehead ft Grlerson 2466 8 N Y 



FURNISHED 
FLATS 



The EDMOND'S 

The Only Flats Catering Exclusively to Performers 

694 Ith AVENUE, BETWEEN 89th AND 40th. 764-756 8th AVENUE. BETWEEN 46th-47th ITU 

776, 778, 780 8th AVE., BETWEEN 47th and 48th STREETS. 

'Phone 2411 Bryant. RATES — 110.00 UPWARDS. 

ONE BLOCK TO TIMES SQUARE. NEW YORK CITY 




WA, ONT, 






I 




Horn* lA/hlte> Rata and Profei 



ilon 



Tha finest Hotel in Canada— bar none. Amarioan and European. Absolutely now. NEXT DOOR 
TO BENNETT'S and THREE BLOCKS TO OTHER THEATRES. SPECIAL RATES TO ARTISTS. 

WALTER B. WALBT, Prop. 

NEW ANNEX HOTEL 



Adjoining the New 

ORPHEUM 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Offers Spooiai Inducements to 

THEATRICAL PROFUSION 

Rooms With or Without Bathe. 

GOOD RESTAURANT. REASONABLE PRICES. 

D. ULLMAN, Manager. 



HOTEL PROVENCE 

Leicester Square, LONDON 



Hee 



J. T. DAVIS, Prop 
dquertere of Ul/hlt 
Terms Moderate. 



e> Rati 



BEST PLACE TO STOP 

or 
NEW YORK CITY 

"ft Seoonda from Broadway. M 



THE 



. Kl 

183 Wut 34th Streat 



Famished Rooms only. Rathe— Telephone 
Klectrio Light. 

('Phone SMS— Murray Hill.) 

Termi Reasonable 

Under Mana gement Misses COOKE sad CLINTON. 

Whitehead Joe & Grlerson American N Y 
Wblteley A Bell 1463 Broadway Brooklyn 
Whit ford Annabelle New York Roof N Y 



JOHN W. WORLD 
iWINDELL KINGSTON 

Week June 14, Orpheum, Spokane. 



Wilbur Curl 08 Charing Cross Rd Ix>ndon Eng 
Wilbur Clarence Htl Atlantic City 
Wilder Marshall P S Atlantic City 
Wllklns & O'Pay l"»r»:{ Broadway N Y 
Williams CIiiih '-MLVJ RutKcr St Louis 
Wllllnms & Gordon 22.TJ Indiana Chicago 
Wllllanis Cowboy (Jueon Shu Diego Cal 

KOl'TKS— 7 

Williams A Sepal .'17 K Robinson Allegheny 
Williams A- Stevens IVkln Stork Chicago 
Williams A Van Allen 001 Queen Portsmouth Va 
WUIiard's Temple of Music 1 Palisades Pk N J 
Wllllnrd's Temple of Music 2 Dreamland Coney 

Is N Y 
Wilson Pros 130.". E f» Maywood 111 
Wilson A: Wilson 302 4 Troy 

Wilson Helolse A Ainoros Sisters 10-1 E 14 N Y 
Wilson A Frazler 145 E 4S N Y 
Wilson Ixuls 20 Sheppnrd Lynn 
Wlnnne & ('ussier Devil's Auction Co 
Winkler A Kress Trio 252 W :iK N Y 
Winter Wlnonn 5102 Hlbbard Chicago 
Wise Jack :'.0 Pittsburg 

Wlxon Ac Eaton .'to Teeumseh Providence 
Wolford A Klugnrd 150 W Congress Chicago 
W.K.dall Billy Alrdome Hlghpolnt N C 
Wood Maurice Shea's Toronto 20 Shea's Buffalo 
Wood Pros Bllon Winnipeg 21 BlJon Duluth Minn 
Wood Ralph Lyric Ft Smith 
Wordette Kstelle A Co 'JO Wheeling Pk Wheeling 

W Va 
World A Kingston Orpheum Spokane 



We are st the old stead hotter thsa ever. 

™ MILLER HOTEL 

MBS EMMA WOOD, MgT. H. 0. MILLER, Prop. 

S. E. Cor. 10th and Raoe Sta., Philadelphia. 

AMERICAN AND EUROPEAN PLAN. 

"THE ACTORS' HOME." 

Cafe attached. Batha and Steam Heat on ell 

Soon. PROFESSIONAL RATES— 17 double, SI 

single, 

THE RUDGER 

High olsss Rooming sad Boarding Hoass, 

261 West 424 St., New York 

Opposite the Amerlosa sad near HsmmentaU's* 
SpeoUl ratea for ptsfesstoasJs. 

rURNISHRD ROOMS RRASONARLR. 

242 W. 43rV*ST., NEW^YORK 



World'e Comedy Four Temple Chicago 

Woodward Ed A May Bijou Atlanta 21 Qrand 

Augusta Ga 
Wormwood'a Dogs & Monkeys Keitb'a Phlla 
Worthley Abbott A MIntborne Fontaine Ferry Pk 

Louisville 
Worton Bessie 520 W 135 N Y 
Wnvehe A. Zell Columbia Cincinnati 
Wright Lillian & Boys 435 W 46 N Y 



Yacklev & Bunnell Lancaster Pa 

Yalto Duo 220 W 311 N V 

Yamamoto Bros Winchester O 

Ybnr Princess BIJou La Cross Wis 

Yeoman (;corge 1'nbpie Superior Minn 20 Bijou 

La Crosse Wis 
Young E F 407 W 123 N Y 
doling Ollle A Pro Orpheum Portland 
Yule A Simpson Indlanoln Pk Columbus 21 Farm 

Toledo <> 



Zalno Joe 41 So 7,2 Philadelphia 

'/.nurAu* The ll>* Straml London 

Zanzlgs The :;r.r, W 4.', N Y 

Zazell Vernon A Co Henalssance Warsaw Russia 

Zedu II L Midland (II Pueblo 

Zemin Majestic Ft Worth 20 Majestic Dallas 

/Inn's Musical Co Memphis 

Zolars Two Orpheum Uockford III 



CIRCUS ROUTES 



Barnum A Bailey July S Sheldon In Sioux City 
la 2o- Waterloo la 24 Hock ford 111 Aug 5 Eastou 



7 Scranton 8 Wilkes Rarre 9 Sunbury 10 Will- 
iatnsport 11 Orleans 12 Warren 14 Cleveland 

15 Marlon 10 Toledo 17 Detroit 18 Jackson 19 
So Bend 21 Milwaukee 22 Tomak Wis 28 St 
Paul 24 Minneapolis 25 Little Falls 26 Duluth 

Buffalo Bill June 12 Peterson N J 14 Middle- 
town 15 Newburg 16 Kingston N Y 

Campbell Bros Aug 5 Redfleld 6 Wooneocket 7 
Pi anker ton 9 Chamberlain 10 McKenale 11 
Kadoka 12 Rapid City 9 D 

Ccla Bros Shows June 7 Utlca 21 Geneva O Jnlj 
4 Morris 5 Oeneaee 6 Iowa City 7 Vluton 8 
North wood la 9 Owatonna 10 NorthSeld 

Cosmopolitan Circus June 13 Atkinson Wis SO 
Neenah Wis 27 Rlpon Wis * 

Gentry Bros Aug 22 Warren'on 23 Culpepper 24 
Charlottesville 25 Lynchburg 26 Danville 27 
Clarksvllle Va 28 Oxford 30 Raleigh 81 Green- 
boro Sept 1 Reldsvllle 2 Lexington 8 Mt Airy 

4 No Wllkesboro G High Point 7 MocksvUle 

8 Salisbury Concord 10 Charlotte 11 Moorea- 
vllle 13 Taylorsvllle 14 Statesville 15 Newton 

16 Hickory IT Morgantown 18 Aahevllle 20 
Marion 21 Rutherfordton N C 22 Lancaster 

5 C 23 Rock Hill 24 Gastonia N C 25 Gaffneya 
S C 20 Spartanburg 28 Greenville 29 Ander- 
son 30 Abbeville Oct 1 Newberry 2 Columbia 4 
Charleston Orangeburg 7 Aiken S C 8 Au- 
gusta (in Barnwell 11 Savannah Ga 

Oollmar Bros June 14 Butte 15 Helena 16 Great 
Falls 17 Havre 18 Glasgow Mont 10 WlUlaton 
N D 2 MInot 

Hsgenbeck- Wallace June 14-15 Denver 16 Greeley 
.col 17 Cheyenne Wyo 18 Laramie 19 Rawlins 
2s Butte Mont 

Mcrrla A Rowe June 12 Reglna Saak 14 Areola 
Sask Can 

Ringling Broa June 14 Worceater IB Wooneocket 
10 Providence 17 Fall River 18 New Bedford 
19 Brockton 21 Springfield 22 Hartford SS 
Waterbury 24 New Haven 26 Bridgeport 26 
Stamford 28 Gloveravllle N Y 26 Utlcs SO Syra- 
cuse July 1 Rochester 2 Buffalo 8 Brie Ps 

Sella-Floto June 11-12 Spokane 19 Palonae 21 
I<ewlston Wash 



LETTERS 



Where C. 0. follows name, letter Is In Chi- 
cago Office. 

Advertising of circular letters of any de- 
scription will not be listed when known. 

Letters will be bald for ons month. 

P. C. following nimt Indlestee postal csfd. 



Antwell, Dot. 
Adama A White. 
Allison. Patty, Miss. 
Avery, D. 
Anderson, Albert 
Asbcroft, Ralph W. 
Arado, D. 

Aces, The Three (0. 0.) 
Angers, The. 
Adgle's Llona. 
Adams, Isabel. 
Alnawortb, Virginia. 
Aveato, Elmer. 
Arlington, Billy. 
Armstrong, P. C. 
Armstrong, Max. 
Aualr. itobyn. 
Anderson. Fred. 
Atlantic City Four. 
Austins, Tossing. 
Astrella Sisters. 
Alar -oris. The (C. 0> 
Anderson, Ruth (C. O.) 

Blood, Adele. 
Boyd A Moran. 
Burdlck, Ruth. 
Bragg, Archie (0. O.) 
Bell, Alfred J. 
Bagley. Charlie (C. 0.) 
Baldwin. Kitty. 
Beat, Louis P. 
Brlgnola. E. (C. O.) 
• Beck. Carl (C. O.) 
Belmont, Freda. 
Bertram, Helen (C. 0.) 
Bellvue, Ed. (C. O.) 
Burton, Steve W. (C. 0.) 
Baggesen, Carl. 
BUyck'a Seals. 
Butler. M. J. 
Bell, Floss (C. O.) 
Brlndemour. Great. 
Bowles. George. 
Boyle A O'Brien. 
Hulirer. Irlne. 
Binder, (Smce <C O.) 
Barlow. Nelson A I>t-n«- 

more. 
Barnes. W. M. 
Burn. And- 
Bower-, I !.■•! I.' 
B»-ini, i • \ I 'hi iii.^r 



Beatrice. Mile. 
Brady, Jemes. 
Bedora, Corlets. Miss. 
BloBdell, Mysterious. 
Barns, Chsrllft. 
Borna A McOone. 
Bowen, 0. W. 
Bidden. Ross. 
Berg'o Merry Qlrls. 
Belmont, MsdeUne. 
Benedict, Lew. 
Behr, Carrie. 
Burke, Den. 
Barton A Barton. 
Brown, Mary Ann. 
Baaley, Jeaale (C. O.) 
Bowser, Charles. 
Burns, Eddie (C. O.) 
Boyce. Jno. 
Beverly. BUI. 
Blackson, Harry. 
Bartlett. Guy. 
Bennett. Murray. 
Byrne. John W. (C. 0.) 
Beaumont, Alma. 
Barton, Joe. 

Calllgnon, Harry A. 
Cunningham, J. 
Crouch. Roale, Mlaa. 
Carroll. Rena (C. O.) 
Clifford A Lane (O. 0.) 
Clayton, Webb a. 
Calvert. Albert (C. O.) 
Carroll. Tom (C. O.) 
Campbell, Flossie. 
Crosse. Dr. Margaret. 
Curtis. Bea. (C. O.) 
Constsntlne, W. J. 
Crumbnker. Kdwln. 
Crewe. Anna (C. O.) 
Caldwell. J. 
Crav.-n. Sidney (C. O.) 
I'layton. Webb A. (C. 0.) 
Chlblers. Grace. 
Cllne. Vivian. 
c.-irllsle. May. 
Csrlotte. 
Carroll. C. 

Cmiimliigs. Grace. A Co. 
<C O.I 

Cnv. (jllda Mae vC. O.) 
''urzon Sisters. 



)Vhcn answering advertisements kindly mention Vamfty 



24 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 




The Artiste Who Made Will Rossiter's "When the Moon Plays PeeK-A-Boo" Famous 



MAUD 




Popularising WILL ROSSITER'S SONG "HITS'* 

"Of MISS MALINDA" — "JUST FOR A DAY" 
* ai ?«LZ™ AHy "Gee! But There's Class to a Girl Like You" 

WAKE UP! Send for Prof. Copies. WILL ROSSITER. 152 Lake St.. Chicago. JEFF BRANEN, 1431 Broadway, N. Y. 



AND 



ATLANTIC CITY 4 



OPEN TIME JUNE 28 

JUNE 13, 

Grand, Pueblo, Col. 

JUNE 21, 
Princess, Wichita. Kansas 




GRANNON 



VAUDEVILLE'S DEMURE 
LITTLE SONGSTRESS 



Orpheom Circuit to follow immediately 

Solo Direction SOW. S. KILLER, Long Acre B'ld'g, New York 

TEXAS GUINAN 5SSLSS, 



United Time 



M. S. BENTHAM. Agent 



The 



Stubblefield Trio 



America's Foremost 
Novelty Aerialists 



Tha FASTEST WORKING TRAPEZE AOT U the Vettd; only not of lti kind doing tooth work. 
OOltQrO IAST. Jnat iniahod n *wy m*m*+ fMton in the woat oror both tho Woatorn State* 
«■*•«< tho tnUlrnn-Oonaldiao OUenit, A DRAWING OARS in orory house. 



Agent, ALF T. WILTON, LON N < 



LONG ACRE DLDG. 
EW YORK 



IMAIMCY 



DEBUT IIS VAUDBVILLB 




SOCIETY') 



CO/nBDIBNNI 



Direction B. A. MTERS 



Pliyin$ Empire 
Circuit Theatres 




N with "THE LADY BUCCANEERS 



t* 



K. WATSON 



management, HARRY 7V1. 



ROUSE 



■VI 




I'M 00MINO WITH A REVELATION IN VENTRILOQUIAL ART. 

E J O M IM 3 



O IM 



I'LL BE THERE ALSO. 



IVJ 



I 



I L. T. JOHNSTON 

I VENTRILOQUIST 



Commlngs, Jlmmle. 
Cooper, Lee S. 
Colli oi. Fred. 
Go Bdi, Poor. 
Cullen, William. 
Currle, George. 
Campboll, Musical. 
Clark, Eddie. 
Caldor, Chas. L. 
Curry, L. V. 
Gates, 4 Musical. 
Chapman, Mamie. 
Chase. P. David. 
Chapman Sinters. 
Cutting. Ernest & Ivv 
(C O.) 

Detnocla, Jako. 
Doberty SI titer a 
Dumond. M. 
Davla, Warren. 
Dandy George Duo (C. 

O.) 
Dornton, Harry. 
Dietrich, Ray O. 
Dudley. Alice Cbeslyn 

(C. O.) 



Daum, Geo. A. (C. O.) 
Dietrich. Mrs. <C. O.) 
Darrell A Hodges (C. O.) 
Dunston. Oacar. 
Desmond, Lily. 
De Lee. Lillian. 
DArcy. D. V. 
Des Boche, Gertrude. 
Dupree. Malda. * 

Duffln-Redoay Troupe. 
Do Main A Rochete. 
Demarstlo, I.eo. 
DiiKiiii. Thomas J. 
DoiiKlus. MaMc. 
Diyle, Bart. 
Dunlin. Mike. 
De Gavlue. Alice. 
DeFay Sister*. 
Dougherty. Jim. 
Dimhnr. James T. 
Davis, Jack. 
»ay, Charles. 

Everett, Agnes. 
Earle, Edward. 
Evans. Billy. 
Elverson, Earle. 



Evans, Hilly ((,'. O.) 
Km pile Comedy Four. 

Field, J. Soger. 
Florence Sisters. 
Fuller. Ethel. A Co. 
Fee, May A Ford. 
Feathers, Leesle (C. O.) 
Facclattl, Tom (C. O. > 
Traecona, Menotl (C. O.) 
Faccenda, Alberto (CO.) 
Fischer. Madalvn. 
Fitzgerald A Wilson (C. 

O.) 
Falrcblld, R. D.. Miss. 
Finder, Susie (C. O.) 
Flanntry. W. L. (C. O.) 
Fastell, A. E. 
Forrest. Parry. 
Fay, John J. 
Foo Ling Chlng. 
Farlardo. 

Fnilottcs. Orchestra. 
Foy & Clark. 
Ferraris. The. 
Fay -CoIIm'v & Fay (P. 

C.) 



Forrest, Harry. 
Fiinium, Dick. 

Uaffney, Belle. 
Golden. Sam. 
Genter & (J II more (C. O.) 
Gibson. Fstelle. 
(•Illen. Edward. 
Gould. Jay (C. 0.) 
Garrett, B. 
Greenfield, Caroline. 
Gilbert. Blame. 
Gotcb, Frank A. 
Green, George. 
Green. Felix. 
Ow, Ed. 
Granger. Mollle. 
Gleson. Stella. 
Cllllhan A Murray. 
Glone, Augusta. 
Gregory, Margaret (C. 

0> 
Goodwin, Joe. 
Gallagher. Ed. F. (C. 

O). 
Gladstone. Win. 
Click. Chas. 



Gardner & Golder. 
Glldeu, Mark. 
Gould, William. 
Goldsmith & lloppe (I'. 

CM 
Ga^noux. Mrs. II. 
Gentian*, John. 

Hughes, Gene, Mr. A 

Mrs. (C. O.) 
Hall. Alfred K. 
Hogan, W. J. 
Ilagen A Wescott. 
Hyde. Albert. 
Hanlon. Dlggs A Blerns 

(C. O.) 
Ileald. Frank. 
Hyues, Tom. 
Ileald, Henry D. 
Hendon, A. T. 
Hill. C. W. 

Hayes. Harvey (C. 0.) 
Harvey A Lee. 
Height, Dean A Co. 
Harris. W. H. 
Harrison. Cbarlea. 
Harvey A Farrell (C. O.) 



Hart, Henry (C. O.) 
Hyde, Jlmmle. 
Hales, C. W. 
Hartford. Sadie. 
Henrlcl. 
Hlgglus, R. D. 
Huntley. J. H. 
Hodges, Jamea (C. O.) 
Hewitt, Harry.. 
Hutchinson A Loaby (C. 

O.) 
Hawkins, L. 
Hoffman, Max. 
Hopkins. Col. J. P 
Hammer. Clara M. 
llaugen. Helen. 
Huntington. Florence. 
Healey, Daniel (C. O.) 
HofTmans. Cycling (CO.) 
Haines, Harry. 
HanHun A Howard. 
Hunt. Henry (C. O.) 
Mains, Nat. 
Hadley. Florence. 
Hoy. Hal H. 
Hayes, Sully. 
Harris, Jack. 



Hlckey. W. II. 
Uaulon, Toma (C. O.) 
Hallen, Fred. 
Hallen, Jack. 
Hill, Arthur L. 
Hart, Nellie. 
Hlnes. Billy (C. O.) 
Harland & Robinson (C. 

O.) 
Hume, Ilnrry. 
Harris, Eddie. 
Ilayden, Turn F. 
Hart. Lewis. 
Harding. Chas. 
Hallen, Fred. 
Herbert. Cliff. 
Helbliig, Ed. O. 
Harris, Dutch Charlie. 
Hallen, Fred (C. (). ) 

Icannou, Panacblotl. 
Ishmael, Prince P. 
Irving, Mildred. 

Jerome, Cora B. 
Jamison, Eld. 
Jourdeon, Annette (CO.) 



Johns, Harry (C O.) 
Jarrow, Emll (C O.) 
Johnstone, Gordon. 
Johnson. Otto. 
Jenson, Otto. 
Jones, Miss Gwyn. 
Johnson, Mark. 
Jackson. Csrl J. 
I arris A Martin (0. 0.) 
Jarvls A Martyn. 
Jennings. Arthur B. 
(C. 0.) 

Klrkwood, Jessie (C. 0.) 
Klebs, Elsie (C. O.) 
Kelss, Mro. John. 
Klnsella. Kathleen. 
Kenney, Mabel. 
Keown, J. (C 0.) 
Knowlea. R. G. 
Klare. Katberlne. 
Klelses, Musical. 
Knlgbt, Harlan. 
Kirk. Herbert A. (C. 

O.) 
Klrtland, Dixie. 

Keller, Joseph. 



"When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



VARIETY 



25' 



—. 



THE COOL SYSTEM 

OF 

Scienti fic Trea tment. 

♦Our HEALTH HOME and SANI- 
TARIUM situated on Beautiful 
LAKE MUSKEGON, Michigan 

IS NOW OPEN 



All the advantages of a delightful summer re- 
tort are combined with the treatments. Beautiful 
walks, shaded lawns; every opportunity afforded 
lor complete rest and relaxation. Speoial attention 
to diet. 

Lake Muskegon Is one of the finest Ashing re- 
•sorts in the country. 

Our CHICAGO OFFICE (Suite 907-MM-9M), 1M 
DEARBORN ST., is open the year round, where 
treatments are also riven. 

Direct letters of inquiry to LEW EARL, Gen- 
eral Manager, Chicago, or Muskegon, Mich. 

I. MILLER, Manufacturer 




202 

W.23SST 

N.Y 



of Theatrical 
Root 8 A Shoes, 
CLOG. 
Ballet and 
Acrobatic Shoes 
a specialty. All 
work made at 
short notice. 



K 



•107 MICHIGAN AVE.. 
I 



LJIV. ER 



EXCLUSIVE DESIGNS. 

Oostumer for the Leading Stage OslebrltlSS. 
'Phone, Calumet 2402. 

rnul'OS. CABIN fc lb, IK.60 pet AW». «■!<• 

Claea. Set. IS jrn. Heve sittings or send photos 
itlw. JOHNSON. 'M Ws*»eah A v.. <'M*sir» 



"ClttLEY CASE'S FATIER " 



Written ky Charley Oaee, oemedien Send P. O. 
•order for too. to Case Publishing; Co., Lookport, 
N. T. 



Telephone j 15*4 r Bryant 



4\niETY 



TIMES BQUABE 

NEW TORS CTTT 

Cable Address "VARIETY, New York" 



ADVERTISING RATE CARD 



SPACE OR TIME RATES 

Line 

Iuch (14 Agate lines) 1 time 

In. 3 months (13 times) In advance. 

In. " (20 times) " 

In. 1 year (52 times) " 

Page (672 Agate lines) 

Mi Page 

Front Page (portraits of women only).. 
5000 Lines \ 

10000 Lines VTo be used within one year 
20000 Lines 



1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



. $ .20 

. 2.30 
. 35.00 
. 66.50 
.120.00 
.125.00 
. 65.00 
. 32.50 
.100.00 
t .18 
.17 
/ .16 

PREFERRED POSITIONS 

1 In. across Page $15.00 

2 In. •• " 27.50 

3 In. " " 40.00 

I Page 150.00 

IN ROUTE SHEET 

1 Line one time $ .30 

% Inch one month 8.00 

1 Inch " •' 15.00 

ARTISTS' RATE CARD 

Under "Representative Artists" 

(For Artists Only) 

% Inch single column $4.00 monthly net 

1 Inch " " 7.00 

% Inch double " 8.50 •« 

1 Inch •• " 12.50 

2 Inches single " 12.50 

2 Inches double " 22.50 

% Inch across page 15.00 " 

1 Inch across page 25.00 " 

2 Inches across page 50.00 " 

3 Inches scross page 75.00 " 

LARGER SPACE PRO RATA 

Discount 3 months, cash In advance, 5% 
Discount months, cash in advance, 10% 
Discount 12 months, cash in advance, 15% 

(Advertisements under "RepreeentatlTe 
Artists" not aooepted for less than one month.) 
No Preferred Positions Given. 

CUTS 

Single Column (1 time) $15.00 

Double Column ( 1 time) 25.00 



• 4 

• I 
<< 

• < 

• « 



Advertisements forwarded by mall must be 
sccompanled by remittance, made payable to 
Variety Publishing Co. 



J 




SHORT VAMP SHOES 

(Exclusively for Women >. f*sr Stage. Street sod 
Evening Wesr. Great Variety. tacluslve Models. 



Creator of Short Vamp Sboee. 
507 Sixth Ave., New York. Bet. 80th and 81st Sts. 

Send for Illustrated Catalogue. 
One Plight Up. Tel. 1955 Madison Ssj. 




ICE! 

CHANGE OF ADDRESS 

SEARL ALLEN 

AUTHOR AND PRODUCER 

VAUDEVILLE MUSICAL COMEDY— BURLESQUE 

IS NOW LOCATED AT 

246 West 43rd Street 

PKorte 4573 Bryant NEW YORK CITY 

Keith & Proctor's 5th Avenue Theatre June 14 (Week) 

Kid Gabriel <£. 

Plastic poses of life on the Cow Range 

Copyrighted by permission of Frederick Remington and Collier's Weekly 
ALF. T. WILTON, Exclusive Agent, Long Acre Bldg., NEW YORK 



Kelly, Jas. (P. C.) 

Linton, Harry B. (C. O.) 

LeCsJl. Ed. (O. O.) 

LeMoot, Grace (0. O.) 

Low, Oilman. 

La Frenlere, Arthur. 

LsteUe, Edward. 

Lord. Eleanor. 

Lsvitt Co.. J. U. 

Linns, Hans (O. O.) 

Lsnon, Ted. 

Lelbert, Alex. 

Lloyd, J. D. 

Ls Belle. Marie. 

Leffler, Bennle. 

Lntber, M. H. (0. O.) 

La Tbar, Dora (0. O.) 

Lane, Mlnella. 

La moot, Harry. 

Losler, Howard. 

Lee Richard, L. 

Lowery, Lntber. 

Lucas, Sydney. 

Leery, Martlol (C. 0.) 

Leslie, Joe. 

Laughlln M. 

Loreni, John. 

Levin, Abe. 

La Darro, Frank (C. O.) 

La Fose, Frank. 

Ix>onnrd. J. & S. 

Lockwoods. Musical. 

Leonard, Eddie. 

Lorlmor, Jnck. 

Luce & Luce. 

Lester A Mildred. 

Logan, Frank. 

Lewis. Dave V. (P. C.) 

Lc Croix. Paul. 

Loving. Blanche. 

McKee Deep Stuff (C. 

O.) 
Moore. Marian. 
Mantell, Harry. 
Mexican Trio. 
Miller. Frank. 
McLallen, Jack. 
McDermott, W. J. (C. 

O.) 
McMabon, Tom (C. O.) 
Mexican Trio (O. O.) 
Messier, Sadie. Mies. 
Merl. Onllls. 
McKIm, Edward. 
Martin, B. J. 
Mueller. Albert. 
Moore, H. L. 
Mullen, Dennis. 
Metcbso, Arthur. 
Mitchell, Hssel. 
Merlin, Helen. 
Mauran, Stella. 
McLaughlin. H. 
Morris. Three (C. O.) 
McDonald, W. (C. O.) 
McCarthy, W. T. (O. O.) 
Marcla. May (C. O.) 
McOlbney. Viola (C. O.) 
Metcslf, Ken. (C. O.) 
Moore. Herbert (CO.) 
M In ton (C. O.) 
Morgan, Rlsh. 
McVay. William. 
Marr, Lillian (C. O.) 
Mancdell. Richard (CO.) 
Marsh, Byrn. 
Msnlon, Lucille. 
Masters. Clara. 
Mason, H. 
Morton, Jss. J. 



McGlll. Flora. 
Moncrey, Lens. 
Msnnlng, Helen. 
McCord, Lewis. 
Manchester, Boy. 
McClusky, Anita. 
Mudge 6 Morton. 
Mack, Earnest. 
Miller, Arthur. 
Majestic Singing Three. 
Maynsrd, Dot (C. O.) 
Murray, Tom. 
Mario. Mable. 
Miles. Ben J. 
Msrtyn, Victor. 
McAUlson. Alice. 
McDonald, Mike. 
Marcballs, Musical. 
Muxflold, May. 
Murray. Tom. 
Monaghan A Sheelian. 
Maxwell. William II. 
Morrlsey. Will. 
Miuuuett. Hortence. 
Moore, Helen J. 
Malcom, Thomas. 
Mazette, Anulla. 
Morton, James C. (P. 

C> 
Meljillen-Carson Duo. 
Miller Sisters. 
McAvov. D. & A. 
Manchester, Robert. 

Neumann. Franz. 

Nertb, Happy. 

Nlles. Virginia. 

Neal, George. 

Norton, Jack (C O.) 

Neuss, Ous. 

Nichols, Wm. 

Neville, George (Flsrlan, 

Knight A Co.) 
Newton. Val. (C. O.) 
Nowalk. Eddie. 

Owley A Rsndall. 

Omesa, Ollle. 

Odell. Tommy. 

Owen. May. 

O'Neal, Jimmy (0. 0.) 

Orloff. Mr. 

OWell, Harry (C. O.) 

Penn, Jennie. 

Page, John. 

Plankleh. Harry (C O.) 

Pearl ft Voser. 

Peters. Jack J. (C O.) 

Porto Rlcan Quartet (C 

O.) 
Perry ft Gannon. 
Phillips Bros. 
Phillips. Goff. 
Prsmpln. Laura. 
Plqns. Barker H. 
Perley. L. R. 
Parish, David M. 
Pope. J. C. (C. 0.) 
Plnard, Al. 
Plstel. Lew. 
PetehliiK. Paul. 
Prlnee. Arthur. 
Prliui'Mse. Fred. 

Qulnlsn. Gertrude. 
Quentln. Rene. 

Richards. Elenor. 
Robins. A. D. 
Rlchsrds, Chris. 
Ryan, Dan. 



FARM FO 



SAL 



H<1 SACRIFICE 

Located lu Plymouth. N. II., 3 miles from 
R. R. Depot. Farm consisting of 90 more or less 
acres, 40 acres clear, 50 woodland, consisting of 
maple sugar grove, pine grove, etc.; 12-room 
house, heated by furnace, running mountain water 
In house, cattle barns, horse and hay barns, 
blacksmith shop with bellows, carpenter shops. 
Ice house, wagon sheds, farm Implement sheds, 
apple orchard. Apply to Joe Phillips, care of 
White Rata, 1558 Broadway. N. T. < Oity. - Will 
sell on terms to suit. 



Richmond, Florence. 
Rodiigues, L. J. 
Rundy, H. A. 
Rossnl, Mrs. Wm. 
Raymond, Melville B. 

(C O.) 
Relnhardt, Cyrua (C. O.) 
Ray, Elisabeth (C O.) 
Reynolds, Max (C O.) 
Rice, Felix <C O.) 
Redell, Ed. 
Rosen, R. O. (C O.) 
Rensrds, The. 
Roberts. J. J., ft Co. 
Roberts, Bessie. 
Roseola, R. 
Rogers, Will. 
R'lves, Gur. 
Rogers ft Evans. 
Robyns, William. 
Rackett, Ernest. 
Rence, Slgmund. 
Reed, Fred (Reed 

Birds). 
Robinson, Aids. 
Rio, Otto. 
Re Id, Jack. 
Rny, Fred. 
Rudolph, Frank. 
RogerH, WIIhoii. 
Richards. Chris. 
Richmond, McKee. 

Smith, Luther. 
Street, Rose. 
Seymour & Hill. 
Semon, Primrose (C. 

O.) 
Sbardo, Claude (C O.) 
Scholtc. Mr. 
Schultse, Henry. 
Smarl, Miss. 
Stone, Fred A. 
Silver, Morris. 
Scbenk (Crandall ft 

Schenk). 
Btolts, Melville. 
Saona, Herr (C. O.) 
Saline. Mile. (C. O.) 
Satterlee, Gait* (C. O.) 
Sullivan, James F. (C. 

O.) 
8utherlsnd ft Curtis (C. 

O.) 
Stlnson, J. B. (C. O.) 



Smith, Richard H. 
Stoner, Grace. 
9L Clair. Harry (0. O.) 
Sterling ft Chapman. 
Scott, Grace, ft Co. 
Schllcter. Hubert (CO.) 
Mwaln ft Ostman. 
Strausberg, Louis E. 
Shields ft Rodgers. 
Shields, Louise. 
Splsn, Robert J. 
Somenleitner, Gustov. 
SSrgent, Virginia. 
Soblke, Gos (C. O.) 
Stevens. Will H. 
Swindell, Archie. 
Stewart, Wlnnlfred. 
Stanley, Vera. 
Heamon, Primrose. 
Siiioor- Wheeler Trio 

(C O.) 
Shaw, Harold (C O.) 
Stelger. Ik'HHle (P. C.) 
Stevens, Ix?e. 
Stanley, John. 
Suilth, C. F. 

Thompson, William. 
Trimble, Maud. 
Thurston, May II. 
Thomas & Payne *C. O.) 
Tlvoll Quartet (C O.) 
Tenlll, Frank. 
Trovollo. 
Tate, Beth. 
Ti<>|iaevl. Arthur. 
ThurHton, Gertrude. 
Tunis, Fay (P. C.) 

Ubous, Mrs. Carl. 

Vslln, W. Ver. (( . O.) 
Vivian, Annie. 

Vim, lii-orge. 

Vosco, Walter. 

Viildoe. Paul 

Von Serly Sis'.cTS. 

Williams, Dot. 
Williams, Frank. 
Walton. Orval. 
Winchester. E. L. 
Wlttschlrk. Frlta. 
Wilson, Leslie. 
Williams, Leon. 



THERL .IS ONLY ONE REAL BALLAD 



THIS YEAR. 



II 



WHEN i DREAM IN THE 
GLOAMING OF YOU 

Get It 8MAPIR08 Got It 



* * 



I desire to inform my friends and 
patrons in the theatrical profession 
that I have moved by establishment 
from 1433 Broadway to 

1457 Broadway 

THE MOST COMPLETE AND 
UP-TO-DATE TAILOR SHOP 
IN NEW YORK CITY 

You are cordially invited to inspect 
my new line of smart clothes. 

SAMUEL JACOBS 

1457 BROADWAY 
NEW YORK CITY 



AUDELLA DANCING CLOGS 

Ladies' or Men's Siics 

Price, all wood sole, 84-00. 
Lesthsr shank. 
85.00. delivered 
free. Patent 
fastening never 
rips. 

ALBERT H. RIBMER SHOE CO.. Mllwsukee.Wls. 
GOWNS 




867 8. STATE ST., CHICAGO. 
'Phone Harrison 3686. 

Full line of slightly naed Evening Gowns, Opera 
Coats and Street Gowns, all suitable for Stags 
Wear. Boubrette Dresses made to order, ail oolors 
and styles. Special prices and attention given to 
theatrical profession. Sealskin Coats and Furs at 
all descriptions. 



Comedy Talking Acts. 8 Monologues (sure Are). 
Several First Parts and Burlesques, and Two 
Complete Musical Faroe Comedies. Address 

F»/\UL QUI1NIN 

(Quinn and Mitchell), 

SO Bay 26th St, Bensonhurat, 

Long- Island, tf. T. 



BL00DG00D 

(COSTUMERl 

104 WEST 44th STREET 

NEW YORK CITY 

Telephone: 8805 Bryant. Hear 6th Ave. 



AT LIBERTY 
WALLY HEL8TON 

Binging, Dancing, Acrobatic Comedian, 
for Musical Comedy Eztravagansa Burlesque or 
good partner. Also play animali. 
Address 1908 Columbia Ave., Phils., Fa., or ear* 
White Rats. 

P. B. — My wife, Lottie Helston, has retired per- 
manently. 

The first offer of $100 CASH 

Will buy my MOVING PICTURE THEATRE, with 
lease for six years in a thriving New England 
community of 6,500 inhabitants. This theatre is 
well established and a money-maker! I am sell- 
ing only because of big offer to go on a vaudeville 
circuit. Rent 585 per month. Everything in the 
hall. All you need is 8100 and a pioture machine 
to do business. Write quick or wire G. H. R.. 
820 Point St.. Providence. R. I. 



I WRITE FOR 

JOE WFiLCH. ANDREW MACK. JOE MOR- 
RIS. AL LEECH. BEN WELCH, ED 
WYNN. HAPPY FANNY FIELDS. AL 
CARLETON, HARNEY FERGUSON, HOW- 
ARD AND HOWARD. Ml LIB AND HEW- 
ITT, etc. MY REFERENCES:— Auy <>f ili«-m. 

JAMES MADISON 

Publisher of Madison's Budget. 

VAUDEVILLE AUTHOR 
1493 BROADWAY 

Room 617 Long Acre Bldg., 44th to 46th St. 
Hours 10 a. m. to noon ami by appointment. 



EMMA HEREY-MEYER 

PLAYWRIGHT. 

Wrst'-rn Sketches a Specialty. 
DENVER. COLO. 



]\'hrn an*\rrring aihcrtittcmmt* kindly mention Variety. 



26 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



JACK " 
SINGER'S 



BEHMAN SHOW 



99 



Presents MOLLIE WILLIAMS and LON HASCALL in the 2-Act Musical Melange "PALM BEACH" 

Book and Lyrics by BALLARD McDONALD Music by LEO EDWARDS 

Playing the COLUMBIA AMUSEMENT CO. Theatre* 
P. S.— Can use 10 Experienced. CHORUS GIRLS. Will Buy or Rent any kind of Big Stage Novelties, Mechanical Effects, Illusions 
and Etc. Address JACK SINGER, care of TANNER & CO., Room 220, Knickerbocker Theatre Building, 1402 Broadway, New York City. 



JAMES » LUCIA COOPER 

talking act nr "on." 

UDCH A PLUKKXTT, Aerate. Geo, Blutoh mads me laafh. 



BESSIE WYNN 



DALY g O'BRIEN 

Those "Taaglsfoot" Danoera. 
Watch for the "JUNGLE SHOP" Special Scenery and Effects in "One." 




WILFRED CLARKE 

♦ Pre— ting Hll Sketches 
"NO MORE TROUBLE" and "WHAT WILL HAPPEN NEXT!" 

Address, ISO W. 44th St., New York City. 



HARRY TATE'S <3. 

FISHING MOTORING 



lNe\A/ York. 
England 
Mu ©tralle* 
Africa 



Virginia Sargent 

"THE GIRL PROM THE BLUE GRASS." 
A Dataty Stager ef Qaelat Saafs ever waosm all ta* critics arc meet satkislastlc 



1 Mi **— *#— %fv >• i r^i*~=* mar- ^ eest «i- 




8 1 




beht T |^a| ^ 


TODDARDS — 


1 COMEDY MUSICAL ACT. ' ' T" HH ^^ 
| SOLE DIRECTION. BARNCT MTCRS 


FRXV."T"l^ IS/I l_J 6 1 ^ 1 A rsj " 

"I LOT* XT FIDWJS, KTT OH TOT 'CELLO." 



Pearson .■' Joell 4 Musical Gates 4 



IN VPIUDEVILLE 



1. 



Presenting Their Original Comedy Playlet Entitled 

A CHINESE NUGGET " 

In Three Characters : IRISH, CHINESE, ITALIAN 
Address BERT LEVIY, 2053 Sutter Street, San Frsncisco 



NEW ACT, BUT GOOD. 



m GERTIE it MILT 



AND 

DANCING 

BEAUX 



America's Most Meritorious Musical Act 




BEST Cornet Soloist 
BEST Saxophone Soloist 
BEST Saxophone Quartette 
BEST Xylophone Team 



Address osre VARIETY. 



■VI R. 

AND 



Permanent address, 1460 Bedford Are., Brooklyn. 



Opened HENDERSON'S, Coney Island, MAY 24. 



Phone, 1881-R Prospeot. 



JUST 



LON HASCALL 



Jaok Binder's "Behman Show." 



COMEDIAN 



EDWARD H. LUCAS 



In their Original "SCENES FROM DICKENS." 

May 31 (Headline™) — Empire, San Francisco. 

The San Franoiico "Examiner" says: "They present a genuine novelty, 
they are GENUINE artistes. " 



They demonstrated 



DIEUX 



In astounding fonts on the bounding wire. 
Permanent address, 801 E. 14th St., New York. 



LARRIVEEsLEE 

"The Candy Kid and the Girl." 
16th week on J. J. QUIGLEY CIRCUIT. 



WORKING IN "ONE" WITH GRAND PIANO. 





HENRY 

WEEK TUNE 14, SHEA'S. BUFFALO. 



L/*TE OF ORIGINAL "NIGHT WITH THE F»OETS 



HEATH 



McWILLIAMS 



PARSONS 



WEEK JUNE 21, TEMPLE, DETROIT. Maaaged by EDWARD S. KELLER, Lang Acre Bldg., New Yark 

When answering advertisement ft kindly mention Vahiktv. 



VARIETY 



27 




Written by GUS KAHN and GRACE LeBOY, the writers of "Gee! I Wish I Had a Girl/' will be introduced at the Fifth Avenue Theatre next week by 



RANK 




l 



I 



THE CALIFORNIA BOY with the Phenomenal Tenor Voioe 
OIN/IEI SONG!!! 



COR. BROADWAY AND 89TH STREET, NEW YORK. 






Woodruff, Henry. 
Wooley, Frank. 
Walker, Thomaa. 
Wballen, Mike. 
Wlsejoan, Gee. H. 
Wilson, Geo. W. 
Wolff, Lola. 
Warden, Edith. 
Wilkinson, Mrs. 0. J. 
Wsrren, Day A Wanes 

(0. O.) 
Williams, Male (0. O.) 
Williams, Arthur (C. O.) 
Wardell, Harry (0.0.) 
Wilfred A Lottie. 
Wales, Elile. 
Welxelhsum, K. 
Werner, Hsrry. 
Wills, Nst. 
Wilsons, Musical. 
Weogg, W. 



Williamson. R. D. 
Williams, T. H. 
Whitney, Helen. 
Wlnterbaon, Geo. 
Ward, Helen. 
Whltmsn, Florence (0. 

O.) 
Wright. Harry (0. 0.) 
Walters, Roland. 
Whlttlng A Procee. 
Whitehead A Qrlerson. 
Weston, Sam. 
Watton, B. 
Wood, Jlmsie. 
Wilson Trio, Jack. 
Wakefield. WUla Holt. 
Walters, Clara. 
Walsh, Billy. 

York, Katherloe. 
Yonng, Florlan. 



Yonngson, WlUlam. 
Yonng, James. 

Yonng, William (0. 0.) ... _„ 

Yonng, Mrs. Wm. (0.0.) Zarrow, Ed. 



Young, Pearl. 
Zarrow, George. 



Young, Myrtle Y. 



Zlnk, Adolpb. 



VARIETY'S 
Branch Offices 



Advertisements and subscriptions re- 
ceived in each at regular rates. 

News items may be forwarded to 
the moat convenient, and will be 
promptly transmitted. 

Letters may be sent to either of the 
addresses, and will be forwarded or 
advertised. 

Publication Office 

TIMES SQUARE 

NEW YORK CITY 



CHICAGO 

Chicago Opera House Block 

FIANK WIESBIRG 

Representative 

SAN FRANCISCO 

2064 Sutter St. 

JOHN J. O'CONNOR 

Representative 



LONDON 

418 Strand, W. C. 
JESSE J. FREEMAN, in charge 

Cable "Jessfree: London" 



CORRESPONDENCE 

Unless otherwise noted, the following re- 
ports are for the current week: 

GHIGAGO 

By FRANK WIMHIRg. 

VARIETY'S Chicago Office, 
Chicago Opera House Block. 

MAJESTIC (Lyman B. Glover, nigr. ; agent. 
W. V. A.). — Carter De Haven, accompanied 
by Leon a Pam and Lillian Rhodes, feature, pre- 
H«'iitliig a delightful and artlBtlc combination of 
Hong8 and dances, with a beautiful setting. Aalilo 
from De Haven's own individual work, the two 
girls are clever, and the offering Is about the 
iR'st of Its kind Hhown here. Emma Janvier ap- 
pealed particularly to women, with her eccen- 
tricities and comments on feminine incidents. 
She proved an excellent number following James 
Young and Catherine Calvert (New Acta). Her- 
bert and Willing have their first showing at 
the Majestic since they closed with a burlesque 
show. Their material Is about the same, slightly 
freshened. They are credited with emphasising 

the negro type with unusual skill and quite a de- 
parture In this t particular style. Tom Nawn, 
asslHted by Mrs.' Nawn and Charlotte Appelle, 
the latter not altogether happily placed as the 
Genii, seemed to elicit Intercut as in the past 
when the vehicle was first brought to view. 
Ila Grannon has magnetic personality and wltii 
tine stage presence won the plaudits with catchy 



songs. This is her first appearance here. 
Schrode and Mulvey actually started the best 
part of the show. They seemed to Inject anima- 
tion Into the entire performance after they ap- 
peared, for It was dolefully tame before. The 
Banks-Breaselle Duo, two women, attired In 
Colonial garb, played Instruments expertly. 
There Is no comprehensive reason for the fancy 
dress. Donald Graham, singer of Scotch songs, 
following the style of Jack Lorlmer, has not the 
voice or songs of the other and does not dance. 
Lugl Brothers are acrobats, similar to Rice and 
Prevost and many others of the same brand. 
The acrobatics of the straight are good, while 
the comedy suffered by comparison. Francisco 
and McCone, magicians, appeared, and Paul San- 
dor's animal act closed. 

AMERICAN (Wm. Morris, mgr.; agent, direct). 
— Eddie Foy heads, also Young Brothers, Fred 
Fischer and Maurice Burkbart, De Blere, Delmore 
and Lee, Paul Nicholson and Miss Norton. Edith 
Helena, Mr. and Mrs. Clarke, "Those Four Girls." 

JULIAN (J. C. Condermao, mgr.; agent, Wil- 
liam Morris).— Louis Kelso, Haverly and Wells, 
Mr. and Mrs. Monroe and Co., Innes and Ryan, 
Iblilkawu Jups. 

NATIONAL (Dr. Reed, mgr.; agent, William 
Morris).— Nat Burke and Co., Lord and Warren, 
Rene Moska. Eva Detnar, Bonuer and Boylyn. 

OGDEN (W. F. Welnrlcb, mgr.; agent, William 
Morris). — Maud Cooper, Harry Ross, Lillian 
Garay, Dan Aheru. 

WHITE FRONT (Johnson Bros., mgrs. ; agent. 
William Morris).— Rlegler and Delcourt, Ward 
and Webster, Lord and Warren, The Murthalers. 
ADD CHICAGO NOTES 

Bert Buker will pJay a few weeks In vaudeville 
this summer, opening at the Majestic next week. 
He will be starred by Mort Singer next season. — 
Abe Reynolds and Dave Ferguson have resigned 
with "Miss New York, Jr." for next season.— 
Williams and Van Alstyne will furnish the music 
for Montgomery and Stone's new musical piece 
which George Ade has finished. 

NOTES.— Hampdon Durand and Jhuips V. Lee 
are collaborating on songs and sketches for a 
number of vaudeville nocple. They have completed 
a new act for May Ridel le, who leaves musical 
comedy for vaudeville. — James J. Corbett says he 
will sail for the other side this summer to play 
a season In England and other cities In "A Thief 
of the Night," his present vehicle. lie will then 
return to the States and play 30 weeks for Wil- 
liam Morris. He will not resume his starring tour 
at least until season after next.--A new vaude- 
ville theatre will be erected by D. II. McCarthy 



at Bear Lake, Mich. It will have a sestlng ca- 
pacity of 1,200.— Charleston, W. V., will have a 
first class vaudeville theatre early next season. 
Louis II. Ramsey, of Lexington, Ky., Is the build- 
er. — The American Music Hall will temporarily 
close the second week In July to enable the con- 
tractors to remodel the Interior of the bouse. A 
balcony will be one of the Important Innovations 
and the place will be generally beautified and en- 
larged. -A series of Sunday afternoon concerts 
will be Inaugurated at the Auditorium next fall. 
They will be orchestral In chsrscter. Among the 
soloists engaged by Max Rablnoff, under whose 
direction they will be given, Include Nordics, 
Martin, Sammarco, Constantino, Blspham, Eddy, 
Maud Powell, Mme. Olltska, Zukowskl.— Geo. W. 
Stewart gave a trial of his new scenic sketch at 
one of the theatres last week and made a good 
Impression. — McWatters and Tyson will probably 
go with Lew Fields next season. At present the/ 
they are playing dates around Chicago. Miss 
Tyson has fully recovered from her recent accident 
which resulted In her being confined In her room 
at the Sherman nouse for seversl days. — On or 
about October 1 the Sherman House, famous ss a 
theatrical reudesvous, will be torn down and a 
magnificent 15 story built on the present site. The 
hostelry will be completed and opened the follow- 
ing year. It will be patterned after the Knicker- 
bocker in New York. — Sam Ehrllch has withdrawn 
from bis vaudeville act and will hereafter give his 
attention to writing and producing. He will make 
his headquarters In Chicago. His wife will con- 
tinue In the sketch. 



SAN PRAINGIACO 

ORPHEUM (Martin Beck, gen. mgr.; agent, 
direct).— Week 31: Mabel Illte and Mike Donlln 
headed In "Stealing Home." The comedy suffered 
for few If any In the audience had ever beard of 




1909 



Gus Hill's Enterprises 



1910 



HOMER L.IIMD 

In a New American Play " THE INNER MAN " 



tfa- 



A Comedy with Music 



"THE SMART SET 



If 



I 9 

eo PEOPLE 60 



"McFADDEN'S FLATS 



MANAGEMENT OF BARTON * W18WELL. 
HILL A MANCHESTER'S ENTERPRISES 



"Vanity Fair" "Crackerjacks" "Masqueraders" 

WANTED. — Singers, Dancers, Novel Features. Comedians. Good-looking Chorus Girls, Vaudeville .\< ' •■. >'< 



"OAT NEW TORN" 

"THE SHOEMAKER 



Ml 



ngers, Dancers, Novel Features, lomecilans, uood-looklng Chorus Girls, Vaudeville .\h-. «'<• 

TO LET FOR ROAD OR STOCK 

"HAPPY HOOLIGAN" "AROUND THE CLOCK" 'A HOT OLD TIME" 

"THROUGH THF HREAK1.KS" 

1356 Broadway, Now York 



When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



28 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTIST© 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



— 




GUY RAWSON 



AND 



rRANODS GLARE 



"JUIT KIDS 



•• 



Address VARIETY. 



DICK » ALICE McAYOY 



"Herald Square Jimmy 



w 



Sing of the Newsboys. 



Address oare VARIETY. 



II 



I*ISTKM 1 1 



CHARLOTTE TOWNSEND 

The 0BX6XMAL Hotel Switchboard OtrL 



united 



VELDE TRIO 

In their European Equilibria! Aorobetio, Combination, including the "LOOP-THE-LOOP" DOGS 
(The original, not a copy). Tor Parka and Fain address Mies Ethel Robinson, Western Vaudeville 
Association, Chicago. Permanent address, oare VARIETY, Ohioago Offloe. 

Valerie Bergere 

AND HER OWN COMPANY. %B9 



Presenting m repertoire et Playlets 



TIME ALL FILLED 



3 Marvelous Mells 



(1 Woman and • Ken) 

SENSATIONAL GYMNASTS (Original). 
Open for Vaudeville, Parka, Pairs and Burlesque. 



Address oare VARIETY. 



GRANT 



GARDNER STODDARD 

Presenting "VAUDEVILLE FRIVOLITIES" 

Tremendous Success in England 



MARIE 



OPENED on the MOSS-STOLL Tour in LONDON, MAY 1 7th. 

Agent H. We WIELAND, 16 St. Martini St., London, W. C. 



RE-ENGAGED AT ONCE FOR THE ENTIRE TOUR. 

(REGARDS TO ALL FRIENDS) 



WILL HALI.IDAY and PETE CURLEY are MOT playing "The Battle of "Too-Soon." Their new 

vehicle is a scenic comedy production. 

Halliday and Curley 

AT THE NORTH POLE 




FRANK KEIMIM 

SCENERY FROM THE LEE LASH STUDIOS. 

Rube Dickinson 



EX-JUSTICE OF THE PEACE. 
Per. Address, WHITE RATS 

El O M & f»l_UI 



sam - GORDON and SHAKEN - emma 

Eooentrio Singers and Danoera. 
Direction B. A. MYERS, Knickerbocker Theatre Building, Hew York. 



r\/iiivi 



ALEXANDRA DAGMAR 



Address care VARIETY. 



WKIETY 

IMS BROADWAY. MEW YORE CITY. 

CARDS OF ARTISTS 

UNDER THE HEADINO OF 

•• REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS " 



AT FOLLOWING RATES: 

1 Inches double ool , S22.50 monthly, not 
1-2 Inoh across page, 16.00 " 

1 Inoh ,r 26.00 

2 Inches " 60.00 

Lsr((er 'Space Pro Rata 

Mo advertisement under this heading scoepted for less than one month and no preferred position 

given. Remittance must accompany advertisements forwarded by mail. 

Cash disoount for 6 and 12 months. 



1 -2 Inoh single ool., 64.00 monthly, net 

Inoh ™ 7.00 

1-2 Inoh double ool., 6.60 

1 Inoh ■ 1 2.60 



ii 

II M 



•I 
•I 




UNITED TIME 



KENNEDY 



Pat Casey, Agent 



When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



VARIETY 



29 




WONDER WORKER 




Fifth Avenue Theatre, New York, indefinite 



June 14— Third Week 






ALF T. WILTON, Agent 



■■ 

native language, the singer* ha ml ling each tongue 
fluently. The troupe consist* of a man, a woman, 
who carrle^'off the honor* of the pl«ce» and three 
small glrlsjfwho a<l«t to the stage picture rather 
than the viajnlor artistic streugth of the sketch. 
There are several < lianges of scene, the piece 
being finiM.i-H t <■; > presented In every detail with a 
very atrong appoal for kind applause at the finish. 
The number Is novel and odd In Its class. Patsy 
Doyle gave the best on the bill a hard chase. 
lis put over a laugh with every story and topped 
It all off with a little stepping which brought 
back memories of the add Howe and Doyle days. 
Jennings and Renfrew pate framed up a lot of 
parodlee and songs with d|tc)i lines, which landed 
them In a soft spot and wisely refraining from 
too much talk passed through In fine shape. The 
Zanettos gave the show a good start with some 
capital Juggling. 

IX BINS 1» UCB (Geo. Bothwell, mgr. : 
ugent, William Morris). — The week's bill offered 
plenty of variety with a fair average of enter- 
tainment. Celloa De Deo with a trained animal 

■aa-aaa«.M.s«^..™B-^B*B*BaBssaBBansasBanasBnsaa*B*B 



the Polo Orounda or Hans Wagner, bat never- 
theless Mabel and alike scored a aafe hit, maluly 
through the cleverness of the former. Billy Van 
In blackface told some funny stories and sang 
some funny songs. Avednno Quartet, two women 
and two men, favorably received. A baritone solo 
by one of the men Just about pasaed. "A Strenu- 
ous Rebeanal" until Claude Ollllngwater entered 
dragged consldenfBljy but ouce he got buay thing* 
brightened up and the act finished easily the 
laughing hit of the bill. The Vlodobonas are sup- 
|K**ed to be eccentric comedians direct from the 
European Music Halls They may be taken for 
coined laus on the other side, but over here It will 
be aald that one la a good violinist. The hold- 
overs were Donald and Carson, Baeder-La Velle 
Trio and "Sunny South." 

NATIONAL (Sid Grauman, mgr.; agent, S.-C. 
W. Reese). — Carroll Johnson, second week aud 
repeated success. Harry LeClair made good. 
Count DeButt and Toasell, amusing bicycle turn, 
but the Count's comedy Is rather suggestive and 
could be dropped without Injury to the act. Both 
are good wheel performers. Sydney Qrant couldn't 
seem to make the audience understand his 
"Archie" stories. Zay Holland la au excellent 
violinist with a good voice. The Elite Musical 
Four played popular selections and were forced 
to several encores with the brasses. Considerable 
Improvement could be made In appearance through 
new uniforms. The present ones are anything but 
beautiful. 

EMPIRE (W. Z. Tiffany, mgr.: agent. W. S. 
O. 8. Burn?). — Mr. and Mrs. Edward Lucas top 
the bill with "Scenes from Dickens." The most 
artistic piece of work is shown In the closing 
from "Bleak House." Mons. Noe J. LaVlgne is 
undoubtedly one of the best baritone singers on 
the st aire, formerly a local dramatic teacher be 
naturally was a big hit, but Mr. LaVlgne could 
hold his own on any bill and well earned the re- 
ception handed him. Cummlngs and Merley were 
programmed as offering a "laugbable farce," en- 
titled 'The Major's Wife.' " The billing was in 
wrong, for the act ran nearly a half hour without 
a laugh. The International Comlques were a bit 
crippled owing to the ahsence of one, but kept 
things moving and were well applauded. Trlxeda 
and Robinson are a pair of good entertainers. The 
female member is a graceful dancer and plays an 
exceptionally good "tough," but In this line her 
partner Is only fair. He made a quick change to 
evening clothes and In a straight role makes good. 
Walton opened the show. As a Chinese "Legit" 
Walton Is In a class by himself and In a different 
spot would have done much better. 

FISCHER'S (E. A. Fischer, mgr.).— "The King 
of Patagonia." 



and delivery brought her many encores. Her 
gown* are the talk of the town. S. Miller Kent, 
In "Marriage In a Motor Car," excellent vehicle, 
capably handled. Margaret Feeley, a Denver 
actress snd * company of local players, were ac- 
corded a hearty reception. They presented 
"Witches' Hour and Candle Light," telling a story 
of north and south. The "Gibson Girl Review" 
gave the audience a chance to see seven pretty 
girls, who sang fairly well. Julius Tannen was 
the individual bit with a bright monolog. The 
Three Misses Weston, Instrumentalists, opened 
strong. The Three Dooala, gymnaats, closed sod 
held sttention. 

CRV8TAL (Wm. A. Weston, gen. mgr.; agent, 
W. S.)— An exceptionally good bill, headed by 
Rafayette's Terriers, one of the best dog act* 
shown here. Lucy Lucler, Ellsworth and Irwin, 
harmony singers, excellent. Houaely and Russel, 
comedy aketch, "He and She," one of the beat 
laughing vehicles of the season. The man in the 
act doea not speak until the fall of the curtain. 
Hoyt and Marlon, very good. Maale Martell, 
alnger and impersonator, went well. Business ex- 
cellent. 



of her stay here. Bert Williams made hie first 
appearance in tbla house and scored additional 
honor* In filling the spot Just ahead of the diver 
with better results than any of the others who 
have attempted. Williams was one big bit from 
start to finish, and with a crowded houae to work 
to Monday night Mia* Kellerman bad to watt un- 
til Williams made a speech after bis fourtb *oog. 
Oaston aud Greeu also registered a substantial 
hit with their new sketch, called "Spooueyville." 
It la a delightful bit of light entertainment with 
clever catchy songs and nicely placed talk. Both 
acquitted themselves admirably, and Miss Green 
wou some extra laurels for "You'll . Be Sorry." 
There la considerable horse-play and a bad finish 
to "A Fortune Hunter's Misfortune," presented 
by Edgar Allen and Co., but the sketch waa well 
received. No little merit 1* added by Gene War- 
ner, who is an accomplished harpist. Butler and 
Basaett put over a solid score with their novel 
skating on real Ice. The Bennee Family offered a 
comic opera version with costume change* for each 
number. The selections were all sung It their 



BOSTON 



DENVER 



By HARRY X. BEAUMONT. 

Office, Crystal Theatre Building. 

ORPIIEITM (Martin Heck, gen. mgr.; agent, di- 
rect). — For the last week (31) of the season the 
bill was not up to standard. Lily Lena, head- 
liner, revelation to the West. Her peculiar atyle 



THERE IS ONLY ONE REAL BALLAD 



By ERNEST L. WAITT. 

VARIETY Office, 68 Summer St. 

KEITH'S '(Geo. Clark, mgr.; agent. U. B. (>.). 
— Vesta Til ley, headlined, big welcome; Frank 
Stafford and Marie Stone, In really good sketch; 
"Silvers" and Nelson, clown and acrobat, great; 
Heury Cllve. illusionist; Tate's "Motoring"; 
McKay and Cantwell. good act; Milt Wood, danc- 
ing; Frederick's Pony, 

ORPHEUM (Lindsay Morrison, mgr.; agent, 
William Morris).— Jas. K. Hackett, featured, 
excellent sketch, well played; Dolly Toye, double- 
voiced singer, a bully act; Collins and Hart, 
big laughs; Canarls, good magician; Millard 
Bros, comedy cyclists; Moore and Stasia, good 
posing and singing; Besnah and Miller, fair; Will- 
iams and Rose, good sketch; Amos, Juggler, many 
novelties. 

GLOBE (R. P. Jeannette, mgr.; agent, direct.). 
— Roland Traverse, Illusionist; Kennette and Pat- 
terson, songs snd stories; The Bowmans; Aurlem- 
ma, singer; Jack Clahane, Jack Manley, singers. 

PREMIERE.— Mack and Hill, German; 8 mall 
and Webster, Barron and Worgbley, and "Blos- 
som Row." 

HUB (Jos. Msck, mgr.; sgent, direct).— Rollins 
and Carmen Sisters, Fannie Hatfield and Co., 
Dan Morrison. 

NEW PALACE (I. Mosber, mgr.; agent, direct). 
—Moon and Phllllppe, Hayes and W Utile, Julia 
Tracy and Henry Little, with m. p. 

WONDERLAND.— Joseph Merrick and Co.. Mr. 
and Mrs. Harry Thorne, Mr. and Mrs. Jamea 
Galor, Winnie Crawford. Mrs. Jules Levy and 
Co., Willie Slsto. Teel's Band. 

NORCMBEGA PARK.— Open-air theatre burned 
last week, Is being rebuilt; opened next week. 

NOTES.— Lindsay M orison, mgr. Orpheum, Is 
to keep the house open this summer with his own 
stock company. — "101 Ranch," week 14. 



JOE 



ACNES 




THIS YEAR. 



WHEN I DREAM IN THE 
GLOAMING OF YOU 

Get It-SliAPIRO'S Got It 



t * 



PHILADELPHIA 

By GEORGE X. YOUNG. 

KEITH'S (H. T. Jordan, mgr.; agent. C. It. O.) 
— No better balanced or more entertaining bill ha* 
been offered here In * long time. Not an act fell 
down, and there was a pretty close race among 
several for the chief honors, with Annette Keller- 
man holding her own In the third and final week 



(Late feature "Schooldays" Co.) 



Alhambra Next Week 



(JUIme: i4) 






PAT CASEY 

The man behind 
the booking 



REMICK 

The man behind 
the songs 




M 



LULL BEESOIN 



I 



rvl.C3.l-H 



irvj 



YES I 
IS 



S/\/V\ Rl 

HERE. 



D/1HNTY LU 

OAKLAND "TRIBUNE," June 1st. 

The audiences are finding keen satisfaction 
In the lively vaudeville at the Oakland Orpheum 
this week. 

One of the greatest dancing acts ever seen 
here la contributed by the Lulu B * — OB trio. 
Miss 15ri-s.ni Is a dainty maid, light of foot, 
pretty of face and charming In every respect. 
Not the least pleasing feature «»f her perform- 
ances Is an electrical novelty, whereby her face 
is pictured t>n a screen while she Indulges In a 
series ">f expressions, all in pantomime, some- 
thing after the fashion of Anna Held when that 
artist used to render "I Just Can't Make My 
Kyes Behave." 



LU BEESON and Vl/ARD And 

SAN FRANCISCO "EXAMINER,'' May 17th. 
"Night in El Paso" Attracts. 
Of the new nets, the most distinctive Is that 
of the Lulu lb. son Trio, entitled "A Night In 
El Paso." Willi magnificent scenery and beau- 
tiful costumes "The Night" is but a songful 
prelude to an exhibition of soft shoe dancing 
thai brought rapturous applause. Miss B e t p ou 
is considered the leading soft shoe- dancer of 
America and certainly her work yesterday was 
a proof that few feminine devote«»s of the buck- 
and wing can teach her anything. A feature 
of the act was u biiarre presentation of Miss 
Iteeson's face on the back drop, magnified to 
heroic size and as life-like and animated as the 



WEBER 

clever dancer herself had appeared a few min- 
utes be fo re. There was minii speculation as to 

how this living portrait, too natural to lie a 
moving picture. \mis produced. 



PAT CASEY 

Sole Representative 



When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



30 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



■ 



FRED KARNO'S Comedians 



• in* 



NOW PLAYING LONDON, ENGLAND 



Night in an English Music Hall" 
Night in Slums of London" 
Address all Communications to ALF. REEVES, Manager, 27 Vaughan Road, Camberwell, London 



WILLA HOLT WAKEFIELD 



soho BiABDrea. 

I I L I A M MOESII OISOVIT. 



Lillian Hale— Co. 

Presenting •• THE PHANTOM RIVAL/* Written by 

SAGIR DEAN 

MANGEAN TROUPE 

Lady and Gentleman Novelty Acrobats Introducing the First and 

Only Lady Doing Double Somersaults 

From a Teter Board to Shoulders 
Closed lew York HIppodroma Hay 29, have some open time. 



can 



OPENS 




JUNE 




BRIGHTON BEACH MUSIC HALL 




WILL ROSSITER'S 

$5,000.00 SCENIC 

AND ELECTRICAL 

PRODUCTION. 



WITH THE 



ANGEL VOICE" 



Be on hand to witness the most beautiful and artistic act in America. 
Exclusively Booked by JACK LEVY, 140 W. 42d ST., N. Y. CITY 



irsi 



WIREINE 



The most sensational and daring slack wire per- 
formance ever shown. For particulars address 

B. A. MYERS, 

KNICKERBOCKER THEATRE BLOC, NEW YORK 




* 



i\/i>flkrvj 



irvj 



9 9 



ORIGINATORS OF "HEM AND 
HENRY," "MAKING THE WATCH" 
AND THE "ISTHMUS." OTHERS 
PLEASE LEAVE THESE ALONE. 
THEY BELONG TO T78 AND ABE 
COPYRIGHTED. 

Maa«t«aieat 

ALF. T. WILTON 



THE MAN WHO MADE "THE MASCOT" FAMOUS. 



HARRY BROWN 

IN HIS BIG SUCCESS "THE VILLAGE DOCTOR" 

11 "Cohen and His Ward" 



Supported by 

BILBERT FITZ8ERALD 

And A Clovor Co. 

WIEK JUIH 7tk 

AHIRJCAM. M. T. C 




presents 




(Copyrighted) 

BIG SUCCESS 

GEORGE BARTON, who was in my employ, is no longer 
with the above* act. 

Direction B. A. MYERS 





THE IRRESISTIBLE COMEDIENNE 



PLAYING UNITED TIME 



IXIE-TRAY IGANZA-FRAY 



INGING-SAY— JUNIE McCREE end ALBERT VON TILZBRS ONG-SAY 



•• 



OOD-KAY OU-YAY EARN-LA OO-TAY OVI-LA E-MA 



•• 



AT-PAY A3BY-KAY, Agent 



EUGENE ELLSWORTH and EDNA EARLIE LINDON 



Isa Hsrry Jackson's •oroasaU*' fare*. "HIS DAY 

When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



•• 



PLAYTNG IN THE WEST. 



VARIETY 



31 




San Francisco Office 




HAS BEEN ESTABLISHED AT 

2064 Sutter Street 

JOHN J. O'CONNOR, Representatite 

Advertisements and subscriptions may be forwarded to 
the San Francisco office at regular rates. 

News items sent there will be promptly transmitted. 

Mail addressed care of Variety, 2064 Sutter St., San Fran- 
cisco, will be forwarded when address is known, or advertised. 



act drew down a big share of the honors. Nothing 
particularly striking In Hhown, but It Ik h pleasing 
act for tbe small time. One of the dogs worked 
aa If he had been whipped. This was noticeable 
enough to hurt the act. The Cubltt Trio ftirnlfdicil 
a sloglug act, which only needs development. They 
are three girls, but the trio does not work together 
uulll tbe float number. Thin In a mistake. One 
of the three look* peaches In boy's clothes and all 
make an attractive appearanrc. A better song 
for the finish would help. (leorgla Nelson dls- 
appolnted only those who have seen her In the 
••Majesties." She sings a couple of songs nicely 
and theu talks a little. That little is too much. 
Georgia ought to sing only. She could add some- 
thing by picking out a catchy boy song and np- 
l»earlng In suitable costume. The act was very 
well liked. Adcle Purvis Onrl and a young girl 
who does a pretty spade dance furnished one of 
the best liked numbers. The Carlos Trio, three 
men. all but s|>oilcd a good Instrumental act by 
olnging. The act is attractively dressed and the 
men are gissl musicians. Mayo and Mayo offered 
h comedy acrobatic sketch which pleased. Thomas 
|.«hir offered a monolog of light merit, and the 
Columliia Four got through nicely with a comedy 
singing turn on familiar lines. Mabelle Nash wan 
replaced after the first show by (ieorge Atkinson, 
a blackface comedian. J. Salkeld, ill. songs, held 
over, and there were several new pictures. 

1'Nlgl'K iK. J. Harry, mgr. >.— The Three 
lyres won the chief laurels this week with a 
fHlrly good bill in support. Renzetta ami I/a Rue 
were well liked for their comedy acrobatic turn 
with Reno and Smith in a barrel-Jumping net, also 
doing nicely. Walter Reynolds met with only 
slight success with his monolog, the talk being 



draggy. Reynolds needs to Inject life iulo his 
deilvery. Stanhope and Castle used an old sketch 
for their offering, but put It over In good shape 
and they were well received. Jennie (Jlrard saug 
three songs in generous applause. The sougs are 
pitched extremely high, the top notes belug 
screechy, a defect easy of remedy. Professor 
Struck, with a Herrmann-like make-up and a 
routine of simple sleight-of-hand tricks, managed 
to mystify and entertain enough to win favor. A 
new trick or two would help him a lot. John 
O'Hrlen, the weekly hold-over, did well with songs 
and some "gags." His liest laughs were secured 
with Charley Kcuna's caudle story. O'Brien has 
changed the first part of It. lie has also adopted 
OfTcnunu's fault of "kidding" the audience and 
the cnmly-box patrons. This is unnecessary and 
may teach him bad habits. 




ITALY'S LEADING PAPER 

FOR THI 

Afltaitel Picture md Phomgripfc Bishess 

PUBLISHED FORTNIGHTLY. 
•Mi larga pagaa. Eight shillings far UIU 

(11.60). 

MHar*Pivpriftert Prof. GUALTTERO L FABBEI, 
SUM, St, Tto 4*1 taito, M MlUa (Italy). 



ATLANTIC CITY, N. J. 

YOl N4JN PIKK (agent, t\ B. O.i.-Joe Harts 
•Bathing <;irls." solid hit; Frederick V. Bowers 
(New Acts); Kstelle Wordette and Co.. In "A 
Honeymoon In the Catskllls." hit; Horton and 
I .a Triska. very clever; Veronica and Hurl-Falls, 
comedy acroliats. sensatioual; tJracey, excellent 

musical. SAVOY (Harry Brown, mgr. ; agent, 

direct).— Clarence Sisters, went hlg; Ralph White 
head (New Actsi; Florrle Benjamin, good; in. 
p. .XTKKPI.ECI1ASE PIER. (E. L. Perry, mgr.; 
agent. Rudy Heller). — California Musical Trio, 
excellent; De Muths (New Acts); Billy Davis, 
very good; Baby Carlln and Louis Wlnsch, good; 

m. p. NOTE.— Beginning Monday, June 21. 

the Steeplechase Pier will run seven acts. Three 
shows dally will l»e given. I. B. PI'LASKI. 



BALTIMORE. 
MARYLAND (Fred C. Shnuuberger. mgi . : 
agent. V. B. O. Monday rehearsal 10). Smith 
ami Alexander, "Apache." and other dances, well 
executed but rather tiresome. Bnnlta, wore stun 
ning costumes and assisted greatly by "plant" In 
a box; Frank Marckley, banjoist. fair; Horace 
Porter, character stories, too ancient a selection; 
Zara-('armcu Trio, excellent; 
milium, htulesque magicians, 

and Al I.ee (New Acts). 

A- Scheck. mgrs. ; agent. 
Merry MctJregors. excellent 
Murthn, (tcrman comedienne, 
field and Co. In "Am I Your Wife?" funny 
sketch, good company: Muslco. instrument 1ml 
tator, pleased; Kennedy ami Kennedy, s. and d., 
won favor; Frederick rlo. equilibrists, very good; 
Dorothy Manners, comcilicnne, dainty: Bert Han 
Ion. monologlst. icood. ACADEMY OF MUSIC 
• Harry Henkle. mgr.; agent, -M. W. Taylor). 
Shelly Trio, good; Perry and Elliott, comedy 
sketch, well received; Fred Cole's bull dogs, well 
trained; Butseber and Cross, applause; Bessie 
Browning. excellent. HoLLIDAY STREET 

iCcorgc Rife. mgr.). .Line Stunrt. \ery Hood ; 
The l.iingdons. goml lin|>rcssjon: Neil Bemiet, good: 
Williams and Lawrence. well received. 
I.l BIN'S TWIN »K. C. Karle. mgr). Vaudeville 



Martlnnl and Maxl- 
h mused; Ed. Wynu 
VICTORIA (Pearce 
Wm. Morris i. The 
singing act; Lilllim 
good; George Win- 




Gaumont'SS Films 



Licensed by Motion v^fV^/f^ "" Picture Patents Company 

RELEASE, TUESDAY, JUNK ljtli. 1909 

"HUNTED TO THE END" "A PAYINB BUSINESS" 

DRAMA Approximate length, 717 ft. COMEDT Approximate length, 886 ft 

RELEASE. SATURDAY. JUNK 19tH, 1909 

"THE CRY FROM THE WELL" 

DRAMA Approximate length, 812 ft 



Urban 





Licensed by Motion Picture Patents Company. 

WEDNESDAY. JUNK 16th, 1909 

'THE NEW FOOTMAN" "MODERN ALGERIA" 

COMEDT Approximate length, 609 ft SCENIC Approximate length, 196 ft 

WRITE FOR ADVANCE FILM DESCRIPTIONS. 




Importer of Gaumont and Urban-Eclipse Films. 
52 STATE ST., CHICAGO, ILL. 19 EAST 21st ST., NEW TOIE 



< 






niul m. p. «;a\'KTY « Wm. Ballauf, mgr.).— 

Vaudeville. HLK( TRK PARK (Max Rosen. 

mgr.). — Polar, "tin* man up the pole," clever; 
Matauda Japanese Troupe, good; Rlccl'a Baud; 

good attendance. 8UBURHAN PARK (August 

Feoneman, mgr.; agent, William Horrla). — Harry 
Dare, mutdcal, very good; Beatrice Vance, aong- 
atress, good; Mamie Fleming, well received; Mart 

Fuller, monologlat, pleaaed. OWYN OAK 

PARK (John Faraon, mgr.). — J. S. Rooney, 
pleased; May Fulton, good; Ardo and Eddo, bar, 

won favor. FLOOD'S PARK (Jack Flood, 

mgr.). — Vaudeville and burleaque. RIVER- 

VIKW PARK (Michael Fltsalmmous, mgr.).— 

HhihI concert h. vaudeville and m. p. BAY 

SHORE PARK (Dennla Rone, mgr.).— Boaton 
Indies' Orchestra. 



0HA&LE8T0V, 8. C. 



Brawtley, mgr.). — The 

, excellent; Scott Leslie, 

line; H. E. Chase, eccen- 

-ACADEMY OF MUSIC 

agenta. W. V. A.).— Al. 

head liner, excellent; BUI 

good; Kroft and Myrtle, 

a. and (1.. splendid; Jolly BUI Evans, ex- 

— HAMPTON PARK AIRDOME (Cbarlea 



MAJESTIC (Geo. S. 
Three Kellya, a. and d 
and Merry Little Maids, 
trie comedian, fair. — 
(Harry B. Ilearn, mgr.; 
White's Four Roaebuda. 
Jnnea. "Mualcal Moke," 
comedy 
cedent. 



vllle, — -OKPHKIIM (t'has. Sweeton, mgr.; agent, 
VYella Circuit). — The Orpheum did a very large 
business hint week, as no cara were running to the 
parka. This wreak Wh(hoii and IJttle, good co- 
medy aketcli; The Sin-lings, travesty; Jack 
Springer, Fred Primrose, blackface, m. p. 

OBBRDORFER. 

J0HV8T0WV, FA. 

(il.OBK (J. O. Foley, mgr.; Aaaociated Booking 
Agency of Pittsburg).- -Twin City guartet, good; 
Jim- Weston, l>lackface comedian, goml; The Mu- 
alcal Veera (colored), ordinary; S-S; Nellie Alqulst 
and OlUe Clayton, sister act, clever; Mr. Smith, 
champion aither player and yodler, took three en- 
ecrea at the opening ahow; Bradley and Ward, 
eccentric dancer* and talkera, good. AUDI- 
TORIUM (A. W. Thornley. mgr.). -Since It haa 
opened aa a m. p. house with Its pretty refresh- 
ment arbora it la doing a big bualneaa. Terence 
Boylan of this city has replaced "Jack Howard, 

late of Keith's," aa singer. NOTE.— Howard 

Damon 'ft Show did a rather light business here 
owing to rain, but gave two rut t ling perform- 
ances. JESTICAM. 



It. Mathews, mgr.). — Manhattan Stock Co., In 

vaudeville and repertoire. NOTE. — Mr. D. H. 

(•estcrflcld, formerly tbe mualcal director of the 
1'iistlme Amusement Co., has formed a partner-" 
ship with Mr. W. II. Bresnihan, a clever and 
popular young gentleman of this city, and they 
have opened the Olympic Theatre, formerly run 
by Mr. Geo. Chiida. The theatre, after It haa 

I n remodelled and new scenery Installed, will 

no doubt lie one of the prettiest here. They will 
inn VHiidevllle and moving pictures for Ave cents 
admission. J. KIIRICI1.H ME8SERVY. 



CUMBERLAND, MD. 

AfADK.MY OF MUSIC (Melllnger Bros., nigra. ; 
Ixxiklng agent. John McCasliu). — Pop. vaudeville 
was Inaugurated at this honae last week with the 
following bill: Percy aud Fields, comedy Jugglers, 
good; Iiew Welch. Hebrew politician, clever; I.011 
Hussy, xylophone expert, won applause; Kvans and 
Itukctt. talking. good; Eva Snyder, s. and d., very 

clever. NOTE. Elmer E. Rutter, late manager 

.of Tlie Maryland, left for Canton. O., to accept 
the management of a house in that city. — Wm. 
MeCrny. better known as "Cradoc," haa accepted 
the management of The Maryland and la getting 
things In shape for the coming aeaaon. — Merry- 
land Park opens Its regular season this week. 

W. D. ROIIRER. 



EVAN8VILLE, IND. 

On act omit of the street car atrlke In thla city 
the Herald Square 0|M>ra Co.. booked to play at 
Oak Summit Park, was cancelled, as no cara were 
running in that part of the city, and It was I in 
|M.v^j ii|,> f,,r people to reach the park; closed until 
the strike is declared off. The Air Dome 1* draw 
Ing nice crowds with moving' pictures and vaude 




SAYS 

He Can't Go Seven Days Without an 

Order. 

START SOMETHING AND SEE US GET 
A HUMP ON. 

It is said that a camel can go seven days 
without water. 

The SELIG POLYSCOPE CO., Inc. 

45-47-40 K. ]?;imli»1ph Stiret, 
C>si.'.-ii'..\ I'. S. A. 

Order SLUG'S Next 
"THE C0UM1PY GIRL'S PERIL" 



When an nciring advertisements kindly mention Vahikty. 



32 



— — 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



Netta Vesta 

anronro coitbdeehhe. 



EHreotloa JXYXB JACOBS. 



ft 



US Broadway. Bow York. 



Mt. and Mrs. 




Fir. addrBBs mi W. 185th St., Hew York. 
'fhiM, 8080 Momlngslda, 

tlenry a Alice Taylor 

THE 1X0 NOVELTY ACT. 

Thil week (June 7) American Music Hall, 
Hew York. 

BARNEY MYERS, Agent. 



wigoin'sTparm 

Apply U THE CHADWICH TUP. 



Barry-Wolford 



I Typaonl Top 



aatll July 1, 1909. 
Beating for the summer at 

Reeds Lake, Grand Bapida, Mick. 
Address BEBER'S PAVLUOM. 

BUSH and PEYSER 




"THE NARROW FELLER." 

THE PIOTTIS 



"THE ITALIA* AND HIS BWEETHEABT." 
Oar* VARIETY. Doing WelL 



Two Racketts 



- "Fiti In Evening Drat*." 

Permanent addreaa — £900 Eighth Aye., e/o 
Gain. 



J. 



»«""« MANLEY »"• 
d.llt STERLING 

Yea, we had a rood aeaaon. 
Harry F. Weber was our Pilot. 
Wo are at Einyavillo, Ont. 

VAX GRACE 

Ritter a"" Foster 

A0R0S8 THX POHD. 
Aiinm care VAUDEVILLE CLUB, 

•I Charing Cross Band, London, Bag. 

OTTO VIOLA and BRO. 

Comedy Acrobatic Pantomimista in 
"JUMPS AND BUMPS." 

Direction B. A. MTEB8. 

lavt Yaw Cart ia VAIIETY 



"THAT VERSATILE FELLOW. 

IRVIN 

Working! Yes, but hare 14th open. 



67 VABIETIE8 OF VAUDEVILLE. 

LTON 

74 W. 101 it St., Haw York City. 



ANOTHER "SURPRISE*" FROM THE WEST 



HIIFFORD 



AND 



CHAIN 



SINGING AND TALKING 



SOLE DIRECTION 

JACK LEVY 

140 W. 421 St., New York 

Phone: 2164 Bryant 

Cable Address: Jaclev 



RICHARD 




DIRECTION 

B. A. MYERS 

BMCBIBBOCBM TfltATBB BUILDING 



A NOVEL COMEDY GYMNASTIC ACT 



BOOBBB SOLID 



z 



THE ORIGINAL 

"AROUND THE WORLD 
IN FIFTEEN MINUTES" 

Having made such a Pronounced 
Hit as played by 



SINGING M W IMPERSONATOR 

Alta Yolo 



Some mediocre "copyists" are of oourse cropping 
up under suoh thin disguises "A Tour Around the 
World in 81 Minutes," but all managers know 
there it only one ALTA YOLO. 

Sole Direction B. A. MYERS 




morioan 



NANCE 



GWYN 



In her original, dainty CC 

and artistic conception of 




" "The Frolicing Woodnymph" 

Sole Direction JACK LEVY, 140 W. 42d St., New York. Phon., am Bryant, cabi. add™,., jaaia*. 



MILFORD, MASS. 

LAKE NIPMUO PARK (Dan. J. Bprague. mgr.; 
ngent, United Independent Bonking Office, N. Y. 
P.). — Cluett Jamas, fine; Kit Karaon, clever; Le 
Mare and Ilorton, excellent; The Spirit of '76, 
bit; Sadie Rogers, excellent. 

CIIA8. E. LACKBY. 



Joplln, Mo., agent). — Kentucky Girls, dinging, 
fair; I^ssanl Bros., acrobats, good; Vardcn, Terry 
nnd Wilbur. musical art. the lilt of the bill; 
Mable Casey, singing, fair; The Carta*, acrobats, 
well received; C. I* Carrell. ill. song, local; 
Lillian Doone and Co., tnl:i(l-readlng act, ap- 
plauded. J. F. B. 



Fabacber, mgr.). — Schwahh and Knell, Charles 
la Salle, Salvador De Angeln, Audrey Abbott and 
International Grand Opera Duo. 

(). M. SAMUEL. 



Hams. Bella Hall, Savoy-Michael Graham and Co., 
Sullivan and Summers, Virginia King, Two Graces 
and The Sorcerers. SAM FREEMAN. 



MUR01E, IHD. 

STAR (Ray Andrews, mgr.; Gus Sun, booking 
agent).— Lowell Drew, comedian, good; John 
Gnaa, trick bone soloist, very good; Frank Gray, 
III. song*, good; Lillian Wright and her dancing 
boys. "The Henry Bros.." bit; Mr. and Mra. 
Franklin Colby, spectacular Mack art musical 
novelty, hit. GEO. FIFER. 

MUSKOGEE, OKLA. 
LYRIC (C. L. Carrell, mgr.; C. E. Hodklna, 



j THERE IS OHLY OHE REAL BALLAD 



THIS YEAR. 



ft 



WHEN I DREAM IN THE 
GLOAMING OF YOU 

Get It— SHAPIRO'** Got It 



* » 



BEW OBLEAH8, LA. 

OREENWALL (Singer, Roae. Greenwall. I,eo 
pold A Israel, mgrs.).— Lew Roae. expounder of 
the theory that dancing below the waist line 
should be considered fonl. ia the resident manager 
of the GrccnwaJI during Its successful summer 
season of high class vandevllle at low down prices. 
Mr. Rose has Inaugurated a series of dally 
contests. On Monday there Is roller skating; 
Tuesday, waltalng; Wednesday, clusslcal piano 
playing; Thursday, amateurs; Friday, quartets; 
Saturday, ragtime piano playing. Trading stamps 
have not been given as yet. Hose admits he Is a 
great manager. Tokl Murata opened with dex- 
trous Juggling and skillful wire wnlklng: I<an 
cn«ter and Cooper are , comedians; Knnx and Alvln 
were generously applauded; Miss Alvln might 
lengthen her skirts with profit. lew Rose's 
"Minstrel Misses." a pretentious "girl act." 
"thought out." "got up" and "put on" by L. 
Rose, who Is also the Interlocutor, was a triple- 
plated hit from the Introductory overture to the 
final durst of minimi patriotism, during which 
"burst" the producer himself wrapped himself 
lu a huge American flag. FARACHER'S (A. 



OBEOBTA, H. Y. 

ONKONTA (Fred Glllen. mgr.).— Gormley and 
Audubate, comedy acrobats, very good; R. Vir- 
ginia King, vocalist, fair; Beauchamp and Audrey, 
comedy acrobats, few good stunts, act drags, needs 
more life and vim; Parson Sisters, a. and d., 
passed; Mrs. Norton, ill. songs, fair. 

READING. PA. 

ORPHKUM (Frank D. Hill, mgr.; agent, TT. B. 
O.). — Buutb and Rudd, (Mark and Hartman, I*rlti- 
cess Susanna, Thoa. Potter Dunn. m. p. BUI 
pleasing. Second half: Helm Children, Mimic 

Four, Creatore. Pollard. GRAND (Rela A Ap- 

pell, nigra. ; agent. W. 8. Cleveland). — Couture. 
The McKcunas. Second half: Columbia Comedy 
Four. Danny Dougherty, cx-champlon bantam, 

added attraction for week, got id drawing card. 

NEW BIJOU (direction S. Luhiii; agent. Bart Mc- 
Ilugh».--M. p. and F. Marlon Pierce and Co., 
Fra lit Row man. Miller and Muck. ("has. E. Mack. 
Bill changed Thursila.v. CARSONIA PARK.— 
0|S'iilng a success. G. R. II. 

SYRACUSE, N. Y. 

GRAND OI'KHA HOUSE (C. II. IMumer, mgr.). 

I 'earl Tangley, Wnsbburn's Animals. Joseph Ho 

uiiilne, Shrewbrnoke and Berry, I*ainbert and Wll- 



W0B0E8TEB, MASS. 

POLIH (J. S. Criddle. mgr.).— The Poll Stock 

Co. lu "The Bishop's Carriage." FRANKLIN 

SQUARE (John Burk, mgr.).— Franklin Square 

Stock Co. In "The Girl of the Golden Weat." 

PLEASANT STREET (Fred Dean, mgr.).— M. p. 

and III. songs. PARK (Samuel Grant, mgr.).-- 

M. p. and 111. songs. NICKEL (Samuel Grant. 

mgri.— M. p. and 111 songs. WORCESTER 

(John Bush. mgr.).--M. p. and 111. songs and 
vaudeville; Arthur Moore, pianist, big; Collin* 
and Lahellc. s and d.. good; Mr. and Mra. Jack 
Wheeler; "The New Wife," very good; La Sombre 
Bros., trapeze , fine. W. M. SHERMAN. 

YOUHOBTOWH, 0. 

IDORA PARK (Gen. Rose, mgr.; agent. United 
Olflces). -Robin, clever tramp Juggler; The Kram- 
ers, comedy aid dnnclug. fine; Cora Younghlooil 
( orsoii Sexlel, excellent girl and musical act; Cor 
coran n:id Dixon, funny minstrel act. and Larose 

and I.agusta. wire act. first class. NOTES. ■ -E. 

Stanley, formerly manager of Idora Park. Is In 
charge of ldlewlbl. a new resort on the Youngs- 
town A Sharon trolley line near Sharon. — Frank 
Tlerney. a vaudeville performer, baa filed suit for 
divorce from Irma Croft Tlerney, who was with 
the "Follies of 1W)7" Co. laat season. 

C. A. LEEDY. 



When anvwering advertisement* kindly mention Vabiety. 



VARI 



33 



SEND IN OPEN TIME FOR NEXT SEASON 

WitH Route Booked. Can Arrange Convenient Jumps 

WILLIAM MORRIS, Inc. 

Acts desiring immediate or later time abroad* forward particulars and photos at once. 

PARK MANAGERS, WILLIAM MORRIS, InC. Can furnish you with all the best acts you want 

«Hiiic«i w gwK MiyniiDiiw. NEW YORK LONDON orncc 4... t«amo.w.c 167 DEARBORN ST., CHICAGO 



LONDON OF riCC. 41 S STRAND, W. C 
PAUL HVRRAT. M>i»<tr. 



KJIVI 



I 



The Vaudeville Artists' Benevolent ■ Protective Order of America 

250 W. 42d STREET. NEW YORK CITY 

This is a General Booking Office, not confined to the handling" of talent who are members of our order only, but the theatrical frofession in general, 
giving us extraordinary facilities for procuring the best talent available. 

MANAGERS of Parks, Theatres, Fairs, etc., will do well to consult us and make our offices your headquarters when in New York. 

PERFORMERS, send in your open time. All performers welcome. 

NEW YORK REPRESENTATIVES for VER BECK A FARRELL. Booking time in Pennsylvania, Ohio, New York and Illinois. Nothing too large 
or small for us to handle. Address WM. H. STANLEY, Bui. Mgr. 

Members of V. A. B. A P. 0. of A. send your dues to this office. 'Phone— 4468-Bryant. 



QUICK RESULTS 

One customer whs so plonked with fown that we received this wire quick: "Press perfect; make 
iiiiinlter three forty-live at once. Harry Weaver." 

We get n lot just like this. Our "BOOKLET of STAGE FASHIONS FOE LADIES" Ik the answer. 
Semi f..r It; it eoats you NOTHING. 

WOLFF, FORDING & CO., 61-65 Eliot St., Boston, Mass. 



VAII 0ct y° ur RAILROAD TICKETS on the LEHIGH VALLEY A DELAWARE, 
■ VII LACKAWANNA A WESTERN R. R. at the VAUDEVILLE STEAMSHIP 

CAN 



sj \M If I PJ AGENT. Write, call <»r telephone. My representative will deliver the tickets 

^ar^^BBtasssl URIl to ymi. 1 havp always served yosj well. 
Going to Europe? Tickets on all Steamship Lines. Lowest rates. PAUL TAU8IG, 104 E. 14th St., 
New York, German Savings Bank Building. Telephone 2099 Stuyvesant. 

THE ENGLISH PROFESSIONAL JOURNAL 
Circulation guaranteed to be larger than that of any English journal derated to the Dramatie or 
Vaudeville Professions. Foreign subscription, 17a. 4<L par annum. 






■EW YORK AGENTS— Paul Tausig, 88-84 West 22d Street, and Samuel French ft Bona, S4-t6 
West ttad Street. 

Artists visiting England are invited to send particulars of their act and date of opening. 
8TAGE Letter Box is open for the reception of their mail. 

16 TORS STREET, COVENT GARDEN, LONDON, W. a 



Now booking Summer Parks and Vaudeville Theatres in California, Arisona, New Mexico and Texas. 

Managers Write or Wire. 
JO THEATRES JO 

THAT INDEPENDENT VAUDEVILLE AGENT 







BOSS SUTTER STREET, 



INDEPENDENT VAUDEVILLE CIRCUIT. 



8AN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



WANTED -BIG COMEDY and NOVELTY FEATURE 

Acts to write or wire open time. Now hocking for North Avenue, Schindler's and Thalia Theatres, 
Chicago. Also other houses in Illinois, including Castle, Bloomington; Grand, Joliet. 

CHICAGO BOOKING AGENCY 

CHAS. H. DOUTRICK, Manager. Room 29, 92 La Salle St, Chioago. 



OPERA HOUSE MANAGERS 

Let me^cjak your theatres for the summer with vaudeville and motion pictures Write for particulars. 

CASINO VAUDEVILLE BOOKING AGENCY 

Republlo Building. Room 024, Chioago, 111. 'Phone Harrison 8969. CONEY HOLMES, Manager. 



ARTISTS' REPRESENTATIVE 
Booking Vaudeville Acts Everywhere. Can always arrange plenty of work for good 

Send your open time. 
(SUITE llll-lllS) SCHILLER BUILDING (OARRICK THEATRE), CHIOAGO. 



aota, 



WANTF D GOOD ACTS at all times. Booking houses in New York. 

ww ** 1^ ■ t %J ■ Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia, Maryland and Michigan 

Address : ASSOCIATED BOOKING AGENCY, 404 Schmidt Bid C . f PITTSBURG, Pa. 





Among my LIMITED EXCLUSIVE PERMIT PARODIES are "The Right Shirt but the Wrong Jew!" 
"Beautiful Lies!" "Meet Me With Your Clothes on, Rosie!" "I love my wife, but oh! you kid!" (with 
baby business). Price $1 each. Send for List. Gaiety Theatre Building, New York City. 

NOT CONNECTED WITH AMY OTHER BOOKING OFFICE. 

LONG ACRE CIRCUIT 

521-5 90 Lonrf Acre Building, Tlmaa f quare, New York 

ACTS WANTED for Family Vaudeville Theatres. Put your name on the books. If you make 
good, we can keep you working. 

L. N. SHED EN, General Manager. 



HAMMERSTEINS 
VICTORIA 



AMERICA'S M08T 
FAMOUS VARIETY 
THEATRE. 



Open the Year Around 

VAUDEVILLE HEitDLIMRS 
GOOD STANDARD ACTS 



AND 



If you have an open week you want to Oil at 
abort notice, write to W. L. DOCKSTADBR. 

Garrick Theatre. Wilmington. Del. 

Can close Saturday night and make any city eaat 

of Chicago to open Monday night. 

ERNEST EDELSTON 

VARIETY AND DRAMATIC AGENT. 
f 7 Qreea St., Leloeater Square, LONDON 

Sole Representative. 
John Tiller'a Companion. Waller C. Kelly. 

Little Tick. Fragaun. 

Always Vacancies fer Good Aels 



Percy G. 




CIRCUIT 



The COLONIAL 
The ALHANBIA 
The 0RPHEUM 
The CRESCENT 



New York 

Harlem 

Brooklyn 

Brooklya 



The NOVELTY WUttanuberg 
The GOTHAM East Now York 
The GREENP0INT Brooklyn 

Addreit all PERSONAL Mtera to 
PERCY 0. WILLIAMS, Unr Acre Bid*, 
1505 Broadway, New York 



THE AUTHOR WITH THE GENOME SUCCESSES 

Aak Mark Murphy, Pred Bowers, Grade Km- 
mett A Co., Harry First ft Co., Coombs and Stone, 
Charles Bounell and Mable Craig, Dave and Percle 
Martin. The Cbadwlck Trio, Sommers and Storke, 
and over One Hundred and Plfty others. Order 
your new material for the coming season now 
from the Author who has the real successes to 
his credit. CHARLES HORWITZ, Knickerbocker 
Theatre Bldg., 1402 Broadway, V. Y. Boom 816. 



THE COLUMBIA 

BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

VAUDEVILLE 

N. S. EPSTIN, Manager. 

One place where all managers either see act* personally or get reports. 

Booked Through United Booking Offices. 



IIVUVIEIDI 

From two to five weeks 



Fox Vaudeville Booking Agency 

DEWEY THEATRE, Mew York 

VAUDEVILLE ACTS OF ALL KINDS WANTED 

ENTERPRISE AMUSEMENT CO. 

110 Bell Block, CINCINNATI, O. 

Artists send in your o, en time. WM '. IMfl, General Manager. 



When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



34 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



the YzyrrnxLoauxsT WITH a production 

ED. F. 

REYNARD 

Presents Beth Dewberry and Jawn Jawnson la 

"A MORNING IN B20RBVTLLE." 

Direction JACK LEVY. 



HOVA 



BliiD - 





Tfcsj CkaiyUm Stsagsrs mt TAmiovllU 

BERT COOTE 



Club, W. fTtk ft, M«w York. 

160 Oxford St., W. 




All those theatrically interested are wondering If 



WALTER STANTON 

" THE GIAHT ROOSTER " 



•ad "Only Bird Impcreonator la the Uelveree" 
(Vide Frees), hen had enythiag to do with the 
phenomenal raa of "Jaak aad Jill," which beats 

AddrtM direct, or WM. MORRIS, Afeat 




(LOUISE) 



(EDITH) 



Hamlin sNoyes 

"JUST 0IBL8 IH COMEDY.'' 

Comedy Playlet. 

Agsaaat. ALF. T. WILTON 

STUART BARNES 

Direction GEO. HO MAMS. 

FLYING WEAVERS 



Care WHITE EATS, 



SHEER "d BURTON 

Singing and Talking Comedians. 
Invite offers. Address oare VARIETY. 



It isn't the name that mahee the act- 
It's the aot that mahee the name. 




THE XING OE IRELAND. 

JAMES B. DONOVAN 

AMD 

RENA ARNOLD 

QUEEN OF VAUDFVILLE, 
DOING WELL, THANH YOU. 

SEYMOUR 

and NESTOR 

NOVELTY 80101X0 AOT. 

Address Ml West 170th St.. New York. 

"Phone STtS Audubon. 



■ 



THE 

BARREL 
BUMPERS 

HIDE (ASWELL 



AMD 



ARNOLD 



HOLD 
AN AMERICAN RECORD IN PARIS. 

44 ENGAGEMENTS, COMPRISING S3 
MONTHS IN 86 MUSIC HALLS AND CIR- 
CUSES, IN ALL 060 PERFORMANCES IN 
THE FRENCH CAPITAL. 

BARNY MYERS, American Representative, 



Hairy Atkinson 

"The Austrslian Orpheus." 



On the United Time. 
PAT CASEY, Agent. 



MARSH ALL P. WILDER 

ATLANTIC CITT. N. J. 

Boll 'Phone. 106. 

ROBERT HENRY HOULE 



Seat season <n 



• « 



HIS NIGHT ORR, 



•• 



BOB RICHMOND 

la his new monologue upon Current Topics. 
Address 874 Central Park West. New York. 

Have Your Card in VARIETY 



— 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



GartelleBros. 

Introducing Singiag, Daaolag and 
8KATORIALI8M 
. Direction, REICH A PLUNHETT. 



■ MQUIIITI 



Mason j Keeler 



Direotien MORT H. SINGER. 

Theatre, Chicago. 




GAVIN, PLATT 
•nd PEACHES 

Preeeoting "THE STOLEN RTD." 
Address 4417 Old Ave. (Bronx), New York. 




Cheer up, boys, this is the only life to lead; 
we've tried them all. 



GRIFF 




"The Comedian Juggler." 
Had a good time at Pneu- 
monia Park, Grand Rapids. 
I always thought Queen 
Victoria's reign was the 
longest; but Ramona Park 
rain beats her hollow. 
Majestic, Chicago, 
Commencing June 14th. 



SAM J. CURTIS SCO. 

Address all communications to my Personal 
Representative, 

BERT COOPER 

Mark Stern Building, 
108-104 W. 66th St, How York. 

FRIEND and 

DOWNING 

Care VARIETY*! London Offloe. 



WEST and WILLIS 

THE PROGRESSIVE PAIR IH 
"WANTED, A PARTNER." 



OROI 

"The Coney Island Girl." 
WITH OMEGA TRIO. 



BILLIE REEVES 



Q 

a 

o 

a 

o 

B 




3 

o 

B 

o 

Q 

& 






"F0LLIE8 Or 1000." 

Management, MR. r. ETEOTELD, JR. 

'06-'00-'10. 

H. Y. Theatre Roof for the Summer. 



MARION 



VICTORIA 




Direction AL SUTHERLAND. 

Friends, White Rats aad Artists Performers: 

The Great Conspiracy is on foot against me. 
Cooked up by JAMES HARRIGAM and MR. 
ROBINSON, of the New Brighton Theatre. I 
always thought that Jim Harrigan was an intimate 
friend of mine. Now I understand that same said 
person, Jamea Harrigan, is trying to* vaeak in the 
back door and play it a week ahead of me. I 
am not jealous— only I feel that way — and if Mr. 
Robinson is a friend of mine he wouldn't have 
tramp jugglers working on the stage ahead of 




FRANK BYBON, JR. 
introducing 

The Great Lester 

Everybody in New York wake up, Minnie St. 
Clair is in town. PAT CASEY said he was going 
to give her an opening, and I think MB. IRWIN 
of the 6th Ave. Theatre has something to do with 
it. I don't see how he gets the new aots first and 
makes headliners out of them light away. 

I am at Keith's, Boston, Next Week (June 14). 
Who is Sampter, or why is an agent 1 





The cleverest singing and mnaloal novelty of 
the world. Boohed on the SULLIVAN-CON- 
8IDLNE time. 

Direotion of NORMAN JEFFRICS. 



Chat, 
aad Jotle 



QUINN 



'The Oirl and the Gawk.' 



June 



Week June 7, Criterion, Asbury Park. 
14, Criterion, Atlantio City. 

GORDON A SOLOMON, Agents. Gaiety Theatre 
Bldg., New York. 



EDU/. /VlftDGE 

CURRAN and MILTON 



"THE CITY OIRL AID THE COUNTRY 80Y " 

Wish to inform all Managers and Agents that our oomedy 
"kissing scene ' is fully protected. 

WILL CONSIDER OFFERS for MUSICAL 
COMEDY or BURLESQUE for next season. 

(COMEDIAN AND SOVBRETTE). 

PERMANENT ADDRESS CARE VARIETY. 



When amivtring advertisements kindly mention VARIETY. 



VARIETY 



— 









WEATHER NOTES -Look Out for a Cyclono 

r m ■ I ^m. .. ^ssw ^m i 'isis** _. saw i ■ . 

TO 
THE 

(HURRAH-HURRAH) ^ — ^. ? - ^ 

Dtaoovarad by thoea "It" Song Explorers IRVING BERLIN, GEO. WHITING and TED SNYDER, 

writers ol "Beautiful Eyes,** "Sadie Salome,** "Dorando." 

WE HAVE IT— YOU NEED IT— DON'T MISS it— COME GET IT T * 

- 

Professional Copies and Orchestrations In any Key to Recognized Artists M 

UBLISHED BY <g 

I ( | HC ) 

112 WEST 38th ST., NEW YORK 






MUSIC PUBLISHERS 








FILMS 




Tiade Mark 




Released June 14th, 190 

"THE SON'S DCT,IDI1 " 



RETURN 



ALMOST FATAL RESULT OP HIS ARRIVING INCOGNITO 

The eon of a rural boniface leaves home to fight for fortune. Arriving in the metropolis he secures 
a position in a banking house. By dint of assiduity he attains in time a standing of importance and 
financial ease. When he left home he declared he would not return until he had made a name for him- 
self, but in the meantime his parents have fallen into sore straits, and their little inn is in danger of 
being sold over their heads. Pride forces them to keep this condition from the boy, and his sweetheart 
sends him the sad news. To surprise them he conceals his identity, having grown a beard, and when 
the old folks see the roll of money he has on him, their poverty makes them unconscionable, and they 
almost effect the murder of their own unknown son. 









- 



LENGTH* 993 FEET 



- 



THE SOW'S BETURH. 









e»l««»«»cJ June I 



ISO! 



"HER FIRST BISCUITS 

This comedy depicts the woe that is wrought by the cooking schools, showing how a young wife, 
who is seized with an insatiable desire to emulate mother, bakes some biscuits and nearly kills the 
community, who are unguarded enough to partake of them. 

LENGTH, 514 FEET 









"THE FADED LILIES" 



A very pretty short story of a highly strung musician who mistakes a floral tribute for an expres- 

ling his affection unrequited he is thrown into severe illness, which proves fatal, 
owing to his refusal to take the doctor's medicine. 

LENGTH. 461 FEET 



sion of love. Upon findini 




HE* FIE8T BISCUITS. 






RELEASE DATS OF BIO GRAPH SUBJECTS MONDAY AND THURSDAY OF EACH 

IET 81 QUI MAIL LIST AID KEEP POSTED WHITE FOR OUR DESCRIPTIVE CIRCULARS 



IOGRAPH 

Licensee of the Motion Picture Patents Co. 




COMPANY 

11 E. 14th STREET, NEW YORK CITY 



kM 



When anttDcring advertitemenU kindly mention Variety. 



"*"?#* ' -' v 



^ "'?3*.■ , 



i - 




f* 



«* 



. «, .. 



vf. 



*X" 



■ 






SSS 



. * 










• 



/ 



i..a 



i& 



jlf 



rf 



vHO 



usw 



*■ - 



■— — - 




+ 






■ 



/ 









ca« ahe*,k T?ou« Afi j i c f5 «. Hoo c„-.a,«. 

8*11 far hflMl In* *S> ©poa at Coli-urn. Loadoa, July Hkfm foa* wooki; rotara to America la Assist. •»•*»» taa-Oifkaaai Olrcait Bopt. SO. ^^ ,, L / ^ i ^^ ^ W1B .1:^^— . 
Tho abort oat to a rowodaotfoa of oao of Mr. Ahoara'i orlgiaal harloaioo ridia* ftaiahoa, of which ho has throo, aanuly: "A MILE IN It SECOVM," "T*X OJTE MILS KAMDIOAP,' 
"TBI MOTOm BAfl*.^ 

I ■ = 






— 



SP 



«*■ 



THREE SHELVEY 




Sensational-Flexible-Gymnasts 

Bxciu«v. At«nt, ALF. T. WILTON 



JUNE 7, 




I H C A I 



, • 







WEEK 






AND EVERY WEEK THEREAFTER. 

We are pleased to announce that the demand for our films haa mora than doubled since the first release, and our clienta are mora than gratified with results. 
NOTICE TO INDEPENDENT EXHIBITORS: It haa bean brought to Our notice that certain Exchanges are furnishing the Exhibitors with so-called independent 
films purporting to come front the 



; 



International Pro 




Co. 






DONT BE MISLED. We will ask every exhibitor to send us the name of the Exchange which furnishes service, and wa will gladly inform yon if they art) 
our goods. 

WARNING: There are a number of Exchanges palming off low grade, cheap and shoddy stock. Don't let them tell yon they are getting onr goods. Wa appeal to 
the Exhibitors who have been served with inferior quality films. 

ASK THE EXCHANGE if it is giving yon the INTERNATIONAL PROJECTING & PRODUCING CO.'S product/ If you don't think it is onr brand, don't loae 
any time in communicating with us. 

IMPORTANT NOTICE: We hare no agent or exclusive Exhibitor. Every legitimate Independent Exchange and Exhibitor is entitled to onr output and weekly 

- — ■"- A %m n*. m — -fa—. A— »afc AV+rmlmm. am am M\*\m%.Jm\ J!*aaA **■ - - — *- 1L& *>« *m • mm. aAIaa ' aM 



release. All business transacted direct through the main office. 
Place your orders in time to take advantage of weekly release 









• 









We are now permanently located in onr new, large quarters. 









International Projecting & Producing Company 

f a*a •■ a% a% X mJmm mm*, m m ■ ■ m Baal auav aaa\ ■ ■ ■ a aaa, ■ aa, ■ .aflat mm*. B a a mm*, m* .mm*, .mm*. a a m 

M F" a a ■ m ^ m \ a r mT^m. ■ ■ ■ ■ mT ^m ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ "Si ■ BVB aV Vk mT^m ■ ■ ■ aF^B, ■ aV^ aF^Bi 



'« • 



(Suite 723) SCHILLER BUILDING, CHICAGO, ILL. 



When anmering advertisement* kindly mention Variety 



9& 



T* 



TEN CEN TS 




if 



VARIETY 



■ i*iii i 



■' ■ 



•■■snsavasaw 



■■ ■ ■' '■ ' I 



"A NIGHT IN A MONKEY 







. f 
















- 



PRESENTED BY 
















At Present, HAMMERSTEIN S Victoria 
and Roof Gardens, New York 



< ( 



N/iirvirsii 




ivj-rirvi 



. 



i ? ' 










19 



Introducing THE FAMOUS "APACHE DANCE" 

■ * 

Greatest sensation ever playing on the Pacific Coast Played to capacity in every town] visited 

Did we bring 9 em in ? Ask Alex Pantages 

Engaged (or Season '09-'10 as Special Feature with FRED IRWIN'S " MAJESTICS " RICHARD PITROT is the pilot 



A few of the 

Criticisms 

of 



LILLIAN MORTIMER 



AND 

Co. 



MISS MORTIMER WINS BT REALISM. 



Melodrama Quten, Now at Orpheum, 
Famale George M. Cohan. 



Is til* 



VAUDEVILLE IS ADVANCING. 



Advanced vaudeville Isn't merely an empty ' 
title. It means a great deal, and even casual 
Investigation proves tbst to be s fact. 

The bill being presented at the Orpbenm the- 
atre furnishes sn excellent example of what 
advanced vaudeville really means. For Instance, 
only a few years ago an act having one the- 
atrical drop or curtain as scenic accessory would 
have bean considered high class simply because 
It carried scenery st all. For the production 
of "Po White Trash Jinny," the melodramatic 
classic being enacted by Lillian Mortimer and 
her plsyers st the Orpheum this week, sn en- 
tire carload of- scenery is necessary, a number 
•f expert scenery handlers and a special direc- 
tor. Five persons are required to present the 
playlet, aa many as often are needed in some 
of the much talked of four-act dramatic produc- 
tions on tour. — Spekaae "Spokesman Review." 



LOS ANOELE8 "RECORD." 
ORPHEUM. 
The show this week st the Orpheum is not 
up to the ususl standard of the vaudeville 
house, but there are seversl numbers tbst offset 
the weakness of the other sets. The hits are 
Lillian Mortimer and company In a little play- 
let, "Po' White Trash Jinny." 



LOS ANGELES "EXAMINER. 1 



OAKLAND "TRIBUNE." 
BY BETTY MARTIN. 



One play at the Orpheum only Is given, and 
that under the somewhat lengthy title of "Po* 
White Trash Jinny." Lillian Mortimer is the 
stsr performer in this humsn Interest sketch, 
and with her Is sn sble support. The story 
centers about life In a small village in Virginia, 
and the curtain rises upon a yard scene, with a 
cottage in the rear. 

The sketch Is s powerful one. 

"Po* White Trssh Jinny." ss now given, Iscks 
the srtlstlc finish of a Belssco production, but 
It hss every element needed to make it quite up 
to the standards of that artist. 



ORPHEUM SKETCH REAL MELODRAMA. 

Lillian Mortimer Also Plays It Artistically, Is 

Opinion of Reviewer. 

BY OTHKMAN 8TEVBN8. 

The play sounds like Hall Caine, and Is besu- 
tl fully scted; quite the best bit seen of late. 
Miss Lillian Mortimer, who plays Jinny, Is an 
artist, and unlike most really clever actresses, 
is not weighed down by the knowledge of ber 
cleverness. 



SEATTLE "POST-INTELLIGENGER." 

AT THE ORPHEUM. 

An Ideal Playlet. 

Melodrama found Its msster playlet in "Po* 

White Trash Jinny," presented by Miss Lillian 

Mortimer and her company. 

Miss Mortimer is sn sctress. Her compsny 
is strong snd the plot of the play might be 
stretched with esse into a melodrama that would 
make Sslome Jane look like a ten-twenty-thirty 
stock offering. One does not have to wait until 
Jinny bows appreciation of her effort to 
the quality in the woman. 



On the Orpheum Circuit, In her play- 
let A Miniature Melodrama that has 
made a substantial hit. JUST CLOSED 
SEASON. Permanent address, Port 
Washington, Long Island, V, Y. 

LOB ANGELE8 "HERALD." 



"PO' WHITE TRASH JINNY" HOLDS OWN 
WITH NEWCOMERS. 



BY W. HERBERT BLAKE. 

The purely dramstlc laurels of the bill belong 
still to Miss Lllllsn Mortimer's "Po* White 
Trssh Jluuy," which bears the strsln of Its 
second week exceedingly well. The realism of 
Jinny's chloroforming Is actually Irritating, and 
ought to decrease the business of the dentists 
hereabouts. If all melodrama were as sweet 
aud uplifting as this little sketch, one vexing 
problem of the modern stage would be near 
solution. 



Of course, the moment that the curtain goes 
up on the stsge setting of "Po' White Trssh 
Jinny," the splendid melodramatic playlet being 
presented with grest success at the Orpheum 
theater this week, the audience applauds, for 
the scene is one of the best of the kind ever 
shown on s local stage. It Is complete In every 
detail —Butte (Mont.) "Miner." 



fc 



When mnncering ad v r ti —m m U kinHf mention Variety. 



TEN CENTS 




VOL. XV., NO. 2. 



JUNE 19, 1909. 



PRICE TEN CENTS. 



COMBINATION OP SMALL TIME 
COMPLETES FINAL DETAILS 



The Mozart, Sheedy, Bijou and Quigley Circuits in 

Booking Agreement. 



On Thursday at noon in the offices of 
Denis F. O'Brien, attorney for the White 
Hats, the final papers were to be signed 
binding the / Mozart, Sheedy, Bryan and 
Tingley circuits of small time in one 
lM>oking pool, under the charter of the In- 
dependent Booking Office, of New York. 

The combination lists about fifty of the 
smaller bouses, and the I. B. O. will be in 
a position to supply a season's consecu- 
tive time. 

During the coming week an office around 
Times Square will be taken, and the or- 
ganization of the booking office perfected. 
All I. B. O. managers will use the White 
Hats form of contracts. Bonds have been 
exchanged between the White Rats order 
and the circuits represented guaranteeing 
faithful performance of all contracts by 
both artists and managers. 

The offices recently vacated by William 
Morris in the Holland building are under 
consideration. 



MURDOCK DEAL CLOSING. 

The deal between John J. Murdock and 
other western vaudeville managers had 
not been closed up to Wednesday of this 
week. Several of the wild and woolly 
delegation returned to New York early in 
the week, and were in frequent consulta- 
tion with Mr. Murdock, who also arrived 
in town. 

It was said that Mr. Murdock has dis- 
posed of his interests in the theatres out 
west to Fred Henderson, of Coney Island, 
:i Martin Berk satellite, for $100,000. It 
was the opposition to Mr. Henderson pur- 
chasing the Murdock share in the different 
houses which had delayed the closing of 
the deal, according to report, the other 
managers associated preferring not to 
have strength given to Mr. Beck by the 
addition of Mr. Henderson's voice in the 
direction of the theatres. 

Options have been given to Mr. Mur- 
dock. according to one of the managers, 
upon the outstanding stock held in the 
Western Vaudeville Association by the 



western managers. If the options are 
taken up Murdock will be in sole control 
of the Chicago agency, although it is pre- 
sumed the Kohl & Castle connection with 
that booking office will remain. 

The W. V. A. is now booking for a 
number of the smaller western circuits, 
each having a representative in the offices 
or booked by one of the office staff. The 
larger time formerly supplied from the 
Chicago office has been shifted to New 
York. 



DRESSLER ASKING $a,ooo. 

Marie Dressier is now ready for vaude- 
ville if the managers are willing to pro- 
duce $2,000 weekly for her services. 

The comedienne closes to-night with 
"A Boy and A (iirl" on the Amsterdam 
Hoof, the show leaving at the same time, 
going to the storehouse for the present. 
There is nothing in sight just now. for the 
Amsterdam top. 

Lew Fields this week placed Miss 
Dressier under contract for three years. 



SAVAGE SIGNS BOBBY NORTH. 

Though no public announcement has 
been made by either of the parties, Bobby 
North, the Hebrew comedian, has been 
placed under contract by Henry W. Sav- 
age to play for the latter during the next 
three years as a principal comedian. 

No piece has yet been selected for the 
ccming season in which Mr. North will 
first play under the Savage management. 
North was in "The Merry Go Round" last 
year at the Circle, having played as a 
single act in vaudeville before and after 
that engagement. 

JUST FOUR WEEKS FOR LOUISE. 

M. S. Bentham has persuaded Louise 
Dresser to play vaudeville this summer. 
Miss Dresser, who left "The Candy Shop" 
last Saturdav, has consented for four 
weeks only. 



OFFERS $ioo f ooo FORFEIT. 

In the annual report of the Board of 
Directors of the White Rats (published 
elsewhere in this issue) there is an offer 
by the Board to deposit a bond or cash 
to any amount within $100,000 on the 
like deposit of the United Booking Of- 
fices, to guarantee the faithful perform- 
ance of all contracts, and the payments of 
all damage arising through breaches. 

The condition is that the United agree 
to a Board of Arbitration for the adjust- 
ment of differences between its managers 
and White Rats. 



WHITE RATS BUY SHOW. 

Chicago, June 17. 

At the sheriff's sale of "Coming Thro' 
the Rye" the White Rats, through their 
Chicago representative, became the owner 
of the show. Judge Dunne, the western 
attorney for the Rats, had issued an at- 
tachment against the Porke Amusement 
Co. when the piece played at the 
Creat Northern in this city, closing the 
show. The claim was for salary due mem- 
bers of the Rats engaged. 

At the auction a bid of $100 secured the 
property. Whatever goes with the sale 
will be shipped to New York. The legal 
expenses of the seizure and sale a mount ml 
to $93. 



SINGER KEEPS LA SALLE. 

Chicago, June 17. 

It has been settled that Mort Singer 
will retain the La Salle next season. 
Harry Askin and Chas. Murphy, who had 
a legal light for the house, have withdrawn. 

The rental of the La Salle under its new 
arrangements is not known, but it is un- 
derstood to be considerably above what 
Singer has been paying. 

"KASSA" COST $85,000. 

St. Ijoiiis. June 17. 
John Luther I/ong. author of "Kassa," 
has brought suit in the Circuit Court here 
for JM.ON4.-M royalties on the play and for 
an accounting against Mrs. l^eslie Carter, 
who produced the play at Delmar. here, as 
well us in New York. Washington and sev- 

m 

eral other cities. Monday night the scenic 
equipment of "Ka-ssa." now at Delmar, was 
r.tlached. 

Mrs. Carter says she has spent $H."i.<MM) 
01. the play, and settled with I/ong sonic 
time since. 



MANY ACTS FOR WILLIAMS. 

London, June 8. 

Despite reports to the contrary and Mr. 
Williams' own statement thai he saw very 
little over here during his late trip worth 
engaging, the big New York manager has 
signed a number of acts, and holds option 
upon many more. 

It ean be stated with some certainty 
that Mr. Williams left Europe with no less 
than thirty numbers under contract for 
next season to play his own houses and 
those of the United across the pond. Per- 
haps as many, or, at least, half aa many, 
more are held under tentative agreements 
conditioned upon routingB secured from the 
assembled managers of the United offices 
upon Mr. Williams' arrival over there. 
He is now on the Mauretania on the way 
over. 

The biggest act Mr. Williams engaged 
was Yvette Guilbert. She is under con- 
tract to play seven weeks at $2,600 week- 
ly opening Oct. 11. Von Biene, the 'cellist, 
is to return also next season to the 
United States, secured by Mr. Williams 
for eighteen weeks at $750 weekly, open- 
ing in September. Albert Chevalier and 
Marie Lloyd are others mentioned. 

PALACE ENGAGEMENT EXTENDED. 

(Special Cable to Variety) 

I/>ndon, June 17. 
The successful run of Clarice Vance at 
the Palace has been extended for six weeks 
h nger. 



OFFERING AMERICAN TO SHUBERTS. 

St. Louis, June 17. 
Though nothing definite ran be learned 
here it is understood that the meeting of 
the St. Louis Theatre Company last week 
resulted in the election of Louis Cella to 
succeed Ceorge Middleton. The officers 
now are said to be John Havlin, president ; 
Louis Cella. vice-president : Frank Tate, 
secretary and treasurer. 

The same night tin* meet inn was held 
Messrs. Ilavlin and Cella left for the east, 
where Mr. Cella will renew negotiations 
with the Shuherts to take the American. 

The oiil.v new rumor in St. Louis is that 
the Imperial Theatre may he included in 
the deal, hut in» change "l" |".lir\ is ex- 
pected. 

What the Shuheits will d«> woh the Car 
lick if they secure 'he >m. : !• in is a mat- 
ter of y.fiecii1;i' i>' 



VARIETY 



"JOHNNY" WIGGINS RETIRES. 

Oarl Lothrop will hereafter handle the 
bookings for the Moore A Wiggins thea- 
tres in Rochester and Detroit. "Johnny" 
Wiggins, who has been attending to this, 
will give his attention only to the business 
management hereafter, in company with 
James H. Moore, his partner. 

Neither of the Messrs. Moore and Wig- 
gins are passing sleepless nights through 
lack of wealth. Each seems to be satis- 
fied with what he has. It is a possibility 
that Mr. Wiggins will retire from all 
active participation in the conduct of the 
theatres, making the pleasure derived from 
traveling his pursuit. 

Lothrop has been the resident manager 
of Keith's, Boston, for a couple of years. 
He may continue to book for that house, 
along with the Moore A Wiggins proper- 
ties, having headquarters in New York. 

Mr. Lothrop starts upon his new duties 
June 28. 



A MUSICAL FUNERAL. 

Paris, June ?0. 

The funerals of celebrities are now 
preserved for future generations by 
means of the cinematograph. It has be- 
come quite common in Europe to be 
treated to this divertisement in moving 
picture exhibitions, the rich interment in 
Paris to-day of Francois Chauchard, the 
self-made multi-millionaire, being the lat- 
est added to the collection. 

From Berlin comes the report that a 
woman named Weissmann has applied to 
the German Government for a patent on 
a gramaphone which can be placed on a 
funeral hearse, to be worked by the coach- 
man from his front seat, and so grind 
out an appropriate funeral march. A 
great poet asked that he should be buried 
beneath a weeping willow; it will now 
be possible to insure a musical funeral 
at a minimum cost with the perform- 
ance of favorite airs that will bring the 
tears to the eyes of the mourners, so the 
proverbial onion will no longer be re- 
quired. 



"SHAPIRO" EDWARDS' SELLING 
AGENT. 

Due to his many theatrical ventures 
for next season outside his music pub- 
lishing business, and a very large offer 
to continue in vaudeville himself for 
thirty weeks, Gus Edwards has turned 
over the business end of the Edwards 
publishing establishment to "Shapiro," 
who will art as Edwards' selling agent. 

The Edwards Arm will continue the 
offices at Broadway and 45th Street, 
maintaining a professional department 
there. 

"Shapiro" will handle the sale of the 
numbers of the Edwards eatalog, said to 
be considerably over 100, and distribute 
the music generally among the trade. 

ACTS LOSE BY FIRE. 

Meridian, Miss, June 17. 
Several vaudeville acts lost their per- 
sonal oroperty in the fire which destroyed 
the Air Dome Theatre here late last week. 
Among the artists who suffered were liyrd 
and Vance and Woodford and Marlboro. 
(The latter managed the house, on which 
there was no insurance.) F. Julian Byrd 
was slightly injured in attempting to 
save his property. The total loss was 
$36,000. 



EVEN MORE FOR PATJIJNE?. 

The Morris Circuit hypnotist, Pauline? 
(who opens at the American, New York, 
on Monday) says the report as to his con- 
tract next season with the Morris people 
was incorrect in certain details as to time 
and money. 

Pauline's? recital of its terms is that he 
has agreed to play thirty consecutive 
weeks next season for Morris. The first 
twenty are to be at $2,000 weekly, while 
the final ten weeks will return Pauline? 
$L\500 each. The Morris Circuit also holds 
an option on Pauline? for a further ten 
at the latter figure. 

For the American engagement and two 
more weeks this summer Pauline? has 
contracted for, he is to receive $1,750 each. 

B. A. Meyers was the agent in all of 
Pauline's? negotiations and contracts with 
Morris. 

It was reported about this week that 
Percy G. Williams upon arriving in New 
York and learning Pauline? had signed 
with the Morris Circuit did not feel elat- 
ed, especially when he was informed that 
the probable cause for Pauline's flop was 
the bringing of Prescelle into the Fifth 
Avenue by Keith A Proctor. 

Prescelle is also a hypnotist, and the 
engagement for the K.-P. house was made 
without the knowledge of Mr. Williams, 
who was then in Europe. It is said the 
Keith-Proctor people had placed no or- 
der for Pauline? at the Fifth Avenue, nor 
at the Keith theatres in Boston or Phil- 
adelphia. 



UNITED MANAGERS GATHER. 

Most of the United Booking Offices man- 
agers gathered on Wednesday for a talk 
over the booking outlook. Several of the 
smaller managers attended, but they were 
not prepared, each acting independently 
and without consultation with one an- 
other. 



LOCK UP DEFAULTING MANAGERS 

The White Rats received information 
this week that J. E. Faltys and G. M. 
Gilman, two managers who defaulted in 
artists' salary, are in jail at Jackson, 
Tenn., awaiting trial, which has been set 
down for September. 

The two men managed the Forrest Park 
Theatre at Little Rock, Ark., and during 
the week of May 10 suddenly left with- 
out settling with the artists engaged. A 
repetition of the offense occurred two 
weeks later, when they had secured pos- 
session of the Park at Jackson. 

Through the General Counsel of the 
Bats, Denis F. O'Brien, in New York, and 
the Rats' western attorney, Judge Dunne 
of Chicago, steps were immediately taken 
for the prosecution of the defaulters. 

All artists playing either Park during 
the weeks mentioned are requested by 
Harry Mountford, secretary to the Rats' 
Board of Directors, to make a statement 
in writing, swearing to it before a notary 
public, embodying all the facts within 
their knowledge, and forward the state- 
ment to him at the headquarters, 1553 
Broadway, New "York City. 

On the bill at Forest Park were Dela- 
voye and Frits, Audrey Abbott and Boy, 
Maude Beale Price Co., Ricci, The Halds- 
worths (Holds worths), Rizal and Atima. 

It is reported that there is a bad con- 
dition of affairs in the bookings and man- 
agements of many southern resorts at 
present, including parks, and artists con- 
templating a trip to that section are 
warned by artists now in the South to 
scrutinize contracts offered, and investi- 
gate thoroughly before accepting, where 
either the manager or the booking agency 
or firm may be unknown to them. 



Johnny Ford has returned from Aus- 
tralia and will appear in a Charles B. 
Dillingham production next season. 



Carl McCullough will play the leading 
juvenile role in the Mclntyre and Heath 
piece to open at the Circle, New York, 
August 30. The company will number 
over 100. The scenes in the show are 
laid in French Lick Springs and Hayti. 




MORRIS BRINGING "MONK." 

Last Sunday William Morris embarked 
on the new Hamburg-American liner 
George Washington, due to arrive in 
New York tomorrow (Sunday). 

On board is "Consul," the chimpanzee, 
engaged by Morris to appear in his house, 
and will probably open at the American 
Roof July 3. 

"Consul" is an ape, but not the "Consul 
Peter" under contract to play at Hammer- 
stein's August 2. It is claimed for both 
"Consul" and "Consul Peter" that each is 
the most wonderful piece of the Darwin 
origination extant. 

"Consul" is the property of Frank Bos 
took, and is more properly "Consul 2d." 
The original "Consul" died some time ago. 
The ape returning with Mr. Morris was 
exhibited at Coney Island in '07. 

The booking of "Consul" by Morris 
caused a great deal of talk when it be- 
came known. 



GERMAN MANAGER BANKRUPT. 

Berlin, June 8. 

Manager Max Bruck, a well known va- 
riety director, has offered a settlement to 
his creditors of 25 cents on the dollar. 

Bruck is the manager of two halls, both 
paying houses. Bruck became involved 
by indorsing his sister's notes for about 
t»00,000 marks. His sister, Miss Bruck, 
has a residence and hotel in Dusseldorf. 



BRUGGEMANN LIKES "io-ao." 
The Empire, Hoboken, is olosed for the 
season, and the Empire, Paterson, may 
stop playing in a week or so, both feel- 
ing the warm weather in its effect upon 
attendance. 

The two Empires belong to A. M. Brug- 
gemann, formerly a United manager, but 
who shifted the policy and bookings of 
his house to Feiber, Shea & Coutant a 
month or so ago, since playing "10 20" 
vaudeville. 

It is said that Mr. Bruggcmann has 
been well pleased with the results of the 
cheaper priced shows, and will continue 
through next season with them, not re- 
turning to the United Booking Offices for 
his acts. 



MURRAY SISTERS CANCEL 30 WEEKS 

A contract for thirty weeks with the 
Orphcum Road Show next season was 
destroyed by Al. Sutherland, the ngent. 
this week while the tears streamed down 
over his youthful looking cheeks. 

The destruction of the paper was 
brought about when Victoria Murray, of 
the Murray Sisters, called on Mr. Suther- 
land to say that a Chicago business man 
would be her husband in five or six 
weeks. 

Sutherland said he thought Victoria's 
husband should settle for the lost com- 
missions, but Miss Murray with a soulful 
look stopped his thoughts in that direc- 
tion. 



AMY BUTLER. 

After mi hIihcih'c from (he atnge of three rears, little AMY BUTI.ER linn decided to re-enter tbe 
vaudeville field. She will do so under the direction of William L. Lykena, the agent. 

MISS 11UTIJCR la an art lute of some reputation, and her reappearance will be made through tbe 
mcana of a no>clty act, Id which MIhb Butler will have the aaalatance of four boya. 



TWO CUBAN DANCERS IN TOWN. 

During the week Jaty and Indra, a 
couple of Cuban girls, arrived in New 
York, giving a trial show to the managers 
iiiider the direction of their agent, Charles 
I'omhaupt, of the Marinelli office. 

The Cubanesses claim they dance a 
dance not hitherto seen, and a couple of 
local managers were on the qui vive to 
capture a summer sensation. Nothing 
further has been reported. 



VARIETY 



WHITE RATS ANNUAL REPORTS 

SUBMITTED AT MEETING 

Condition of the Artists' Order and Important Events 

of the Year Set Forth in Board of 

Directors 9 Resume. 



At tlw annual general meeting of the 
White RatB of America, held in the club- 
rooms, New York, at noon on Thursday, 
reports of the order for the year past 
were read and approved. The report of 
the Board of Directors is printed herewith. 

In the absence of Fred Niblo, president, 
Junie McCree, vice-president, presided. 

At the general meeting nominations 
were made for the incoming Board of Di- 
rectors. The balloting will require about 
three weeks. The present directors are 
automatically nominees. A change in the 
by-lawB since the last election has made 
the terms of the eight directors receiving 
the largest number of votes three years; 
the Hecond eight, two years, and the third 
double quartet, one year. 

The executive officers, other than the 
directors have one more year to serve 
before their term of office expires. 

At the Colonial, Chicago, June 2o, a 
public meeting of the Hats will take place. 
On Thursday evening, June 24, an initia- 
tion will occur in the lodge room at the 
Sherman House. 

The Colonial meeting will be the cul- 
mination of a week's work spent in Chi- 
cago by several prominent Hats. 

Junie McCree will Ik? chairman, sup- 
|M>rted by Will J. Cooke, Tim Cronin, 
(ioorge Delmore, Frank Fogerty, Walter 
LeHoy and Bobby Caylor. 

Among the speakers for the occasion 
are Denis F. O'Brien, the general counsel 
to the Hats, Judge K. F. lhinne, the west- 
ern attorney for the order, and Harry 
Mount ford, Secretary to the Board of Di- 
rectors. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS FOR 
THE TEAR ENDING JUNE 17, 1909. 

In present hit; the statement of the work which 
has Inhmi accomplished during the past 12 months, 
thi* first year In which thlH Lodge ha* been under 
tli<> control and supervision of an elective lioard. 
It It) with feelings of great pleasure that the 
Hoard come lie fore their brother** who elected 
them, and It la with feelings of great gratifica- 
tion that they are able to submit a report of 
growth, financially, morally and politically, hither- 
to unprecedented In Its career. 

The financial statement, which will be presented 
as a supplement to this report, prepared and 
Hlgued by a State Auditor of the State of New- 
York, shows a great financial Increase and Is 
worthy of serious study by every mcml>cr. The 
reserve, fund has been Increased three- fold; the 
Income has been quadrupled and Investments have 
been made which will bring In an average profit 
of approximately 7Vj per cent. Without undue 
boasting It may be stated that the White Itu t -■ 
of America is In every way now the strongest 
organisation of actors In the world. 'Hie increase 
In membership, the surest test of the growth 
of any lodge, has been phenomenal, the roll of 
memliershlp having been doubled within the la«t 
12 months. 

When It Is considered that It Is extremely dlffi- 
cult to obtain entrance Into this Organization. Hint 
the greatest scrutiny is made as to tin' fitness 
for membership, and that we are debarred from 
accepting within our ranks anything except white 
male performers, this Increase becomes even more 
startling. 

The Hoard of Directors have attended 78 meet 
lugs with an average attendance of ll'a Thl* 
does not count sub-commit tee meetings of tli • 
Hoard, which number 0**. Much of the business 
donp by the Hoard, for obvious reasons cannot 
lie published, but were we even to attempt to 
give a hurried list of that which can be made 
public, this report would become cumbersome and 
tedious. 

The past year within our ranks has been one 
of comparative peace. There was some slight 
friction soon after the opening of the Chicago 
office, but this was soon adjusted by the vol- 
untary resignation from his office of our represen- 
tative there, and later on by hla voluntary resig- 
nation from the membership of the Order. 



Discipline had to be administered by the Lodge, 
but Id only three ease* baa expulsion been found 
necessary, aud the menders should know where 
any member baa been expelled from the Order, 
that Buch a step was only taken after careful 
thought and after every consideration of leniency 
had been shown, and that the crime was deserv- 
ing of the great penalty of being ostracised from 
the fellowship of this Order, and members should 
know that It la their duty to make such expelled 
members realise the enormity of their offense. 

The Board, daring the past year, has lost one 
of Its members, the late Brother W. F. Carroll, 
who was one of our Trustees, and the Board knows 
that the members will join them In their regret 
for the untimely decease of Bro. Carroll, aud lu 
Its sympathy with the surviving relatives. 

The Board wishes to express its thanks to tbo 
President and Big Chief. Bro. Fred Niblo, for the 
never-falling interest which be has taken in the 
Order, and the good work he has done for It when 
bin other engagements have permitted. 

The Board, in Its deliberations, has had the 
advantage of being presided over by an almost 
Ideal chairman, the Vice-President of the Order, 
and Chairman to the Board of Directors, Brother 
Junie McCree. Too much praise cannot be given 
our Chairman for bis unceasing attention to the 
meetings of the Board, his knowledge of the work- 
ings of the Order and his readiness at all times 
to sacrifice himself for the good of this society, 
and it Is with much pleasure that the Board Is 
able thus publicly to place on record their appre- 
ciation of his services. 

Brother Harry O. Hayes, Treasurer of the Order, 
has been faithful, attentive and assiduous In the 
performance of his duties, and the Board are 
glad that all of these officers have still another 
year to serve. 

The Chicago office for the last few months has 
been under the control of Brother Hobby Gaylor, 
and he. with his geniality and love for the or- 
ganization, has worked wonders. The Hoard wish 
to express their thanks to him fr* the manner 
In which he took up hla position at a moment's 
notice and for the excellent manner In which 
he has performed his onerous duties. 

The (Mtllcy pursued by the Board In appointing 
tine of its memlters to act as their western repre- 
sentative has met with great success. It was felt 
that In the land of the west, where vaudeville 
was growing by leaps and bounds, that some of- 
ficial representative carrying weight should be on 
the ground, and that that idea was correct has 
been proven by the excellent results obtained by 
our first representative, Bro. Kd. Keougb, the 
second. Will J. Cooke, and the third, Bro. Frank 
Kogerty. 

Kaeh of these gentlemen, at considerable loss 
to themselves, has handled successfully, peace- 
fully and admirably the disagreements between 
imr members and managers In the west, and while 
thanking our representatives, we also wish to 
thank those managers In the west who met and 
received them In the spirit they did, who made 
their work lighter by the kindly manner In which 
they treated our representatives when they sought 
them for the purpose of adjusting differences and 
complaints. 

The success which has been achieved by our 
associated companies and enterprises are also mat- 
ters of record. The Hoard of Directors I* pleased 
to chronicle the great success of the Associated 
Actors' Company, which paid a dividend for the first 
six months at the rate of 21 per cent, per annum, 
and Is pleased to hear that It Is growing stronger 
and stronger each day. In a large measure this 
Is due to the efforts of Its officials, including Its 
Indefatigable treasurer. Major .las. D. Doyle, ami 
the Hoard would suggest that the members of the 
Order, having money to Invest or to save, should 
look 'carefully into this company and study its 
many advantages lteforc placing their savings In 
other probably more risky aud less remunerative 
channels. 

"My I.ady Vaudeville." by Coo. Fuller Golden, 
was successfully launched this year, and without 
doubt will remain forever the standard work on 
vaudeville and the Inception and progress of the 
White Hats of America. The Hoard thinks that 
every member should have this book, not only to 
read It once, but to study It, so that they may 
become famlllnr with the great Ideas upon which 
this Order rests. 

It was the Intention to submit to the members 
for consideration a comprehensive method of In- 
surance and sick benefit, but owing to the length 
of time which the Insurance corporation took to 
negotiate the arrangements. It Is Impossible to take 
advantage of this at the present moment, but It 
is only a question of two or three weeks before 
such a prooosltlon will he submitted to the mem 
hers for their approval or rejection. 

The title of tne newspaper of this Order and Its 
otficlal organ has alnndy been decided on. ami It 
U hoped that It will make Its Initial appearance 
before the rail The reason that this appearance 
las been tlni- delayed Is Im>< -nnse of the many other 
things the Hoard li'id lu hauil. which ursurped all 
their attention for the time. 

The Hoard Is pleased to see that there Is still 
opposition In vaudeville, which opposition seems 
likely to continue and grow, and It takes no small 
credit to Itself for the continuance of such op 
position, as It nipped In the bud the tactics pur- 
sued by' the I'nlted Hooking Office, of disrupting 
and breaking up Independent shows. Not another 
ease has come to their knowledge since the decis- 
ive steps taken by the Hoard with regard to the 
attempted stealing of one of Mr. Morris" acts at 
the Lincoln Square Theatre. Such publicity was 
given It by the action of this l^odge, that «U 



other managers, so far as we have been able to 
learn, have left those despicable methods severely 
alone. 

It Is too early yet to say anything about the 
new combination which has been brought about 
by your officials, Messrs. Felber A Shea, Sheedy, 
t^uigley and Mosart, but It is hoped that this 
combination, dolug their business legitimately 
and using the White Rat contract, will so educate 
the actor that be will learn to scrutinise and ap- 
preciate the protection of an equitable contract. 

The Board of Directors are not opposed to a 
combination as a combination; In fact, they would 
much sooner deal with a combination of managers, 
than with managers Individually, provided that 
the heads of such combination are In a position 
to control such individual managers; which state 
of affairs does not at the present moment seem to 
prevail In the United Booking Offices. 

The Board believe that better results can be 
obtained by dealing with large combinations who 
are willing to live up to their contracts, their 
' promises and their written agreements, than with 
Individuals; some responsible, others mostly Ir- 
rrsponnlble; and even now, ere It grows too late 
aud legislation steps In, the Board would welcome 
an arbitration agreement with the heads of the 
I'nlted Booking Offices. This Board 1b willing to 
put up a bond or cash to the extent of one hundred 
thousand dollars If the U. B. O. will do the same, 
guaranteeing the faithful performance of contracts 
for Its members and the payment of any damages 
which may be grsnted either party In case of 
breach of contract by the decision of an arbitra- 
tion committee, consisting of one representative 
of this organisation, one representative of the 
U. B. O., and a chairman agreed upon by these 
two. The great argument used by the U. B. O. 
Is that the actor to a certain extent is not a 
man of money, and even If damages were obtained 
against him, It would be Impossible to collect 
them; but we stand ready to back any member 
of our Order to the extent mentioned above. 

Surely there never was a better example of an 
equitable contract than the result of Injunction 
proceedings of B. F. Keith vs. Annette Kellermann. 
An equitable contract gives the remedy to the 
manager and also protects the actor, and for this, 
this Board, whether elected again or not, means 
never to cease struggling, till It obtains from the 
dominating force amongst the managers In vaude- 
ville such a form of contract. 

The action of the Lodge which has created the 
greatest comment and received the greatest pub- 
licity, Is the manner In which it has taken 
up combined with the efforts of other societies 
the attempt to pass an act amending the present 
Kmployment Agency Law, known as the Voss BUI. 
Tills was first suggested at our general meeting, 
June 17, last year, and afterward publicly an- 
nounced from the stage of the American Theatre 
at the first meeting of the White Rata' Political 
league, when In open meeting It was stated that 
we should attempt to pass such a bill through the 
legislature, providing for a B per cent, commission 
and Incorporating a clause which provided for an 
equitable contract. This statement was again re- 
Iterated from the same theatre and the same plat- 
form at the next meeting, and instructions wero 
given to our attorney to immediately proceed* to 
draft such a bill. The bill was nearly completed, 
when we were Informed that another organisation 
was about to Introduce a similar bill, and so — 
that there should lie no clash of minds —nor two 
different bills Introduced for the same purpose — 
a committee of all the actors' societies was formed 
at which the bill was discussed and submitted to 
Mr. O'Brien for (he final drafting of the amend 
inenf . 

Owing to the committee of the Senate and the 
Assembly being engaged in the codification of the 
General * Laws, of which this proposed' bill was 
an amendment, It was found Impossible to In- 
troduce It early In the season, and It was not 
introduced until the Governor had signed the Codl- 
ficntlcii Law. 

The hill was Introduced Into the Assembly by 
Mr. Voss; the hearing was held before the General 
Laws Committee of the Assembly, and It was re- 
ported on favorably by the chairman of that com- 
mittee. Mr. (Jeo. Greene, and passed the Assem- 
bly; It was then sent to the Senate, and here In 
trisluced by Senator Broogh. referred to the 
Judiciary Committee aud reported out favor- 
ably by the Chairman. Senator Davis, and passed 
by the Senate. To all of these gentlemen we 
here publicly tender our thanks as well as to every 
Assemblyman and Senator who voted for the right, 
and used his Influence to Insure the passage of 
this bill. It was then sent to the Governor, where 
it was found that during the codification of the 
General Laws, a clause had been slipped in ex- 
empting Syracuse from the provision of the General 
Laws; the Governor therefore decided that this 
was a Special City Hill, and submitted It to the 
Mayors of Buffalo and New York for their ap- 
nro'val or rejection. The Buffalo hearing was first. 
This bearing was advertised In New York In a 
dally newrpa|M«r on the Friday before the hearing, 
and In VAKIKTY the Saturday before the hearing, 
also In two Buffalo papers for two consecutive 
days. The hearing occurred before Mayor .1 . N. 
Adam, and though there was not one single theat 
rlcal agency to which this bill referred In Buffalo, 
lie vetoed the bill within 1". minutes after the 
I earing, thanks to a combination brought about by 
the representatives of the I'. B. O. In that city. 
Mayor McClellari. although he whs In no wav 
compelled to do so. granted a hearing on the fol 
lowing Wednesday lu New York, and the agents 
were convicted out of their own mouths. Mayor 
McClellan stated In a written memorandum that 
such a state of affairs was h ill-grace to clvillza 
tlon. and that the State certainly ought to In- 
terfere to protect actors In these matters. An 
atfeinnt was made to gel Mayor Adam to reconsider 
his veto. In which attempt we were siiti|>orted by 
our affiliated organizations, and bv every man con 
nectcd with the theatrical profession In the I'nlted 

Slates of America, but ll wax »( mill, and 

the Governor refused l<> sign the Bill as It did 
not come wIMil't his province, having been veined 
by one of the Mayors. 

The leader of this movement on behalf of the 
White Hats of America. Is Brother Tim Cronin, 
the President of the White Hats' Political League, 
and from June la«t up to date he has never censed 
for one moment to use his energies, his eloquence 
and hi" personal power to Insure the passage of 
this bill, and the Board of Directors w hh to 
plnce on record their unanimous thanks to him for 



the great and glorious work done by ham wad hla 
associates in this direct lou, and In so dolag nearly 
freeze the actor from the incubus under which 
he exercises his profession. But tha bill to not 
dead; it only sleeps, it will be Introduced the 
first of next year before the Senate and the As- 
sembly, aud If it Is defeated next year It will 
be re-Introduced In 1011, and so on until they 
have finally removed the graft, the bribery and 
the tyranny under which the actor of the United 
States of America at the present moment works. 

The Board also feel themselves exceedingly for- 
tunate lu having such a trustworthy and efficient 
staff as they have had for the last year, and In 
its clerical and technical work and the successful 
commercial bandllug of the monies of the Order. 
Its succeed |g in a great measure due to our fra- 
ternal secretary, Bro. W. W. Waters, who with 
his wide experience in banking metboda has been 
able to place our office In such condition aa to win 
for the office even the praise of our accountant 
and auditor, Mr. Jas. Clinnln, Public State Ex- 
aminer aud Auditor of the State of New York. 
Bro. Waters has sacrificed his time and hla profes- 
sional engagements to attend the meeting* of the 
liodge, and being here almost every Saturday af- 
ternoon to supervise the work of our cashier and 
the office, besides spending Innumerable evenings 
for the same purpose. Ills minutea and financial 
statements have been models of brevity and clear- 
ness, and since his position Is an honorary one, 
the Hoard of Directors has pleasure In recom- 
mending to the general meeting of the Lodge that 
the sum of fifiO.Ot). as a slight recognition for the 
able manner In which he performed bis duties, be 
presented to Bro. Waters. 

The work which has been done by our attorney, 
Mr. Dennis F. O'Brien, general counsellor, will be 
seen from bis own report, which, he will submit 
to the members coincident with this. There are 
many things which necessarily cannot be made 
public, but the Board thinks Itself exceedingly 
fortunate In having obtained the services of snch 
a conscientious, painstaking, honest and learned 
counsellor. 

Judge Dunne's work In Chicago speaks for Itself, 
and the Board also submits his report which 
proves his worth to this organisation. 

Through all this diversified work, through all 
this multitude of matters, the Board has had as 
Its right hand man, the Secretary to the. Board. 
Bro. Harry Mouutford, and In everything that has 
>>een done for the good of the Order lie baa been 
largely concerned, and he baa helped to create 
in a large measure the success which has crowned 
the efforts of the Board for the last year. The 
attacks which have been made upon hlin In many 
quarters, on being Investigated have redounded 
simply to hla credit, and the employment of 
private detectives and other underhanded methods 
In attempting to harm him In the estimation of 
the Hoard, have resulted In the extreme opposite. 
He has now !>een working for the Board for some 
IN months and never for one moment has he ceased 
to apply himself with seal and ardor to the wel- 
fare of this organisation. He has been of Inval- 
uable and Incalculable worth at the pdbllc ap- 
pearances the Lodge baa been compelled to make 
during the past year, and the fact that we are 
now running six different organisations In this 
office, all under his business management and all 
In themselves successful, s|>eaks for Itself. 

The Hoard knows that he la a faithful and 
capable exponent of their policies, nnd In the name 
of the Ixslge thanks him for his untiring aervleea 
and hla unceasing devotion to the duties of his 
office. 

The policy of the Board has been a lielllgercnt 
one; If any wrong was done, It tried to right it. 
It fought and if re-elected, will keep on fight- 
ing, not from any love of fighting, not from any 
love of struggle, hut the Board Is convinced that 
only by employing the methods which they have 
done for the last 18 months can the rights of 
the actor be obtained, and WHEN obtained, con- 
served and preserved. 'Hie Hoard does not believe 
in war AS war, hut It believes that It is the 
only hope of obtaining peace, and It further be- 
lieves thst It Is only by constant warfare and agi- 
tation that this can be obtained, and It appeals 
to all actors In the legitimate, vaudeville and cir- 
cus world, who are not members of this organisa- 
tion, to Join this Order for that one single purpoae. 

Individually the actor Is at the mercy of the 
manager, collectively were the actor to stand as 
a unit, the manager would then la- at the mercy 
of the actor, and this Hoard would show much 
irore mercy to the managers, than the manager up 
to the present time has been Inclined to show 
toward the artist. 

The Board only wants pence; It only wants a 
contract once having been signed to be lived up 
to by boin parties. It wants a fi per cent, com- 
mission for the agent, not for the manager; It 
wants the actor to receive the money he has 
contracted f < i . and when THAT comes aliont, the 
fighting will cease. There will ho nothing more 
to struggle for. all the Board will be required to 
do then will Ih» to see that peace continues, but 
till that time comes, the policy of this Bosrd If 
re-elected will be to continue to fight until those 
conditions are attained, and If re-elected the Board 
pledges Itself to continue its aggressive policy 
which ha - achieved such good results In the past 
nnd never to cease Its efforts until freedom of 
contract between the manager and the actor has 
been obtained; that is. freedom for the actor 
to accept or refuse, till the actor can offer his 
services to whom he feels inclined, and those 
services having once been accepted shall be sure 
of receiving the remuneration which the manager 
has agreed upon, without having to fear any of 
the legalized IiIh< kini II or extortion which at pres 
ent exists. 

The Board lias tried |<> do lis work falllifullv 
and linnislly. and this day returns Into the mem 
her-' h ii ml < the honor whleh they hav«> cmiferrcd 
upon them when the\ rlerlcd t In- ■■■ Iri'i year, 
and tlio Bon nl frel- i'oii\ Ini'i'il Hull whoever irifiv 

follow In their fnni-ie|i< will carry on the good 

work thus begun and mm ■ ■■• (■■■:•-«• until th"t" 

I- iieace. |ir.,-.uci I M iii.l i ■ I < 1 1 ' v In i he t lii'iitrh'.'il 

profession In ihe I n ! ■ . -l Si .ies of \un-rh-a 

Tin* l'ij"ii ( in-ill! !ii>ii-'s in (ii!in»c iiiid 
New lirmi-w irk •!<>-..■ tlii- week. Tin* 
I'.ijiHi- ;il l'.n\ miiim- :iM<l I'-rlli A in boy will 
i n ii duriiiL.' Hi" li'' 1 - \v''!mt. 



VARIETY 



WANT THE "LUBIN" BOOKING. 

The small time booking agents were 
figuring this week on securing the book- 
ings for the Lubin chain of smaller com- 
bination vaudeville theatres. With the 
announcement that Felix Isman has in- 
creased his interest in the Lubin houses 
to a full purchase, the agents commenced 
estimating how many of the houses the 
William Morris office could handle. Isman 
in connected with the Morris Circuit. It 
was through this connection that the 
bookings for Lubin's Palace, Philadelphia, 
were given t# the independent agent and 
manager. 

The Lubin string holds around fifteen 
theatres in different cities. About four 
play the better class of smaller acts. The 
others vary in the number of shows daily 
and do not cater with expensive bills even 
for this class of show. 

It is understood that nothing will be 
done until. Mr. Morris returns from 
Europe on Sunday. 

While the connection of Mr. Isman with 
the Lubin vaudeville and picture theatres 
has been well known for a long time, the 
report that Isman is also concerned with 
Lubin in the tatter's moving picture 
manufacturing business could not be con- 
firmed. It is said that the combination of 
picture manufacturers of which Lubin is 
p member does not approve of one of 
their set becoming an exhibitor. Neither 
do the picture exhibitors themselves, 
claiming the manufacturer has an ad- 
vantage over them. Lubin has exhibited 
pictures in his own houses for a very long 
while. 

This may be a reason for the sale to 
Isman by Lubin. Another is set forth as 
the loss encountered by the Isman -Lubin 
partnership since recently opening Du- 
mont's, Philadelphia, as a picture house. 

Both Isman and Lubin reside in Phila- 
delphia, where each carries on business. 

George Bothwell, who has been manager 
of the Palace since its opening, was re- 
placed this week by Isador Schwartz, for- 
merly manager of two of the smaller houses 
for Lubin. It was reported that Bothwell 
is to have charge of the film headquarters 
ir. New York. 



"THE FROGS" HAVE A PARTY. 

The organization of colored artists 
known as "The Frogs" gave an entertain- 
ment at the Manhattan Casino on 
June 14. 

The society has been formed for about 
r year. Recently it purchased the prop- 
erty at 111 West 132d Street, New York, 
for a clubhouse, the purchase money hav- 
ing been subscribed by the members. 

It is said that very shortly "The Frogs" 
will admit all their reputable brethren in 
the profession as members. 

George Walker is president of "The 
Frogs." Among the members are Bob 
Cole, Rosamond Johnson, Bert Williams, 
J* ssie Shipp, Alex. Rogers, R C. McPher- 
son, Samuel Corker, Jr., James R. Europe 
and Tom Brown. 

A carnival and minstrel show will be 
given by the Colored Vaudeville Benevo- 
lent Association at Sulzer's Harlem River 
Park, August 12. This is another society 
of colored artists. 

Harry Atkinson, "The Australian 
Orpheus," leaves to day (Saturday) for 
England to fulfil contracts on the other 
side. 



BARRED ELLIS OUT. 

At the opening of 'The Follie/ftf 1909" 
at the New York, Monday night, Melville 
Ellis, who has been connected with the 
production of several Shubert shows, was 
refused admission to the Roof upon pre- 
senting a ticket. 

Last week at the Apollo, Atlantic City, 
where "The Follies" was first shown, Lee 
Shubert and Lew Fields were requested 
to leave the theatre after they had seated 
themselves. Mrs. Fields accompanied her 
husband. 

A slight wordy argument followed the 
invitation to go, but the party left with- 
out further ado. 

There was a story on Tuesday that a 
trio of speculators who bid in a great 
number of the seats auctioned off for the 
premiere of "The Follies," suffered a loss 
on the transaction. 

The three men were said to have pur- 
chased about $2,500 worth of the tickets 
at premiums running from $2 to $15. One 
speculator on Monday afternoon sold four 
orchestra seats for $100, but the demand 
was not brisk. In the evening the market 
sagged dreadfully, according to report. 

Afterwards Mr. Shubert said he would 
incorporate the expulsion into a scene in 
"The Midnight Sons" now running at the 
Broadway, New York. 



ENTIRE BILL QUITS. 

Paris, June 10. 

A somewhat remarkable incident oc- 
curred at the Gaiete-Parisienne (a small 
concert hall on the Boulevard Ornano) 
last Sunday afternoon. The usual mat- 
inee, often the biggest performance of the 
week at some of the smaller music halls 
in Paris, was announced and a large audi- 
ence had assembled, but to the consterna- 
tion of the manager not a single artist 
put in an appearance. The whole com- 
pany, as a matter of fact, for some un- 
explained reason, had taken French leave. 

To save the situation and incidentally 
the gate money, the director put on a 
moving picture show, but this substitu- 
tion entirely failed to meet the approval 
of the audience, who commenced a noisy 
demonstration and even threatened to tear 
down the place. 

The police were called in, but order was 
not restored until late in the afternoon. 



THE GIRL WITH THE ANGEL VOICE. 

"The Girl with the Angel Voice" is a 
protege of Will Rossiter, the Chicago 
music publisher. His attention was 
drawn to her vaudeville possibilities by 
learning that Mme. Calve had heard her 
sing in Seattle, and had prophesied for her 
a brilliant future. Pictures of the young 
woman are on the frontispiece this week. 

The nameless girl has a contralto voice 
of what is described as exceptional qual- 
ity, and has surrounded herself with a 
masterpiece of scenic effects. "The Girl" 
appears as the center of a gorgeous stage 
picture representing Heaven in a really 
impressive way. Each song brings a shift 
of scene until at the finish of the act she 
sings her masterpiece, Tosti's "Good-Bye." 

Vaudeville has too few truly artistic 
offerings, and "The Girl With the Angel 
Voice" takes place with the best. 

The act is Mr. Rossiter's property. Jack 
I-cvy is the booking agent in charge. 



$M<fcSoo IN CONTRACTS. 

London, June 7. 

If the contracts A. Wolheim, of the 
Marinelli London Branch, carried in his 
pocket to Oswald Stoll wire signed, as 
they were expected to be, Mr. Wolheim 
has turned the largest booking deal ever 
completed at one time in vaudeville. 

The contracts represented $229,600 in 
gross salaries, with commission to accrue 
to the Marinelli office of one-tenth of 
that sum ($22,950), agencies over here se- 
curing in some instances as the present, 
a 10 per cent, fee without a "split." 

Three acts are involved: Seymour 
Hicks, $1,750 for 64 weeks; Ellaline Ter- 
ris (Mrs. Hicks) in another and single 
act, 62 weeks at the same figure weekly, 
while Zena Pare and Brett are down at 
$1,000 a week for 44 weeks, all the time 
to be played on the Moss -Stoll Tour. 

It is reported Mr. Stoll has said that 
while these acts at the figure (extraordi- 
nary if not miraculous, when compared 
v/ith what English managers a few seasons 
ago thought), may not prove unusually 
profitable, they aid vaudeville in general 
by giving a "tone" to the houses played in. 

The first engagement in vaudeville of 
Mr. Hicks over here was with his wife, 
Miss Terris. When Miss Terris returned 
to musical comedy for a spell, Miss Dare 
replaced her. Now the three have each 
an act of their own. 



MURRAY STICKS TO MORRIS. 

London, June 9: 
Paul Murray, the London representative 
for William Morris and England's candy 
kid, has decided to continue in that ca- 
pacity for the Morris Circuit. It was 
definitely arranged while Mr. Morris was 
here. Murray has had several offers, two 
exteremely flattering ones from large Eng- 
lish circuits. 

Murray will go over to New York next 
September. 



A "HUMAN BILLOQUET." 

America possesses little knowledge of 
"Billoquet," a French game. A large ball, 
with a small aperture, is thrown through 
the air. The point of the game is made 
when the globe lands on an upright stick 
fastened in the ground, remaining on a 
stick through the perpendicular piece of 
wood catching the ball in the opening. 

Signor Perez, a Spaniard, who brought 
into public light "The Double Somersault- 
ing Auto," has now devised a "Human 
Billoquet" for a sensational number to 
those who may care for it either indoors 
or out. 

It is no less than a "Human Billoquet." 
A ball with a woman fastened to it in an 
upright position is set at the top of an in- 
cline. The slide down gives the ball suffi- 
cient momentum through some arrange- 
ment to propel ball and woman forty feet 
through the air, alighting on the stick 
there set as in the ordinary game, although 
in this case the stick will likely l>c of iron 
or steel. 

Mile. Dutrien, the original "double som- 
ersault" rider, will be the "human" part 
of the flying Billoquet. 

The act has been placed with the New 
York Marinelli office. 



SIRES MISS A MUSIC HALL. 

With the announcement this week that 
William A. Brady is behind the promotion 
of a new theatre on West 48th Street 
(running from 137 to 143), New York, it 
became known that the Sires had planned 
a couple of months ago to erect a music 
hall on the same site, installing a stock 
musical comedy company with Blanche 
Ring in the lead. The plans of the Sires 
had so far progressed at the time, it is 
said, that Miss Ring was under contract 
to them. 

The new theatre is to be called The 
Netherland, and is due to open about New 
Year's. A company was incorporated in 
Albany last week, with C. D. McCaull, 
representing Mr. Brady, a director. 

One, A. C. Quarrier, is reported as the 
purchaser of the site for a syndicate, 
without Quarrier's associates being 
named. There is an A. C. Quarrier who 
acts as bookkeeper for the Sires in the 
Bijou Theatre. 



ACTORS ADVANCED RENT. 

New Orleans, June 17. 
The outcome of the "flop" at "White 
City" through which the acts booked in 
there by William Morris were obliged to 
play the remainder of the week at Bla- 
iiey's Lyric was that on Wednesday night 
when the show opened, Arthur Beauvais 
advanced W. H. Ladd, the defunct "White 
City" manager $20 to secure the daily 
rental of Blaney's for that evening. 

Mr. Beauvais received his advance back 
after the show, but on Friday evening 
when he repeated the performance, the. 
sky remained clouded and it looked so 
much like rain that everything was de- 
clared off for the rest of the week, in- 
cluding Mr. Beauvais's double X. 

No one on the bill received salarv. It 
cost Beauvais $70 to make the jump into 
New Orleans. 



SAVED TEN LIVES. 

Toledo, June 17. 
Last Sunday while out in command of 
A. Q. Thacher's launch, "Say-When," 
Sidney Wire, assistant manager of the 
Casino, saved a party of ten people, who 
were caught in a sudden squall. 

They were in the sailing yachts 
"Venus" and "Winifred," which had cap 
sized by the time Mr. Wire's boat reached 
them. 



VAUDEVILLE IN TAMPA. 

Tampa, Fla., June 17. 
J. H. Burgert, successor to Burgert & 
Rati iff,* has opened the Orpheum Theatre 
here with vaudeville. Bookings are sup- 
plied by the Empire Theatrical Exchange 
in Atlanta, which handles a considerable 
amount of small time in the southern 
States. 



Bob Russak will manage "Vanity Fair" 
next season. 



Josephine Joy, formerly with Frit/i 
Seheff, is coming into vaudeville as a 
single singing act. M. S. Benthnm says 
so. 



ACCIDENTS A-PLENTY. 

An unusual number of accidents have 
Imm'h reported within the last ten days. 
( adieux, "The King of the Wire," is in 
the Itayomtc Hospital, Bayonne, N. J., 
suffering with a broken ankle and will 
not l>e able to move for several weeks. 

One of the Riee Bros., comedy acrobats, 
fell a few days ago and broke several 
fingers, while a member of the Nord Fam 
ily, high divers, injured his shoulder. 



VARIETY 



niETY 



A Variety Paper lor Variety People. 
Published every Saturday by 

THE VARIETY PUBLISHING CO. 
UN Broadway, 

Times Square, Yew York Otty. 

•{ 1SS \ 



Iditer aad Proprietor. 



Jafered m eeeead-cieM metier Deoeutoer 22, 
1900, et the Po$t OJIm el New York. N. Y. t 
under the met of Oomareee of Merck 8, 1879. 

— ■ ■ — T ■■ -■■■ -■ ■ ■ ^- 

CHICAGO OFTXGB, 

7M Ohleage Opera House Hook, 

(Photo, Moim MW). 

PftAJTX wmBM, Bepreoeatetlee. 



lovdov omai, 

418 Stread 

(Cable, "Jeaafree, Leudeu.") 
J. nXEMAM, la 



sa* rauioxsoo omoi, 

•064 latter St. 
JOKV J. O'COVMOS, Eopnoontetivo. 



DZSTO OITICB, 

Oryatel Theatre BuUdtag. 

KABBT BEATTMOMT, Repreoeatatlre. 



pajlii oma, 

NliilM Solat Bidler, 
EDWABD O. mBllW, loproooBtetiTO. 



BXKIZV omox. 
Voter dea Liadea 41, 
BimL'l LXMMAMT. 

0. K. SJOBT, E oprooon tetiro. 



Koto eord may bo fouad in advertising section 
of thio iMOO. 



IVB90SZFTI0V HATES, 

Annael $4 

Foreign 5 

Biz ond tkroo mouths la proportion. 
Single eoploo 10 cents. 

YABIBTT will bo moiled to o pormonoDt ed- 
dress or oa per route, oo desired. 

Advertisements forwarded by moll must bo ac- 
eompanlod by remittance, mode payable to Variety 
Publlahlag Co. 

Copyright. 1000. by Variety Publlahlag Co. 



Vol. XV. 



JUNE 19. 



No. 2. 



The American Music Hall, Chicago, will 
.•lose July 3. 



Edwin Stevens opens On the Orpheum 
time Sept. 5. 



A divorce has separated Mr. and Mrs. 
Henry Delton. 



Martin Beck may leave for Europe the 
early part of July. 



{Jeo. Beban will remain in vaudeville 
over next season, anyway. 



Rawls and Von Kaufman have gone to 
their summer home in Muskegon, Mich. 



Hal Godfrey returned to New York this 
week. He has been abroad for some time. 



"The Midnight Sons" at the Broadway 
is said to have played to $16,000 last 
week. 

Lee Harrison and Jack Wilson leave 
Monday for a vacation at French Lick 
Springs. 



The Dankmar-Schillers arrived this 
week, and open at the Fifth Avenue 
June 28. 



Kelly and Rose have dissolved partner- 
ship. Spencer Kelly will hereafter ap- 
pear with Marion Wilder. 



Violet King returned to London last 
Wednesday. She returns to open on the 
Orpheum time next November. 

Frank B. Corr, who attempted suicide 
several weeks ago in Chicago, is reported 
to be well on the way to recovery. 



Vinie Daly opens at Dresden Oct. 1, with 
engagements at Vienna and Prague to 
follow, secured . through the Marinelli 
office. 



Svengali, the "mind reader," opened at 
Pantages', Spokane, last Sunday, booked 
by Louis Pincus, of the Pat Casey 

Agency. 



Ferdinand C. Mesa, manager of the Ar- 
menonville, Havana, Cuba, reached New 
York on Wednesday in search of bookings 
foi his house. 

"The Imperial Musicians," a "straight" 
organization, is a new Jesse Lasky num- 
ber to be first seen at Morrison's, Rock- 
away Beach, June 28. 



Elita Proctor Otis returns to eastern 
vaudeville July 15 at the Brighton Beach 
Music Hall, booked there by M. S. Ben- 
tham in a new comedy piece. 



The Brit tons, colored, open for the 
Morris Circuit at the American, next 
week, also having engaged for next sea- 
son. B. A. Myers acted as the agent. 



Charles B. Arnold, the Eastern Wheel 
manager, is visiting in Cincinnati. Mr. 
Arnold will return in a couple of weeks to 
commence work on his shows for next 
season. 



Harry Brown, of "Mascot" fame, has 
taken up his summer residence at Blue 
Point, Long Island, having concluded his 
season in vaudeville with "The Village 
Doctor." 

Jenie Jacobs has recovered from an at- 
tack of pleurisy which threatened pneu- 
monia at one critical moment. Miss 
Jacobs returned to her desk in the Casey 
Agency on Monday. 



Jos. M. Gaites, who has Bessie McCoy 
under contract, declines permission for 
the "Yama" girl to play vaudeville, and 
expects Miss McCoy to rejoin "The Three 
Twins" next season. 



Charles Bornhaupt, the New York rep- 
resentative of the H. B. Marinelli Agency, 
has booked Frank Lc Dent, the comedy 
juggler, for Marinelli's Olympia, Paris, Le 
Dent opening Sept. 1. 



Princess Rajah, The Charles Ahearn 
Troupe, The Sehloms, "A Night in a Mon- 
key Music Hall," "La Belle Americaine" 
and Four Fords are holding over this 
week at Hammerstein's. 

Wednesday night at the American, a 
deor cheek of the evening before was pre- 
sented by a young man with the explana- 
tion he had seen but half the performance 
Tuesday and had conic back for a sight of 
the remainder of the show. 



A report from London says the Morris 
Circuit may have Arthur Prince, the Eng- 
lish ventriloquist, for next season. The 
United was supposed to hold a contract 
for Prince's services then. 

Viola Harris (Mrs. Harry Brown, of 
Brown, Harris and Brown) is resting at 
Hot Springs, Ark. Mr. Brown is at the 
Brown bungalow, Riverside, R. I. The act 
starts on its fall tour Sept. 10. 

Claude and Fannie Usher have written 
a new act for Hennings, Lewis and Hen- 
nings, which the trio will rehearse during 
vacation time while at their summer home 
at Putin-Bay, Lake Erie (Ohio). 



The Orpheum, Brooklyn, closes to-night 
(Saturday); Alhambra will wind up for 
the summer June 26, and the other Will- 
iams' theatre, Colonial, closed shop for 
the warm weather last Saturday. 



James K. Hackett may be headliner at 
Deimling's, Rockaway Beach, the opening 
week, commencing June 26. Mr. Hackett 
is concluding hia six weeks' engagement 
on the Morris time at the American to- 
day. 



Howard M. Arnold and Grace V. Walsh, 
who call themselves "The Kiddos," have a 
singing and dancing act named "Many 
Merry Minutes," which the couple are now 
"breaking in," preparatory to a New York 
visit. 



Geo. L. Archer's "Williams and Walk- 
er's 'Chocolate Drops'" are about to re- 
turn to the East, working back, the time 
for the colored act having been extended 
by the Sullivan-Considine Circuit in the 
west. 



Prof. Gcnnaro, of Gemiaru's Venetian 
Band, left for Europe last week. While 
abroad the bandmaster will visit his 
mother, 82 years of age, and secure a set- 
ting for a new act he has designed for next 
season. 



Frank Coombs and Muriel Stone have 
abandoned their summer bookings through 
the illness of Miss Stone. The act came 
to New York, where Miss Stone is rest- 
ing. They were playing on the Orpheum 
Circuit. 



The Four Lukens, Three Mosher Bros, 
and Empire Comedy Four have been en- 
gaged through the New York H. B. Mari- 
nelli office to open at the Berlin Winter- 
garten, August 14, the commencement of 
next season there. 

The Mohawk, Schenectady and Bijou, 
Binghamton, N. Y., may take on vaude- 
ville next season. A corporation has been 
formed to manage the Binghamton house, 
which replaces the Armory in that city 
as the variety theatre. 

Sam Scribner has an automobile all his 
own. The machine balked the other day. 
When Scribner stopped telling his new 
purchase what he thought of it, the re- 
pair man said $100 extra damage had 
been caused by the heat. 

J. H. Weiss, an old-time park manager 
and promoter, has taken charge of Cleve- 
land Beach, Cleveland, which was former- 
ly called "White City." Free attractions 



are shown at the park, together with 
vaudeville in the theatre. 



Following a week at Rockaway, Mont- 
gomery and Moore are going on a de- 
layed honeymoon of three years, the post- 
ponement of the happy time having been 
brought about by a flood of "time" to the 
pair, who are headlining the bill at the 
New Brighton Theatre, Brighton Beach, 
this week. 



Joe Hart is dickering to import Ab- 
dallah, a sensational dancer, and claimed 
by Ed. Lawshe, Mr. Hart's press repre- 
sentative, to be a beautiful woman. Mr. 
Hart is in receipt of a letter from 
Matthew Dwyer, his European agent, say- 
ing that he (Dwyer) saw Abbie, and 
that's enough. 



S. Z. Poli now has his private office in 
the United suite, which leads many to 
believe that next season Mr. Poli will 
secure the "split" with the agency on 
the commissions for his houses, some- 
thing the director of the Poli Circuit has 
wanted ever since he heard about others 
getting theirs. 



Monie Mine is due to open her return 
English season August 23 at the Canter- 
bury, London. Miss Mine will leave New 
York July 24. Her husband, Will H. Fox, 
also must put New York behind him to 
appear in London Coliseum, August 30. 
It will be Mr. Fox's eleventh English tour, 
and last until 1010 has passed away. 



Irene Franklin and Burt Green sail to- 
day for London where they open at the 
Palace, July 5. Last Saturday night Miss 
Green gave a farewell and birthday party 
to about 80 invited guests at the Hotel 
Majestic, Coney Island. The invitations 
mentioned it was Miss Franklin's (Mrs. 
Green) 2i>th anniversary of her birth, and 
she confirmed the statement. 



There are two vaudeville agents who 
have not presented themselves in the 
United Booking Offices suite since the or- 
der was promulgated that no agent could 
enter the inner sanctum without an 
"O. K" from someone connected with the 
agency, or before divulging his business. 
On Wednesday one of these standing-out 
agents was visited in his office by nine 
United managers in search of acts. 

Lillian Mortimer, having finished her 
first vaudeville season on the Orpheum 
Circuit, has returned to her summer home 
at Port Washington, L. I., where she will 
devote her time to writing a number of 
sketches, one for Selma Herman, who will 
make her vaudeville debut in the fall. 
Miss Mortimer will arrange her eastern 
time through her manager, J. L. Veronee, 
who directed all her enterprises in the 
dramatic field. 

At the annual meetings of the Aelors' 
Society of America, held in the society's 
rooms last Friday, Thomas A. Wise was 
re-elected president; Fanny Cannon, vice- 
president, and 11. Nelson Morey succeeded 
George Seybolt as secretary. The follow- 
ing directors urn- circled for the year: 
Kalph Delniorr. Fanny Cannon. William 
Court Iri<:li. « >-<•:■■ LaL'le. Fdward Locke, 
Lionel Adam-. W. I) M-»n«\ Harold Woolf. 
George Sryl.cO l.i'l : :in l\ ii:;--l»my . George 
T. Meed.. 



8 



VARIETY 



IRWIN BUYS OUT BRYANT. 

Fred Irwin lias added a third show to 
his two Eastern Burlesque Wheel organ- 
izations. Mr. Irwin lias taken over the 
Harry Bryant (knnpany, known as "Harry 
Bryant's Burlcsquers." Irwin will re- 
name the show ''Fred Irwin's Gibson Girls 
in Burlesque." 

Harry Bryant has been in the show 
business about thirty years, commencing 
with a partnership known as Bryant and 
Holmes, and afterwards Bryant and Wat- 
son. The latter team were the first to 
follow Rice and Barton into the mixed 
vaudeville and extravaganza, calling their 
first show "The American Burlesquers." 

That was about twelve years ago. Mr. 
Bryant has been on the Eastern Wheel 
since the circuit was formed. He may 
retire from the stage for a season or so 
to secure the rest demanded after his 
long, continuous career. 



AL WOODS HAS OLYMPIC. 

Hyde & Behman's Olympic, the Eastern 
Burlesque Wheel house in Brooklyn for 
last season, has T»een leased by the firm 
to Al H. Woods, the drama purifier. What 
Woods intends to do with the theatre 
hasn't come out yet. He is slowly se- 
curing a string of theatres in Greater 
New York. 

The Olympic is in close proximity to 
Hyde & Behman's Star, which also play 9 
the Eastern shows. Appearing at the 
Olympic following the week at the Star 
was about the same as a return engage- 
ment at that house would have been. 

With the opening of the new Western 
Wheel house further down Fulton Street, 
Brooklyn, next season, the Eastern folk 
considered the Olympic as useless for their 
purpose, although Hyde & Behman are 
said to have agreed that if the Columbia 
Amusement Co. desired the Olympic for 
another season, it would be placed at its 
disposal. 



ROBINSON TAKES SHOW. 

Charley Robinson has completed ar- 
ia ngements to operate Rice & Barton's 
Big Show (Eastern Burlesque Wheel) 
next season, paying to the proprietor of 
the franchise and name a fixed weekly 
royalty. Mr. Barton, who is one of the 
deans of burlesque, will not go on the 
road. 



WESTERN LEAVING PROVIDENCE? 

Providence, R. I., June 17. 

It is very doubtful if Providence will 
have the Western Burlesque Wheel shows 
next season. The Imperial, where the 
Western companies have heretofore put 
lip, is on the market. Several show peo- 
ple have looked it over within the past 
ten days. It is under the control of the 
Shuberts. 

The Eastern Wheel shows play at the 
Westminster. 

DES MOINES 4-DAY STOP. 

Des Moines, la., .Tunc 17. 

M. J. Kargcr's Empire will be a four-day 
stand on the Eastern Burlesque Wheel 
next season, Mr. Kaiser having contract- 
ed with the Columbia Amusement Co. to 
this end. 

Shows leaving Kansas City will play 
Sunday, Monday, Tuesday and Wednes- 
day in Des Moines, losing the remainder 
of the week going into Minneapolis. 



IMPOSSIBLE BURLESQUE FOR 5C. 

Chicago, Mune 17. 

There was hardly a seat left in the 
l ; . S. Theatre Sunday afternoon. The 
l'. S. is a small place made over from a 
storehouse and seats alsait 250. It is 
located on State Street, near Harrison, 
and the exterior announces ''Burlesque" 
in bold type. 

Sidney Selig, who struck upon the idea 
of offering the so-called burlesque, has 
not erred in this respect. He has shown 
good judgment in eliminating the pic- 
tures which are prevalent in the vicinity 
and introduced an innovation in five- 
cent entertainment, especially the kind 
that appeals particularly to the class 

that patronizes places where women 
reign. 

The typical surroundings of the "music 
hall" are evident, but the 'performance is 
unblemished as to cleanliness in word or 
action. There are three men and seven 
u omen. 

Harry Shefton, according to the billing, 
is the principal comedian, prbbably be- 
cause he is the biggest, physically, and 
wears the plume of a prince or king of 
something. The seven women include an 
Oriental dancer (not "cooch") and prin- 
cipal boy. The latter wears blue tights 
that seemed to have withstood the strain 
of stretching bravely, for there were 
symptoms of much wear, in fact so much 
that it appeared ancestral. The wearer of 
these might have occupied the back row 
of a real burlesque troupe in former days. 

The situation of the piece, which seemed 
to earn the most hearty support from 
an audience composed principally of men 
and boys, was when the principal boy and 
soubret make preparations to osculate 
and are interfered with by the comedian, 
who demanded from one dollar to fifty 
cents every time they kissed. This is an 
old piece of business done in the burlesque 
houses during the last generation. The 
principal boy and soubret murmur to 
themselves inwardly. Their lips do not 
seem to move. They read their lines 
like a school boy reciting from book. The 
performance is worth the price to see 
how improbable one can be. 



NEW BURLESQUE COMBINATION. 

Willie Drew and Thomas W. Dinkins, 
both Western Burlesque Wheel managers, 
have entered into an association. Camp- 
bell & Drew's "Tiger Lilies" will next 
season go on the road under their joint 
management. 

Campbell & Drew will turn over both 
their other shows to other producers next 
season, on a weekly royalty basis. In 
the rearrangement the "Tiger Lillies," 
which is Willie's own property, returns 
to his individual control. When it takes 
to the road "Zallah," a sensational dancer 
who played last year with several of the 
Campls'll & Drew shows, will be the 
feat u re. 



NEW SHOW FOR "RUNAWAYS." 

Jack Reid and Ella Reid Gilbert have 
been engaged by Peter S. Clark for "The 
Runaway Girls" next season. 

Mr. Reid will put on a musical comedy 
by Thos. T. Railey, entitled "The Gheezer 
of Gullabaloo." 



EMPIRE DIRECTORS MEET. 

The 11)09-10 frame-up of the Empire 
Circuit's houses (Western Burlesque 
Wheel) is said now to have been definite- % 
ly arranged, although the Board of Di- 
rectors, in daily session at the New York 
headquarters, and at the Imperial Hotel 
(where Col. James E. Fennessy is making 
his home temporarily), kept all their 
deliberations secret. 

All that could be learned was that a 
definite wheel had been fixed for next 
year's tour, that Jersey City had been 
reduced to a three-day stand, and that 
Providence might be. eliminated alto- 
gether. The directors were still holding 
closed meetings Wednesday evening, but 
it was intimated that a statement of the 
transactions consummated might be 
forthcoming by the latter part of the 
week. 

Lieut. II. Clay Miner returned from a 
tour of the south to attend the meetings. 
On Monday Harry Martell and James 
Lowrie returned from an automobile trip 
into the middle west to be present. Presi- 
dent James J. Butler did not attend. It 
is said he communicated all his wishes 
as to the disposition of pending matters 
to Col. Fennessy, and the latter speaks 
for him in the deliberations of the Execu- 
tive Committee. 



CROWD WANTED ACTION. 

Philadelphia, June 17. 

There was almost a riot at the Gayety 
(Eastern Burlesque Wheel) at the Mon- 
day matinee when a "cooch" dancer not 
unknown to fame simply appeared and 
after announcing that the authorities had 
refused to permit her to give a perform- 
ance, bowed her thanks and departed. 

The audience insisted that she "show," 
and when Manager Eddie Shayne protest- 
ed that he was forced to obey instructions 
from City Hall, a disturbance was pre- 
cipitated. The audience was finally per- 
suaded to let the show, go on. 

At the Trocadero (a Western house, 
playing stock burlesque) Chooceeta gave 
what was called a Spanish dance, and was 
unmolested. 



WILLIAMS'^ NEXT "IMPERIALS." 

The cast for H. W. and Sim Williams' 
"Imperials" for next season has been com- 
pleted. It will have Harry L. Cooper. 
Helen Almorah, Violet Hilson, Corinne 
De Forrest, Clara Raymond, James Fa- 
gan, Thomas Merrick, George Thurston, 
'The Irish-American Trio," George Herz, 
"Korcnah" (Spanish dancer), Zazel's 
"Living Pictures," Eddie Jones, Nick 
Murphy, Fred Kgener, W. T. La Rue, 
Frank King, and twenty choristers. 

The book and lyrics of the piece will 
1m- new, written by Sim Williams and 
Mr. Coo|H»r. The music has l.cen fur- 
nished by Violinsky. 



A lour of n year abroad, embracing 
Great Britain and the continental coun- 
tries excepting Russia, has been sub- 
mitted to Carrie De Mar, who is averse 
to remaining away from New York for 
that length of time. A condition of the 
engagement is that Miss De Mar trans- 
late her "Lonesome Flossie" number into 
French and German. Miss De Mar has 
bookings in England for three months 
next season, and will appear at home be- 
fore leaving to fulfil them. 



NEW YORK'S FIRST STOCK. 

New York is this week viewing its first 
summer stock burlesque at Hurtig & 
Seamon's Music Hall on 125th Street. The 
organization which opened there on Mon- 
day last is headed by Joe Fields, formerly 
of Fields and Wooley. Fields will put on 
each week a new set of pieces as long as 
patronage keeps the enterprise running. 
The olio features which do not take part 
in the pieces are changed weekly. This 
week's selection includes Rawson and 
dare in "Just Kids," Sam Dody and 
Mabel Lester, together with a boxing 
exhibition between Joe Bernstein and 
"Kid" Griffo. 

Hurtig & Seamon have expressed satis- 
faction with the returns and declare they 
will keep the company going as long as 
New York shows any interest in the 
enterprise. K-dna Green and Edna Daven- 
port (Duvenport Sisters) are the principal 
women, backed up by a chorus of eighteen 
girls. 



SPIEGEL TAKES "MORNING GLORIES." 

"The Morning Glories," an Eastern Bur- 
lesque Wheel show, last season under the 
management of Harder & Hall, a couple 
of newcomers in burlesque, will be man- 
aged next fall by Max Spiegel, under a 
permit from the Columbia Amusement Co. 

The show will be renamed and called 
"The College Girls." 



NEW COLUMBIA BY DEC. 1. 

The Columbia Amusement v Co. (Eastern 
Burlesque Wheel) people are of the opin- 
ion that their new Columbia Theatre, at 
Seventh avenue (Broadway) and 47th 
Street will be in readiness by Dec. 1, next. 

The Thompson-Starret Co. will take 
hold of the building operations when the 
wreckers clear off the Bite of the old 
buildings. This will require one more 
week. 



DIXON'S OWN "BIG REVIEW." 

"The Big Review" will be under the 
sole management of Henry P. Dixon 
next season. The pieces are to remain 
without change, but new people will in- 
terpret them. 

Sam Dessauer, the retiring member of 
the former Dixon & Dessauer firm will 
handle one of the Eastern Wheel shows. 



Hill and Ackerman have signed for next 
season with the Fay Foster vShow. 




T 3 GUESSES. T 

What American act paid for this ad- 
vertisement? 



VARIETY 



ARTISTS' FORUM 



lae jnt totters te I 




•a m« eM* af 

Nmm •# writer mat be sltaed 



b* ImU la strict 



Letters te te paluahsd is tela eslama mat te writtea sxohnrvafj te TAHITI. DasHsstei 
tetten will set te printed. Tfcs writer who taplioatts s totter te tha Fonun, «tth«r tempts «r after 
It appaan km, will act te pmattted tea piMlsf* af It asala. 



Madison, Wis., June 0. 
Editor Variety : 

I want to call attention of brother ar- 
tists to the high-handed manner in which 
things are conducted in W. S. Butterfleld's 
houses. Week May 31 we played at the 
Majestic, Kalamazoo, Mich. The finish of 
our act calls for thirteen slides and a film 
on the picture sheet. Wednesday after- 
noon nothing appeared, and after vainly 
waiting in the dark for some time, we 
were finally obliged to exit. 

As an example of the skilled help But 
tcrfiold employs, his operator is a novice, 
and general utility man around the thea- 
tre, besides distributor of hand bills 
around the town. In this instance he be- 
came more than usually muddled, and 
dropped his carbons out of the machine. 

Saturday night (too late for any possi- 
ble redress, even had there been any) we 
found in our pay envelope a letter from 
Mr. Butterfield stating he was obliged to 
deduct $10 from our salary for misbe- 
havior, referring to our exit. 

Casual inquiry among artists who have 
worked for him will bring to light many 
similar instances of unfairness. The trou- 
ble with many is that they quietly submit 
to these indignities and lack of courage 
to state their case for the benefit of others. 

Dave Claudius, 
(Claudius and Scarlet.) 



New York, June 14. 
Editor Variety: 

Variety in its lust issue had a note 
saying Nat Brown is now working with 
one Ayer. 

I wish to inform my friends and every- 
one in general that that Nat Brown is 
not the same Nat Brown, of Collins and 
Brown. 

I have lM»en associated with Milt D. 
Collins for four years, and wo ore l>ooked 
solid through next season. 

Xat Hrotrn. 

Berlin. Juno 7. 

Editor Variety: 

I notice in Variety that I am in n 
subordinate position to Mr. Steiner in the 
management of the Wintcrgartcn. 

I would kindly request you to rectify 
this error by stating that I- am a co-di- 
rector of this establishment, and every 
contract issued from the same has to bo 
signed'by both of us. CA/ij». Mvrtcnn. 



THE ABRAMOFF FUND. 

These additional subscriptions have been 
received for S. AbramofT: 

Pivvliiuwlv u«'Wih»\v1«'<1k«m1 $ , JCiS.<M) 

Join nnil Tilly Mnrrlwni lniM) 

Or|ili<'iiiii Circuit hMih-Iick: 

('Iihh. Fi'li'ky $1 .00 

Elliott KiiriMiinn •~ , ° 

W. I. I'Hwximrt J- 00 

Khv W. Mi-yiTS •"»" 

J. W. SiiIIIvhii •"•O 

J. M. O'Connor 50 

4.00 

$2s'J.OO 



ACTOR AND MANAGER CLINCH. 

Linton, Ind., June 17. 

A quarrel arising out of a hasty can- 
cellation finished in a direct fight here 
several days ago when Manager Palmer, 
of the local Air Dome, and Mr. Ryno, of 
Ryno and* Emerson, a vaudeville team, 
settled their differences in an exchange of 
fisticuffs in a newspaper office. The prin- 
cipals in the row were taken to the police 
office and both fined, Palmer for assault 
and battery and the artist for provoking 
the fight. 

In a public statement Ryno said that 
the manager had cancelled his contract 
without sufficient reason, and in order to 
escape payment of the team's salary. 
After the cancellation there appeared an 
article in one of the Linton newspapers 
commenting on the act in the harshest 
terms. Palmer later admitted that he 
was the author of the offending item. The 
artist went to the newspaper to protest 
against the treatment according him and 
upon meeting the manager there a wordy 
war opened, growing into a fist fight. 

"The management of the Air Dome," 
said the actor afterward, "cancelled our 
act on Tuesday after we had appeared on 
Monday night, stating that our offering 
did not meet with the approval of the 
audience. We were liberally applauded 
and a large number of the people who 
were in the theatre have come to us and 
said that our act was superior to any 
that has ever appeared in the Air Dome." 



HUNG ON TO NORAH BAYES. 

Had the foreign vaudeville managers 
their way, Norah Bayes would be headlin- 
ing European bills now instead of being 
featured with "The Follies of 1909" on the 
New York Roof. 

Earlier in the season, Charles Bornhaupt 
of the Marinelli Agency (New York 
branch) proposed to Miss Bayes a trip 
across. When Flo Ziegfeld, Jr., Miss 
I 'ayes' manager, heard of it, he wanted 
I'ornhaupt to explain how the foreign 
halls could afford to pay Miss Bayes 10,000 
fiancs monthly, which he demanded for 
her services, also telling Mr. Bornhaupt 
that Mr. Ziegfcld didn't think much of 
him for wanting Miss Bayes any way, when 
In- knew the Zicgfcld new show was about 
1o go in rehearsal. 

Bornhaupt 's reply was a letter to Zicg- 
fi'ld. with a contract for foreign time en- 
closed, at a monthly salary of 10.000 
fumes ($3,200) for Miss Bays. The con- 
tract was not returned to Mr. Bornhaupt. 



Cadioux, the wire-walker, fell at Wash- 
ington Park, N. J., last week, breaking 
both legs. 



Geo. II. Pierce, the custodian of the 
White Bats, is' receiving congratulations 
on his contemplate*] marriage. The name 
of the future Mrs. Pierce is held under 
cover. 

Charles and Josie Quinn, who have 
been west for six months, will presently 
commence eastern time, with bookings en- 
tered into through Gordon & Solomon, the 
agents. 



CLAIMS NO INJUSTICE DONE. 

There has been no injustice done Work 
and Ower, the comedy acrobatic act, by 
the demand upon the team for commis- 
sions alleged to be due, according to 
Charles Bornhaupt, the New York repre- 
sentative for II. B. Marinelli. 

"1 want to set forth my side of this 
Work and Ower matter," said Mr. Born- 
haupt. "It is not a Marinelli account, but 
my individual claim. When Work and 
Ower first came over here and appeared at 
the New York Roof, following the Stcin- 
Erretto Troupe, another acrobatic act, the 
conditions that night were all adverse to 
Work and Ower's success. They were 
voted a failure, and no one would play 
them. 

"I got W. T. Grover of the Brighton 
Beach Music Hall to give the act a week. 
Mr. Grover agreed and then backed out 
after hearing the bad reports. I told him 
the act was all right; I had seen them 
abroad, and they needed only a proper 
chance. I guaranteed Mr. Grover, Work 
and Ower would make good, and they did. 
They were the hit of that week's show 
down there. 

"Then I secured a season's engagement 
with the Orpheum Road Show for them. 
When the contracts were signed I told the 
two men that had it not been for my per- 
sonal attention and interest in them, they 
would be home. I asked as a remuneration 
for the extra work done, since the com- 
mission on salary they then received would 
be very small, that they agree to give me 
commission on the next re -engagement, 
which they did. 

"I did not ask commission on all their 
future American work. That is a mistake. 
All I asked was what I thought, and they 
did, too, at the time, that I was entitled 
to. 

"Now they are one of the best comedy 
acrobatic acts in this country or Europe, 
and they made themselves l>oeause I per- 
sisted in their behalf." 




GRACE HAZARD. 

The M.'miUS CIRCUIT lift* Induced ORACH 
HAZARD to make a final vaudeville plunge >*.'• 
fnro cnmmenclntf tn slmlv fur tlio til lo role of 
•Till: PARISIAN MODKI.." whl.h Miss Hazard 
hits enuiiK*'it lo dike next season under the man 
up'ment of Mlttenthal Ill-others. 

Coiiiiik'mi'Ii.c Monday at the American, Miss 
Hazard stiuls the lust week In New York vnrlHy 
elieles. •uid after a Htop on the Atlantic Clly 
Itourdw .tlk, will hio herself nwny for the summer. 



DAZIE ACCEPTS TIME. 

Before leaving for Europe, Dazie, the 
dancer, has accepted a limited engage- 
ment in the Keith theatres, opening June 
28 at Boston, and playing at the Fifth 
Avenue, New York, July 5. 

A pantomime, "L'Amour d' Artist," 
written by Sig. G. Molasso, has been ex- 
pressly constructed for her. Dazie will 
be the first American dancer who has 
attempted to interpret a story without 
Words. 

Dazie will likely commence her for- 
eign tour Sept. 1 at the Olympia, Paris, 
remaining in the Parisian capital two 
months. The Apollo at Vienna will have 
the American danseuse for the following 
month. 

Bonsflglio, the pantomimic dancer, who 
appeared at the New York Hippodrome, 
will be Da/.ie's assistant in her act while 
abroad. 



BALTIMORE'S $400,000 SITE. 

Baltimore, June 17. 

A deal has been closed in this city for 
the erection of a huge vaudeville play- 
house on the site of the old Baltimore 
& Ohio R. R. building, also the site of the 
old Baltimore Museum, conducted for 
many years by the late P. T. Barnum. 

The lot was bought last Saturday by 
the Garden Company, a corporation char- 
tered under the laws of Delaware, but 
composed of Baltimore capitalists, who 
will build the theatre. It will be man- 
aged when completed by a prominent New 
York manager, name undivulged. The 
building will cover the entire plot, lOOx 
1(14. The selling price was $400,000. 

The policy will be high grade vaude- 
ville. The interior will not have a dupli- 
cate outside of New York. Elevators will 
carry patrons from the foyer to the gar- 
den on the roof, which will be surmounted 
with an ornamental heavily wired glass 
dome, converting the garden into a sun 
I arlor in winter. A rathskeller will be 
located in the basement. 

It has not been decided as yet what 
booking agency will supply the house, 
expected to lx» completed by next Thanks- 
giving. 



Mrs. George E. Murphy, known profes- 
sionally on the stage as Fannie Monroe, 
a memlier of the Murphy and Whitman 
Co., died June 10 at the home of her 
mother, 307 West 120th Street. Funeral 
services were held Saturday last at St. 
Aloysius Church, 132d Street and Seventh 
Avenue, New York. Mrs. Murphy before 
joining the Murphy-Whitman Co. had 
been connected with several New York 
productions. 



Charles L. Woodward died at Schenec- 
tady, N. Y., June 10 in his H4th year. 
One of the surviving children is George 
A. Woodward, musical director of The 
Dorp Theatre in that city. 

La Veen ami Cross will commence a 
lour of the Orpheum Circuit August l."». 

Gavin, Plait and "INskIms." aficr a leu 
weeks' tour on the Western Vaudeville 
Association time, arc h.wk in New York. 

Alia Yolo. Hi.- vin-'n,^ impersonator, is 
on a tlner iimiitliv' imir of the Pacilic 
Coast. B. A. M.vi- is Miss Yolo's agent. 



10 



VARIETY 







LONDON NOT 

VARIETY'S LONDON OFFICE. 
sis fTmAjn>, w. a 

(Mall ft* AomHcuh and loropeana In Europe If addressed care VARIETY, as absTS, will 
ha proiaptlj forwarded. ) 



London, June 0. 
Williard Simms, who opened at the Em- 
pire this week, made them laugh at times, 
but the act was not received in the same 
way as it has been in the States. Mr. 
Simms has cut out the afterpiece in "one." 



Jimmie Britt leaves this week for Sun- 
bury to train at the Wier Hotel, which is 
run by Leonard Barry, a music hall artist. 
Jim is matched to fight Summers on July 
10, the fight to take place in the open air 
at some park in London. 



"Sporting life," the play that Seymour 
Hicks was supposed to put on some time 
this summer, is said to have fallen 
through. 



Houdini has signed contracts that will 
take him to Australia in the fall of this 
year. 



Bellman and Moore have been booked 
for another complete Barassford tour 
through Paul Murray. 



Mr. and Mrs. Bob Fitzsimmons sail for 
New York June 12, returning here in Au- 
gust on their way to Australia. 



The Belleclair Brothers will be held over 
at the Coliseum next week, and after that 
they will take about four months' work 
on the Continent, returning to fill engage- 
ments on the Stoll time. 



The Morris office on June 7 resembled 
more a school for Hebrew comedians than 
a booking office. Members from these 
acts were present at the same time: Jor- 
dan and Harvey, Howell and Scott, Friend 
and Downing and the teacher, Joe Welch. 
Talk about a corner near the Williams- 
burg bridge. 



Emil Hoffman, the baritone, is over here. 
Though taking a vacation, Mr. Hoffman 
will probably make an English production 
cf his musical sketch. 



Kathryn Mi ley will open at the Tivoli 
the latter part of this month. 



Helen Trix "stopped the show" at the 
Palace, Dundee, last week, where she 
topped the bill. That Miss Trix stopped 
the show is an actual fact. The manage- 
ment was obliged to place her in the clos- 
ing position to save the bill. The audi- 
ence refused to allow anyone to follow 
after her earlier position the first of the 
week. 



Evie Greene has received a letter from 
a proud father who wrote his little girl 
had never before cried in a music hall 
until she heard Miss Greene sing her sec- 
ond song. The father wanted to apolo- 
gize to Miss Greene for the cry. How 
would you accept that note if you were 
Evie 7 



Mooney and Hollbein are back. Jim 
Mooney visited the States for medical 
advice about his dancing leg. He threw 
it out of joint awhile ago. Jim may be 
stepping again in a few months. 



The Water Rats benefit comes off at 
the Oxford June 14. It will be a great 
affair. A crowd of stars will appear. 



Thomas Barassford objects to the state- 
ment that The Great Lafayette is largely 
interested in the Barassford Circuit. Mr. 
Barassford says that Lafayette positively 
does not hold a share of stock in his line 
of houses. 



After a long tour of the Continent, 
Frederic Melville and his "Moto-Girl" are 
at the Coliseum this week. 



Marie Lloyd is being sued by the Moss 
Empires for $5,000, the Circuit alleging 
Miss Lloyd broke the "barring" clause. 



William Morris returned from the prov- 
inces last Thursday. Though he would 
say nothing, it listens rather reasonable 
that Morris has been looking over the 
Thos. Barassford houses and other halls 
booked by Mr. Barassford. The news of 
an affiliation between Morris and Barass- 
ford ought to cause a bit of excitement on 
this side. A move of this kind would 
surely have an important effect on the 
proposed big combine. The situation is 
just this at present. A few of Barass- 
ford's houses, or, rather, halls, that he 
books for, are reported to have joined the 
big combine. Barassford is really the only 
important factor of the music hall world 
who is not involved in it. With William 
Morris' American circuit, an arrangement 
could be made, causing the other manag- 
ers, whether combined or not, to do a lot 
of figuring. An international circuit of this 
kind would have things all its own way, 
and as for American material, Barassford 
would be easy. The rumor of the affilia- 
tion has not been confirmed as yet, but it 
is certain the parties mentioned have been 
in conference for some time. 



On Friday night last Thomas Barassford 
was seen at his pet hall, the Brighton 
Hippodrome, and the head of the tour 
really felt like talking. Mr. Barassford 
takes great pride in his music hall in 
Brighton, and well be might. He stated 
it was seldom that a neat little profit 
was not handed in from this hall at the 
end of a week. Mr. Barassford's home 
io in the same building, with a private 
entrance into the auditorium. Another 
house that Mr. Barassford likes to 
talk about is the King's Theatre in 
South Sea. This hall, he states, has never 
had a losing week since its opening. The 
two theatres mentioned are controlled by 
Mr. Barassford, and he gives them his 
personal attention. Mr. Barassford re- 
marked it was very difficult to manage a 
house when it is controlled by a board of 
local directors, and can not be given per- 
sonal attention by a head of a circuit. 
When asked just how he stood with Will- 



iam Morris, mad if there was anything in 
the affiliation rumor, he vtflsssl he wmald 
be pleased to enter into any business ar- 
rangement with Mr. Morris, but would not, 
say whether or not anything of the kind 
had been spoken of. 



"The Star Bout" last week made its 
first West End appearance, at the Oxford. 
The first part of the show, with its slang, 
was received very quietly, but the ring- 
side scene seemed to pass. O'Connor's ex- 
cellent funny work was the part the audi- 
ence liked. Another funny bit of the 
present act was the ejflforts of an English 
actor, who takes the place of the Corbet t- 
looking fellow. He forgot every other 
line, going into real acting, while throw- 
ing out the "wise talk." Of course this 
was only funny to Yanks. Ben Rosenthal 
was an actor last week, doing the "Spider" 
in a way that promises Ben a chance of 
being a great actor some day, or one day. 



After his Palace engagement (to run 
for seven more weeks) Walter C. Kelly 
may accept a few odd weeks with some 
of the independent halls in the provinces. 
Mr. Kelly has no plans for next season, 
and apparently no desire to work for a 
few months after finishing here. The 
Judge is thinking seriously of taking a 
long tour among the countries of the Far 
East. 



Sidney Wood (Maud and Sydney Wood) 
is reported engaged, and to be married 
on July 4 of this year. This was told in 
strict confidence by one of the family, so 
don't tip it off to a soul. 



The Gus Onlaw Trio have been in Lon- 
don for a few days, and will leave for 
Lyons, France, shortly, where they will 
rest for a few weeks before returning to 
fill English engagements. 



Gardner and Stoddard topped the bill at 
the Empire, Edinburgh, last week. 



OHana San returns to the Coliseum 
this week, having been on a trip to the 
Continent. 



A turn worth mentioning is the patter 
act of Farr and Farland, at present play- 
ing the Tivoli. The comedian doing a very 
funny Johnny has enough laughs up his 
sleeve for any hall, while the "straight" 
is a good one. 



Daisy Jerome has taken to long clothes 
and character studies. While doing a 
Scotch in one of the West End halls the 
other night, a little Scotch program girl 
was awfully sore. 



The Tivoli management had a hot time 
one day recently. The' hall has been do- 
ing immense business through ^gathering 
several stars at once for the attraction. 
When Marie Lloyd was billed over Harry 
Lauder, Lauder is said to have set up a 
howl which could have been heard in 
Liverpool on a quiet evening. The man- 
agement had to change about, covering up 
all the paper pasted with Marie on top. 
What Marie said isn't of record, but she 
was probably good natured enough not to 
embarrass the management further than 
Lauder had done. 



Alfred Butt of the Palace will allow "Con 
aul Peter," the ■naastinnal "saoak," to 
leave his house in time to keep the Ham 
merstein engagement in New York. llutt 
has the ape for the three weeks preceding 
the New York opening, with an allowance 
tor travel. It seems from the story about 
that when Percy G. Williams engaged 
Vesta Tilley for six weeks in his Metro- 
politan houses, it was understood that 
Miss Tilley should immediately return at 
the termination of the New York time to 
reappear at the Palace. But Miss Tilley 
did not come back after finishing on the 
Williams circuit. She continued on in 
United houses, much to Butt's chagrin, 
and Mr. Butt may now decide that what 
is good for Peter can do for Paul as well, 
so we won't be shockingly surprised if the 
Palace manager induces "Peter" to hold 
over the contemplated London visit, if the 
monkey's success warrants it. 



The vaudeville people around London 
who know the situation are wondering if 



THE DOINGS IN BERLIN. 

Br WILLIAM GOULD. 

Berlin, June 6. 

I have been Ike Rose's guest for a week, 
and through his courtesy I have seen all 
the shows in Berlin. 

There is a musical comedy on at the 
Metropole called "The Upper Ten Thou 
sand," music by Gustav Kirker. He has 
revived many of his New York successes 
in this piece — that is, "Baby and Jusque 
la." Madge Leasing, an old New York 
Casino favorite, is the leading woman and 
quite a hit, especially in a "Yama" num- 
ber, assisted by Fred Wright, the English 
comedian. Wright is something of a 
linguist. I have seen him in Paris play- 
ing in French ; Berlin, in German, and 
London, in English. 

Also saw "The Dollar Princess" at thr 
New Operetten Theatre. It is by the au- 
thor of "The Merry Widow," but not to 
be compared with that huge success. 
There is only one melody that might l>c 
come fairly popular in America. 

In the latter part of the first act and 
in the first part of the second act, tliey 
have made a new and startling departure. 
You see a field and a clear sky (eyclo- 
rama drop gradually turning from day to 
night, leaving everyone on the stage in 
darkness). The leading woman makes her 
entrance in the darkness. You do not see 
her face until the first half of the second 
act is over. Second act opens with moon 
and stars shining; gradually the stars one 
by one go out and the moon disappears, 
then dawn. 

The chorus is the ugliest I have ever 
looked at; but their voices! We never 
heard the like outside grand opera. 

M the Apollo Music Hall an American 
act, Meier and Studl, must have learned 
their dancing at Mink's or Child's. Tin- 
man also punches the bag. There is an 
animal actor here named Paula, a won- 
der. He makes up for a baboon and runs 
all over the theatre; so real he frightens 
the women. He does an act taken from 
one of Edgar Allan Poe's short stories. 

Harlstein is the headliner in a two 
scene sketch built on mistaken identity, 
and was very well received. 

They are trying to coax the Berliners to 
skate (roller). Nick Kauffmann and Ike 
Rose introduced the idea, but the Ger- 
mans are very slow to accept the sport. 
as they hate to part with their money 
for anything but food and beer. 

Nothing extra at the Wintergarten last 
month. 



VARIETY 



11 



"THIRD PARTY" MOVEMENT 

REPORTED TO BE FORMING 

New "Color" Device, and "Talking-Singing" Pictures 

to Be Basis for the Third Division. Plenty 

of Capital Said to Be Interested. 



It was rumored about this week that 
showmen of means had become interested 
ii. the new devices for color photography 
as applied to moving pictures, and the new 
"talking-singing" picture machine lately 
brought over to America from England. 

The story is that a corporation of very 
lp.rge capitalization will be formed to take 
both over. It will operate as a third 
party in the picture trade, granting 
licenses to exhibit the output and estab- 
. lishing a thorough system throughout the 
country. 

No names have been mentioned for 
publication, but it is said two or three 
film renters who have been approached 
approve of the scheme, and have signified 
their willingness to join immediately 
when the project shall have been 
launched. 

The color device is held by patents to 
FrieBe Green, and was reported in last 
week's Variety, which also contained an 
account of the "talking-singing" pictures, 
owned by Jeapes & Barker, of England, 
the American rights having been brought 
over here for sale by Ben Nathan, the 
London showman. 



ADDING AMERICAN SUBJECTS. 

Chicago, June 17. 

It is understood that the International 
Projecting & Producing Co., the largest 
"independent" in the picture trade, is 
making arrangements to add American 
subjects to its weekly supply of films. 

These arrangements, according to the 
report, will bring into the International a 
manaufacturer or so of limited output at 
present, and outside the trust, giving the 
Independent, if the calculation is correct, 
four or five native subjects weekly as an 
addition to its release list by January 1. 



SUITS AGAINST VIASCOPE. 

Chicago, June 17. 

A whole battalion of lawyers appeared 
here to represent the Biogra ph. -Edison 
combine in their suits against the Via- 
scope Co. this week in nn effort to pre- 
vent the independent concern from fur- 
ther producing moving picture apparatus. 

The Patents Co. is plaintiff in four 
different suits, which were instituted June 
l. r ». alleging that the Viascope people were 
infringing upon their patents. The 
Patents Co.'s lawyers were Rector, Hib- 
ben & Davis, and Kerr, Page, Cooper & 
Davis. 

The Viascope has been upon the market 
for some time, although its use has not, 
been very general among the independent 
exhibitors. 



The Alfred Weiss Film Exchange has 
been incorporated in New York, with a 
capital of $10,000. The incorporators are 
Alfred and Helen Weiss, 1235 Lexington 
Avenue, and Herman Schmidt, 307 E. 77th 
Street, New York. 



ANOTHER EXCHANGE DROPPED. 

The Patents Co. made known via circular 
announcement this week that the Michi- 
gan Film Exchange, of Detroit, had been 
dropped from the list of its licensed mem- 
bers. In this case the ostensible ground 
for dropping the exchange was its alleged 
failure to submit to headquarters a 
monthly report of its business, together 
with remittances for the projecting ma- 
chine royalties on the part of its clients. 



4,000,000 DAILY. 

The Brooklyn Eagle last Sunday print- 
ed a moving picture article in which it 
was said that 4,000,000 people daily visit- 
ed picture shows during 1908. 

Other statistics gathered by the writer 
of the story gave $50,000,000 as the in- 
vestment in the moving picture industry, 
and that films measuring in all 100 miles 
are shown every day. 



SEEK PICTURE MONOPOLY. 

Philadelphia, June 17. 

Announcement was made here this week 
that William Gane, the moving picture 
promoter, had taken over the two Harry 
Davis Theatres on Market Street, one at 
Eighth and the other at Ninth Street. 
This is believed to be another move in an 
effort on the part of Felix Isman, George 
H. Earle, Jr., and others to corral the 
entire business of exhibiting moving pic- 
tures in this city. Only a few days ago 
it became known that S. Lubin had re- 
tired from the management of his five 
amusement enterprises and that Isman, 
who has always had ap interest, had 
taken them over. Gane is interested with 
Isman in a new picture place in New 
York at 31st Street and Broadway, and 
the connection is plain. 

While reports have it that Mr. Lubin 
will quit the exhibition business altogeth- 
er he has made no official announcement 
to this effect. He will shortly open New 
York headquarters for the handling of his 
film manufacturing and machine business. 
George Bothwell. who has been Lubin's 
right-hand man in the promotion of his 
picture theatres, will take charge of the 
New York ofiice. 

PROMISE NON-INFLAMMABLE FILMS. 

Paris, June 7. 

It is reported the firm of Lumiere, 
Lyons, will shortly place on the market 
their long talked of non-inflammable film, 
which will be sold at the price of 80 cents 
per metre (roughly 15 cents a yard). 

They are also busy perfecting a film for 
scientific projections with a width of one 
centimetre (0.393 inch), but which will 
increase the picture from one yard to 
more than a vard and a half. 

* 

Stella Mayhew and Hillce Taylor are 
aboard the Rotterdam, bound for New 
York. 



SOCIETY FOR POPULAR EDUCATION. 

Paris, June 7. 

A society has just been established in 
Paris (office at 16 Rue Grange Bateliere) 
called Soeiel6 Pro Cinf», with the object 
of giving popular education by the means 
of moving pictures. 

A new syndicate of "Authors of Moving 
Picture Films" is being formed in Paris 
for the purpose of grouping all writers of 
plots suitable for reproduction for motion 
pictures and the proper protection and 
collection of their rights and royalties. 
Particulars can be obtained from the 
Societe 1 des Gens de Lettres, 38 Rue du 
Mont Thabor, Paris. 

The annual meeting of the Internation- 
al Literary and Artistic Association will 
be held this year in Copenhagen from 
June 21 to 26, as previously announced. 
The program for discussion is on the re- 
cent conference at Berlin, a legislative 
review concerning all literary property, 
the unification of the period in which 
authors' rights must be paid and the cine- 
matograph and moving pictures as liter- 
ary property. 



CAMPAIGN AGAINST WHITE PLAGUE. 

St. Louis, June 17. 
The Municipal Commission on Tuber- 
culosis is holding meetings here this week, 
in an effort to spread information as to 
the prevention of the disease. The city 
body proposes to carry on this educa- 
tional campaign, and one of its chief ex- 
hibits will be a series of moving pictures 
showing points of interest, such as hos- 
pital camps, out-of-door camps and tene- 
ment districts where the. infection 
breeds. 



STATE ST. PICTURE HOUSES. 

Chicago, June 17. 

Jones, Linick & Schafer practically own 
and control nearly every moving picture 
house on State Street. They seem to 
have cornered the market when the in- 
fusion began a few years ago. The "Bijou 
Dream," adjoining their Orpheum, de- 
voted to pictures and ill. songs, occupies 
two floors. The upper floor is given over 
to pictures for which 5 cents is charged, 
while downstairs one may see a vaude- 
ville show for a dime. There are 108 
seats in the "Bijou Dream." Three acts 
are given from 10 a. m. to 5 p. m., while 
another shift relieves until midnight. The 
number of performances are numerous. 

The Premier features vaudeville as well 
as pictures. Edna Howard, a soubret, 
with a desire to impersonate either Mabel 
llite or Kate Barry, opened one of the 
shows. She is followed by a eolored man 
mined Kid Brown, who starts in boldly 
with a monolog that would even cause 
his race to blush, so aged and decrepit 
were his jokes. He then dances and 
piays the banjo bluntly much to the dis- 
comfort of those who paid the nickel. 
The pictures are the more important 
here in every sense. 

The T'niijue. another Jones. Linick & 
Schafer house. h:is moving pictures only, 
the series runninL r from the product of 
the Essanay. Selig. C.aumont. Pat he and 
Edison. 

The pianiste at the (Jem. where vaude- 
ville is sandwiched with pictures, played 
'Old Kentucky Home*' incidental to a 
Mm showing a foreign subject in fancy 
costume. One reel of 1.000 feet is used 



at this house weekly, while six acts, di- 
vided into two shifts, are provided. 

The American. State Street, opposite 
the Folly, is owned by Sidney Selig, who 
nisi) operates the picture theatre at 
'White City" and the l\ S. burlesque 
house on State street. There are about 
";>;> seats. One exit is through the stage. 
Pour acts and pictures are given for five 
cents. The acts are not announced by 
placards as the others. A comedy act 
by two men seemed to find favor, while 
a young man with unshaven countenance 
sang ballads. 

The National is conducted by F. B. 
Trabbit. It seats 208. Four acts and 
pictures make up the bill. Business is 
so good that the adjoining building will 
be utilized to increase the seating capac- 
ity to 900. 



ADMITTING MINORS CAUSES ARREST. 

For allowing minors without adult es- 
cort to enter his picture show on Ralph 
Avenue, Brooklyn, last Saturday, Abra- 
ham Zergefflisk was placed under arrest. 



MOVING PICTURE REVIEWS 



"Ten Nights in a Bar-room." 
Chicago. 

Based on the play of the same name, 
the picture tells in comprehensive action 
the trials and tribulations of an honest 
youn& workman seeking to be honest, bat 
addicted to drink, even against his own 
struggles to shun the habit. Every im- 
portant scene, including the bar-room in- 
cidents, is faithfully carried out. The 
subject is a very good one, and one of the 
most interesting of the dramatic series 
placed on view. (Essanay.) 

Frank Wiesberg. 



"The Sleeping Tonic." 
Chicago. 

A young man is troubled with insomnia. 
A doctor prescribes the remedy. The re- 
sult is he sleeps everywhere and every 
place he finds, at last on the concrete 
wall of a fountain. In his slumber he 
rolls over into the water. The situations 
are rapid and amusing. (Essanay.) 

Frank Wietberg. 



"The Moonstone." 
Chicago. 

An adaptation of Wilkie Collins' novel, 
"The Moonstone." The story is centred 
around the head of the sacred "Moon- 
Cod." The taking of the moonstone 
takes one's imagination to mystic sym- 
bolism of India. The scenes are pictoral 
in the extreme. The spectator is taken 
into picturesque and fantastic spots. A 
daughter of one of the principals is put 
into a hypnotic sleep. In her dreams she 
pves the location of the Moonstone. 
Many perilous adventures and episodes of 
the thrilling sort are given in succession. 
Artistically it is an excellent achievement. 
Its melodramatic value is of a high order. 

Frank Wirsbrrg. 

The Pitt-Inn^ Calcium Light Co. has 
been incorporated in tlii* State tor the 
rent in" of film and the business of deal- 
ing in machines and supplies. The incor- 
porators aire Kdward M. Saunders. Richard 
A. Uowland and dame-, IV Clark, the two 
latter of I'itt-hii'v 



12 



VARIETY 



■w 



NEW ACTS NEXT WEEK 

Initial Presentation, First Appearance Of 

Reappearance in or Around New 

York City. 



( NEW ACTS Or THE WEEK J 



Ed. Wrothe and Co., American. 

Haines and Vidocq, Fifth Avenue. 

"The Girl with the Angel Voice/' 
Brighton Beach Music Hall. 

Keeley Bros, and Co. (New Act), Brigh- 
ton Beach Music Hall. 

Banyan, Columbia. 

Burnt and Fulton, Bayonne. 

Alix Lukos, Bayonne. 



Whitehead and Grierson. 
Songs, Talk and Dances. 
One. 
American. 

Joe Whitehead is a popular western 
comedian. He has appeared in musical 
comedy in Chicago and around out there. 
Vaudeville has also known him but not 
in New York. At one time the act was 
known as Whitehead and the Grierson 
Sisters. Now it is Joe Whitehead and Flo 
Grierson. At the American on Monday 
they appeared "No. 6." After the matinee 
the act was placed "No. 10." following 
Rice and Prevost, who had brought out a 
great deal of mirth, which did not help 
the western people any. There is talk to 
open and talk later on. Songs and dances 
are sandwiched in. It is Mr. Whitehead's 
dancing which does the most. For an en- 
core, he offers to dance in any stvle re- 
quested by the audience. Several accept 
the open invite. In work Whitehead re- 
sembles somewhat Eddie Foy. although a 
much better dancer. In sjieech he ia re- 
mindful at moments of Junie McOree, 
whom he succeeded as the principal in "The 
Girl Question" nt the La Salle. Chicago. 
It looks as though Mr. Whitehead could 
make himself a favorite in New York 
vaudeville. His dancing is getting quite a 
lot as it is, hut the opening talk will 
have to be brightened up. Perhaps all 
new matter excepting a few lines would 
help even more. Miss Grierson sings a 
song, the melody furnishing a letter dan- 
cing air than in song, and she joined her 
partner in the lively stepping to follow 
the singing of the selection. "Let's Take 
a Walk" was a duet also earlv. Thev left 
the stage on this, too soon to have done 
so, and too risky on that song. Miss 
Grierson hasn't a voice to brag of, and 
what she has is interfered with bv a tre- 
molo. The dressing seemed to be designed 
to make overgrown "kids" or rural young 
people. Another kind might be tried for 
comparison. Simc. 



Howard and Lewis. 
Songs and Talk. 
14 Mins.; One. 
Columbia. 

A bright, snappy line of talk would 
work wonders for Howard and Lewis. 
The comedian has a very good idea of 
what is expected of a "Dutch" funny 
man, and is easily capable of handling 
something better than the present mate- 
rial. The singing of the pair is now the 
strength. The "straight" has a good 
\oice. although he is hurting his work by 
a noticeable self -consciousness. He sings 
one song straight, the comedian following 
with a parody. It is from the Matthews 
and Ashley creation. The act did very 
well at the Columbia. Burlesque would 
be a good berth for the team. Hash. 



Lydia Dreams and Co. (1). 
Ventriloquial. 
Three (Parlor). 
American. 

Lydia Dreams is a man despite ''Lydia." 
He is a foreign act, but has played over 
here before, and during the past season 
outside of New York. In his ventriloquial 
offering Mr. Dreams gives ventriloquism, 
female impersonation, rapid sketching and 
lightning changing. It seems almost too 
much for one, and it is. The ventriloquist 
connects the different lines with his 
"dummy," a very poor looking one, much 
too elderly in appearance for the "kid" 
it is supposed to be, and likewise too old 
to be seated on a lady's lap* Mr. Dreams 
being the "lady" when this happens. The 
voice throwing is not always distinct, and 
the comedy secured is through Dreams 
working the "dummy's" arms with his 
own inserted through the sleeves of the 
coat. The act as it is now, said to be a 
new one for Mr. Dreams, can stand an 
awful lot of fixing. Sime. 



Santora and Marlow. 
13 Mins.; Full Stage. 
Columbia. 

There certainly can be no complaint 
entered against Santora and Marlow for 
lack of variety. They do a little of 
everything. Talking, singing, dancing, 
rapid sketching, paper-tearing and acting. 
That's quite an array to slide through in 
thirteen minutes. Miss Marlow looks 
very well in a pink soubret costume, 
and handles herself in a likable manner. 
A costume change or two would not be 
amiss. In the scene from "Lights of 
London" she displays some real ability. 
As the heroine in a thriller Miss Marlow 
might l>e a wonder. Mr. Santora uses a 
half-tramp make up. and as a comedian, 
noes not get very far. He makes a 
rather fair sketch of the usual charcoal 
sort. The couple take the melodrama 
scene seriously, Santora giving a great 
imitation of the deep-dyed villainous-vil- 
lain. The act opened the show at the 
Columbia, and passed through nicely. 

Dash. 

The Gordon Bros. 
Singing and Dancing. 
12 Mins.; One. 
Henderson's. 

The Gordon Bros, formerly supported 
Eddie Leonard in his minstrel act. They 
are offering a straight dancing and sing- 
ing turn. A simple routine of singing and 
dancing, with no effort to pad out with 
talk, displays their specialty nicely. A 
'coon" song starts them off. the boys 
showing some well handled soft shoe step- 
ping. An Eddie Leonard, imitation (an- 
nounced), follows, and for the finish both 
go to an elaborate series of wooden shoe 
dances. The Gordon Brothers are equal 
to anv of the two-man acts in unison 
dancing and they work up a big applause 
finish with their intricate combinations. 
They are of good appearance, dress care- 
fully with just about the right touch of 
Hash, and sing rather nu.re agreeably 
than the average in this sort of specialty. 

Ruth. 



John F. Ford and the Clark Sisters. 

Singing and Dancing. 

16 Mini.; Full Stage (11); One (5). 

Henderson's. 

The Clark Sisters aforetime worked 
with George Whiting while John Ford has 
made up half of several singing and dan- 
cing teams. The new three-act gives every 
promise of working into .a valuable num- 
ber, if its reception by the Henderson 
audience Monday afternoon is any indi- 
cation. Of course the few bits of tall: 
between Ford and either of the girls 
went the way of all dialog at Hender- 
son's, but the quiet, neat dances, the at- 
tractive appearance of the sisters and 

Ford's excellent "coon shouting" won for 
the young people a whole lot more enthu- 
siasm than ordinarily falls to the lot 
of a "break-in" act at the beach. A fast, 
clean series of songs, dances and costume 
changes brings the trio to an excellent fin- 
ish. Here Ford, after working up a pan- 
tomimic quarrel with the girls, recalling 
rather strongly a similar bit done by 
Harry Fox and the Melnotte Twins, leaves 
the stage and disappears through the audi- 
ence singing one of those "Good-bye" 
songs. The three work this bit up cap- 
itally and make a spirited close to a very 
entertaining quarter of an hour. Such 
rough points as occur are minor ones and 
capable of easy correction. Rush. 

Basellari. 

"Double Voice Singer.* 

11 Mins.; Two (6; Special Drops); One, 

(5). 
Brighton Beach Music Hall. 

Basellari is announced as making his 
first appearance in America. He is a man 
of very foreign appearance, recalling 
somewhat Mons. Pauli who showed here- 
abouts with Countess Rossi. Basellari 
has a fair natural tenor voice and a fal- 
setto voice, in tone and register much 
like a boy soprano. At the opening the 
singer is seated on the seashore l*'fore an 
unfinished canvas and as he paints he 
sings in his natural voice. Scar the easel 
a supposed model lies on the sand, partly 
concealed by a sunshade. The parasol 
moves slightly from time to time and 
the hidden "model" takes up the song in 
a verv fair imitation of a woman's so- 
piano. Basellari's face is shielded by the 
sketching board and for a moment the 
illusion of two voices is complete. Tin 1 
"dummy" model is exposed at the end of 
the song. For his finish Basellari 
walks on the stage playing a violin. 
A skirted dummy is suspended from 
the head of the instrument and is 
made to "walk" and sing as Basellari 
works it. The fact that the singer is no 
ventriloquist and the poor mechanical op- 
eration of the dummv destrov the illu- 
sion. At his opening Monday Basellari 
Mas extremelv nervous and this doubtless 
had something to do with the uncertain 
impression he made. What with his abil- 
ity to play the violin and the curious 
freak double voice he should certainly be 
able to shape up some sort of adequate 
vehicle. The present arrangement is of 
doubtful value. Rush. 



Kid Gabriel and Co. (a). 
Plastic Posing, 
xi Mini.; Full Stage. 
Fifth Avenue. 

Kid Gabriel and Co. are reproducing in 
life Frederick Remington's sketches of 
western life. The company consists of a 
lifelike "prop" horse and two men. One 
announces before each picture. He han- 
dles the talk rather well, but it is long 
and often unnecessary. The principals 
work entirely in white. The pictures are 
all very good, when taking into considera- 
tion the absence of a real horse. With an 
animal as well trained as that shown by 
La Titcomb at Hammerstein's there would 
lie something to talk about. As it is it is 
simply a question of how near the orig- 
inals the poses reach. There are probably 
a great many in each audience unfamiliar 
with the Remington paintings. As a sight 
act it does very well, but there may be 
some speculation as to whether the animal 
is a phony or not. Opening the bill at the 
Fifth Avenue it passed through. Hearing 
in mind that in the west, where this act 
came from, the reproductions were greatly 
admired, it may be said that they were 
nearer home there, more quickly recog- 
nized, if not from Mr. Remington's 
sketches, from observation. Admitting 
Remington's reputation as the greatest of 
all the western nature drawers, easterners 
— especially vaudeville easterners — have 
n.ostly been educated through "Wild 
West" exhibitions which left the' west for 
that purpose. Perhaps in addition vaude- 
ville easterners are not all capable of 
quick appreciation of art, whether in 
landscape, horsellesh or otherwise, though 
f«'>r the past year, and in the Fifth Ave- 
r.ue, an effort has been made to educate 
the clientele of "refined vaudeville" to the 
bare flesh of the living mule. So not 
alone has Kid Gabriel to battle against 
knowledge unknown, but he must follow 
a "cooch" dancer (disguised as an "art 
study") with a representation of all that 
is lM'st in art. "Art" to the vaudeville 
managers is the box-office statement, 
bulgingly big. Bare flesh or horse -flesh: 
il's "nrt" if the ticket taker does not have 
to read "paper." but on a show-down 
you can safely gamble the vaudeville man- 
ager will choose the bare flesh; the barer 
the better, and at the same time bnng 
up a sign on the stage reading. "The use 
of the word Mam' not permitted in this 
t liea tre." But is it a "theatre?" /M*/i. 



Houghton and Reece. 
Roller Skating. 
Hammerstein's. 

Jennie Houghton and Nella Reece are 
pretty* roller skaters, in looks and work. 
The smaller of the girls is a graceful ex- 
pert skateriste. but they do nothing out 
of the ordinary, although announcing they 
are the first to follow three movements 
of Russian dancers. The girls skate while 
costumed in Scotch kilts. There can be 
no reason for this, excepting to give free- 
dom to the legs, if not to show them. 
There are several other styles of dress 
which would ltccomc both the young 
women ever so much better. Opening the 
bill this week, the girls held interest, but 
will have to improve greatly by fall to 
expect to secure the important time then. 
Thev would make a nice number for the 
smaller out-of-town houses, or fit in well 
with a production having an olio v . 

Sime. 



VARIETY 



13 



ElUline Terriss. 
"Girl Act." 
ColiMum, London. 

Ellaline Terriss made her first lone ap- 
pearance in vaudeville at the Coliseum 
thiw week (June 7). Miss Terriss was not 
exactly alone, having a chorus behind her, 
hut Hhe is without the aid of Seymour 
Hicks upon the stage. Perhaps if the 
chorus should be missing some show Miss 
Terriss would appear to better advantage, 
for the act is a most sad affair. If Mr. 
Hicks, who is Miss Terriss' husband and 
probably "put on" the number, is of the 
opinion the bunch he selected to back up 
his wife helps the looks of the turn any, 
he ought to drop in some performance 
and scan the crowd. About all the girls 
do is to leave the impression while dan- 
cing that they are tripping over their 
dresses. Miss Terriss is a clever girl, but 
she can't give value received with this 
act, and especially as her booking agent 
the other day grew angry when a paper 
said that Ellaline receives only $1,000 
weekly. The songs selected are far from 
pretty, and they contain a little red fire 
about "Our Navy." The audience didn't 
take to the turn. A "fifteen pound single" 
would have received as much applause as' 
greeted Ellaline at the finish. 



Silbon's Novelty Circus. 
13 Mins.; Full Stage. 
Fifth Avenue. 

The general impression seemed to be 
that Sillxm was giving an animal act 
with eats as the principal feature. This 
was not tin* case, however. The animals, 
of which there are but few. are shown 
l»y a man and woman, the man becoming 
ihe main end of the specialty. He is a 
first -rate ground tumbler and when he is 
not tii Iking his comedy gets partly over, 
while attempting to be funny with talk 
he Mops badly. He is a foreigner and 
this may account for it. There are but 
few comedians from the other side who 
are funnv to the New Yorkers. The act 
as a whole is pleasing. Several very good 
tricks are shown with the cats and a 
couple of trick "props" help. Lack of 
speed is the greatest fault. The act drags. 
This could easilv be corrected through a 
little attention on the part of the man. 
The girl docs but little. She put s a pony 
through a few tricks and does a little 
(ontortion tumbling on her own account, 
(losing the show at the Fifth Avenue the 
act did fairly well. Speed should bring 
it around in good shape. Duxh. 



Amos. 

Juggler. 

Four (Parlor). 

American. 

Amos is a young fellow and a juggler, 
opening the show at the American this 
week, a tough spot on a worm summer's 
night. Amos juggles ordinarily, doing his 
best work with hats. There is no comedy 
in the turn excepting that when Amos 
juggled the. hats the orchestra played 
sad music. That was funny. Amos wants 
t»» go on the small time, and work up- 
ward: nlso working faster in his jug- 
gling. If he hasn't comedy, he must de- 
velop speed. It would be wise to have 
both. His closing trick is spinning six 
plates simultaneously on a table, shown 
by a juggler in a burlesque olio during 
the past season. Simc. 



Five Caprice Girls. 

"Girl Act." 

15 Mine.; Full Stage. 

Henderson's. 

Judging from their dancing, the girls 
are trained English coryphees, but from 
the average of good looks and ability to 
carry off pretty frocks in dashing style 
they are American choristers. The com- 
bination ought to develop something. At 
their opening performances Monday in 
the -Coney Island house the act did not 
lun smoothly. There were painful gaps 
and pauses and moments when the team 
work was loose. With further playing 
together the quintet should develop into 
a good "sight" number. They have three 
changes, all pretty, from the ankle length 
"tub" suits in gray with an infinity of 
pink buttons to the soubrette frocks for 
the final dance. In one dance four of the 
girls were rigged out in costumes of the 
I'ations, the prize of the collection being 
an Irish laddie sheathed in a tight suit of 
green velvet. The girls sing fairly, well 
enough indeed for a dancing organization, 
but the strength of the number lies in its 
pretty pictures and animated dances. 

Rush. 



Bobby Dohn. 

"Strong Man." 

10 Mins.; Full Stage (Special Drops). 

New Brighton Theatre. 

Except for a novel setting and one feat 
of strength that has the appearance of 
being dangerous, Hobby Dohn's exhibition 
is rather tame to those who have seen 
the other thrillers in this line. The stage 
pictures the deck of a battleship. At the 
rise of the curtain a l". S. bluejacket 
stands poised at the wheel, making a very 
attractive picture. After a pause Dohn 
enters, wearing a natty naval officer's 
uniform. A huge ship's anchor is em- 
ployed in most of the tests. Duhn bal- 
ances it upon his chin and throws it 
about with an ease that fences the sus- 
picion the apparatus is not really as 
heavy as it looks, a suspicion which is 
advanced by the fact that the assistant 
is permitted to move it several times. 
This same assistant essays one or two 
bits of comedy without conspicuous suc- 
cess. The feature trick is that of throw- 
ing the anchor by a "sea-saw'' device into 
the air. Dohn making a catch as it falls 
across his shoulders. The turn opened 
the show at the New Brighton Theatre 
Monday, yetting away only fairly. 

Hush. 

The Indian Musical Trio. 
Full Stage and One. 
Henderson's. 

"Three genuine full -blooded Choctaw In- 
dians in a novel musical act" is what the 
program says. Passing by the truth of the 
claim of pure Indian ancotry. the trio 
arc not likely to start anything in vaude- 
ville. Their playing on bra^s instruments 
is indifferent and their appearance far 
from picturesque. I'lixll. 

Joe Welch will return from abroad on 
the Kaiser YVilhelm dune 27. Jos. Hart's 
"Uain-I>ears" come in on the St. Louis to- 
day (Saturday). Dob Fit/simmons is due 
on the Minneapolis Monday. Marlim-tti 
and Sylvester reached New York 1:is1 
Wednesday. On June U.'{. Yamamoto and 
Knyoshi. the Japanese nd. sail on the 
Adriatic. 



Maud Muller. 

Songs. 

11 Mins.; One. 

Columbia. 

Maud Muller sang four songs at the 
Columbia Tuesday night and there was 
much applause forthcoming, but whether 
there was an inclination on the part of 
the upper house to "kid" would be hard 
to say. One thing is certain, Miss Muller 
should not attempt more than three num- 
bers. All the selections are of the same 
sort and handled in the same manner. 
No costume changes are made. This 
alone is a heavy handicap, too heavy a 
one for Miss Muller. It has become al- 
most a necessity for single singing acts 
to go in for changes. It helps in many 
ways. Principally it gives the audience 
a chance to think of something besides 
the singing. Miss Muller is a nice-look- 
ing girl with a good idea of putting over 
a song with a snapper, but she is not 
strong enough for the big time. Dash. 



Tom and Edith Almond. 
Music and Dancing. 
15 Mins.; Full Stage. 
Columbia. 

Tom and Edith Almond are showing 
an improved version of their act. The 
newness is largely in a long shoe dance 
introduced by Tom Almond in a kangaroo 
covering, with a special woodland set. It 
is a capital idea, the long shoes giving 
the appearance of reality to the animal, 
and the effect of seeing a kangaroo do a 
dance is amusingly novel. Miss Almond 
mixes in a very pretty little musical spe- 
cialty. Desides the "kangaroo" Almond 
does another and a very good dance on 
roller skates, finishing with the sterl 
skates on a pedestal. As a dancer of his 
kind. Almond classes with the best seen. 
The dressing is also of the best. Doth 
principals make several changes. It 
keeps the offering bright and lively. At 
the Columbia t hev were deservedlv the hit 
of the show. Dash. 

OUT OF TOWN. 



J. H. Gilmour and Co. (5). 
"The Anniversary" (Dramatic). 
21 Mins.; Full Stage (Interior). 
American, Chicago. 

Mr. (Jilinour is director of a dramatic 
school here, therefore his appearance in 
vaudeville may !»»• t<» allow hi< pupil* an 
opportunity of seeing him and several of 
his graduates in real acting. There are 
three male and two female parts. "The 
Anniversary" is described as a dramatic 
I'aylet. It is a tragedy, ironical and 
risky as far as the climax is concerned. 
A married man on the fifth anniversary of 
hi> marriage discovers his wife loves a for- 
mer suitor. The latter confesses and i< 
a> sailed by the husband, who then oilers 
to drink a glass of wine if the other will. 
One ula>s contains poison. The husband 
drinks alone and falls dead. There are 
many inconsistent moments. The .wife is 
a good looking young woman, but unsuited 
to the heavy role. In nninv ways the per- 
formance was amateurish. A man servant 



Caesar Bivoli. 

Character Changes. 

as Mine.; Full Stage and One. 

American, Chicago. 

Hi vol i assumes various characters, mak- 
ing the changes in attire with remarkable 
rapidity. There is a connecting story to 
the people he portrays. He appears as a 
waiter, policeman, three types of women, 
and several others, each complete and won- 
derfully accurate. For an encore Rivoli 
goes in the orchestra pit and impersonates 
the great composers, directing the orches- 
tra. This is new here. He makes up for 
each character. Rivoli's quickness and pre- 
ciseness are truly astounding. He scored 
a tremendous hit. Frank Wicsberg. 



Joly Violetta. 
Songs and Dances. 
15 Mins.; Full Stage. 
Majestic, Chicago. 

With bewitching grace and charm that 
accompany well executed dances, Mile. Vio- 
letta had no difficulty in establishing her- 
self a mistress in her line. She is assisted 
by M. Arnaud, a Brazilian dancer. Joly 
does not alone dance, but sings in French, 
and carries on a conversation in the same 
language. The series of dances runs from 
the gay eccentric to whirlwind. The latter 
j.. verv pood. There is plenty of action 
and animation in the combination. 

Frank Wiesbcrg. 



tormaiice was amateurish. A man servant 
(name not given) a p| tea red to good advan- 
tage. The sketch did not merit the posi- 
tion it h<ld. There were many friends of 
the players in the audience Monday night, 
and plenty of applause. 

Frank \\'ir*l„ nj. 



Julius McVicker and Co. (4). 
"After Six Years" (Dramatic). 
30 Mins.; Full Stage (Special Set). 
Shea's, Buffalo, N. Y. 

"After Six Years" is a "western*' 
drama. In this McVicker sketch, a Immui- 
tiful Indian maid is pursued by relent- 
less foes amid a great deal of excite- 
ment hastened a Ion;/ by a couple of pistol 
shots, but it all turns out right, although 
the program could have printed a short 
synopsis, saved thirty minutes, and pro- 
ceeded on to the next numl>cr without 
the dramatic- interval. />/YA*o»i. 

Bert Baker. 
Songs and Stories. 
15 Mins.; One. 
Majestic, Chicago. 

Coming direct from "The Prince of To- 
night." in which he became prominent in a 
pail entirely away from his Irish charao- 
Kri/alion. Mr. Baker again brought lo 
view his convincing of "Tad," the same 
shown by him in hurlcstiuc. There is a 
great deal of vigor in the character, 
not exaggerated in make-up or brogue. Mr. 
I'aker has several excellent stories, and 
sings Irish ditties in good voice. The audi- 
ence fully appreciated his efforts and he 
i.iade a good-sized hit. 

Frank \\'i< xfn rii. 

Gertie De Milt and "Dancing Boys." 
ft> Mins.; One. 
Savoy, Atlantic City. 

With the n««istancc of .Joseph I.VIlkin 
and ( Jeo. 15. Zinuamacr. r.ertie I )e Milt 
presented a very neat turn, lipped in 
while tlannel and -ilk. all three looked 
nifty. The dancing i- "f H" 1 hanl-hoc 
kind with mhih' in-vv -tcp- -down. The 
bovs in their — | ■« •• ■ iii 1 1 ie- went well ami 

the three >eeinei| < ■ \ » • T 1 1 \ l>:'laneei|. 

/. //. I'itl»*ki. 



14 



VARIETY 



GIRGUS NEWS 



\Q0 



PARIS INOTBS 

BT EDWARD a KSNDRSW. 




PLENTY OF OPPOSITION. 

One of the most complicated circus con- 
ditions of the season exists in Bu^te, 
Mont. In that big mining camp no leas 
than four of the biggest tented organiza- 
tions are billed for an appearance. Cir- 
cus paper covers everything except the 
horizon. The list is: Gollmar Bros., 
June 14; Hagenbeck -Wallace Show, 28; 
Sells -Floto, July 18, and Ringling Bros., 
Aug. 6. 

In the east, besides an opopsition fight 
in Buffalo, N. Y., among Cole Bros., Ring- 
ling and "101 Ranch/' and the Miller and 
Ringling forces in Utica, both those out- 
fits are due to play Fall River, Mass., 
Ringling*' June 17 and "101 Ranch" 
June 28. 



PARADE ON SLEDS. 

W. W. Powers is making his temporary 
htadquarters in New York while contract- 
ing railroads for the Howard Damon 
Shows. He proposea to take out a winter 
circus at the end of thia tour, using the 
Powers' elephants, now a feature of the 
Damon organization, as one of the attrac- 
tions. "The show," said Mr. Powers this 
week, "will be a sort of society circus, 
playing, of course, indoors. I have already 
entered into negotiations for the leaae of 
eight can from Walter L. Main. The cir- 
cus will be transported in these. Parades 
will be given daily in the various sections 
of the towns where the show makes a 
stand for a week or so. The parade wag- 
ons, band wagons and animal cages will 
be fitted with runners, so they may be 
readily transformed into sleds. There is 
no getting away from the fact that the 
circus parade is the feature that draws 
the people in. If the ordinary summer 
parade works as an advertising feature, 
surely the novelty of a parade in the show 
should be a big winner. 

"In a tentative way I have laid out a 
complete season and a large number of 
stands have already been booked. The 
show will be billed exactly as a summer 
show, and the displays will be arranged 
with ring, platform and aerial features." 



WALTER MAIN WEDS. 

Word has been received here that Walter 
L. Main, the circus man, has recently 
taken unto himself a bride. She is Louise 
Katherine Schneider, of Pittsburg, a mem- 
ber of a wealthy family. Mr. Main is 
closely upon fifty years old. The new Mrs. 
Main has seen 28 birthday anniversaries. 
W. W. Powers, ^the elephant trainer, for 
many years in the employ of the Main 
circus, acted as best man at the wedding. 

The couple are now traveling in the 
east. After the honeymoon they will take 
up residence in Geneva, O., where the cir- 
cus man has a fine home. 

Walter L. Main has not taken a circus 
on the road in two years, and in the news- 
paper reports of the wedding he was do- 
scribed as "the retired circus millionaire." 



Valerie Bergere will try out a new 
sketch at the Fifth Avenue next week, 
giving a private showing. It is to be 
called "The Sultan's Favorite" and was 
written l»y Edgar Allen Woolf. 



CIRCUS A HALL SHOW. 

Detroit, June 17. 

"Doc" Waddell, general agent for tho 
I.ambrigger Wild Animal Show, is the 
father of a new circus wrinkle this season. 
The outfit is playing an extended engage- 
ment here in the building of the Casino 
Amusement Co., a permanent structure, 
and the management proposes to fill in its 
time each year until the warm weather 
sets in in earnest playing thia way. 

"Instead of opening under canvas," said 
Mr. Waddell, "we started our spring sea- 
son this year indoors at Columbus. We 
played three weeks there to good business, 
coming to Detroit the last week in May 
for a month. This method makes it possi- 
ble to avoid the bad spring weather which 
has caused the circuses of the country to 
lose large amounts of money in the last 
two years. The scheme has worked out 
so satisfactorily with us," continued the 
general manager, "that other circus mana- 
ge ra have been attracted to it. I should 
not be at all surprised to see many of 
them adopt it next season, and several 
have intimated to me that they will try 
it out after their regular canvas season, 
playing hippodrome buildings and perma- 
nent "halls' until well into the winter. 

"In a number of towns the moving pic- 
ture men have been forced to assume 
leases upon amusement places in order to 
defeat possible competition. These build- 
ings a large part of the time during the 
spring and fall are without attractions. 
The lessees welcome the advent of a circus 
organization to keep them occupied. In 
Detroit another tented organization has 
contracted to show in the Casino Co.'s 
place, and thus a new circus industry is 
under way." 



PRODUCING "THE CIRCUS MAN." 

In Chicago on August 28, Klaw & 
Erlanger will present at McVicker's The- 
atre "The Circus Man," a big play by 
Eugene Pre s by, based on Holman Day's 
stories. 

The cast will have thirty-five people, 
and also "Imogene," an elephant, besides a 
parrot. 

"Hime" Look, the circus man, will be 
taken by Maclyn Arbuckle. 

The story of the show intermingles 
fun, human interest and a love story. 



CIRCUS MEN BECOME ELKS. 

Marion, O., June 15. 

When the Barnum-Bailey circus, show- 
ing here to-day, played Jackson, Mich., 
several of the lK>ys joined the Elks, pro- 
posed by Spot Jerome, of the Two 
Jeromes. 

Dick Ford, one of the best clowns in the 
country, is back with the circus, making 
good a mile. 

Ella Bradna and Fred Derrick arc con- 
sidering a tempting offer to appear next 
season nt Blackpool Tower, England. 

In Cleveland the "Big Show" did the 
biggest business since starting on the 
road. 



Paris, June 7. 
The Casino de Paris closed for the sea- 
son on May 30, but now reopens as a con- 
cert hall during the summer, with M. 
Derouville as manager. 



As the Etoile Palace is the practical 
hunting ground of the agent, so is the 
Paris Olympia becoming the luxurious 
club universal for the manager. H. B. 
Marinelli has been busy again this week 
entertaining at his hall, and the following 
gentlemen have been sampling the , fine 
program here: Henry Bender and Schu- 
mann, of Berlin; Seeth, of Frankfort 
(owner of the monkeys, "M. and Mme. 
X.") ; Morris Meyerfeld, Jr., of San Fran- 
cisco; Oscar Hammerstein; Mittler (Coli- 
seum), Vienna; Tichy, Prague; Kohn, 
Leipzig; Blum, Chemnitz; Lorenzen, Co- 
penhagen. I also noticed Truly Shattuck, 
of New York, on her way to Russia. 



"Chantecler" is obtaining so much free 
advertising in advance that I fear the 
slightest imperfection will mar its suc- 
cess when it is finally produced (next 
winter?) Never in the history of the 
stage has a piece been so widely dis- 



SEVEN LANGUAGES FOR |8o. 

Paris, June 8. 

The Continental Hotel, Naples (Italy), 
will have as a guest on June 22 Charles 
Ringling, of the Ringling Brothers, the 
American circus people. 

Mr. Ringling is scheduled to leave New 
York June 10 on the Moltke, going direct 
to Naples, where he will be met by an 
automobile and a chauffeur who can speak 
seven languages. The chauffeur has been 
engaged through the Paris office of H. B. 
Marinelli for $80 monthly, with an 
additional allowance of $75 for clothing. 

A pleasure tour over the Continent will 
be made in the machine by Mr. Ringling, 
who will not overlook any feature for the 
Ringlings circuses next season. 



BARBER KEPT ON SHAVING. 

Chillicothe, Mo., June 17. 

Capt. Cardona, a lion trainer with the 
Parker Shows, offered to forfeit a sum of 
money to any one who would go into the 
cage with his pets and shave him while 
the lions were at large. When the show 
arrived here late last week Charles Good- 
lier, a local barber, presented himself at 
the tent and agreed to undertake the 
test. The performance was widely ad- 
vertised and when the time came the 
tent was filled. 

Goodner made good. He entered the 
rage. Capt Cardona took a position in a 
chair with a lion posed at each side of 
him, and Goodner went through the 
whole operation of shaving. Afterward 
the show paid the wielder of the razor 
and shears. 



Sir Edward Moss arrived in New York 
on Monday, sailing for London Wednes- 
day. 



The Nevarros, who were to have come 
together in a three-act again, were forced 
to cancel Henderson's Coney Island this 
week, one of the members having taken 
the wrong train from Minneapolis and 
become lost. The Farrell Bros, replaced 
them in the show. 



(ussed as Edmond Rostand's long delayed 
poem. Willy Clarkson, the London wig 
maker, realized this, and when invited to 
submit a costume for the role of the 
cock, probably to be worn by Guitry, he 
put his whole heart into the work. He 
purchased a fine, large cock and shut him- 
self up in a workroom with the bird 
in order to minutely study its plumage 
and how to "carry" it. He created an 
exact reproduction which was, according 
to Willy, approved by Rostand, but Jean 
Coquelin and Hertz declined to give an 
order for the "costume," and they will 
now be sued, as managers of the Porte 
St. Martin Theatre, for $9,650, represent- 
ing the labor in creating a worthy dress 
for Chantecler. 

After several postponements, now the 
fashionable habit at all self-respecting 
houses, the Parisiana produced a new 
show on June 7, in the form of an op- 
erette, "Lucette a la Caserne." The sum- 
mer revue, "A la 6. 4, 2," was likewise 
produced at La Cigale the day before, ob- 
taining good notices. 



The Moulin Rouge is closed until about 
June 18, when a new revue will be pro- 
duced by M. Boyer. late manager of the 
Diable au Corps, who was reported to be 
connected with an enterprise during the 
summer at the Pre Catelan, Bois de Bou- 
logne. 

Etoile Palace closes for summer on 
June 27, until end of August. 

An artist by the name of Edouard Ga- 
rasse, aged 44. who has played extensive- 
ly under the pseudonym of Garat, com- 
mitted suicide on June 6, because his 
wife, a chorister at the Gaiete", threat- 
ened to obtain a divorce. The unhappy 
man shot himself before his three chil- 
dren, who were present at the family 
ouarrel which led to his tragic end. 




EVELEKX m'XMORE. 

Wh<> hit* Jiixt finished ii Niircrssfiil rnKiuMMiiciit 
m.i lli« OUrillXM riKcriT. iin.l will sli-.rtly 
mill for Kiiri'pc. 



VARIETY 



15 



FOLLIES OF 1909. 

There was plenty of surplus energy still 
in reserve among the audience last Mon- 
day night when the curtain fell on "The 
Follies of 1909" atop the New York The- 
atre. The audience, and it was a very 
large one, had entered the aerial place 
with gloves off, ready to make a noise, 
but they were called on but infrequently. 

It was some time along in the first act 
before anybody would admit that a show 
was being given. This change of opin- 
ion happened when Norah Bayes sang 
''Mad House Opera" in the "Hammerstein 
scene." It is a deftly arranged medley,' 
running from "rag" to operatic, and well 
sung by Miss Bayes, who had much to do 
during the evening, even to singing, over- 
much, including "Blarney," very late — too 
late, in fact. 

The medley was followed by Bessie 
Clayton who executed a pretty toe dance, 
liked much better than another effort by 
the same dancer in the second act. 

A travesty on "What Every Woman 
Knows," with eighteen chorus people par- 
ticipating, held little humor. Then came 
"Nothing but a Bubble," with Lillian 
Lorraine leading it. This was Miss Lor- 
raine's second appearance. Previously 
she had sung "Linger Longer Lingerie," 
while wearing a rather long but pretty 
soubrette frock, and displayed a swagger 
as her one best bet. 

When Miss Lorraine sent over the foot- 
lights "Nothing but a Bubble/' it oc- 
curred that perchance a librettist had 
named the song with an eye to sarcasm. 

With Miss Lorraine singing "Up, Up, 
Up in an Aeroplane" the audience literal- 
ly threw up its hands. In the staging 
everything has been done for the number, 
but the girl set all such labor at naught 
through her very small and almost still 
voice. The novelty saved it in part. The 
mechanism makes an airship soar along 
a single iron rail from above the north- 
east corner of the garden, encircling the 
entire, temporarily darkened, roof, under 
the spotlight, while Miss Lorraine, seated 
in the body of the apparatus, delivered 
the song above the audience. 

The song required a voice, and Anna- 
* belle Whitford, who has the best voice in 
the show and is also by far the hand- 
somest woman there would have fitted, 
giving the number what it deserved. 
Miss Whitford had the • opening song, 
"Madam Venus," and she was also the 
plot of the piece during the first of the 
fifteen scenes. When Miss Whitford 
changed her "Venus" entirely -proper-cos- 
tume, the story disappeared, never coming 
up to breathe again. "The Chrysty Girl" 
of Miss Whitford's, while a "pretty" bit, 
just about passed. 

The rest of the show ran along in "bits," 
snatches and "numbers," wholly discon- 
nected, with no excuse or slightest foun- 
dation for anything. This haphazard 
style left a poor impression, and seemed 
to say that "The Follies of 1909" had 
been "cut down" instead of having been 
"built up." 

"I Wish I Was a Boy and I Wish I 
Was a Girl," sung by Miss Bayes and 
Jack Norworth as "kids" (and dandy 
kidlets at that) was utterly irrevelant, 
both in song and characters, but per- 
haps not any more so than "The Jungle 
Scene," the comedy hit of the show. It 



was the one bright spot in a piece lacking 
good comedy, apparently through bad dis- 
tribution of time and opportunity. 

In the Jungle scene, Mr. Norworth as 
Kermit Roosevelt, and Harry. Kelley as 
the Colonel, put over a number of laughs, 
helped by an assorted collection of "prop" 
inhabitants. The song in this was led 
by Sophie Tucker, a "coon shouter" from 
Hill & Manchester's "Masqueraders," an 
Eastern Burlesque Wheel show. 

Another burlesque girl was Miss Mc- 
Mahon, from Hurtig & Seamon's "Trans - 
Atlantiea" who gave her "scarecrow" bit 
from that show, working with Billie 
Reeves, who fell twice for each of Miss 
McMahon's twists or falls. Both the bur- 
lesquers made good, and the bit with Miss 
McMahon was Mr. Reeves' only real 
chance, though he fell out of a box during 
the "airship" number. 

"The Follies" went after vaudeville even 
stronger than burlesque, however, but not 
in person. The opening of the Hammer- 
stein scene has been taken from "The 
Song Birds"; another is from "La Petite 
Revue" (primarily going backward to 
Fanny Rice's similar but single specialty 
in that line) and what looked for a mo- 
ment as though it would pan out, "Mill- 
ionaire's Ward in the Tombs," must have 
been borrowed from Mike Simon's "High 
Life in Jail." 

Excepting Miss Bayes' song and the ex- 
tremely creditable impersonation of Oscar 
Hammerstein by Maurice Hegeman, the 
entire Hammerstein scene might have been 
thrown away. 

The finale of the first act "The Great- 
est Navy in the World" was a double- 
dyed red fire finish with uniqueness as a 
saver, and with the orchestra on their 
feet while playing the "Star Spangled." 

In this Miss Whitford was a strikingly 
stately picture as the Queen, and there 
was not any too much good looks scat- 
tered about, even in the far famed Zieg- 
feld chorus. Four or five of the girls can 
probably drink wine free* any time they 
want it, but the others will have to get 
theirs on the reputation of the "Follies" 
choruses before them. 

Whenever Mr. Kelley could work in on 
the stage, he made fun, and with so many 
good comedians, it's a wonder they 
weren't more often considered. 

A burlesque on Pauline? late in the 
evening caused no convulsions. William 
Bonnelli was "Pearline," and the comedi- 
ans his "subjects." It will prove a first- 
class advertisement for the imitated. The 
only real humor in it was Arthur Deagon 
(made up for "Diamond Jim" Brady) 
counting his diamond studs after each 
hypnotic spasm. 

For the grand closing of the piece, 
Welch, Mealy and Montrose gave their 
baseball number from vaudeville, while 
Norah Bayes sang "Let's Get the Umpire's 
Goat" with the company throwing rubber 
balls over the footlights. 

The first act of "The Follies" is ever so 
much better than the second, but there 
must yet be something done to the first 
part before anybody will rave over that. 

"The Follies" will likely draw as well 
as any of its forerunners. It is a "girl 
show" and "clean." The dialog is spot- 
less and witless; the music is lively with 
many interpolated numbers, and there are 
no "undressing" scenes. 

Harry B. Smith wrote the story; Mau- 
rice Levi composed the music, and Julian 
Mitchell staged the piece, saving the 



THE MOTOR GIRL. 

John Lorenz is the hit of "The Motor 
Girl," and "The Motor Girl" is a hit at 
the Lyric, where the musical comedy 
opened Tuesday evening. 

It is not so very long ago that Lorenz 

was wondering, after Sam Scribner's "Big 

Show" (Eastern Burlesque Wheel) closed 

for the season, whether he should invade 

vaudeville in his "piano specialty" with 
a male or female partner or as a "single 
act," and wanted to know what his 
chances were of "making good." 

This same Lorenz has one great dance 
step, besides being a first-class "loose 
dancer." He had it with the "Big Show"; 
also the "piano specialty." 

In "The Motor Girl" Mr. Lorenz does the 
"piano specialty" and the dancing. He is 
one of the two principal comedians. James 
F. Cook, a vaudevillian, is the other. 

Those who have seen Lorenz in bur- 
lesque would be surprised at his perform- 
ance, a smooth one in every way, and he 
was about the least perturbed of all the 
cast on the opening night. The lines al- 
lotted to him are delivered well; all "get 
over" and he is just John Lorenz, not 
having had time yet to catch the infection 
of "Broadwayism," which may reduce him 
to the level of other well-known Broad- 
way comedians if he falls for the germ 
of swell-headedness. 

It wouldn't be at all a bad scheme for 
Broadway managers to exchange with bur- 
lesque. Broadway gets tired of the same 
comedians doing the same old things in 
the same old way. There are many bur- 
lesque comedians who could walk away 
with a "$2 production" if given the op- 
portunity. Some of the Broadway man- 
agers should stop trying to steal stars 
from others, and send some one who knew 
something around the vaudeville and bur- 
lesque circuits. The only hitch in the 
exchange would be that very few of the 
burlesque managers would accept the 
Broadway comedians. 

"The Motor Girl" is no sensational suc- 
cess. It pleases mostly because it doesn't 
displease. The piece is comic opera, mu- 
sical comedy and straight farce, seen 
and heard intermittently. The straight 
farce takes the story from the opening 
and carries it through to the final curtain. 

The two acts and scenes are set in Hol- 
land and Paris respectively, the first giv- 
ing more of the "Dutch" atmosphere 
which has been so plentiful around New 
York during the winter. 

There are many musical numbers, pret- 
tily costumed in some new dress ideas 
for coloring, and all modest. There are so 
many songs that along toward the end 
they are jumbled together. One grows 
weary as well of hearing the same girls 
sing and sing. Most of the numbers are 
solos, backed up by the choruses. For 
encores to each, changes in maneuvers and 
girls have been provided, which give the 
background of the show a kaleidoscopic 
effect. While there is nothing startlingly 
novel in the piece, these variations make 
for a lively aspect and help a great deal. 

The show starts with a "drinking song." 
Not much was looked for to follow after 

Thome- Koom scene by having those two 
lively and corking dancers, Kosie Green 
and (icrtrudc Vanderbilt in it. The two 
girls were important at other times also. 

tSime. 



that, but it developed steadily, although 
the "straightness" of the songs 'held down 
the first act, relieved only by the comedy 
of Messrs. Lorenz and Cook, with Adelaide 
' Sharp, who played a little "Deutscher" 
serving-maid excellently all the way, se- 
curing an individual hit all her own. 

Elizabeth Brice had a nice role, han- 
dling it well, but she was thrown to the 
front too often in song; something like- 
wise happening to Miss Caine. Miss 
Caine's performance throughout was ex- 
cellent. A bit she did in 'The Belle of 
the Dairy Lunch" distinctly indicated 
that if Georgia would break away from 
the "good-looks-handsomely-dressed-sing- 
ing" path she would make herself heard 
of on the merits that versatility bring. 
She gave liberal and intelligent expression 
to a song called "Finesse," and "The Mo- 
tor Girl" as sung by her was the song 
hit of the piece. 

"In Philadelphia" was a "Quaker" num- 
ber, led by Miss Brice. It scored almost 
as strongly as "When We Were Twenty- 
one," the latter securing the applause 
through the very pretty staging. 

George Pauncefort and George Majoroni 
essayed a grand duke and a general, both 
aged, but the two Georges missed 
their make-up for age by a couple of 
miles, otherwise they escaped notice, ex- 
cepting Pauncefort led the "Twenty-one." 

James B. Carson gave his nice mellow 
"Dutchman," doing finely with his little 
and working with Miss Brice. 

In the large chorus are handsome show 
girls, and among the ponies is a bright 
little blonde, the smallest of all the 
"Dutch Girls," who made herself stand 
out from the line merely with her person- 
ality. 

In one of the numbers a mixed chorus 
of sixteen seat themselves on each other's 
knees from a standing position. It is an 
old burlesque device, and has been used 
by "drilling acts" in vaudeville. At the 
Lyric one could hear about him: "How 
do they do that ?" There is still- much in 
burlesque and vaudeville that hasn't 
played Hammerstein's. 

Mr. Cook brought many laughs with his 
delivery and his comedy in general, he 
and Lorenz playing as two escaped con- 
victs, afterward impersonating noblemen 
whose clothes they steal. 

The music, by Julian Mitchell, was 
pleasing, if slightly reminiscent. Charles 
J. Campbell and Ralph M. Skinner wrote 
the book and lyrics. Disregarding a slight 
tendency in the dialog at times to double 
enteudre, neither the lines nor the 
lyrics served for more than to carry the 
story and singers along. Frank Smith- 
son staged the production, and when the 
credit is split as many ways as it will 
go Mr Smithson might take three-fifths. 

The program claims "The Motor Girl" 
is "Frank Hennessy's Musical Comedy." 

The tenor of the piece was enacted by 
Martin Brown, who scored a large success 
during the second act with a peculiar 
dance, a sort of hybrid loose-Salome-Ori- 
ental. It is the oddest sort of a thing in 
the dance line yet shown by a man while 
fully dressed in men's apparel. 

Si me. 



Emma Cams ha* heen placed through 
the Morris oMYe to open ;it t Im- Palace, 
l/ondon. August '». <»n tin- *:irm> l>ill will 
be Itinaldo. and Ale\. <an and Co., also 
booked I iv Mmii- \fi-~ ('urn*'-* engage- 
ment is for four v •■• i.-. 



16 



VARIETY 



NEW BRIGHTON THEATRE. 

The opening bill at the new Brighton 
Theatre was as bright and entertaining 
as the building that housed it was spick- 
and-span with fresh decorations and fit- 
tings. It was a splendid, well-balanced 
entertainment from start to finish, and 
an expensive one as well. 

Nine acts besides the pictures went into 
its make-up, and the arrangement of fea- 
tures shaped up capitally. Bobby Dohn 
(new acts) opened rather quietly, but in 
the "No. 2" place the Rooney Sisters took 
possession of the stage with a rush and 
got the evening under way instantly. The 
girls have a new style of dressing for a 
turn of the sort, wearing extremely short 
soubret frocks in a white ground deli- 
cately tinted where the skirts flare over 
the chiffon. Black stockings and shoes 
go with the dress, a scheme admirably 
calculated to set off the lightness and 
shapeliness of the little dancers. 

"No. 3" was rather an early spot for 
Valerie Bergere and Co., in their comedy- 
dramatic sketch "Billy's First Love." 
Comedy, however, has the call in the play- 
let, more than balancing the dramatic ele- 
ment, and the ensemble makes for good, 
light vaudeville value. 

Raymond and Overly came into the 
proceedings at this point with a comedy 
hit. The "Dutchmen" have a quantity of 
new matter in their talking and singing 
burlesque. The two, of course, are frank- 
ly rough comedians, but they have a line 
of conversational stuff in which there is 
not a little real humor. One of their big- 
gest laughs came from a variation on an 
old theme. "Look at that great Irish- 
man and patriot, Patrick Henry," says 
one of the comedians in a burst of elo- 
quence. "He it was that pronounced 
that great speech, 'Let ub have peace." 
"What I" returns the other in shocked 
amazement. "An Irishman said that!" 
Which occurs as a good twist to a famil- 
iar gag. When the two got iato their 
"twisted talk" concerning "Watt (What) 
street ?" the audience doubled itself up and 
laughed to kill the sound of the passing 
trains — which speaks aloud for an "easy" 
audience. 

Jos. Hart's "Bathing Girls" appeared in 
a revised form. Glenwood White is now 
in the featured spot, succeeding the orig- 
inal. Besides, the kitchen scene, one of 
the former dull spot" of the turn, ha* 
been replaced with a studio song, White, 
as the artist, managing a series of ridicu- 
lous animated silhouettes in an illumi- 
nated glass background. One of the 
black figures, that of a woman in 
"Salome" undress, does a screamingly 
funny dance. With that one dead spot 
cut and the wardrobe of the girls partly 
renewed, the whole act takes on a surpris- 
ingly large amount of speed. It now 
makes a first-rate "girl" number. 

A ten- minute intermission intervened at 
this point. Opening the second half the 
Willy Pantzer Troupe with their new ma- 
terial scored an immense hit. Stu- 
art Barnes held the show up in the next 
place, and Montgomery and Moore, the 
headliners, drew down a tremendous re- 
ception next to closing. 

It was a hazardous undertaking for 
Paul Kleist to finish out the show, for 
the time was by this advanced to well 
past 11 o'clock, but the quickly recurring 
surprises of his black art specialty were 
quite up to the requirements. Rush. 



BRIGHTON BEACH MUSIC HALL. 

If the opposition of the old and the 
new vaudeville theatres at Brighton Beach 
• is going to result in the style of show 
given at Arthur Hopkins' hall this week, 
summer visitors at the seashore will be 
immense gainers. 

At the Mondav matinee this week a 
slim early audience and the unfortunate 
failure of the two oj>ening acts to receive 
their baggage on time, operated to the 
disadvantage of the first half, but things 
brightened up greatly toward intermis- 
sion, and the performance kept going 
strong from there on. 

Alice Lloyd's enormous following' in 
Brooklyn, from which the house draws a 
large portion of its patronage, made her 
an ideal headliner. The dainty little Eng- 
lishwoman returns from a highly success- 
ful tour in Canada with a partly revised 
series of songs. "You All Want Someone 
1o Cuddle" is a new opener, with a pretty 
swinging melody and the neat sort of 
lyrics that Miss Lloyd handles bo grace- 
fully. "Irene," another newcomer, has a 
racy touch of spice. Miss Lloyd sang six 
songs in all, finishing with "Lovelight," 
which remains a strong popular favorite. 

Toots Paka's Hawaiian Trio, opening 
the second half, were not placed for the 
best display of their musical offering. The 
singing and odd instrumental music of 
the three drew the usual amount of ap- 
plause, although the dancing finish was 
rather more quietly received than is its 
wont, due perhaps to the large percentage 
of women in the house. 

The Millman Trio, closing the show, 
made a strong, sure appeal to this ele- 
ment, thanks to their pretty dressing and 
the lively action of Bird Millman in her 
tight wire dance. "The Genee of the 
Wire" is her appropriate program line. 

The show started with Melrose and 
Kennedy, the comedy acrobatic team, who 
have worked out a routine of their own. 
Most of their material is new and gets 
away from the Rice and Prevost manner- 
ism. The pair were victims of baggage 
delay and in consequence of having to 
work with hurriedly substituted appara- 
tus were very rough at times. 

Armstrong and Verne, Australian come- 
dians (man and woman), managed to get 
their wardrobe together from hotel trunks. 
They had the "No. 2" place. Some of the 
comedian's talk soared in the air, but the 
ringing of both members was liked. The 
man has a particularly strong voice and 
could do "coon shouting" to the queen's 
taste. Thev have some rather extreme 
harmony in duets, emphasized by Miss 
Verne forcing her notes. Monday after- 
noon Armstrong dressed straight and per- 
haps this had something to do with the 
•failure of his clowning to get over. 

Lulu McConnell and Grant Simpson 
started the first real excitement just be- 
fore intermission. Miss McConnell's song 
and the eccentric nonsense that went 
with it woke the audience up and the rest 
of the way was easy for the pair. The 
comedy climax was a big laughing mo- 
ment. 

Henry Clive, in the middle of the sec- 
ond half and immediately preceding the 
headliner, did extremely well. His splen- 
did appearance and the novel style of his 
comedy get him away easily, to which end 
also the pretty picture of Mai Sturgis 
Walker in black velvet page costume, con- 
tributes not a little. Basellari, "double 
voice singer," New Acts. Rush. 



HURTI6 & SEAMON'S. 
After holding their bouse open unusual- 
ly late by the booking of return dates 
for the regular Eastern Wheel shows, 
Hurtig & Seamon have undertaken the 

summer stock burlesque experiment at 
their Harlem Music Hall, the first organi- 
zation of the sort to hold forth in New 
York, in some years, at least. 

The first week's offering is an eye- 
opener. It rather suggests the question — 
if a hastily assembled company can be 
drilled into turning out se good an enter- 
tainment in a week, whv is it that so 
many greatly inferior performances are 
permitted to drag themselves for a whole 
season over the Wheel tours? "The Girls 
from Rottenberg." they call it, and the ar- 
rangement could have replaced any one of 
a dozen burlesque shows on the regular 
tour last season and been an improvement. 

In the matter of its principals the show 
is way above the usual burlesque organ i- 
' zations, the company being picked from 
the different Hurtig & Seamon Wheel 
shows for the most part. Joe Fields heads 
the cast. Besides being the producer of 
the pieces, he plays the leading comedy 
role, that of a Dutchman, of course. In 
this character Fields is well up among the 
best. His "Dutchman" has real humor. 
In most of the comedy bits the comedians 
work upon the "three idea." Harry Hills 
and Joe Buckley, as a Frenchman and 
Irishman, respectively, begin to work up 
a point and Fields finishes it off for the 
laugh. All through he is worked for a 
/'mark" until, just before the finale of 
the second part, he turns the tables on 
the others. At times the humor is broad, 
even "blue," in spots, but it was immense- 
ly effective with the uptown audience. 
Strangely enough for a stock organization, 
there was rather a lower percentage of 
the wornout comedy bits in evidence than 
is noticeable in the regularly staged 
shows, which is. a big, bright mark of 
merit for Fields. 

If the comedy end of the show was to 
be commended, the numbers, put on hur- 
riedly with the assistance of Dan Dody, 
were start lingly good. "Good Luck, Mary," 
led bv Hills and Edna Green, could not 
have made a more direct hit if it had been 
worked out through a month's experi- 
menting. For this Miss Green makes her 
exit through the audience. The eighteen 
girls of the chorus later appear in the 
aisles to sing encores. This spreading of 
choristers through the audience docs well 
enough for once, and the audience itself 
seems to like the idea, but it mnv be verv 
much overplayed. 

Edna Davenport is the company's lead- 
ing woman, a fairly smooth straight 
worker, and Margie Austin handles several 
neat numbers, looking particularly well 
in a messenger boy's uniform, even though 
the suit fit her indifferently. The dressing 
all comes from Hurtig & Seamon's storage 
rooms. 

All the women principals have good 
voices, and the direct purpose of the pro- 
ducers seems to have been to keep them 
as much as possible to the fore — a wise 
course in the handling of a summer "girl" 
show. In the "Good Luck, Mary," num- 
ber there is noticeable for a moment a 
fine, strong female baritone voice. The 
owner is Miss Berg, and she should by all 
means be given a chance to lead a number. 

The olio is made up of acts not con- 
nected with the pieces. Rush. 



AMERICAN. 

The cool Wednesday evening sent a full 
house into the American, where James K. 
Hackett in his last week of a successful 
vaudeville engagement was headlining. 

In "The Bishop's Candlesticks" Mr. 
Hackett seemingly recognizes the value of 
E. M. Holland to the piece through Mr. 
Holland acknowledging the final curtain 
call alone. It may be gracious on Mr. 
Hackett's part, *or it may be also an 
acknowledgment by him that the playlet, 
without Mr. Holland, could not have 
placed him in the realm of "vaudeville 
stars." 

• For Mr. Hackett's individual perform- 
ance he still draws the character of the 
convict too fiercely, and makes it up too 
wildly, barbaric. If Mr. Hackett essays 
the variety stage again he might engage 
for a two weeks' stay in each house, tak- 
ing a character role the first and a "dress 
suit" part the second. 

"The Bishop's Candlesticks" breaks up a 
vaudeville show. It is too sombre in 
theme and handling for anything to fol- 
low. Allan Shaw was "No. 12." the first 
after the Hackett piece. Mr. Shaw's coin 
manipulation is too quiet to remove the 
air the sketch left, nor could the comedv 
bicycle act of the Millard Brothers, who 
closed the program, secure much result for 
this same cause. Knowing that, there re- 
mained little incentive for the Millards to 
exert themselves. 

The "exclusive presentation" of "The 
English Derby" on the picture sheet closed 
the show. 

Maude Hall. Carleton Macy and Co. re- 
peated "The Magpie and the Jay" to the 
same amused appreciation, and the 
Clarkes, banjoists. made their first appear- 
ance at the American The Oarkes still 
believe classical pieces on the instruments 
they play are preferable to "pop stuff." 
They may be right since they have not 
tried both, not knowing the difference. 

It is the first week in a Morris theatre 
as well for Rice and Prevo9t, who hung 
a laughing hit on their belt with their 
pantomimic breakneck comedy acrobatics. 

If Harry Jolson, who appears in black- 
face, is to join the Eddie Leonard Min- 
strels next <ca son. and present the spe- 
cialty he is now showing, how will Mr. 
Jolson open it unless Mr. Leonard con- 
sents that he continue on with his imita- 
tion of him without announcing it? 

Amos, a juggler, opened the show. He, 
Lydia Dreams and Co. and Whitehead and 
Grierson, are under New Acts. The Wil- 
ton Brothers and Brown and Neva no, 
colored, appeared. 

Minna K. Hurst is still singing the "ill. 
songs" as an act on the program. It must 
1m» an act since the "No. 2" spot is filled 
with the same thing each week. It may 
be an act — on the program — but — 

Sime. 



HEADLINERS NEXT WEEK. 

NEW YORK. 

Valerie Bergere and Co., Fifth Avenue. 
Pauline?, American. 
Annette Kellermann. Hammerstein's. 
"At the Country Club," New Brighton 
Theatre. 

CHICAGO. 

Eddie Clarke and "Winning Widows," 
and Juliet? (joint), American. 
Delia Fox, Majestic. 



VARIETY 



17 



VARIETY ARTISTS' ROUTES 

FOR WEEK JUNE 21 

WHEN NOT OTHERWISE INDICATED. 

(The routes here given, bearing no dates, are from JUNE 20 to JUNE 27, inclusive, de- 
pendent upon the opening and dosing days of engagements in different parts of the country. 
All addresses below are furnished VABIETT by artists. Address care newspapers, managers or 
agents will not be printed.) 

"0. R." after name indioates act is with oirous mentioned. Route may be found under 
"Cirous Routes." 

ROUTES FOR THE FOLLOWING WEEK MUST REACH THIS OFFICE NOT LATER 
THAN WEDNE8DAT MORNING TO ENSURE PUBLICATION. 



A B C D Girls 329 W 26 N Y 
Aballos II ft R 770 State Bridgeport 
Abdallah Bros Three 1235 Golden Gate Frisco 
Adair Art £01 S Scovllle Av Oak I'k 111 
Adams Edward B 418 Strand London 
Adams ft Kirk 1553 Broadway N Y 
Adams ft Mack Pantages Los Angeles 
Adams Billy 740 Shawmut Boston 
Adams Billy Royal New Bedford Mass 
Ader Trio 2238 N 3 Phila 
Adelyn Box 249 Champaign 111 
Adler Harry 1912 N Halsted Chicago 
Adler Flo 464 Cleveland Chicago 
Abearns The 290 Colo Av Chicago 
Albanl 1416 Broadway N Y 
Albenc ft La Brant Lynch's Woonsocket R I 
Alburtus ft Millar Hippo Dublin 
Aldracb Blanche 142 Clayton Athens 
Alexandra ft Bertles 41 Acre Lane London 
Alexis ft Schall 327 E 25 N Y 
Allen Cbaa H 481 S Morgan Chicago 
Allen-Delroaln-Allen 840 Madison Brooklyn 
Allen A D Co 74 Pleasant Montclslr 
Allen Violet ft Co 222 B 14 N Y 
Allen Leon ft Bertie 118 Central Oshkosb 
Alien ft Francis 511 Shotwell San Francisco 
Allison Mr ft Mrs E Haddam Conn 
All Hunter ft All N Y Av Jamaica N Y 
Alpha Quartette Alrdnme Grand Rapids 
Alpine Troupe Cole Bros. O R 
Alroua Zoeller Trio 269 Hemlock Brooklyn 
Alrano ft Co West Mlddletown O 
Amatls Sisters 104 E 14 N Y 
American Trio 56 Penn Newark 
Am«>rlcnn Newsboys Quartet Julian Chicago 
American Newsltoys Quartet Richmond Htl Chicago 
Anderson & Evans Hippo Buffalo 28 Comlque De- 
troit 
Angell Sisters 712 W New York Indianapolis 
Apollo Bros 349 W 4 N Y 
Apollo Quartet 89 N State Chicago 
Ardell Bros Family Billings Mont 
Ardo ft Eddo 500 D 84 N Y 
Arizona Troupe 331 E 18 N Y 
Arniond Grace (i O II Jollet III 
Armstrong ft Verne Union Htl Chicago 
Armstrong A: Clark Orplicum Portland 
Arnold & Felix So ft Henry Jamaica 
Arthur Mae !."• Unity Boston 
Arvllle Dorothy 1 W 85 N Y 
Astalres The 42 Eldorado Highland Tk N J 
Atkinson Hurry 21 K 2u X Y 
Auberts Lee 14 Frobel III Hamburg Ger 
Auhurns Three 335 Beacon Sommervllle Mass 
Auers The 37 Heygate Sonthend-on-Sea Eng 
Auger Geo 12 Lawrence Rd So Ealing Eng 
Austins The 10 Bakers lane Rockvllle Conn 
Avery W E 5000 Forrestvllle Chicago 
Avres Howard 0I!> Rltner Phlla 
Aiarils The 229 W 38 N Y 



Raader T.a Valle Trio 3s:i X Christ ianla Chicago 
Baker Harry 3924 Reno \V I'hlln.lelphla 

WANTED 
Animal Trainer 

Dogs and Monkeys. Steady position. 
Write or call. 

160 ELDIIDGE STREET. New York City 

Apdale's Animals. 



TWELVE HUNDRED LEATHER COVERED 

Opera Chairs 

COST |5.50. WILL SELL $1.50 EACH. 
Write 

J. H. MICHAEL, Grand Theatre 

Cleveland, Ohio. 



Baraban Kuaslan Troupe 100 E 116 N Y 

Barber Tom 607 Main Hartford 

Ballats The 319 BUN ¥ 

Ball & Marshall 220 Lincoln Fl Norwd Pk Chicago 

Banka Breazelle Duo Orpheuni Butte 

Barlowe Mollle 242 Dearborn Chicago 

Barry Lydla 77 Bay .32 Brooklyn 

Barry & Richards Dlngman's Ferry Pa 

Itarues Reining & Co 1553 Broadway N Y 

Barron Rube 20 E 88 N Y 

Barron George 2002 Fifth Av N Y 

Barrett Sisters 1964 N 31 Phlla 

Barrett Geo A 211 Missouri Toledo 

Barrett ft Bayne 87 Wolcott New Haven 

Barrett Marjorle 4509 FUmore Pittsburg 

Hartell & Garfield 2000 K 53 Cleveland 

Bates A Melville 76 Gregory New Haven 

Batro * McCue 819 N 2 Reading 

Bayes Nora New York Roof N Y 

Beam Will 1553 Broadway N Y 

Bean & Hamilton Pk Syracuse 

Bean Wm C 8 Haddon Atlantic City 

Be Anos 3442 Charlton Chicago 

Beard Billy 1401 Dayton Savannah 

Beauvais Maridor & Co 274 Indiana Chicago 

Bedlnl & Sonla 106 8 C Bldg Seattle 

Beecher & Maye 1553 Broadway N Y 

Beimel Musical 340 E 87 N Y 

Belford Troupe Rlngllng Bros C R 

Bel) Tom Smith & U'Connor2403 Albemarle Bklyn 

LULU BEESON TRIO 

Week June 21, Orpheum, Los Angeles. 

Bell Arthur II 468 12 Newark 

Bellmonte H & P 20 W Missouri Kansas City 

Bennett Laura 113 W 76 N Y 

Bennetta Bros 200 W 67 N Y 

Bent Win P Bijou Pawtucket 

Berliner Vera Colonial Chicago 

Bernard & Slefert 05.'i S High Columbus 

Bernlce & Howard 3007 Calumet Chicago 

Bernler & Stella 22 Haywood Providence 

F.erol William 104 E 14 N Y 

Iteririnii .V Co Roht Pqutagcs Sacramento 

Beyer Ben & Bro 1490 Bryant N Y 

Hell rend .Musical ."ill Springfield Newark 

Hertlna & Brock way 311 Third N Y 

Beverly Billy I'k Bnyonnc N J 

Beverley it West 202 Delaware Buffalo 

Biff & Bang 178 Bruce Newark 

Bijou Ci dy Trio Uivi-rside Pk Findley O 28 

Collins Columbus O 
Bhiiiipliln & 1 1. 'in () II Wiitervllle Me 
Blaney & Wolfe 2o7 W 44 N Y 
Bingham 335 Beacon Somervllle Maps 
Blrnes Joe 17)53 Broadway N Y 
Black A- White Trio 405 Columbus N Y 
Black Katherlne hO Hill Chicago 
Black & Jones 113 W 30 N Y 
Black's Marionettes 100!) S Ran Joaquin Stockton 
Blessings Pavilion London Eng 
Blondell Mysterious & Co 25 2 N Y 
I'.uiscs Sensal lonnl Altro Pk Alhany 
Booth Gordon & Booth 1553 Broadway N Y 
Boley May Port Wanhlngton L I 
Borden Zeno A llnvdn Kmplre s i< i •nmciiio 
Bowers & Bowers 2 Oliver PI Everett Wash 
Bowers Walter A Crookcr Forest Pk St l.onis 
Bowen Bros. 1553 Broadway N Y 
Bnyda Two 1200 So Decatur Montgomery 
Boyer * Bell Del Rov Htl Cleveland 
Boys In Blue 240 E 21 N Y 
Braehard & Co 124 Bloomlngton Indianapolis 
Brady Owen 44 State Auburn 
Brad fords The 230 W 41 N Y 
Brandons Musical 07 So Clark Chicago 
Bransby & Williams 110 Stockton W Pittsburg 
Breakway Barlows 201 E 14 N Y 
Brenner Samuel N 2S50 Tulip Phlla 
Brennou A Downing National San Francisco 
Broad Billy 1553 Broadway N Y 
Brochman Slater Craml Taeoina 
Bingham Anna R 28 Exch Blnghamton N Y 
Brlnkleys. The. 424 W 39 N Y 



FOR SALE OR LEASE 

SMALL FARM In HUNTINGTON, L. I., 45 minutes from the city. Two acres of land, young 
orchard, barn with box stall, feed and groom's room, carriage shed, and out buildings for cows, sheep and 
chickens. Comfortable cottage ulth t. twelve-foot porch three slc'cs of same. Ornamental steel fence 
front of property. Full particulars. 

MRS. P. W. BARLOW, "LUNA" PARK, CONEY ISLAND, N. Y. 



THE 



MAJESTIC THEATRE '""""' 



Brixton A Brixton 708 Lexington Brooklyn 

Brock Temple A Co 28 W 31 N Y 

Brooks A Denton 670 6 N Y 

Brooks A Jeannette 861 West N Y 

Brown A Sheftall 349 W 50 N Y 

Brown Harris A B Riverside R I 

Browne Harry L Hopkins Louisville 

Browne Bothwcll 407 W 123 N Y 

Brownies The F R D No 8 Topeka 

Browning A Keller 2130 E 16 Brooklyn 

Browning Mr A Mrs 36 Spruce Corona L I 

Brunettes Cycling 231 Cross Lowell 

Buchanan & Russell Ontario Htl Chicago 

Burke A Urllne 630 Budd W Phlla 

Buckley John Empire Butte 

Buhler C II 1303 Putnam Brooklyn 

Bunchn A Alger 2310 N Main Ixnilsvllle 

Burgomaster's Dream Portland Ore 

Buike A Touhey. East Haddam Conn 

Burns A Emerson 1 PI Boledleu Paris 

Burt A Daughter 143 W 45 N Y 

Burton Hughes & Burton 532 Stanton Nlles O 

Burton H B Sherman Htl Chicago 

Bueh Bros Pant ages Tacoma 

Byers A Herman 3640 Paxton Rd Cincinnati 

Byrne Oolson Co Alrdomc Den I son Tex 



Caesar A Co Continental Htl Chicago a 

Cahlll William 305 7 Brooklyn 

Cameron A Byrne 01 Bartlette San Francisco 

Campbells The 121 W 101 N Y 

Carbrey Bros 6 Oxford Pbila 

Cardowiile Sisters 244 W 30 N Y 

t'arew Mabel Orpheum Vancouver B C 

Carle Hilda 227 Riverside Drive N Y 

Carlln Bob 913 Prospect Buffalo 

Carrlllo Leo Nyack N Y 

Carrsys The 10 Perry Pittsburg 

Carson A Devereaux 410 Lime Bvansrllle 

Carson Bros White City Dayton 

Carol Sisters 316 W 140 N Y 

Carlln Rose 100 W 144 N Y 

Carnielo Fernando Hippo Huntington W Va 

Carlos Animal Circus Springfield O 

Carroll Nettie Trio Barnum-Balley C R 

Carroll A Cooke Htl York N Y 

Carroll Chas Avenue Louisville 

Caroti A Fa rnu in 235 E 24 N Y 

Carters The 040 La Salle Chicago 

Carey A Stampe 52 Court Brooklyn 

Casad-De Verne A Walters 812 Valley Dayton 

Caston Dave Bijou Atlanta 28 Grand Montgomery 

Caulfleld A Driver Normandle Htl N Y 

Celest 74 Grove Rd Clapbam Pk London 

Cbadwlck Trio Mt Epbraim N Y 

Chameroys The Brookslde Athol Mass 28 Hippo 

So Staten Isl 
Chase J Percy Bijou Oshkosh 
Chase A Carma 2516 S Halstead Chicago 
Cherle Doris 23 E 09 N Y 
Chevalier Co 1553 Bway N Y 
Chapman Sisters Lyric Jamestown Pa 28 Imperial 

Toiiawanda N Y 
Claiborne Cabell 224 Security Bldg Los Angeles 
Cllto & Sylvester Sanltal Pk Pottstown Pa 
Clarence Sisters 360 W 45 N Y 
Clark A Turner 146 W 64 N Y 
Clarke Wilfred Lambs Club NY 
Clayton F A Woodlawn Rd Bedford Pk N Y 
Clayton Bessie New York Roof N Y 
Cleopatra Phoenix Ariz 
Clermontns Wonderland Boston 
Clerlse Ethel 303 Livingston Brooklyn 
Cleveland C & M Revere Beach Mass 
Clifford Dave It Alrdnme Ft Madison la 
Clifford A Ames 2012 W Cray Louisville 
Clipper Comedy Quartet 20 Travel 28 Ingersoll Pk 

Pes Moines 
Clipper Comedy Four Temple Rochester N Y 
Clyo A Rochelle £7 Park Attleboro Mass 
Cody & Lynn 230 Powell Brooklyn N Y 
Cogan & Bancroft Majestic Butte 
Cohen Tlllle Gayety Phlla 
Colby. Franklyn 2084 West Lake Chicago 
Colbys The 77 Walton PI Chicago 
Cole Will 15 4 Brooklyn 
Cole & Clements Saymore Htl Phlla 
Coleys The Elk Club Chicago 
Colonial Quartet 1M52 Page San Francisco 
Columbians Five 120 Midland Flndlay O 
Comrades Four 834 Trinity N Y 
Conover A Grant 22 Lenox N Y 
Cooper John W 110 Wyekoff Brooklyn 
('(toper Geo W 47 Douglas PI Chlcaco 
Conroy l.e Malre & Co < Irphcum Spokane 
Cook Frank Austin A Stones Boston 
Cooke A- M\ers Fairmont Ik Kansas City 
Coote Bert Green Room Club N Y 
Corcoran & Dixon 23 Truxton Brooklyn 
Corellls Three Barnuin A Bailey C R 
Cossar Mr A Mrs John Majestic Houston 
Cotton Lola Box 125 Cuba N Y 
Coulter A Wilson Majestic Houston 



Courtney A Dunn 232 E 18 N Y 
Cowper Jlromle 86 Carroll Blnghamton 
Cox Lonso A Co 28 Family Warren Pa 
Crane Flnlay Co 101 Elm West Haven 
Crawford A Manning 115 Lawrence Brooklyn 
Crawford Pat 1020 Marlon Columbia S C 
Cree Jessica 501 Klrbly Detroit 
Creo A Co 1404 Borle Phlla 
Crlmmings A Oeary 45 Charles Maiden 
Culver A Lynne 49 E Town Columbus 
Cummlnger A Colonna Coliseum Glasgow Scot 
Cunningham A Marlon 155 B 06 N Y 
Cunningham Bob 1553 Bway N Y 
Currau A Milton Globe Clearfield Pa 
Curtis Samuel J 2803 Av F Brooklyn 
Cuttys MuBlcal 3034 E Baltimore Baltimore 



Dade Genevieve 351 W 44 N Y 

Dagwell Natalie A Aurle 103 W 84 N Y 

Dainty Four 242 W 43 N Y 

D'Alvlnl Rocky Point R I 

Daly A O'Brien 1534 Broadway N Y 

Dandy George Dno 221 W 42 N Y 

Dare Harry 325 B 14 N Y 

Darmondy A Woburn Mass indef 

Darrow Stuart 40 Front Oswego N Y 

Darnley Grace Lagos Htl Fairfield Rd Victoria 

Davenport Ethel 65 Irving PI Brooklyn 

Davenport Troupe Barnnm A Bailey C R 

Davey A Moore 132 E 17 N Y 

Davie Sam 217 E Lalock Pittsburg 

Davis Mark A Laura Star Saskatoon Can 

Darli Bdwards Green Room Club N Y 

Dawson A Whitfield 346 E 58 N Y 

Dsy Carlta 117 W 104 N Y 

Deagon Ed A Kitty Griffith Ind 

Deas A Deas 253 W 30 N Y 

De Cortet A Rego Farragut Vallejo Cal 

De Fur A Estes 2319 Bellefontalne Indianapolis 

De Hollls A Valora Fountain Ferry Pk Lbulsvilla 

28 East End Pk Memphis 
De Lorls Dick BIJou Fargo N D 
De Mont Robert A Co Brighton Beach N Y 
De Trlckey Coy Hunt's Htl Chicago 
De Velde Belda Wheeling Pk Wheeling W Va 
Deaton Chas W 418 Strand London 
Deavea Harry Automaton Bergen Beach 
Deaves Bowman 14 Webster Medford Mass 
Delmar A Delmar Clrco Bell Mexico City 
Del more Misses 418 W Adams Chicago 
Delmoro A Oneida Princess Wichita Kas 
Delmore A Lee 1553 Broadway N Y 
Delton Al H 538 19 Wllwaukee 
Deltons Three 261 W 38 N Y 
Demaeos The 112 North 9 Phlla 
Demonlo Ac Belle White City Pk Bligliamton 
Dempseys The Htl Graymount Denver 
Desmond Sisters 005 Milton San Diego 
Desmond A Co 24 B 21 N Y 
Derenda A Green 14 Leicester London 
Derr Sehadt 928 S 9 Allentown 



The De Muths 

"SCENES IN A RATHSKELLER." 

Deverne A Shirts 057 29 Brooklyn 

De Veau Herbert 304 Prospect PI Brooklyn 

De Tellein A Co 410 Best Buffalo 

De Young Tom 150 E 113 N Y 

Dickinson Rube 2010 Vine Lincoln 

Dixie Harris A Francis 242 Jefferson Decatur 

Dlxons Four 750 Eighth Av N Y 

4 DIXONS 4 

Henry, Tom; Anna, Nona. 



Dohcrty A Ilarlowe 200 Bond Brooklyn 

Doolcy Jed Celeron Pk Jamestown 

Donald A Carson Or|>licum Los Angeles 

Donlgan John 2538 Cedar Phlla 

Donnelly A- Hot all Empire Grand Forks N D 

Donovan A Mackln 305 W 43 N Y 

Dora Queen 240 W 30 N Y 

Dore A: Wolfonl 21 Waldemur Pk Erie *js Cascade 

Pk New Castle Pn 
Doves Juggling 1534 Broadway N Y 
Doyle Patsy 1553 Broadway N Y 
Dot son Howard 1553 Broadway N Y 
Douglas A Van 70 Pacific Brooklyn 
Dow Ac Dow 1021 South 4 Phlla 
Downey A: Wlllard BIJou Superior Minn 
Dragoons Black White City Blnghamton 
Dreano Josh 240 W 30 N Y 

Drew Ixwell It 4220 Pee h In Roxborough Phlla 
Drew Dorothy 377 8 Av N Y 



USE THIS FORM IF YOU HAVE NO ROUTE CARDS 



J. 



SEATING CAPACITY TWELVE HUNDRED, FULLY EQUIPPED. 
v or terms and further particulars, write 



ONIO 



MICH«£L, Grand Theatre, Cleveland, Ohio 



Name 


Permanent A^ rM * 




Temporary 


it 








Week 


Theatre 


City State 



































CARDS WILL BE MAILED UPON REOI'IIST 



18 



VARIETY 



a 



TheBoysWithTheChairs 

aW 



f I 



MARTI NETTIE AND SYLVESTER) 



Successful at the EMPIRE, London, without the aid ol the Claque." 

ARRIVED IN NEW YORK THIS WEEK 






Special Representative, NORMAN JEFFERIES 



Cobb's Corner 

MO. 171. SATURDAY, JUR 1», 1909. 

"Takt Plasty of Sfcsss" 

By WILL D. COBB. 

A sunburned farmer's sunburned ton* 

Said, "Father, I resign; 
This farm thing 'runs for Iwnm;,' 

And It's New York tows for mine." 
•♦New York, Now York," the old man said, 

His toIco grow soft and kind. 
"I was there, goo. In elgnty-tbree. 

Wbon 70a got tbsro, you'll flod." 

CHORUS. 

It's a grand old town tbat Now York town. 

It's tbs fsrm wbors tbo fortunes grow; 
All you need to do is to pick yourself a few. 
And that feller Rockefeller won't bate any- 
thing on yon. 
Wben your feet slstn down on tbat Amsterdam 
town. 
You csn fill your trunk with oil tbo plunks 
you choose; 
But It's s long roam, back home — 
Take plenty of shoes. 

THIS IS THIR1 

"■HANBO'S GOT IT." 

WILL D. COBB, Song smith 

14IS BROADWAY 



Du Bole Qr»at 80 N Washington Bridgeport 
Dudley Gertn.dc & Co 243 Madison Brooklyn 
Duffy Thomas H 4926 Nargaretta St Louli 
Duffy Dan D Lincoln Apta Atlantic City 
Dumltresen-Verruette Tronpe 46 W 22 N Y 
Dunbar A Fisher 235 Warren Chicago t 
Duncan Harry Hunt's Htl Chicago 
Dunn Harvey De Rue Broe Minstrels 
Dunn J Leo 201 E 14 N Y 
Dupllle Ernest A Princess So Pramlugbam Mass 
Duprea Fred 159 Albany Brooklyn 



Barle Cbas Proctors Newark N J Indef 

Eckel A Du Prec Orange Pk Newburg N Y 28 Pk 

Merlden Conn 
Eckboff A Gordon East Haddam Conn 
Bdluger Sisters R F D No 1 Trenton 
Cdman A Gaylor Casino Elklns W Va 28 Odeon 

Clarksburg W Va 
Edwards Fred R Bucklen HI Elkbart Ind 
Edwards Geo 3505 Fleming Allegheny 
Edwards A Clarendon 416 Elm Cincinnati 
Edyth Roae 345 W 23 N Y 
Ebrendall Bros A Dutton Alrdoine Alton 111 
El Barto 2531 N Hollywood Pbila 
El Cota 1144 Broadway N Y 
Elite Musical Four 135 Hull Brooklyn 
Elmore A Ray 2442 State Chicago 
Ellls-Nowlau Circus Orpheum Oakland 



Ellsworth Mr A Mrs 1536 Broadway N Y 
Ellsworth A Linden 1553 Broadway N Y 
Emerald Connie 41 Holland Rd Brixton London 
Emerson A Baldwin 50 Rupert Coventry Bug 
Emery Edwin T & Co Oakland 
Emmet Harry 1115 Peterson Baltimore 
Emmett Hugh Mr A Mrs 6702 Phinney At Seattle 
Emmett & Ixjwer 419 Pine Darby Pa 
Engel Lew 223a Chauncey Brooklyn 
Englebretb Geo W 800 W 5 Cincinnati 
English J A 249 W 30 N Y 
Enlgmarelle 252 Flint Rochester 
Erzleben Bert A Shootover Inn Hamilton City Cal 
Eatelle A Cordova Damon C R 
Eugene Trio 258 W 26 N Y 
Evans A Lloyd 28 Majestic Chicago 
Everett Sophie A Co South and Henry Jamaica 
Evers Geo Unique Mankato Minn 
Excela & Franks O H Wayneaburg Pa 28 Lyceum 
Meadvllle Pa 



Faden MacBryde Trio 17 8 Troy 

Falk Billy A 46 Allen Rochester 

Falardeau Doll Irene Htl Rexford Boston 

Falke Roae Carllo 106 W 144 N Y 

Falke A King 10 Maple Webster Mass 

Falke Cbas 106 W 144 N Y 

Fautas Two Lubin's Pbila 28 Victoria Baltimore 

Farlardeau Doll Irlne (OH Reading Pa 

Farrell Billy Moss A Stoll London 

Faurant Marie 71> E 116 N Y 

Faust Bros 242 W 43 N Y 

Fay Aina Eva Melrose Highlands Mans 

Fay Frank A Gertrude Elk's Club Chicago 

Faye Miller A Weston Forest Pk St Lou la 

Fee May A Forbes 153 Chestnut Pbila 

Felmar Rosi 5 Sanford PI Jersey City 

Ferguson Frank 469 E 43 Chicago 

Kern & Mack Alrdome Chlco Cal 

Fcrnandes May Duo 207 B 57 N Y 

Ferrard Grace 217 Warsaw Chicago 

Ferry 504 So 21 Phlla 

Field Brow 217 % 7 X Y 

Fields A Hanson Box 181 Belleville X J 

Fields Vic 115 E 14 N Y 

Flnlav A Burke Box 193 Onset' Mass 

Finney Chas 258 W 26 N Y 

Flnnle Jack 1911 S Cbadwlck Pbila 

Flske A McDonougb 272 W 107 N Y 

Fltsslrumons & Cameron Sherman Htl Chicago 

Fleming Mamie Htl Fortescue Atlantic City 

Fletcher Chas Leonard 121 W 42 N Y 

Flvnn Chester Pk Cincinnati 

Follett Lonnle 150 E 107 N Y 

Force & Williams Scenic Temple Providence 

Ford A La Petite 418 S Franklin Great Falls Mont 

Fords Famous 391 Gates At Brooklyn 

Forrester A Lloyd BIJou Moosejaw Can 

Forrests Musical 508-59 Dearborn Chicago 

FoMter A Dog National Havana Cuba 

Fournott & Davis 307 3 Av Minneapolis 

Fox A Diamond 11 Grandville Av Grand Rapids 

Fox A KviiiiH Family Lafayette Ind 28 Manlon's 

Pk St Louis 
.Francis Emily A Co 1553 Broadway N Y 
Franklin & Green Htl Russell London "Eng 
Fr ed e rick Helena Orpheum Seattle 
Fredericks Musical 107 E 31 N Y 
rrcessaa A Watson Casino Elklns W Va 



DARE DEVIL SCHREYER 

TIE GREATEST ACT THE WORLD HAS EVER KNOWN 

BUFFALO MID-SUMMER EXPOSITION 

EVERY WEEK-DAY NIGHT. OPENING JUNE 21st. 

AND 

HILLSIDE PARK, NEWARK, EVERY SUNDAY, 5 P.M. 

When you have seen Schreyer you will forget that you ever saw a sensational performance 
in the past. 



AFTER WORKING ONE SOLID YEAR 

The Police Force of Yap Cenf re Has Been Laid Away to Real WHY ? 

MURRY K. HI 

Haa Accumulated a New Monologue 

N. Y. ADDREM, RECORD DEPT., EDISON 00. HOME ADDRESS, EDISON, ILL. 




Frey Trio 1534 Broadway N Y 

Frey Fred 301 Grove Scranton 

Friend A Downing 418 Strand London 

Freeman Broe 87 Anderson Boston 

Frobel A Rage 104 E 14 N Y 

Fullerton Lew J 98 8uminer PI Buffalo 

Fulton May 094 Lenox N Y 

Furnam Badlr Tottenham Court Rd London 



a 

Gale Ernie 100 Eastern Toronto 
Galletl's Moukeys 804 Maplewood Chicago 
Gardeners Four Colonial Columbus O 
Gardner A Lawaon 1214 2 Av N Nashville 
Gardner Georgia A Co 1951 Kenmore Av Chicago 
Gardner West A Sunshine 24 Elm Everett 
Garrity Tom 282 Academy Newark 
Oath Carl A Emma 1553 Broadway N Y 
Gavin Piatt A Peaches 4417 3 Av N Y 
Gaylor A Graff Hanover Pk Meridan Conn 
Gebbart W A B Crystal Chicago 
Georgia Campers Bartholdl Inn N Y 
Gessler Chas 824 Green Indianapolis 
<;ill & Aker Vallamont Pk Wllllamsport Pa 
Gillingwater & Co Claude Orpheum Oakland 
Glhney Bickwill & Schroder Majestic Montgomery 

28 Majestic Birmingham Ala 
Gilroy Hayes A Montgomery BIJou Oshkosh 28 

Bijou Fon du Lac Wis 
Glrard A Gardner Amltyvllle L I 
Gladstone Ida 4457 Oakenwald Chicago 
Gleesons A Houlihan 156 N Willow Trenton 
Glendower & Manion Star Seattle 
Glose Augusta Keith's Bostou 28 Keith's Pbila 
(Mover Edna May White City New Orleans 
Godfrey A Henderson Lakeside Pk Akron O 
(Joforth & Doyle Pk Lynchburg Va 
Goldflnger Louis 502 E 108 N Y 
Goldle Rube 113 Prince Newark 
Goldln Horace Palace London 
Goldsmith A Iloppe Crystal Milwaukee 
Gordon Belle P O Box 40 N Y 
Gordon A Henry 1777 Atlantic Av Brooklyn 
(loss John Gayety Indianapolis 
Gould A Rice 320 Smith Providence 
Goolmans Musical 8 Matthews Blnghamton 
Gossans Bobby 400 S Columbus 
<;<>ttlel» Amy Crystal Pasco Wash 
(ioyt Trio Empire Edmonton Can 
Graces The 418 Grand Brooklyn 
Graff A Graff Atlantic Garden Atlantic City 
Grant Wells 8 408 James Utlca 
Grant Bert A Bertha 2950 Dearborn Chicago 
Grant Sydney 269 W 261 N Y 
Gray A Van Lieu 1400 Woodlawn Indianapolis 
Grimes Mr A Mrs Thomas 3629 Williams Camden 
Grossman Al 632 North Rochester 
Guertln Louis E Henderson's Coney Island N Y 
Gullfoyle Joseph V 22 W 128 N Y 
Guild Martin J 100 Boer urn PI Brooklyn 



Haggarty A Le Clair 129 17 Detroit 
Haggerty Larry 317 Atlantic McKeesport 
Halllday ft Curley 1553 Broadway N Y 
Hale Lillian A Co 2010 N Marvine Pbila 
Hall Alfred K 28 Butte Mont 
Hamilton Estelle 2641 No 31 Pbila 
Hamilton A Buckley 26 Somerset Boston 
Hamlin A Noyes 1014 1 National Bk Bldg Chicago 
Hamlin & Lyle 28 Star Bradford Pa 
Hamlin Hugo William Tell Htl Boston 
Hammond A Forrester Box 83 Scarsdale N Y 
Handler Louis 1512 Broadway N Y 
Ilanlon Jr George 141 Charing Crosa Rd London 
Hannon Piags A Burns 39 N Clark Chicago 
Hn 11 *ome Colonial Marietta () 28 Empire Iron- 
ton O 
Hanson Mildred 1843 Dean Brooklyn 
Hanson Harry L Orpheum Evansvllle 28 Lyric 

Chattanooga 
Hanvey A Baylies 247 Palisade Av W Hoboken 
Hara Ayesha Circle Htl N Y 
Hardman Joe A Hot Springs Ark 
Harland A Boll son Crystal Denver 
Harris Harry I 2252 Wabash Chicago 
Harris Chas 37 Llo Fall River 



HEIM CHILDREN 

Resting for a week. 



Harris Sam Vogel's Minstrels 
Harris Hattle New Home Htl Pittsburg 
Harrington Giles W 024 Acklln Toledo 
Harrington Alfred A 325 B 14 N Y 
Hart Bros Hagenbeck Wallace C R 
Harvey Elsie A Boys 140 E 14 N Y 



The Okas. K. Harris Courier 



George Evans and Ren Shields aa a song-writ- 
ing team have never been equalled — their "GOOD 
OLD SUMMERTIME" and "COME. TAKE A 
TRIP IN MY AIRSHIP." have both been famous 
successes— they have been brought together once 
more after a separation of two years by Mr. 
Harris and have written two novelty waits song 
successes, which will be ready for the profession 
July 1st 

"Nobody Knows, Nobody Cares" 

haa reached Chicago and is growing as popular ia 
the Windy City as It ia at the present time in 
New York. 

A novelty piece soon to be issued which will 
make the natives sit up and take notice is a rag- 
time effusion, entitled "THE BURGLAR BUCK," 
being successfully introduced by Mrs. Wm. A. 
Annis at Hammerstein's Ylotoria this week 
(June 7). 

CHAS. K. HARRIS, 

SI WEST Slat ST., NEW YORK. 
MEYER COHEN, Manager, 

Ohioago, Grand Opera House Bldg. 



Haskell Loney Orpheum Portland 
Hatches The 304 W 38 N Y 



E. F. HAWLEY 

Bandit's Rest, Qhaxlestown, M ich. 

Hayden Family 11 State Oshkosh 

Haynes Jessie J 21 E Robinson Allegheny 

Hayea A Wynne 434 W 164 N Y 

Hayes Brent Bedford London Eiig 

Hays Unlcycle 430 W Cincinnati 

Hays Whelock Troupe 411 No Main Kalamaaoo 

Hayman A Franklin Gibbons Tour London 

Hasxard Lynne A Bonnie 251 E 31 Chicago 

Heaston Billy Charlerol Pa 

Helm Children 110 Wash Av Altoona 

Helston Whally & Lottie 1908 Columbia Pbila 

Hemingway A Morreselle 33 E 3 Covington 

Hennlngs Ia-wIs & Hcmiings Bay Lake Erie O 

Hensbaw Edward 80 E 116 N Y 

Henry & Jones 1813 Watts Philu 

Henry Jack 41 Lisle Leicester 8q London 

Herbert Bert Hart's Bathing Girls Co 

Herbert Bros 235 B 24 N Y 

Herbert A Vance 1345 John Cincinnati 

Hcrrman The Great 108 Rue Foil Merlcourt Peril 

Herrmann Adelaide Oilsey Htl N Y 

Heuman Troupe Coles Broe C R 

Hickman Wills A Co Pearl River N Y 

Hickman Lee 305 E 42 N Y 

Hill Cherry & Hill 216 Bay 23 Bath Beach 

Hill & Whltaker Empire Braiifcd Eng 

Hill A Edinunda 262 Nellson New Brunswick 

Hill A ?ylvianny 1553 Broadway N Y 



HILL AND SYLVIANNY 

Address F. M. Barnes, 118 So. Clark St, 
• Chioago, 111. 



Hill A Ackerman King Fltchburg Mass 

Hlllman A Roberts 330 80 13 Saginaw 

Hlrschburg Marcus R 30 Opera Blk Zanesvllle 

Hobsons The Rlngling Bros C R 

Hoey A Mocar Norumbega Pk Boston 

Holden A Harron 953 71 Bay Ridge Brooklyn 

Holmes A Holllston 218 Elm W Somervllle 

Hodges A Launchman 133 W 26 St Louis 

Hodglni Daisy Rlngling Bros C R 

Hoerleln Lillian 418 Strand I<omlon 

Hoffmans Cycling 3 N Clark Chicago 

Holt Alf 41 Lisle London W C Eng 

Horan Eddie 1553 Broadway N Y 

Horton <& La Trlska Proctor's Newark 

Hotallng Edward C 557 S Division Grand Rapids 

Howard I.en 9K3 3 Av Brook lvn 

Howard Sam 87 Springfield Newark 

Howard Harry A Mae Marlce Baths Hot Springs 

Howard A Co L 421 B 137 N Y 

Howard A Co Bern Ice 8007 Calumet Chicago 

Howard A Howard Proctor's Newark 

Howard Ed 1026 B Berks Pbila 

Howard A St Clair Vaudeville Club London 

Howard A Harris 16 St Martins London 

Howe Laura 298 Harvard Brookllne 



When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



VARIETY 



19 



LEONARDS 



IVII 



After a pleasant and 
profitable year with 

COHAN and HARRIS 

Jerome - Schwartz 

Have Signed with 



THE 



Jerome II. Remick 

COMPANY 

Everybody seems satisfied. 



Howell ft Scott Mows ft Stoll Tour Eng 

Hoyt ft McDonald Nutlonnl II tl Chicago 

Hnbbert Laura 4311 Culumet Av Chicago 

Huegel ft Qulnn UK E 24 Krle 

Huehn Musical Farm Toledo O 2S Falrvlcw Pk 

Dayton 
Hughes Johnnie & Matle Orpheum Oakland 
Hughes Musical Trio Orpheum Spokane 
Hughes Mr ft Mrs Gene 601 W 135 N V 
Hulhert Laura (;rand Phllllpshurg Pa 24 BIJoa 

TjTone Pa 
Hurley Musical 152 Wall Elizabeth N J 
Hurley Frank J Globe Boston 
Hurst Mlnola Cardinal Basel Suisse Ger 
Hyde Bob ft Bertha Camp Rest Clifton Me 
Hylands Three 22 Cherry Danbury 



Ingram ft Hyatt 1314 Edmondson Baltimore 
Ingrams Two Bijou Ishpemlng Mich 
Ioleen Sisters Orpheum Rock ford 111 
Irving Thomas R Palm Syracuse 
Irving Musical SO Boston Newark 
Irving Cliff W 303 W 140 N Y 
Ivy ft Ivy 2237 E Second Brooklyn 



Jackson Family Rlngllng Bros C R 
Jackson Alfred 225 Fifth Av N Y 
Jacobs ft Sardel Cole Bros C R 
Jacobs, Theresa 5018 Prairie Chicago 
Jacobs ft West 200 E 2 Jamestown 
James ft Prior 912 Second Av Seattle 
Jenkn ft Clifford Rlngllng Bros R 
Jennings & Jewell 3302 Arlington St Louis 
Jerge Aleene ft Hamilton 392 Mass At Buffalo 
Jerome ft Hunter 240 N Franklin Phlla 



Johnson R Melvln Johnson Htl Lafayette Ind 
Johnstons Musical 377 Eighth Av N Y 
Johnson ft Pelham Moulin Rouge Rio de Janeiro 
Johnson Bros ft JohnBon 035 Rayden Camden 
Johnson & Wells Orpheum Ia>b Angeles 
Johnstone Lorlmer Ontario Htl Chicago 
Jones Florrle 221 W 42 N Y 
Jones ft Sutton 224 W 17 N Y 
Jones John 450 Sixth At N Y 

Jordan Brauneck & Chullta Farm Toledo 28 Fair- 
view Pk Dayton O 
Jorden Great 1533 Cadwoldere Phlla 
Jordens Five 4803 Ashland Chicago 
Josselyn Wm H & B B Unlonvllle Conn 
Julian ft Dyer 09 High Detroit 



Kalma & La Farlon 1337 E 111 N E Cleveland 

Kalmo Chan ft Ada Rlngllng Bros C R 

Kartell 112 Clark Chicago 

Knufman Bros 1553 Broadway N Y 

Kaufman ft Sawtelle 4815 Calumet Chicago 

Kaufman & Kcnilwortb Cape Vincent N Y 

Kaufman Reba & Inez Folies Paris France 

Kavunaugh & Davis Barnum & Bailey C R 

Keane J Warren 28 Majestic Butte 

Keastl's Circus Paragon Pk Boston 

Keatcs John V 70 W 109 N Y 

Keating Cbas 05 Hudson Hartford 

Keeley Lillian 134 Wadswortb E Boston 

Keeley ft Parks Orpheum Franklin Pa 2S Family 

Warren Pa 
Keife Zeuu 28 Los Angeles Los Angeles 
Kelfer ft Chapman 2435 S 17 Phlla 
Keith ft De Mont 722 W 14 PI Chicago 
Kelcey Sisters & Billy Cuniuilngs Lyric Dayton 28 

Orpheum Lima O 
Kelly Harry New York Roof N Y 
Kelly Walter C Palare London 
Keltners 317 Carlisle DuIIhk Tex 
Kennedy ft Kennedy 211 E 14 N Y 
Kenton Dorothy Hansa Hamburg Ger 
Keogh & Francis Box 00 Colon Mich 
Klefer & Kline 2001 Mulberry Toledo 
Kimball ft Donovan 133 Northampton Boston 
King Violet 383 Central Pk W N Y 
Klralfo (ins 710 3 EvaUHville 
Klovllle Jack 1553 Broadway N Y 
Knight Harlan 10 Deluwarc Albany 
Kobers Three 00 13 Wheeling 
Kohl (ius ft Marion 911 4 Milwaukee 
Kolb ft Miller Sans Snucl Pk Cincinnati 
Klant ft Myrtle O H Birmingham 28 Grand Nash- 
ville 
Kramer Bruno 104 E 14 N Y 
Kraton John 149 Schenectady Brooklyn 
KratonB The Empire Glasgow Scot 
Kretoro 110 Wash A I toon a 
Kretschman 1119*4 Broadway Camden 



Lacey Will 020 Que N W Wash D C 

Lakola ft Lorain Palare Htl Chieago 

Lamhlnttcs Grand Marquette Mich 

Lamb's Manikins 31 Columbia Milwaukee 

Lampe Bros 1553 Broadway N Y 

I.ampe Otto W Washburn's C R 

Lnncaster ft Miller Crystal No Platte Neb 

Lane Eddie 305 E 73 N Y 

I/ane ft Adell 332 Genesee Rochester 

Langdons The 115 E 14 N Y 

La Bettlna Fairyland Hlnton W Va 28 Theota 

Richmond Va 
La Bell Troupe Dominion Pk Montreal 
La Blanche Great 723 3 Baltimore 
La Centra ft La Rue 2401 2 Av N Y 
La Clair ft West Box 155 Sea Isle City N J 
la Delles Four Pantages Spokane Wash 
La Estrelllta 1553 Broadway N Y 



La Fayette Lamont Co 2909 Cormany Cincinnati 

La Ford Chas 327 Jackson Muncle Ind 

La Marr Hurry Wm Tell Htl Boston 

La Maze Bros Bijou Winnipeg 28 Bijou Duluth 

La Moines Musical 332 5 Baraboo Wis 

La Pearl Harry Barnum ft Bailey C R 

La Rose Bros 107 E 31 N Y 

La Tell Bros Majestic Lexington Ky 

La Tina Mile 4001 Brooklyn Kansas City 

La Tour Irene 78 Burnet Newark 

La Toy Bros Van Buren Htl Chicago 

Im Ella Grand Sacramento Cal 

La Telle ft Grant Keith's Providence 

Lansford Jeanne 461 Klngsland W Nutley 

Lam-t ft Ardell 332 Genesee Rochester 

Laurant Marie Collins Columbus O 28 Garden Pk 

Cincinnati 
Lawrence ft Healey Sherman Htl Chicago 
Lawrence ft Dale 2 New Castle Court Boston 
La Fleur Joe 57 Hanover Providence 
La Ford Cbas St Charles Htl Muncle 
Le Hirt Mons 760 Clifford Rochester 
I*a I>ole llelene 28 San Francisco 
La Mar ft Gabriel Htl Normandle N Y 
I.a Zar ft La Zar 108 Dearborn Av Chicago 
La Raub ft Scottle 333 Locust Johnstown 
Le Roy Chas Alrdome Salina Kas 
La Vine ft Clmeron Trio Eastcbester ft Rhine- 
lander Av N Y 
I* Clair Harry 245 W 134 N Y C 
Le Clalrs Two Poll's Waterbury 
Le Dent Frank Orpheum Denver 
Le Fevre ft St John 1553 Broadway N Y 
Lee Sallle 025 8 Av N Y 

Le Witt ft Ashmore Co 200 N State Chicago 
Leahy Bros De Rue Bros Minstrels 
Leigh Lisle 140 Arnold River Side R I 
Leigh Grace New York Roof N Y 
I.eiKhtons Three July 2 Orpheum Frisco 
Leeds ft La Mar 1553 Broadway N Y 
Lena Lily Orpheum Spokane 
Leonard James & Sadie 220 E 20 N Y 
Leonard ft Phillips 701 W Erie Chicago 
Leonard Grace St Paul Htl N Y 
1-eonard ft Drake 1099 Park PI Brooklyn 
Leonard Cus 1721 Q Sacramento Cul 
Leonard Edward 1122 Green Phlla 
Leonard ft Louie 810 N Park Chicago 
Leo Arthur 1088 Richland Baltimore 
Leo Jolly 730 Carmen Camden 
I^eslle George W 130 W 44 N Y 
Lester Nina Scenic Everett 
Levitt ft Falls 710 Orange Syracuse 
Lewis Jack Majestic Canton O 
Lewis Phil 121 W 116 N Y 
Lewis ft Young 205 E 78 N Y 
Lewis Walter ft Co 677 Washington Brookllne 
I*wis Harr ft Co 131 W 10 N Y 
Lewis ft Lake 2411 Norton Kansas City 
Lewis ft Man son 74 Orchard N Y 
Lewis ft Chaplu Majestic Dallas 28 Alrdome Chat- 
tanooga 

Lindsay Stilling ft Wilber Ponters Cafe Frisco 

Link Harry F 179 Altbea Providence 

Linton Tom ft Jungle Girls 410 E 20 Denver 

Litchfield Mr ft Mrs Nell 28 Pantages Spokane 

Livingston Murray 830 E 163 N Y 

Livingston David ft Co Cambridge Htl Chicago 

Livingston Comedy Trio Rlngllng Bros C R 

Lock wood ft Bryson 2 Lankershelm Bldg Los 

Angeles 
Lock wood s Musical 1536 Broadway N Y 
Ix>gan Bruce 89 N State Chicago 
I/ohse ft Sterling 39 Mi Lowell Rochester 
Lois 1536 Broadway N Y 
Lloyd Herbert 36 Great Wilson Leeds Eng 
Loraine Oscar 124 Tuxnell Pk Rd London 
Lublns Dancing 921 N Warnock Phlla 
Lucler Marguerite Hans ft Nixe Co 
Luclers Four Box 55 Onset Mass 
Lundy ft Wilde 222 W 141 N Y 
Lynne ft Hazard Pantages Seattle Indef 



HYDE & BEHNAN'S 

Amusement Enterprises 



Folly Theatre, 


Brooklyn 


Olympic " 


M 


Star " 


M 


Qayety " 


M 


Newark " 


Newark 


Qayety " 


Pittsburg 



Star & Garter Theatre, Chicago 




EX 





I 



TEMPLE BAR BUILDING, 
BROOKLYN, N. T. 



Lynotte Sisters 352 State Chicago 
Luttrlnger-Lucas Co 530 Valencia Frisco 



Mah Queen" ft Mr Weiss Lit Bldg Phlla 

Mack Wilbur 28 Majestic Chicago 

Mack ft Phelps Green Room Club N Y 

MacDonald Chas ft Sadie 18 W 100 N Y 

Magnanis The 834 Union N Y 

Mnkerueko Troupe 21 Travel 28 National San 

Francisco 
Multese Frank ft Co 289 W 147 N Y 
Malvern Troupe Steeplechase Atlantic City 
Mallla ft Bart 123 Kensington Rd London 
Maltese Frank ft Co 289 W 147 N Y 
Mandel Eva 208 State Chicago 
Man ley ft Sterling 111 Schiller Bldg Chicago 
Manning Sisters 67 S Clark Chicago 
Mantell's Marionettes 3413 S Colby Everett Wash 
Manning ft Dixon 41 W 117 N Y 
Marchl ft Raab 230 Franklin Johnstown 
Marcbands The 109 E 89 N Y 
Mardo Trio Rlngllng Bros C R 
Marlowe Plunkett ft Murri 21 Hippo Huntington 

W Va 28 Hippo Charleston W Va 
Marlon ft Lillian 1530 Broadway N Y 
Mario Trio 2* Ingersoll Pt Des Moines 
Marsh Joe 244 E Ohio Chicago 
Marshall Bros 335 Plymouth Abingdon Mass 
Marshall* The 754 Fulton Brooklyn 
Martha Mile 258 W 20 N Y 
Martin ft Crouch 907 S 12 Springfield 111 
Martin Dave ft Percie R F D No 2 Derby la 
Martyne Eddy White City Pk New Orleans 
Mathlesen Walter 90 W Ohio Chicago 
Mason ft Doran Bijou New London 
Maurer Francis Northern Bldg Chicago 
Maurice ft Perrln Co 113 Chestnut St Louis 



• • 



fit 



THE LITTLE GIRL WITH A GREAT BIG SONG 



as 



My Wife's Gone to the Country, Hurrah!" 

Hear this sung by DAPHNE POLLARD, Week of June 21, New Brighton Theatre, Brighton Beach, N. Y. 










usl 



ublishen 



II 



rt 3 



»tr( 



Ino 

»«*, IM 



rU 



When answering advertisement* kindly mention Variety. 



20 



VARIETY 



. 


9 

In Vaudeville tinder direction of PAT CASEY 




i 






f If! 1 




By Rind 


permission Messrs. HLAW <EL ERLANGER and FLO ZIEGFELD, Jr. 

• 



NITTY NOTES 

OF 





"LET'S GET THE 
UMPIRE'S COAT" 

The audiences cry for it like babies do for 
Mr*. Winslow's 8oothing By rap. 

IT CERTAINLY IS THERE 

The boat "Ball Song" wo ever wrote. If 
yon want a Boil Son*: got a 1909 model. 
Don't to cadilacing around In ono of tbooo 
old time runabout*. GRAB A REGULAR. 
This i* it. Wo require no answer. 

Too, and "HARVEST MOON" also. 

Published by RE MICK 

"We're glad we're married." 



**& 



Marvelous Ed 627 Cass Jollet 

Mariello A Wolfe 125 Camden Newark 

Max A Sbeftela 420 15 Columbus 

Maxwell A Dudley 106 W 96 N T 

May our Rita 508 Salem Medford Mass 

Mayfslrs Tbe 2928 Frankfort Pblla 

Maybew Stella 418 Strand London 

Mass Edna 687 Jackson N Y 

McConnell A Simpson Farm Cleveland Mo Indef 

McCann Geraldlne A Co 706 Park Johnstown 

McCaskey A Howell 806 Philip Missoula Mont 

McDowell John A Alloc NMagara Niagara Falls 

N Y 
McCone A Grant 630 Benton Pittsburg 
McCree Davenport Tronpe Rlngllng Bros C R 
McGee Jos B Geo Yen's Minstrels 
McGratb A Paige 58 Washington Mlddletown 
McOtilre Tuts Orpheum Portland 
McKay & Cantwell Keith's Phlla 
McNallys Four Apollo Berlin 
McPbee A Hill 811 3 At N Y 
McVeigh Grace 745 Amsterdam N Y 
Mears 1553 Broadway N Y 
Meecker J Matt 1553 Broadway N Y 
Mel Is Tbe Rlngllng Bros C R 
Melnotte Twins A Clay Smith 1138 Broadway N Y 



ASS /VIA IN 

way, Vow York. 

Adrloo Free. 



Melrose Bros 188 Park Bridgeport 
Melrose Blmor 1415 Pennsylvania Allegheny 
Mendel 18 Adam 8trand London 
Mentekel 104 E 14 N Y 
Merkel Louis 200 Snmmlt West Hoboken 
Merrlhew A Raney Collins Columbus O 28 Phillips 
Richmond Ind 

Merrltt Raymond 178 Tremont Passadena 
Merts A O'Neill 889 Walnut Chicago 
Methren Slater* Bell Detroit 26 Majestic Wyan- 
dot e Mich 

Miaco Steve Scarbora Pk Toronto Indef 

Mlacos A Fundland 780 8 Av N Y . 

Mlgnon Helene 129 E 14 St Paul 

Middle ton Gladys 530 Drury Kansas City 

Milch Slaters 19 W II St Paul 

Miller A Princeton 88 Olney Providence 

Miner Frank Daman C R 

Miller Loult E & Co Lyric Chattanooga 

Mlllette Rlngllng Bros C R 

Mi limn n Trio Keith'- Boston 28 Temple Detroit 

Miles A Dewey 48 Howard Boston 

Mlllmars A Baby Exposition Seattle 

Mills A Moulton 58 Race Buffslo 

Milton Chas W 1301 Gwlnette Augusta 

Milton A Co Lola Van Buren Htl Chicago 

Mints I.oiil> J (irand Tacouia 

Mitchell A Grant Box 188 Townsend Mass 

Mimic Four 359 W 42 N Y 

Moran W A 312 Huron Toronto 

Monetta Five (i O H Bldg Chicago 

Montague Mona 2959 Ursln Denver 

Montgomery A Healey 2819 W 17 Coney Is N Y 

Montambo A Bartelll 35 Field Waterbury 

Montrase Edith A 150 W 44 N Y 

Montray Edward 814 Western N S Pittsburg 

Mooney A Holbein 1553 Broadway N Y 

Moore A Young Academy Norfolk Va 

Moore Lou W Sells-Floto C R 

Morgan * McOarry Forest I'k St Ix>uls 28 White 

City Louisville 
Moreland Chas 734 Mi Central Hot Springs 



FRANK M0RRELL 



•« 



The California Baby" 



Attorney, 85S 

Theatrical Claims. 



Weeks June 81, Brighton Beach Music Hall, N. Y. ; 
28, Shea's, Buffalo. 

Morris Billy A She r woe d Sisters 508 Pontlac Dayton 

Morris A Dsly 54 Harmon Jersey City 

Morris & Morton 1340 St Johns PI Brooklyn 

Mortloek Alice Astor Theatre Bldg X Y 

Morton A Elliott Moss A Stoll Tour 

Moto (iirl Empire Edinburgh Scot 

Mowatts Juggling Thalia Elberfeld Ger 

Moy Hazel A 1117 7 Sioux City 

Mozarts The 1553 Broadway N Y 

Mueller A Mueller Saginaw Mich 

Mulligan May 120 E 13 Covington 

Mulvey Ben L 287 Richmond Providence 

Murray Eddie Fisher's Los Angeles 

Murray Elizabeth M Orpheum Frisco 

Murray A Alvln Great Albinl Co 

Murpby A WUUard Falrhaven N J 



NEW BRIGHTON 



Management 

David Robinson 



THE HANDSOMEST SEASIDE THEATRE IN THE WORLD 

DEVOTED TO HIGH-CLASS VAUDEVILLE 

ARTISTS BOOKED TO PLAY AT THIS HOU8E, KINDLY SEND ALL MAIL TO THE UNITED 
BOOKING OFFICES AND PHOTOS TO THEATRE AT BRIGHTON BEACH. 

If We Sell You a Trunk 

We end your trunk troubles for you at least, and there Is plenty In this life to worry one without their 
having one of the heavy ipld-fushloned can\as covered wood theatrical trunks on their hands. 

BUYING A BAL means joining the "DON'T WORRY CLUB." How soon are you going to Join? 



WILLIAM BAL. Inc. 

FOB 0ATAXAOVZ T. BTHLDttt 0» 

210 West 42ad Street. New Yerk 



"RAP""* 

J/U/lnm 



Murphy A Drexel 419 8 Broad Pblla 
My Fancy 12 Adam Strand London 
Myers A Boss Pearl Blver N Y 
Mylle A Ortb 1553 Broadway N Y 



Nambus Four Gollmar C R 

Nealon A Titus 511 Brown Pblla 

Xeff & Starr Majestic Galveston 

Newton Billy S 1553 Broadway N Y 

Nichols Four 510 Deuber Canton O 

Noble A Brooks Ssratoga Htl Cblcago 

Nlblo Victor Royal Dublin Ire 

Nickel Earl 845 B 40 Chicago 

Nlrro A Le Roy 1825 Page Allegheny 

Noblette A Marshall 1012 Hempvllle Ft Worth 

Nogard Sisters Griffith Ind 

Nonette 154 Henry Brooklyn 

Normans Joggling 5804 Msrshfleld Cblcago 

Norton C Porter 6842 Kimbark Cblcago 

Norrls Leon A Co 68 W 7 Mt Vernon 

Norrlses The 517 Walnut Hsmllton 

Nosses The Six 165 W 40 N Y 

Nugent Wm F 11 W 118 N Y 

Nugent J C Tbe Osks Canal Dover O 



O'Deii * Hart 2083 Stroud Green Lake Wash 

Odell A Gilmore 870 W Monroe Cblcago 

Odell A Klnley 3405 Colllngwood Toledo 

Ogden Helen 270 Clybourn Chicago 

Oksbe Family 29 Cbarlng Cross Rd London 

01 boos Four 20 Hamburg Peterson 

Omega Trio 1553 Broadway N Y 

Onlaw Gus 418 Strand Ixmdon 

O'Marr Garry 230 B 18 N Y 

O'Neill Emma Saratoga Htl Chicago 

O'Neill Trio Cascade Pk New Castle 28 Idora Pk 

Youiigstnwii O 
Ollrettd Troubadours Keith's Boston 28 Keith's 

Boston 
Opp Joe 1530 Broadway N Y 
Orlwssany Irma 9 Altkenhead Rd Glasgow Scot 
Orletta A Taylor Bergen Rldgeneld Pk 
O'Rourke Eugene A Co 1229 Tlnton N Y 
Orpheus Comedy Four Orpheum Denver 
Otto Bros Hlp|H) Nottingham Eng 
Overlng Trio 140 W 144 N Y 
Owen A Co Garry 1742 St Charles New Orleans 
Owens Billy A Msy 1421 Adams N S Plttsbnrg 
Osays Tbe Kinsley Kenmore N Y 



Pacheo Family Rlngllng Bros C R 

Palmer A Lewis 233 Tremont Boston 

Palmer Sisters 54S Hart Brooklyn 

Pamahasike Prof 1037 E Dauphin Phlla 

Parker Palmer & Co Bijou Knoxvillc 28 Lyric 

Chattanooga Tenn 
Parker A Show 1S7 Hopkins Brooklyn 
Pattens Three BIJou Tyrone Pa 
Paterson's Bronze Studios 010 Lark In Frisco 
Pearcc Sisters 725 Lane Seattle 
Pepper Twins Robinson Cincinnati 
Pearson A (Jarfleld 220 W 38 N Y 
Peck Roy Yogel's Minstrels 
Pederson Bros 035 Greenbush Milwaukee 
Pelot Fred A Annie 161 Westminster Atlantic City 
Perry Frank L 747 Buchanan Minneapolis 
Pertlna 44 Cartwrlgbt Euston Rd London 
Peters Phil A Nettle 1553 Broadway N Y 
Fetching Bros 10 Packard Lymansville R I 
Phlllppo Sisters 140 W 30 N Y 
Phillips A Bergen 373 Chsrles Boston 
Phillips Mondane Majestic St Paul ' 
Phillips Samuel P 310 Clssson Brooklyn 
Piccolo Midgets Box 23 Phoenlca N Y 
Pike A Calame 973 Amsterdam N Y 
Plnard A Manny 275 S B Brooklyn 
Plamondons Two 1114 Qulncy Topeka 
Plunkett A Rltter 816 Main W Everett 



POWERS BROS. 

IV A FISH STORY. 



Polk A Polk 825 W 21 N Y 
Pollard Dalphe Brighton Beach N Y 
Pollard Gene 713 Fulton Brooklyn 
Pope J C A Dog 240 Franklin Phlla 
Potter A Harris 701 Lei end Cblcago 
Porto Ernie A Mildred Bush Lake Minn 
Powell Eddie 2314 Chelsea Kansas City 



Will Marion Cook 

THE ORIGINATOR. 

Former acts — "Clorindy and Mem- 
phis Students." 

New acts — Original, Sensational, 
Melodious. 

"ROSE LAND" 

Negro Sketch — 25 People. 

"Hawaiian Romance" 

Musical Drama of the South Sea 
Islands. 



NEW YORK CHICAGO 

13* West 37th Street 67 Clark Street 



Powers Trio 5 Washington Somervllle 
Powers' Elephants Damon C It 
Prevost & Brown Mathla Jainairu X 
Prices The Orpheum Brockton 
Probasco 420 Monroe Rochester 
Prosit Trio Rlngllng Bros C R 
Pryor Billy 63 Dartmouth Boston 
Puces Jolly 10 Porter Boston 
Pucks Two 160 E 80 N Y 



(JulKU & Nlrkersiui Crystal Pnehlo Col 

Qulllln L German Village Columbus 

Qulnn A Mitchell 20 Bay 26 Bensonhurst L I 



Racket ts Two 2000 8 Av N Y 

Radford A Valentine Vaudeville Club London 

Rue & Brosch Star Seattle 

Rainbow Sisters Crystal Manitowoc Wis 

Ramsey Sisters Orpheum Vamonvcr B C 

Rankin A Leslie 413 W 30 N Y 

Ratelles The 637 Letorneaux Montreal 

Raymond Ruby Fairvlew Dayton in Wheeling Pk 

Wheeling W Vn 
Raymond \- Hall Orpheum Oakland 
Raymond Clara 141 Lawrence Brooklyn 
Rector Harry CIrco Trevlno Monterey Mex 
Red Eagle 418 Strand London 
Redding Franceses A Co 204 W 133 N Y 
Reed A St John 454 Manhattan N Y 
Reeves Blllle N Y Roof N Y 
Relck A Howard 123 Greenwich N Y 
Reld Sisters 45 Broad Elisabeth 
Rle*ner A Gores 128 Roanoke San Francisco 
Rellly Frank 027 Communlpaw Jersey City 
Remington Msyme Htl Gerard N Y 
Uenshaw Bert Pulque Minneapolis 



RICE s CADY 

West End Heights, flt. Louis. 



Rice Frank & True Forest Pk Cblcago Indef 

Rice Willy Rlngllng Bros C R 

Rlckrode Harry E Pantages Bldg Seattle 

Rich Duo 000 N Western Chicago 

Rich A Howard 311 W 13 N Y 

Richard Bros Pantages Sacramento 

Richards Wm Dlngman's Ferry Pa 



PELZER AND WHYTE 

Week list, HTNDERSON'8, COVEY ISLAND. 
Bee the Act. 



When answering advertisement* kindly mention Variety. 



VARIETY 



21 



STUART 

Will be seen next season in an entirely NEW 
and ORIGINAL character singing act entitled 



BARNES 



£t 




Y 1= E S 



93 



DIRECTION 



HOMANS 



I WRITE FOR 

JOB WRLCH, ANDREW MACK, JOB MOR- 
RIS. AL LEECH, BEN WELCH, ED 
WYNN, HAPPY FANNY FIELDS, AL 
CARLETON, BARNEY FERGUSON, HOW- 
ARD AND HOWARD, MILLS AND HEW- 
ITT, etc. MY REFERENCES:— Any of them. 

JAMES MADISON 

Publisher of Madison's Budget. 

VAUDEVILLE AUTHOR 
1493 BROADWAY 

Room 617 Lone Acre Bid*., 44th to 45th St. 
Hours 10 a. m. to noon and by appointment. 



Richards & Montrose 450 S 1 Mt Vernon 
Richards A: f! rover Queen San Diego <-'al 
Richardson* The Three Saginaw Mich 
Richardson John S 18 Grauyer PI Buffalo 
Richmond Bob 374 Central Pk W N Y 
Rteaner & Hlxon Uatqvc Los AngHe* 
Riley & Abern 331 W Hancock Detroit 
Rlngllng Adolph BufTalo Bill C R 
Hipp Jack Majestic Birmingham 
Ritchie Gertie 207 Walnut Buffalo 
Hitter A Foster Argyle Bog 
Rivera A Rochester 249 W 23 N Y 
Roads A Engel 223a Chauncey Brooklyn 
Roattlno A Stevens 114 E 11 N Y 
Roberts C E Pantages Sacramento 
Roberts Children 320 Point Providence 
RoIiIm-Ii & Childress Arcade Toledo 
Robledlllo Mlgerd Rlngllng Bros C R 
Robinson A Grant 408 James Utlca 
Robinson Alice 457 Orchard Chicago 
Roberts Family 320 Point Providence 
Roberts Slgna 610 23 Merced 
Koltare Chas 215 W 23 N Y 
Romaln Manuel A Co 12 Seattle Boston 
Romanoffs The 133 17 Wheeling W Va 
Honaldos Three R D 5 Stark Mich 
Roode Claude M Sells-Floto C R 
Roof Jack A Clara 705 Green Phlla 
Rose Elmer A 218 Pulllam Atlanta 
Roso Julian 17 Green I^elcester Sq London 
Ross A Lewis Touring South Africa 
Ross Sisters 05 Cumberford Providence 
Ross Eddie G Hillsdale Mich 
Rose Adele 242 W 43 N Y 
Rosenthal Don Harold 210 W 1 Oswego 
Rosev (' W Celeron Jamestown N Y 
Rossi Alfredo BufTalo Bill R 
RosslejB The 15.13 Broadway N Y 
Rowland 450 Av N Y 
Rowley Sam 07 S Clark Chicago 
Royal Doll Princess 102 W 35 N Y 
Royal Musical Five 240 S Brooklyn 
Roy Rob 5 Polk Alley Elizabeth Pa 
Russell Bros Elmhurst L I 
Russell A: Church 420 Av E Bklvn 
Russell Bertha Nobs 172 W 77 N Y 
Russell Tenle Scenic Temple IloMoii 
Russell Jessie A Co .117 S 7 St Louis 
Rutledge A Pickering 133 W 4.1 N Y 
Rvnn James. & Mildred loio 3 Minneapolis 
Ryan A Rltchfleld Box 20 Sayvllle L I 

8 

Sable Josephine Folles Marlgny Paris France 
Salmo Junn Rarrlsfonl Stock fonl Eng 
Salvall Saratoga II tl Chicago 
Sandberg A Lee 711 Orchard Chicago 



WALTER 



LIZZIE 



SCHRODE and MULVEY 

June 28, Oipheum, Spokane. 



Sanders Troupe 300 E 14 N Y 
Sampson Harry 6411 Addison W Phlla 
Samuels A Chester Box 110 Melrose Pk 111 
Sanford A Darlington 2422 So Adler Phlla 
Sanford Jere Star Seattle 
Santell Great Oxford Htl Chicago 




THt STANDARD ENGRAVING CO. 



mmiwrrm *—mM M.t«iuii 



Alhambra 



J 
Y 



Schafer Hat Center Macon Ga 

Sears Gladys Revere Boston 

.-.»•.. ieu ot UeudiTHou Alrdome Savannah 

Sveugala Original Watertown N ¥ 

Slmuuons Four Saratoga Htl Chicago 

Sharp A 8barp 209 B 13 N Y 

Shuw & Shuw Eastport Me 

Miedmau W S Dumont X J 

Sheer A Burton 212 Woodward Av Detroit 

Shelvey Bros Orpheuui Rockford 111 

Sherlock A Van Dalle 514 W 185 N Y 

Sherman A Rice 440 W 81 N Y 

Schach A McVeigh 745 Amsterdam N Y 

Scbarr Wheeler Trio 8130 Commercial Chicago 

Shefels Male 1018 3 Appleton Wla 

Slddons A Earle 028 Main Phlla 

Sllvu & Sllva Baltimore Md 

Sirlgnmo's Banda Roma 11 E 116 N Y 

Schrode Billy New York Roof N Y 

Scott A Wright 530 W 122 N Y 

Seaiuou Chas F Orpheuui Bklyn 2$ 

X Y 
Setnon Duo Crystal Anderson Ind 28 Lakeside Pk 

Dayton () 
Seurab Billy A: Mae Cairo Mich 
Seymour A Nestor 501 W 170 N Y 
Shanuon Harry Ludlngton Mich 
Sharp * Sharp 200 E 13 N Y 
Sherry Joseph V Spark's C R 
Sllveno A Co 2029 Liberty Ogden Utah 
Simpson Cora 718 N Maine Scranton 
Simpson Cherldah Orpheuui Oakland 
Slater A Finch Trousdale Minstrels 
Smlrl A Ressner 438 W 164 N Y 
Smith A Heagney 272 S 11 Newark 
Smith A Brown 1324 St John Toledo 
Smith Al 123 Irving Brooklyn 
Smith A McNamara 49 N Englewood Phlla 
Smiths Aerial Rlngllng Bros C R 
Snyder & Buckley Ilammels Hockaway L I 
Solar Willie Pljou Jackson Mich 
Somers A Wlble Box 24 Col lings wood N 
Spauldlng A Dupree Box 285 Osslnlng N 
Sperry A Dogs 8 W 7 Jamestown N Y 
Sprague A Dixon Island Pk Eastou 
Springer Jack 432 S > Louisville 
Stadium Trio Eldora Pk Oakland 
Stantons The 351 W 44 N Y 
St Alva Addle 205 E 105 N Y 
St Clair Anne 2910 Armour Chicago 
St Leon Family Luna Villa Coney Island N Y 
Stafford Alice 213 W 85 N Y 
SlufTord A: Stone Brighton Beach X Y 
Stanhope Paul A 407 W 123 N Y 
Stanley A Wathon 245 W 38 N Y 
Stanley A Co Harry 1553 Broadway N Y 
Stanley Mr A Mrs Lew Columbus (> 
Starr A Goldln 120 W 115 N Y 
Stead Walter 155 Prospect Cambridge 
Steeley A Edwards 608 8 At N Y 
Stelnert Thomas Trio 409 Lenox N Y 
Stephenson Chas 2 Sumach Toronto 
Stewart Cal Queen San Diego 
Stewart Harry M 105 Schaeffer Brooklyn 
Stevens A Washburn Starlnnd Saskatoon Sask Can 
Stevens Paul 323 W 28 N Y 
Stevens Kitty 132 Lincoln Chicago 
St irk it l.nmlou Pnxtang Pk Ilarrlsburg Pa 
Stoddanls The 317 Kirkpatrlck Syracuse 

Sli lie Heth Mora Pk Yolin^'sluwii O 

Strickland Rube Celeron Pk Jamestown 

Stuart Dorothy Htl St Paul N Y 

Stuart J Francis 2448 Martin Phlla 

Stuart A Keeley S22 College Indianapolis 

Stutzman A May 1553 Broadway N Y 

Sullivan Hros Four S High Milfred Mass 

Sullivan Pasquelena & Co 21 Ingersold Pk Des 

Moines 
Sully \. Phidps Harber Pk IS.IInw 

O II \\'oi.(|si,u-k N't 
Snllv Grace 304 E 41 NY 
Sundy & Wilde 222 W 141 N Y 
Sunny South Orpheiun I os Angeles 
Susana 1'rliness proctor's Newark 
SutclifTe Troupe 40 Agalncourt Hd London 
Sutton A Sutton Palace Htl Chicago 
Swam & Bambard 110 W 00 N Y 
Swlckards Tlie 805 Bathhurst Toronto Can 
Sylow II Barnum A Bailey C It 
S.x inonds .lack Superior Wis 
Symphony Quartet 1025 20 Washington 



Tancan A Clavton 1387 St Marks Brooklyn N Y 
Tannean Julius 252 W 70 X Y 
Tnsmanlan Vandleman Troupe Gollmar Bros C R 
Tasseman Robt B Star Buffalo lndef 



TEMPLE QUARTET 

Week June 21, Temple, Detroit, Mich. 



Taylor Mae Forest Pk Littlo Rock 

Taylor Viola 236 Harrison Boston 

Teed A Lazell 4247 Lorain Cleveland 

Telegraph Four Wash Spokane 

Temple Quartet Temple Detroit 

Templeton Robert L Moss A Stoll Tour London 

Templeton Paul Francis 1426 16 Oakland 



Falls Vt 28 



Ten Eycks The Delhi N Y 

Texas Comedy Four Palace Ashvllle X C 

The Quartette Hammersteiu't> X Y 

Trolley Car Trio 1142 Tuunell Milwaukee 

Trumble Francis Gerard Htl N i 

Thomas Norman 354 Manhattan N Y 

Thompson Harry 112 Covert Brooklyn 

Thompson Sisters 334 £ 41 Chicago 

Thornton George Bennett's Qucttcc 

Tlecbea The 114 E 2 E Liverpool O 

Tlemey A Odell 1553 Broadway N Y 

Till John A Louise 8W» tUlvui Maldm 

Toledo Sidney lakeside Pk Dayton O 

Tompkins Charlotte J 2541 Lafayette Denver 

Torcat A Flor D'Allxa Parish Madrid Spain 

Towner 8h»ter» 26 Water Blnghamtou 

Townaend Charlotte A Co 601 W 135 N Y 

Tom Jack Trio 102 B 14 N Y 

Toms Tumbling 2789 Fulton Brooklyn 

Toona Mile P O Box 654 Denver 

Tops Topsy A Tops 617 W School Chicago 

Toubey Pat East Haddam Conn 

Tralnor & Dale Celeron Pk Jamestown 28 Pk Al- 
bany 

Travers Belle Trocadero Pblla lndef 

Trehor 406 Virginia St Paul 

Tripp A Vellng Rlngllng Broa C R 

Trudell A: Fuller Star Hartford lud 2S Grand Peru 
Ind 

Thardo Claude 33 W 05 N Y 

Thurston Leslie 85 Lexington N Y 

Tunis Fay Dragon Inn Detroit 

Turner Bert Richmond Htl Chicago 

Tweedley John 242 W 43 N Y 



Urma Hetty 104 E 14 N Y 



Vagges The Barnum A Bailey C R 

Valadons Les 407 Thames Newport 

V a Ida re A Varno Hagenbeck-Wallace C R 

Van Billy Orpheuui Oakland 

Van Buren A Close 2250 W 05 Cleveland 

Van Eppcs Jack Novelty llo<|iiliiiii Wash 

Van Horn Majestic Indianapolis 

Yardnles 1 lie lxiweil Mich 

Vardaman National Htl Chicago 

Vurdon Perry A: Wilbur Lyric Dallas 

Vlsco 41a Acre Lane London Eng 

Vasco A Co 1418 Beaver Allegheny 

Vaughan Dorothy Sherman 1 1 1 1 Chicago 

Vaundetta Musical Duo 247 Pratt Ravenna 

Vedmaro Rena 740 Amsterdam X Y 

Venetian Musicians I'nbpie l>cn Moines 

Venetian Street Musicians 32 Alaska Chicago 

Vera Mile 737 De Kalb Brooklyn 

Vermette-Capottl Trio 451 Hreboeuf Montreal 

Victorlne Myrtle Idora Pk Oakland 

Vincent Sisters 4S Centre New Rochelle 

Vincent A Hose M'O Olive I iiiI1iiiiii|h<I Is 

Viola Oito A Pro 123 Monlauk Av Brooklyn 

Vloletta Jolly 104 E 14 N Y 

Vivians Two Temple Detroit 2S Romano Pk Grand 

Hapids 
Volta 1553 Broadway X Y 



Return Engagement 

THIS WEEK (JUNE 14) AT THE AMER- 
ICAN THEATRE, NEW TOES. 

HARRY JOLSON 

THE OPERATIC BLACKFACE COMEDIAN. 

BIO FEATURE WITH EDDIE LEONARD'S 
MIN8TREL8 NEXT SEASON. 

"DOWN AMONG THE 
SUGAR CANE" 

BOTHAM-ATTUCKS MUSIC CO. 
ICC W. 37th Street Caw York 



Von Dell Harry 1R53 Broadway N Y 
Von Serley Sisters 430 E 138 N Y 
Vynos The 300 W 31 N Y 



W 

Wade A Reynolds 015 2 Louisville 

Wablund A Tekla Trio Trevlno Circus Mex 

Ward A Harrington 418 Strand London Eng 

Ward A Hart 1900 South 11 Pbila 

Wartenberg Bros 104 E 14 N Y 

Walker Mabelle 208 Pottlnatonlne Leavenworth 



WALSH, LYNCH .». 00. 

Presenting "HTJOKIN 'S RU N." 
Address oare VARIETY. 



Wagner Paul Hippo Charleston W Va 

Wagner Peter 145 W 127 N Y 

Waller A Maglll 102 7 Av N Y 

Walsh May 28 Bedford Court Mansions London 

Watson & Baker 3024 Reno W Phlla 

Walker Xella 2* Majestic Chicago 

Walters Clnra Washington l» (' 

Walters & Walters 74s Dearborn Chlcsso 

Walton Irvln K Wl Mug Pk Wloellnu W Va 

V: ll.iii i. nt I'k Wlnport I'a 





Supported by HERBERT WARREN and EMMA CAMPBELL 

TIME ALL FILLED 

PLAYING ORPHEUM CIRCUIT, Opening August 9th, until 
March 15th. followed by UNITED TIME. 

Fifth Avenue Theatre, New York, June 21 



\A/I1-I-IA.VI MORRIS, Inc. 

BOSTON OmCE NOW BOOKING the New England Parks and Theatres. 

CONSECUTIVE TIME| SHORT JUMPS. 

Good Comedy and Novelty Acts always wanted. 
TRED MARDO, Boston Representative, Orpheum Theatre Building, Boston, Mass. 



When answering advertisement 8 kindly mention Variety. 



22 



VARIETY 



Fourteen Great Songs 



FOR 



Fourteen Thousand GREAT 



SINGERS 



No matter -what kind of a song you need you can find a sontf to suit you in this list. Pro- 



fessional copies, slides and orchestrations are ready ; 



••MY PONY BOY" 

"SHINE ON, HARVEST MOON" 
"WHEN I MARRY YOU" - - 

"I WANT SOMEBODY TO PLAY WITH" 
"DAISIES WON'T TELL" .... 
"I WISH I HAD A GIRL" .... 
"LET'S GET THE UMPIRE'S GOAT" 

"HONEYLAND" 

"STINGY KID" 

"LONGING FOR YOU, SWEETHEART" - 

"DUBLIN DAISIES" 

"I WONDER IF IT'S TRUE" 
"TRANS-MAC-NI-FI-CAN-BAM-DAM-U-AL-I-TY" 
"IF I HAD THE WORLD TO GIVE YOU" 



By 



«« 
«< 
«« 
<< 
«< 
<i 

• 

M 
•I 

• t 

• • 
«« 
«l 



Heath and O'Donnell 
Bayes and Norworth 
Bryan and Gumble 
Williams and Van Alstyne 
Anita Owen 
Kahn and LeBoy 
Bayes and Norworth 
Shields and Blanke 
Nat Goldstein 
Gillespie and Chapel 
Percy Wenrich 
Clare Kummer 
Burris and Smith 
J. Hayden-Clarendon 






Cowboy song 

A real moon song 

The Waltz Song Hit of the country 

A great child song 

Ballad 

Ballad 

Baseball song 

Novelty song 

Kid song 

Ballad 

Irish novelty song 

High-class ballad 

Coon song 

Semi-high-class ballad 






J 



H 





NEW 



IT 

Kindly address all professional mail to the New York office. 




Walton Bert A Lottie 209 B 14 N Y 

Walton Fred A Co Lamba' Club N Y 

Ward Billy 189 Myrtle Brooklyn 

Ward Tom 162 Leilogton Brooklyn 

Warden Harry 1608 Broadway N Y 

Warren Marrelons Acme BTerett Wash 

Warren Fauet 342 W 43 N Y 

Warren Bob 1628 So Carlisle Pblla 

Warren Bert Keystone Bldg Pittsburg 

Washburn ft Douglas 434 Third Brooklyn 

Washer Bros Box 100 Oakland Ky 

Waters James R Indlanola Pk Columbus O 28 

Farm Toledo 
Watson Sammy 333 St Pauls Jersey City 
Watson ft Little 505 Van Cortland Pk Av Ixmerre 

N. Y 

Wayne Ethel 142 W 49 N Y 
Weadlck A La Due Gen Del Rochester Indef • 
Weavers Flying 1553 Broadway N Y 
Welch Jos ft Cecelia 248 Fulton Buffalo 
Wells Maxlne Bijou Knoxvllle 2s Grand Augusta 
Fla 

Wells R C Palace London Eng 
Wenrlck ft Waldron Richmond Htl Chicago 
Weat Sisters 810 Grove Brooklyn 
West Frankle 218 W 46 N Y 
Wharton ft Mobler 208 Kensle Chicago 
Wheeler ft Erahlne Dixie Atlanta 
Whitman Frank Ramoua Pk Grand Kaplds 
Whitman Bros 1385 Chestnut Pbtla 
Whiteside ft Picks Ethel Pk Lafayette Ind 
Whittle W E Farm Caldwell N J 
White ft Uerelle 215 W 88 N Y 



JOHN W. WORLD 
MINDELL KINGSTON 

Week June 81, Orphean, Seattle. 



Whitehead Joe ft Grlerson 2466 8 At N Y 
Whlteley A Bell 1468 Broadway Brooklyn 
Wbitford Annabelle New York Roof N Y 



Whiteside Ethel Family Lafayette Ind 28 Man- 

nlon's Pk St Louis 
Wilbur Carl 418 Strand London Eng 
Wilbur Clarence Htl Atlantic Cltj 
Wild Al 11 Lyric Nashville Tenn 
Wilder Marshall P 8 Atlantic City 
Wilklns & o'l-iiy 15.53 Broadway N Y 
Williams Frank & Delia Palnivru X Y Indef 
Williams Cbas 2652 Rutger St Louis 
Williams ft Gordon 2232 Indiana Chicago 
Williams Cowboy Queen San Dlegu (a I 
Williams ft Segal 37 E Robinson Allegheny 
Williams ft Stevens ivkln Stock Chicago 
Williams & Van Allen 601 Queen Portsmouth Va 
Willlard's Temple of Music 1 Palisades Pk N J 
Willlard's Temple of Music 2 Dreamland Coney 

Is N Y 
Wilson Bros 1305 E 6 Maywood 111 
Wilson ft Wilson 892 4 Troy 

Wilson Helolse ft Atnoros Sisters 104 E 14 N Y 
Wilson ft Prasler 145 B 48 N Y 
Wilson Louis 26 8heppard Lynn 
Wlnane ft Cassler Devil's Auction Co 
Winkler ft Kress Trio 252 W 38 N Y 
Winter Winona Princess Chicago Indef 
Wise Jack 39 Pittsburg 
Wlxon ft Eaton 30 Tecuraseh Providence 
Wolford & Blugard 150 W Congress Chicago 
Woodull Billy 317 Flrt Av So Nashville 
Wood Maurice Shea's Buffalo 

Wood Bros BIJou Duluth Minn 28 Unique Minne- 
apolis 
Wood Ralph 28 Lakeside Pk Akron O 
Wordette Estelle ft Co Wheeling Pk Wheeling 

W Va 
World ft Kingston Orpbeum Seattle 
World's Comedy Four Temple Chicago 
Woodward Ed ft May Grand Augusta Ga 28 Grand 
Montgomery 

Wormwood's Dogs ft Monkeys Keith's Newark 
Wortbley Abbott ft Mlnthorne East End Pk Mem- 
phis 

Worton Bessie 529 W 135 N Y 
Woycbe ft Zell Columbia Cincinnati 
Wright Lillian ft Boys 430 W 48 N Y 



Yackley & Bunnell Lancaster Pa indef 
Yalto Duo 229 W 30 N Y 
Yamamoto Bros Winchester O 
Yeomau George Bijou La Crosse Wis 
Young E F 407 W 123 N Y 

Young Ollle & Bro 21 Travel 28 Orpheum Frisco 
Yule ft Simpson Farm Toledo O 28 Waldmau Erie 
Pa 

Z 

Zalno Joe 41 So 02 Philadelphia 

Zanaigs The Empire Nottingham Eng 

Zanslga The 806 W 45 N Y 

Zasell Vernon ft Co Renaissance Warsaw Russia 

Zech ft Zech Acme Everett Wash 

Zeda H L Midland Htl Pueblo 

Zenda Majestic Dallas 28 Alrdome Chattanooga 



CIRCUS ROUTES 



Gentry Bros Aug 22 Warrenton 23 Culpepper 24 
Charlottesville 20 Lynchburg 26 Danville 27 
Clarksvllle Va 28 Oxford 30 Raleigh 31 Green- 
boro Sept 1 Reldavllle 2 Lexington 3 Mt Airy 

4 No Wllkesboro 6 High Point 7 Mockavllle 
8 Salisbury 9 Concord 10 Charlotte 11 Mooree- 
vllle 13 Tayloravllle 14 Statesvllle 10 Newton 
16 Hickory 17 Morgantown 18 Ashevllle 20 
Marlon 21 Rutberfordton N O 22 Lancaster 

5 C 23 Rock 11111 24 Gastonla N C 23 Gaffneys 
S C 26 Spartanburg 28 Greenville 29 Ander- 
son 30 Abbeville Oct 1 Newberry 2 Columbia 4 
Charleston 6 Orangeburg 7 Aiken S C 8 Au- 
gusta Ga 9 Barnwell 11 Savannah Ga 

Gollmar Bros Juue 21 Mlnot N D 

Hagenbeck- Wallace June 21 Ogden Utah 22 Logan 
23 Idaho Falls 24 Butte 25 Helena 20 Missoula 

Norris ft Rowe June 21 Valley City N D 22 Cas- 
selton 23 Llslnm 24 Oakes 

Ringling Bros June 21 Springfield 22 Hartford 23 
Waterbury 24 New Haven 20 Bridgeport 26 
Stamford 28 Gloversvllle N Y 29 Utlca 30 Syra- 
cuse July 1 Rochester 2 Buffalo 3 Erie Pa 

Bells-Floto June 21 Lewlston Wash 

Smith's Shows June 21 Covington Va 28 Mont- 
gomery W Va 



Barnum ft Bailey July 8 Sheldon la 9 Sioux City 
la 20 Waterloo la 24 Rock ford 111 Aug Easton 
7 Scranton 8 Wilkes-Barre 9 Sunbury 10 Wlll- 
iamsport 11 Orleans 12 Warren 14 Cleveland 
15 Marlon 16 Toledo 17 Detroit 18 Jackson 19 
So Bend 21 Milwaukee 22 Tomak Wis 23 St 
Paul 24 Minneapolis 25 Little Falls 26 Duluth 

Campbell Bros June 19 Moose Jaw Park 21 Reglna 
24 Prince Albert Can Aug 5 Redfleld 6 Woon- 
socket 7 Plankerton 9 Chamberlain 10 McKentle 
11 Kadoka 12 Rapid City S D 

Cole Bros Shows June 21 Geneva O July 4 Morris 
5 Onessee 6 Iowa City 7 Vinton 8 North wood 
9 Owatonna 10 Northfleld 

Cosmopolitan Olrcus June 20 Neenab Wis 27 Rlpon 
Wis 



LETTERS 



Where O follows name, letter Is In Chicago. 
Advertising of circular letters of any de- 
scription will not be listed when known, 
letters will be held for one month. 
P following name Indicates postal. 



Antwell Dot 
Adama ft White 
Allison Patty 
Avery D 
Anderson Albert 
Asbcroft Ralph W 



Arado D 

Aces The Three (C) 
Augers The 
Adgle's Lions 
Adams Isabel 
Alnsworth Virginia 



Direct from the Coast to the AMERICAN MUSIC HALL, CHICAGO. 

for WILLIAM MORRIS, as feature 



OPENED THIS WEEK (June 14) 





The Great Character Impersonator and Lightning Change Artist 
"The brilliant attraction of the program" is what AMY LESLIE in the Chicago "Daily News" says 



When tntwtring advtriitomentt kindly mention Vabiot. 



VARIETY 



23 









NEARLY ALL THE GOOD ARTISTS ARE HERE-JOIN THEM 



SPECIAL RATES 

TO 
PROFESSIONALS 



Jj/wwan 



Hotel 



CHICAGO. 



J. K. SEBREE, 

President 

ROY S. SEBREE, 

Oen. Manager 

LOUIS A. JUNG, 

Asst. Manager 



DINE IN OUR BEAUTIFUL RESTAURANTS 



POPULAR PRICES. 



SERVICE AND FOOD THE BEST. 



Avesto Elmer 
Arlington Billy 
Armstrong P C 
Armstrong Max 
Adair Bobyn 
Anderson Fred 
Austins Tossing 
Astrella Bisters 
Alarcons The (C) 
Anderson Ruth (C) 
Austin ft Sweet 
Aldrlcn Blanch 
Armlnta A Burke 
Abl Bd 
Blood Adele 
Boyd A Moran 
Burdlck Butb 
Bragg Archie (C; 
Bell Alfred J 
Bagley Charlie (C) 
Baldwin Kitty 
Best Louis P 
Brignola E (C) 
Beck Carl (C) 
Belmont Freda 
Bertram Helen (C) 
BclWue Bd (C) 
Burton Steve W (C) 
Baggesen Carl 
BUyck's Seals 
Butler hf J 
Bell Floss (C) 
Brlndemour Great* 
Bowles George 
Boyle A O'Brien 
Bulger Irine ' 
Binder Grace (C) 
Barlow Nelson ft Dens- 
more 
Barnes W H 
Burn Andy 
Bennett A Darling 
Beatrice Mile 
Brady James 
Bedors Corleta Miss 
Blondell Mysterious 
Burns Charlie 
Burns A McCone 
Bidden Rose 
Berg's Merry Girls 
Belmont Madeline 
Benedict Lew 
Bebr Carrie 
Burke Dan 
Burton A Burton 
Brown Mary Ann 
Busley Jessie (C) 
Bowser Charles 
Burns Eddie (C) 
Bartlett Guy 
Bennett Murray 
Byrne John W (C) 
Beaumont Alma 
Barton Joe 
Bolven C F 
Braham Michael 
Bush Frank 
Baker Margaret 
Buffalo Young 
Blondell LI buy 
Bond Harry 
Bush ft Peyser 
Bergman Henry 

BSUB J 

Beverley Bill 
Caldwell & Herbert 
Chase & Carina 
Carlllo Leo 
Cooper ft Wilson 
Collins ft Jewell 
Crandell ft Schenck 
Clare Frances 
Connolly & Webb 
Calllgnon Harry A 
Cunningham J 
Cronrh Hosle Miss 
Carroll Rcna (C) 
Clifford & Lane (C) 
Clayton Webb A 
Calvert Albert (C> 
Carroll Tom (C) 
Campbell Flossie 
Cross Dr Margaret 
Curtis Boa (C) 
Coiistantlne W J 
Crumbaker Edwin 
Crewe Anna (O 
Caldwell J 
Craven Sidney (C) 
Clayton Webb A (C) 
Cbllders Grace 
Cllne Vivian 
Carlisle May 
Carlotte 
Carroll C 
Cummlngs Grace ft Co 

(C) 
Coy Gllda Mae (C) 
Curson Sisters 
CommlngB Jlmmle 



Cooper Lee 8 

Collins Fred 

Co Eds Four 

Currie George 

Campbell Musical 

Calder Chas L 

Curry L V 

Chapman Lila 

Cutting Ernest ft Ivy 

(C) 
Democls Jake 
Doherty Sisters 
Dumond M 

Dandy George Duo (C) 
Darn ton Harry 
Dietrich Ray O 
Dudley Alice Cheslyn 

(C) 
Daum Geo A (C) 
Dietrich Mrs 
Darrell ft Hodges (C) 
Dunaton Oscar 
Desmond Lily 
De Lee Lillian 
DArcy D Y 
Des Roche Gertrude 
Irnpree Malda 
De Main & Rochete 
Dugan Thomas J 
Doyle Bart 
Dontta Mike 
De GaTln Alice 
DeFay Bisters 
Dunbar James T 
Davie Jack 
Day Cbarles 
Dllger 

Dow ft Dow 
Dean Cliff 
IMerickes Bros 
De Vere Billy 
Dean Gussle (P) 
Demareatdo Joe > 
Ephralm Bros 
Khrllch Sam 
Espe Albert 
Everett Agnes 
Barle Edward 
Evans Billy 
Elverson Barle 
Evans Billy (C) 
Figgis Arthur S 
First Barney (C) 
Felsman ft Arthur 
Ford ft Clark Sisters 
Flske Katberyn 
Furman Radie 
Flynn Carl 
Farlowe Edna 
Fein Lew 
Field J Roger 
Florence Sisters 
Fuller Ethel ft Co 
Fee May ft Ford 
Feathers Lessie (C) 
Facciattl Tom (C) 
Frascona Menotl (C) 
Faccenda Alberto (C) 
Fischer Madalyn 
Fitzgerald ft Wilson (C) 
Fnlrrhlld It D Miss 
Fisher Susie (C) 
Flannery W L (C) 
Fastell A E 
Forrest Harry 
Fay John J 
Foo Ling Citing 
Farlardo 

Fndettes Orchestra 
Foy & Clark 
Ferraris The 
Forrest Harry 
Farnum Dick 
Gennaro T 
Gray Julia 
Gordeus Rounding 
Gulllo Albert 
Golden A- Hughes 
Golden Sum 
Center ft Gilmore (C) 
Gibson Estelle 
Glllen Edward 
Gould Jav |C) 
Garrett B 
Greenfield Caroline 
Gilbert Elaine 
Green George 
Green Felix 
Goer Ed 
Granger Mollle 
Gleson Stella 
(Jllllhan & Murray 
Gregory Margaret (C) 
Goodwin Joe 
Gallagher Ed F (C) 
Gladstone Wm 
Gardner ft Golder 
Gilden Mark 
Gould William 
Gagnonx Mrs B 



The EDMOND'S f f1!a r tT hed 

The Only Flats Catering Exclusively to Performers 

tOf tth AVENUE, BETWEEN 89th AND 40th. 754-756 8th AVENTTE, BETWEEN 4«th-47th 8T8, 

778, 778, 780 8th AYE., BETWEEN 47th and 48th STREETS. 

•Phone 2411 Bryant. RATES — flO.OO UPWARDS. 

ONI BLOCK TO TIMES SQUARE. NEW YORK CITY 



OTTAWA, ONT, 




Adjoining tha Hew 

ORPHEUM 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Often 
THE TBCATRICAL 

Booms With or 
GOOD BESTATJBANT. 

D. ULLMAN, 




ION 



PEXOBS. 



HOTEL PROVENCE 

Leicester Square, LONDON 



Haa 



J. T. DAVIS, Prop 
dquartoro of Ul/tilt 
Term* Moderate. 






BEST PLACE TO STOP 

rjr 
NEW YORK CITY 



'tt ftoooada f 



THE 



. Kit. 

163 Wnt 34th Strait 



Fnrnlahad Booaa only. Botha— Toloph< 
EJectrio Light 

('Phono 8448— Murray HU1.) 

Tavams Raasaaabla 

Undar Manafement Miaaoa OOOXB and OXIBTOB. 

FURNISHED BOOMS REASOBABLB. 
Naar Tlaoa Square and Broadway. 

242 W. 43rd ST., NEW YORK 



Ilaymnn ft Franklin 

Hathaway Archie 

Hermann George 

Harcourt Daisy 

Harder ft Hall 

Hull I.llllc 

IIi»PI»c (Juy 

Iloiltce Henry 

llului Arthur ((') 

HukIh'b Gene Mr ft Mrs 

llugnn W J 

Hagen A Wescotf 

nydo Albert 

Hiinlon Dlcgs ft Kicrns 

(C) 
Hcald Frank 
Ilyncs Tom 
lleald Henry I) 
Hcndon A T 
Hill C W 
Hayes Harvey (C) 
Harvey ft Lee 
TIalght Dean ft Co 
Harris W H 
Harrison Charles 
Harvey & Farrell <C) 
Hart Henry (C) 
Hyde Jlmmle 
Hales C W 
Hartford Sadie 
Henrlel 
Hlgglna R D 
Huntley J II 
Hodges James (C) 
Hewitt Harry 
Hutchison A: Lushy (C) 
fTawklns L 



HofTtnan Max 
floiktiiH Col J D 
Hammer Clara M 
Haagcn Helen 
Huntington Florence 
Healey Daniel (C) 
llnfTmans Cycling (C) 
Mniiies Harry 
Hanson A: Howard 
Hunt Henry (C) 
HhIiir Nat 
Hadlev Florence 
Hoy Hal II 
Hayes Sully 
Harris Jack 
Hlekey \V II 
1 1 n lien Fred 
Mullen Jack 
Hill Arthur L 
Hart Nellie 
Hlnes Hilly ((') 
Harlanrl ft Robinson (C^ 
Hiinie Ilarrv 
Harris Eddie 
Haydeti Tom F 
Hart Lewis 
Herbert Cliff 
llclhlng Ed O 
Harris Dutch Charlie 
Hallen Fred (C) 
Icnnnon Panachlotl 
Islniiael I'rlnce P 
Irving Mildred 
Jerome ft Hunter 
Johnson Sable 
Jerome Cora E 
Jamison Kd 



Wa ere at tha old stand bottar than ever. 

™ MILLER HOTEL 

MfT. fl 

A Baee 



S. S. Oor. 18th i laoe tta,. Hie Iphta? 9 * 



WOOD, 

AMBBIOAN AMD BUBOFBAB BLAB. 
"THB AOTOBS' BOMB." 
Oaf o ettaohed. Botha oad ttoaa Baat oa 
toon. PROFESSIONAL BATES— 87 double 
alacla. 



THE RUDGCR 

High olaaa Booariao; oad Beordlas 

261 West 42d St., New York 

Oppoalto tho Aaerloea oad aaor Hoaaorotata'a. 
Speolel ratoa for profoaaiooala 



"THE CENTRAL" 



111 W. 42dStroot 
NSW YORK 

(Few Doora below Hammoratoiii'a). 

Large and small, well furnished rooms, with 
board. Private Baths. First-class French and 
German Cooking. Moderate terms. 

TABLE D'HOTE piNNEBB Barred in the ground 
floor dining room. 8ft CENTS. 
Thone 4608 Bryant. F. MOUBET. 



Jourdeon Annette (C) 
Johns Harry (C) 
J arrow Em II (C) 
Johnstone Gordon 
Johnson Otto 
Jenson Otto 
Jones Miss Gwyn 
Johnson Mark 
Jackson Carl J 
Jarvls ft Martin (C) 
Jurvls & Martyn 

Keleovne Maggie (P) 
Kaukiehl Mr (P) 
King Charles (C> 
Kirk wood Jessie (C) 
Kiehs Elsie (Cl 
Kelss Mrs John 
Kinselln Kathleen 
Kenney Mabel 
Keown J (('» 
Knowlcs It (} 
Klare Katherlne 
K it lirli t Harlan 
Kirtland Dixie 
Ketler Joseph 
Linton Harrv It (C) 
bCiill Ed (Ci 
IjiMont Grace (C) 
Low (ill man 
I. a Frenlcre Arthur 
J ..tt < 11" Edward 
Lord Eleanor 
Levitt Co J M 
l.inne Han" (C» 
l.ernm Ted 
l.<iliert Al"\ 
Lloyd J D 
La Belle Marie 
Leffler Reimlc 
Luther M II MM 
La Thor Doru (Ci 



(C) 



Lane Mlnella 
Lamont Harry 
1.or.ier Howard 
Lee Richard L 
Ixwery Luther 
l^-ary Martini 
I>eslle Joh 
I.aughlln M 
l.orenz John 
I/Cvln Alw 
1a Darro Frank 
La Fuse Frank 
Leonard J \- S 
Luce & Luce 
I.ounn Frank 
l/ovlnu Blanche 
Lloyd Bessie 
In Maze Chris 
Lyric Comedy Trio 
I o«.ter Ella 
McKi'e Deep Stuff 
MiMire Marian 
Mnntell Harry 
.Mexican Trio" 
Miller Frank 
M.I alien Jack 
McMnhon Tom (C) 
Mexican Trio (C) 
Metier Sndle 
Merl Cullla 
MeKim Edward 
Martin E J 
Mueller Allx>rt 
Moore H L 
Mullen Dennis 
Meidiao Arthur 
Mitchell Hazel 
Merlin Helen 
Mauran Stella 
McLaiiKhlln H 
Alorrls Three iC> 



(C) 



(C) 



CECI l_ 

Homa \A/hlta Rata mtxdk Profoaolon 

Tha flneat Hotel la Panada.— bar none. Amarioan and European. Absolutely new. NEXT DOOR 
TO BENNETT'S oad TKBES BLOCKS TO OTHEB THEATRES. SPECIAL RATES TO ARTISTS, 

WALTER B. WALBT, Prop. 

NEW ANNEX HOTEL 



i oil I 

. M 



McCarthy W T (C) 
Marcla May (C) 
McGibney Viola (C) 
Metcalf Ken (C) 
Moore Herbert (C) 
Mlnton (C) 
Morgan Rlsb 
McVay William 
Marr Lillian (C) 
Maucdell Richard (C) 
Marsh Byrn 
Mauioii Lucille 
Masters Clara 
Mason H 
McGlll Flora 
Moncrey Lena 
Manning Helen 
McCord Lewis 
Manchester Roy 
McClusky Anita 
Miller Arthur 
Majestic Singing Three 
Murray Tom 
Miles Ben J 
McDonald Mike 
McAlllson Alice 
Marchalls Musical 
Maxfield May 
Monaghan A Bbeehan 
Morrlsey Will 
Maszuett Hortence 
Moore Helen J 
Malrom Thomas 
Mazette Anulia 
McLallen-Carsou Duo 
Miller Sisters 
McAvoy D A A 
Manchester Robert 
Mueller Chum A Mueller 
Macarte's Monkeys 
Mildred A Lester 
Mile A Martha 
Murray J E 
Neumann Franz 
North Happy 
NMch Virginia 
Neal George 
Norton Jack (C) 
Neuas Gus 
Nichols Win 
Neville George 
Newton Val iO 
Owley A Bandall 
Omega Ollle 
Odell Tommy 
Owen May 
OTloff Mr 
O'Nell Harry iC) 
riper Franco 
IMcaro Luigl 
Parry R 
Fowell Eddie 
1'enn Jennie 
I'age John 
Dlankleb Harry (C) 
Pearl A Yoser 
Teters Jack J (C> 
l'orto Kican Quartet 
(C) 

I'erry A Gannon 
riillllps Bros 
Phillips C.off 
Prampin Lain a 
Perley L R 
Parish David M 
Plstel Ix'w 
r^rlmrime Fred 
(Julnlon Gertrude 
(Jiicntln Bene 
Richards Lienor 
Robins A 
Ryan Dan 
Richmond Florence 
RfHlrlguez L J 
Rundy II A 
Rosaid Mrs Win 
Raymond Melville It H'l 
Relnhardt Cyrus id 
Ray Elizabeth (C> 
Reynolds Max i('i 
Rice Felix (C 
Redell Ed 
Rosen R O (C) 
Renards The 
Roberts J J & Co 
Roberts Bessie 
Roseola R 
Roirers Will 
R'lves Gur 
Robyns William 
Itackett Ernest 
Re.d Fred 
Robinson Aldn 
Ray Fred 
Rudolph Frank 
Rogers Wilson 
Richmond M«K« ■•■ 
Rivers \- Ito.ln-I.- 
Redford A Win. I,. • - 
RoliiiMon Win A 



Robinson E L 
Ranf Claude 

Sheehan I (C) 

Sanford Florllla 
Standard Four 
Shean Lou 

Smith A Campbell (P) 
Smith Luther 
Street Rose 
Seymour A Hill 
Semon Primrose (C) 
Shardo Claude (C) 
Seholtz Mr 
Schultie Henry 
Smarl Miss 
Stone Fred A 
Silver Morris 
Stolta Melville 
Saona Herr (C) 
Salina Mile (C) 
Satterlee Cale (C) 
Sullivan James F (C) 
Sutherland A Curtis (0) 
Stinson J B (C) 
Smith Richard H 
Stoner Qrace 
St Clair Harry (C) 
Sterling A Chapman 
Scott Grace A Co 
Schlicter Hubert (C) 
Swain A Ostman 
Strausberg Louis E 
Shields A Rogers 
Shields Louise 

Splan Robert J 
Soraenleltoer Gustor 
Sargent Virginia 
Stevens Will H 
Swindell Archie 
Stewart Wlnnlfred 
Seamon Primrose 
Sohoor Wheeler Trio (C) 
Shaw Harold (0) 
Stevens !.«• 
Stanley John 
Smith C F 
Thompson William 
Trimble Maud 
Thurston May H 
Thomas ft Payne (0) 
Tlvoll Ouartet (C) 
Tenlll Frank 
Ttovollo 
Tate Beth 
Tropace] Arthur 
Toye Dorothy 
Takecama Elko 
Fbous, Mrs Carl 
Drma Hetty 
Vslln W Ver (C) 
Vivian Annie 
Van George 
Voaco Walter 
Von Serly Slaters 
Von Fassau Harry 
Von Marlon 
Williams Dot > 
Williams Frank 
Walton Orval 
Winchester B L 
Wlttschlrk Fritz 
Wilson Leslie 
Williams I -eon 
Woodruff Henry 
Wooley Frank 
Walker Thomas 
Whallen Mike 
Wiseman Geo II 
Wilson Geo W 
Wolff Lulu 
Warden Edith 
Wilkinson Mrs O J 
Warren Day A- Warren 

m 

Williams Male (C) 
Williams Arthur (C) 
Warden Harry (C) 
Wilfred A Lottie 
Wales Elsie 
Welxeltiaum K 
Werner Harry 
Wills Nat 
Wilsons Musical 
Weogg W 
Wllilams T II 
Whitney Helen 
W inl erbuoii <ieo 
Whll mini Floreii< e ((') 
Wriirhf Marry (Ci 
Wiilti-rs Kolnnd 
Willi. hi It 
Wood limbic 
Wi.llimvebor Henry 
\\ 'illlrmi- Harney 
\\ ■ I.i. W.lll.T F 
\\ • f-. .! Imiimv 

\\ ■ ■' ': ^ I .1 I P) 

W . ' ■/. I 'red 

N • K .llerlne 

^ ■:■ -• Fl .1 ;hii 



When answering advcrlinementa kindly mrntinn Variety. 



24 



VARIETY 




»" of th^ MUSIC WORLD 

WILLIAMS 



P 



it 



rsi 



THAT'S 




PLENTY 



u 



OR. "O MISTER, MISTER LISTEN LIKE Jk FRIEND" 



OTHER "HITS" 

"0 ! Miss Malinda" 
"Games of Childhood Days" 
"800 ! Bit There's Close 

To 6lrl Like You" 
"What's the Bee 

of Moonlight" 
"Just For Day" 
••DRIFTING" 



JEFF BRAN EN 



P. S.-Pretty Good, Eh? WIRE or WRITE KK,. COPIES. WILL ROSSITER, T?? £Jft c ^«. 'S8YSW5: .4., wo*™^™*™ 



AU REVOIR TO ALL FRIENDS 




AND 







Sailing on 5. 5. New York to-day. Returning on August 1st. 

LONDON ADDRESS, HOTEL RUSSELL 



LOVELY 
LIVELY 

Playing 
Orpheum 
Circuit 

OEVTEB "POST," 
DENVER "TIMES " 



"MAGNETIC AS A BATTERY ^ PRETTr AS A PICTURE."— Ashton Stevens, New York "Journal." 





JUNE lot. '09— "THE PETITE SINGER MIGHT HAVE HELD THE STAGE AN HOUR MORE THAN SHE DID WITHOUT TIRING THE AUDIENCE.' 
JUNE lot, 'OS— "COULD THE AUDIENCE HAVE HAD ITS WAY THE ATTRACTIVE 8TAR WOULD BE SINGING YET." 



fRED 



ELSA 



HIGH CLASS MUSICAL ACT FEA1 RING 



THE PENDLFTfiNS elsa pendleton 

■ ■■■Li I ■lllriih I ^rFI^%P Vaudeville's Premier Lady Violinist 



Sole Direction JACK LEVY, 140 W. 42nd Street, N. Y. 



Vaudeville's Premier Lady Violinist 

v 

Phone 2164 Bryant. Cable Address "Jaclev, New York." 



Youngson William 
Young James 
Young William (C) 
Young Mrs Wui (C) 



Young Myrtle Y 
Young James 
/I'm A1 
Zlnk Adolph 



CORRESPONDENCE 

Unleu otherwise noted, the following re- 
ports tre for the current week: 

GNIGAGO 

By FRANX WTESBSRO. 

VARIETY'S Chicago Offlco. 

Chicago Opera Hoaae Block. 

AMERICAN (William Morris, mgr.; agent, 
direct*.— It was not until after the first few num- 
bers that the bill became evident of exceptional 
merit. The exception to this Ih the piano-comedy 
act of Foster nml FoMer. who were given third 
place, following "The Dresden Dolls." May 
Ward's "Dregden IMls" was not up to the ex- 
pectations. The small girls can dance, but are 
not In unison In the ensemble numbers, while the 
young woman who takes Miss Ward's place and 
makes up to look like her Is fur from achieving 
any particular notice. She can neither slug nor 
dance. The act. considering Its pretension, is a 
doleful sffnlr. Even the effects were either de- 
layed or neglected. J. II. <illinonr and Co. and 
Caesar Rlvoll (New ActsK McWuttcrs and 

Tyson returned after a brief al»en. .■ and again 
ocored a huge hit. bigger and more emphatic than 
ever before. Grace Tyson is not only talented 
but very clever, and she ought to be heading a big 
musical production. Fields and Lewis, flrst time 
here together in mnny years, surprised the audi- 
tors with their most amusing string of nonsense. 
It is a long time since the audience laughed so 
heartily. As It Is now Fields and lewis have 
one of the very best talking acts seen In Chicago 



In a long time and that Is saying a great deal. 
I'aul Nicholson and Miss Norton revived their 
modiste skit, much better than the other. They 
have added considerable good material and pro- 
vided merriment in rapid succession. Charles and 
Nellie King have a neat singing and dancing num- 
ber. Del more and I.ee showed their attructlvc 
and skillful aerial novelty. c rosing the show. 

MAJESTIC (Lyman II. Glover, mgr.: agent, W. 
V. A.). — Richard (inlden und Co. In "A Case of 
Divorce," headline. Well worth place held. Frank 
Fogerty Is a newcomer. Ills Irish wit and pleas- 
ing personality won for him many admirers and 
he will be welcomed here as often as he cares to 
visit us. There Is so lunch originality and candor 
in his talks that one In Inspired to listen to him 
without iHitberlng as to the subsequent numbers 
on the bill. Griff Is a good comedian, better than 
his juggling. He s|>cnks fluently and excellently 
■mil furulrdics agreeable comedy, the kind that 
humors the audience. Joly Vloletta and Bert 
'.taker (New Actsi. Conroy and I>c Malre Co.. In 
•A King for a Night." were a solid hit. The 
satire Is well written and replete with amusing 
situations. Frank Whitman again showed how 
well he could dance and play the violin simul- 
taneously, a feat he accomplishes with skill. 
Frank Rogers Is the Hist colored ventriloquist to 
iip|M'iir here. He uses two figures and does well. 
George l'aul and Co.. In "Lalnir and the Man." 
were liked. It Is a dramatic sketch, dealing with 
capital and labor, as the name applies. The 
Wnrrlcks opened with comedy acrobatics. Ralph 
Johnstone performed Intrepid and perilous feats 
on the bicycle. It Is one of the best acts of Its 
kind In vaudeville. 

The east of "The Golden Girl" when the piece 
take to the road 'in September will Include 
ritinklln Farnum, ('has. Horn. Defer Mason, Mlna 
Davis. Marie Flynn and I.. II. Fuller. Homer H. 
Mason, who will star In "A Stuborn Cinderella" 
i'i the fall, will have In his support Ezra C. 
Wnlck. Mabel I. a Vole, Walter Howe. 10. 1,. Stair 
mid Margaret Keeler. 

JI'LIAN (J. G. Conderman. mgr.: 
lam Morris). — Chas. De Camo and 
and Kii'cu. Campbell and Itrady, 



with "The Lady 
Wheel Burlesque 
•Colonial Relies," 
M. Strnusc. Two 
show, wldch will 



Arthur Sidney's School Act. 



agent. Will- 
Dog. Gilbert 
Esmeralda, 
-OGDKN (W. F. 



Welnrlch, mgr.; agent. Win. Morris). — Jolly 
Ramsey, I'null and Leon. Geo. Sully, Rene Moska. 
NOTES.— Great Carroll and Glole Filer are 
putting on the st<s*k pieces at the Star, Cleveland, 
for Jos. Oppenhcimcr. Miss Filer Mages all the 
numlters. — James and Maude Ryan are resting for 
the Mimmer at Jenkins, Minn., and will resume 
their vaudeville time in the west the middle of 
August. — J. A. Steruad leaves for New York Sun 
i lay to be gone nlnuit four weeks, lie will be con- 
spicuous along the I<ong Acre Riilldlng in the in- 
terest of the many vaudeville productions he 
controls and Ik hooking. — The Kcdzle, a ten-cent 
vaudeville theatre booking through A. K. Meyers, 
will l>e remodeled during the summer and will 
huve a seating capacity of LINK). Win. Malcolm, 
the manager, contemplates building another house 
along the same lines In the fall. — Jo*. K. Watson 
will be the principal comedian 
Buccaneers," the new Western 
show, taking the route of the 
under the management of Harry 
Mocks have ulso signed for the 
Ih> organized and rehearsed in Chicago. — Edna 
Wallace Hopjier Is appearing in "Floradora" at 
Sans Solid Dark theatre. Among the principals 
are William Stewart, Florence Martin, Nella Fox, 
Josephine Stanton. Harry Carter, Fdwnrd Beck, 
Fugcnc llallam and a chorus of thirty-five. Next 
week Frank Moulan will revive "'Hie Sultan of 
Sulu"; the week after, "King Dodo," to be suc- 
ceeded by Haymond Hitchcock, In "The Yankee 
Consul"; De Wolf Hopper, in "Wang" and "El 
Capital)." — George S. Van's Minstrels, a vaudeville 
act owned by Jake Sternad. Is the attraction at 
Forest Dark this week. The entire performance 
Is given by the members of the organization, which 
•iiimt'crs twelve. — Tlie cool weather had disastrous 
effect on the amusement parks. Rain, generally 
followed by cool breezes, found these places al- 
most deserted. A number of concessions have 
either closed or defer opening until the weather 
is more settled. It Is argued by park experts that 
the resorts should not have opened until the 
middle of June. — Alfred Bonner nnd Anna Meek. 
last season with Irwin's "Mojestlcs." are In 
vaudeville over a route given them by l'aul Goud- 
ron. The couple were recently married and they 



are combining their honeymoon with business. — 
Rose Burden and Anna Coo ley. last, season with 
•'Mlsa New York, Jr.." and Nick Murphy, are 
spending the summer In London. They will re- 
turn In time for »he fall season. — Lew M. Gold- 
l>erg. manager of the Grand and Castle at Jollet 
ami Rlooiningtoii. 111., sails for Europe June .'{0. 
He w'JI ' '.• accompanied by his mother. A tour u 9 
Kngliiud. Frame. Switzerland ami (•crmaiiy will 
l>e made. The new* theatre now being erected at 
Rlooinlngton by Mr. Goldberg will have a seating 
capacity of l.HOO and will probably play vaude- 
ville. If the Castle Is not changed for other pur- 
poses. The two theatres are part of a circuit of 
vaudeville houses in the middle west and booked 
by Chas. II. Doutrlck. about twenty In all. wiier«- 
prlce* range from 1o to of) cents. They ure "regu- 
lar" theatres.- Several new vaudeville and moving 
picture theatres will be built In various parts of 
the city for next season. Most of these places 
will cost from $lo.(HMi to f'jo.oon each, and they 
will l>e leased by owners, who seem to believe In 
the future of cheap vaudeville. 



SAN FRAMGISGO 

Olll'IIEI'M (Martin Beck. gen. mgr.; agent, 
dlrecn. — Week U: Ellis Nowlan monopolized the 
laugh Industiy. Their "A Night at the Circus" 
contains nil the flavor of n real big top produc- 
tion without the lemonade or peanuts. The piece 
Is limed to a nicety and was well worth the price 
of admission Itself. Cherldah Simpson's pi analog 
received a wnr^n hand. I'ellnton and Foran In "A 
Spotless Reputation" appeared rather early. Talent 
Is wasted In such an act, and. nit hough both 
played their parts as well as could be expected, 
they foiled to make an Impression. "The Novelty 
Dancing Four." headed by Johnny Hughes, re- 
ceived a fair portion of applause with one of the 
neatest dancing acts shown here this sea mid. Who- 
ever costumed the act knew their business, for In 
apitcarancc the net Is second to none. The hold- 
overs nre-Hlte nnd Donlln, The Vlndahonas, Claudo 
Gilllngwater nnd Co., nnd Billy Van. 

NATIONAL (Sid Granman. mgr.; agent. W. 
Reese. S.-C). — An entertaining bill was handed 



W'hi-ti tiHxircrhig advertiacmenta kindly mention Variety. 



VARIETY 



25 



THE COOL SYSTEM 



OF 



Scienti fic Trea tment, 

Our HEALTH HOME and SANI- 
TARIUM situated on Beautiful 
LAKE MUSKEGON, Michigan 

IS NOW OPEN 



All the advantages of a delightful summer re- 
tort axe combined with the treatments. Beautiful 
walks, shaded lawns; every opportunity afforded 
for complete rest and relaxation. Special attention 
to diet. 

Lake Muskegon Is one of the finest fishing re- 
sorts la the country. 

Our CHICAGO OFFICE (Suite 907-908-009), 115 
DEARBORN ST., is open the year round, where 
treatments are also given. 

Direct letters of inquiry to LEW EARL, Gen- 
eral Manager, Chicago, or Muskegon, Mich. 

Ie MILLER, Manufacture? 

of Theatrical 
Boots A Shoes, 
CLOG. 
Ballet and 
Acrobatic Shoes 
a specialty. All 
work made at 
short notice. 



202 

W.E3SST 




K 



•107 MICHIGAN AYE., 
I 



UIN/I EIR 



EXCLUSIVE DE8IGNS. 

Ooetumer for the Leading Stage Celebrities, 
'Fiona, Oslnmot MO* 

FHOIOS. CABJMklS, $8.M pel IWU. •!»• 
Olase. Eat. 20 yre. Have sit tinge or send pbotus, 
or ntwatlv*. JOHNSON. W Wa»»aah *».. Chicago. 



01 



CHARLEY CASE'S FATHER 



I* 



Written by Charley Case, oomedlan. Bead P. O. 
order for too. to Oaae Fubliahlng Co., Lookport, 
N. T. 



T.l.phon.J.'JS'B^, 



VARIETY 



TIMES SQUARE 

NEW YORK CITY 

Cable Address "VARIETY, New York" 



ADVERTISING RATE CARD 

SPACE OR TIME RATES 

1 Line $ .20 

1 Inch (14 Agate llni'8) 1 time 2.80 

1 Iu. 3 months (l.'t timetO In advance.. 35.00 
1 In. " (20 times) •• " .. 66.80 
1 In. 1 yeur (52 times) " " ..120.00 

1 Tage (072 Agate lines) 125.00 

Vj rage 65.00 

% Page 32.00 

Front Page (portraits of women only) .. .100.00 

5000 Lines ) L .18 

10000 Lines '-To be used within one year <, .17 

20000 Lines ) / .10 

PREFERRED POSITIONS 

1 In. across Tage $15.00 

2 In. y " 27.50 

3 In. " " 40.00 

I Tage 150.00 

IN ROUTE SHEET 

1 Line one time $ .30 

% Inch one month 8.00 

1 Inch " ** 15.00 

ARTISTS' RATE CARD 

Under "Representative Artists" 

(For Artists Only) 

% Inch single column $4.00 monthly net 

1 Inch " '• 7.00 " 

% Inch double " 8.50 

1 Inch " " 12.50 " " 

2 Inches aingle " 12.50 " " 

2 Inches double " 22.50 " " 

% Inch across page 15.00 " " 

1 Inch across page 25.00 " " 

2 Inches across page 60.00 " " 

3 Inches across page 75.00 " " 

LARGER SPACE PRO RAT* 

Discount 3 months, cash in advance, 5% 
Discount months, cash in advance, 10% 
Discount 12 months, cash In advance, 15% 

(Advertisements under "Representative 
Artists" not accepted for less than one month.) 
No Preferred Positions Given. 

CUTS 

Single Column (1 time) $15.00 

Double Column (1 time) 23.00 

Advertisements forwarded by mall mast be 
accompanied by remittance, made payable to 
Variety Publishing Co. 




SHORT VAMP SHOES 

(Exclusively for Woman). Per Stage, Street and 
Evening Wear. Great Variety. BxcltMtve Modem. 



Creator of Short Vamp Shoes. 
007 Sixth Ave., New York. Bat. 80th and Slat Sta. 

Send for Illustrated Catalogue. 
One Plight Up. Tel. 1005 Madison Sq. 




ICE! 

CHANGE OF ADDRESS 

SEARL ALLEN 

AUTHOR AND PRODUCER 

VAUDEVILLE-MUSICAL COMEDY-BURLESQUE 

IS NOW LOCATED AT 

246 West 43rd Street 

Phone 4373 Bryant NEW YORK CITY 

SEVEN YEARS' VAUDEVILLE WORK 

No, we can't give you booking for seven years, hut we have been working SEVEN YEARS in order 
to be able to give you work for one year on the BE8T TIME SOUTH, and now we can positively arrange 
this time for you if you have the goods; it will pay you to investigate. 

THE EMPIRE THEATRICAL EXCHANGE 



1026-27-28 Knickerbocker Theatre Building 
NEW YO«K 



LOWNDES BUILDING 
ATLANTA, GA. 



the National patrons last week, each feature ex- 
ceptionally strong in its own line. "The College 
Trio" crossed the wire first. Saona following. One 
man takes care of the singing in the former act, 
the other two accompanying with piano and banjo. 
The singer offers three nuiuttcr*. '-Redhead" laud- 
ing a solid hit. A duet by the musicians was 
favorably received, but It remained for the finish, 
u .burlesque on the balcony scene from "Romeo 
and Juliet." to win the day. Saona showed sev- 
eral impcrHotiutioiiK of great men past and present, 
t'hliiulta's appearance mused the ft' mule portion 
of the house to sit up nud say, "Ah. Isn't she 
cute?" t'lilquita claims to Im> the smallest adult 
oil earth, but at that she carries herself like a 
real big actress, ami the way she goes through 
her Spunish t>ong ami dance stamps her as a little 
thoroughbred. Anderson and Hurt were the laugh 
gatherers In a sketch showing some of the troubles 
of married life. Hert Sheppard presents a novelty 
in the form of Australian whip manipulation. Al- 
though Gayuell Everett held a hard spot she got 
otT to a good start with her o|s>ulng song, 'using 
a hand mirror In the spot light a la Alice Lloyd. 
Miss Everett finished in male attire, and no doubt 
would have done better in a Intter position. Al 
Cameron and Co. closed the show with "The Last 
of the Regiment." Mr. Cameron has provided 
himself willi a novel singing art. and. aided by 
uinmI eleetiical effects, scored heavily. A Swiss 
wnrhler not progi ;uned ;i!so appeared, but nftcr 
Matt Keefe he couldn't verv well start anything. 

KMl'IUE i\V. Z. Tiffany, mgr. ; agent. W. S.. 
O. S. Iturnst. — Cocci a iiinl Amato introduce the 
famous "Apache Ibmce" to San Francisco this 
week. The "Apache Dance" Is n piece of "French 
art" (Sun Francisco likes "French art"!. The 
applause was not deafening, but the only reason 
I he audience didn't applaud was localise they 
dldn't want their nclirlilioiv to know they np- 
proved. which they did greatly, nevertheless. As 
dancers. Cocci a and Auialo rank witii the Ih-si. 
And if one could forget the situation, the dance 
Itself is really i-iterestiMg. Hut the situation Is 
there Just the same, and that Is also a piece of 
"French art." The Empire probably played to 
capacity all last week. Edith ami Slg Frimis 
opened th*show with a comedy bicycle act. I'nl- 
cycles of nil sixes and shapes are used and the 
(ouiedian through hard work and some good comod.v 
lauded a hit. Anita Primrose appeared in a series 
of impersonations, making her changes on the 
stime In a ml nature dressing room assisted by a 
maid. Her characters vary and are all very well 
taken. Otto Sehedn carried off second honors with 
his violin. May iMiryen and Co. had "The Im- 
postcr." with several humorous situations. It 

proved the laughing hit of the bill. 

FISCIIKIt'S iK. A. Fischer. mgr.h- -"The 
Pawnbroker" is a one man show. Will King as 
"Cohen, the I.oan Shark." has everything to him- 
self, lie kindly allowed Nellie Montgomery to put 
a laugh o\er now and ilici. hut the rest of the 
company were snowed under. 

XOTK. The stockholders of the Crystal. The- 
atres in Colorado held a inciting at the Fmplrc 
last week. E. F. Ackermaii reported the houses 
all paid for and said from now on tiny would pay 
dividends. 



DENVER 

By HARRY BEAUMONT. 

Offlce, Crystal Theatre Ilulldlng. 

CRYSTAL (Win. A. Weston, gen. nmr. ; au'enV 
W. Si. Week 7: Orpheus Comedy Four, scored 
heavily; Scott and Wilson, comedy acrobats, novel 
opening and treat routine of acrobatics; the Slmr 
rocks, mystified with "second slirht." amusing 
with odd comedy and nn orlclnal putter sum;, 
good novelty; Ileum and Rutter. best dancers here 
this season; tin* Clay son Family, musical, gave the 
show a swift start. 

TFII.FRIFS CAKItFNS iChas. Jacobs, mgr.: 
agent, W. S.. I>onver». Lucy I.iiclor Trio, went 
big: Russell ami Urey. musical. goo<l; Hickman 
and Lydston. s. and d.. scored. 

NOTFS. — Tlie Parks have suffered owing to 
severe rain and hall storms. The Tuilcrles under 
feet of water for two days. Cloudburst In the near 



vicinity. Not much damage done. — Lucy Lucler, 
Ellsworth and Irwin have signed with Fred Ir- 
win for his "Big Show" next season. 



BOSTON 



By ERNEST L. WAITT. 

VARIETY Offlce. 

09 Summer St. 

KEITH'S (Geo. Clark mgr.; agent. U. B. O.).— 
Vesta Tllley, held over, big personal success; The 
(treat lister, ventriloquist, excellent; Mr. and 
Mrs. Frederick Vwlker, musical, pleasing; Kelly 
and Harretf, Catherine Hayes and Sabel Johnson, 
laughs; Cornalla and Eddy, Jugglers; Hess Sis- 
ters, good dancers; Patsy Doyle, novel mouolog. 

GLOItF; (It. P. Jeanuette, mgr.; agent, direct). 
— Mansfield Bros., sharpshooters; Manhattan News- 
boys* Quartet; Dcltnar Bros, mid Dog; Julia Ray- 
mond. Impersonations; Jack Clabane, -singer. 

NEW PALACE (J. II. Mosher, mgr.; agent. 
direct).— Cora B. Tanner Co.. Feeny and ltellly, 
Alabama Trio, Eula Bramelle. violinist and a 
dandy; Qulller ami Tracy, musical; Ruby Ray- 
mond, singing and whistling. 

AUSTIN & STONES (Stone and Shaw, props.; 
agent, direct). — Eflle Lorain. "Mystery Queen" 
(Houdinl act): Fort in Bros., acrobats; Mile. Oolo. 
magician; Marino und MhicIiIbo, wrestlers; Le 
Favor Bros. 

LEXINGTON PARK.— Niles nud Raymond, good 
skit; Billy Pryor: Three Madcaps; Hollen and 
Hayes; Imperial Women's Orchestra. 

MKDFORD BOULEVARD (J. W. Gorman, mgr.; 
booking direct).— Till, Cherry and Hill, cyclists; 
Itell and Caron, comedians; Musical Busklrks; 
Puraud Trio; (iuertin. Jumper: Hoev and Mozar. 

NORUMBEGA PARK I new theatre opened In 
place of one burned i. —"Watermelon Trust." Jones 
and Mayo, mimics; Seymour's Dogs; Eugene Trio; 
Musical Fredericks, latter excellent musical act 
with novclt i< s. 

WONDERLAND (Revere Beach: William Mor- 
ris, agent I. -Dancing Parleys; Leslie Thurston, 
magician: Duffy. Santcllc ami Puffy: Eckel und 
Ihiprcc: (J in dner and (odder. 

PMI LA DELPHI A 

By OEOROE M. YOUNG. 

KEITII's (H. T. Jordan, mgr. ».- -It takes more 
than an ordinarily good bill to arouse enthusiasm 
ainonir I he fan workers at this time of the sea- 
son. The week's bill here was well selected for 
summer cut 1 i i.lnment and kept the big Monday 
night house I i goisl humor. Pert Leslie and Co., 
in his latest "llomiii" sketch, was the i>lg nolsi*. 
There wiis a bit of shifting in the characters 
owing to Oeorge W. Ryan. who plays trie 
"straight." being called home by serious illness 
in his fiimil.v. Kichnnl Flower, who played the 
servant, did very well in Ryan's part. Leslie 
was ne\er lunnier and Hand Emery gave excel- 
lent siiii|iort. Nat Haines und Will Yldoci|. a 
coii|de of youngsters blinking In. put over a 
riot of laughter in llnir blackface spe« ially. They 
are deserving young fellows, nud if they con- 
tinue to do as well as they did here, should soon 
gain a reputation thai Joe Wood would recognize. 
Edmund lbiy'> familiar sketch. "The Unexpected. *" 
made its reappeara'.ee alter a long absence with 
lite/ Macnulcv fe.itund and Mai Davis ns Just 
•Tn." The sketch in. i'!i' its usual giw>d Impres- 
sion. Wormwood's dogs mnl monkeys scored as 
usual. Thin- is im aninial act In vaudeville which 
contain- i li« • same auioimt <■( eoiued\ , and the 
bie.vclc ridim: of the monkeys h.-»s developed Into 
really w nxlcrfiil pro|Mii t Ions. Melville and Illg- 
gins were billed to offer "Just a Llltle Fun." 
and handed It over In chunks. Mae Melville gets 
a lot out of the material used In a unlet way and 
Hobby Hi.'gins and his shape furnishes n good 
foil. Tin v were on late but held the spot down 
finely. The Ollivetti Troubadours were well liked 
for their musical act. but the "Carmen" selections 
at the opening could stnnd a lot of Improve- 
ment. It Is too much Jumbled to give proper 





POft 

CHAS. B. ARNOLD'S 
"FADS AND FOLLIES 91 

AND 

"SERENADERS" COS. 

Prima Donnas. Show Girls 

Chorus Girls and Ponies 

Chorus Men 

Address Room 315 
Gaiety Theatre Building, New York 

ALIDELLA DANCING CL08S 

Ladies' or Men's Sires 

Price, all wood eole. $400. 
Leather shsnk. 
$5.00, delivered 
free. Patent 
fastening naver 
rips. 

ALBERT H. BIBMKB 8H0I 00.. Milwaukee. Wis 




$67 S. STATE ST., CHICAGO. 
'Phone Harrison 3686. 

Full line of slightly used Evening Gown*, Open 
Ooata and Street Gowns, all suitable for Stage 
Wear. Soubrette Dresses made to order, all colors 
and style*. Special prices and attention riven to 
theatrical profession. Sealskin Cost* and Fur* of 
all description*. 



Comedy Talking Acta. $ Monologues (sure Are). 
Several First Farts and Burlesques, and Two 
Complete Musical Farce Comedies, Address 

PAUL QUININ 

(Quinn and Mitchell), 

$0 Bay 16th St, Bensonhnrit, 

Long Island, N. Y. 

BL00DG00D 

(COSTUMER) 

104 WEST 44th STREET 

NEW YORK CITY 

Telephone: $$06 Bryant. Near 6th Ave. 



IN 



8EE 



JOE ADAMS 

COOLEST SPOT DT IZW T0RX. 

West 44th Street 

("88 Seconds from Broadway") 
Everything that's nice to eat and drink. 

BRIGHTON BEACH 
MUSIC HALL 

Matinees Daily 8:46. Evenings at 8:80. 

ARTHUR M. HOPKINS, Manager. 

WHERE the Stars APPEAR. 

Best Bills Ever Oiven at a Seaside Theatre. 

WESTON, Ootan-to-Ooean Walker, 

Sultl ivtM'iilly : "WImii yon feel down mnl «>til, fe?l 
Hun' is no iiki- llvlnir. JiiHt tnk<- your Imd t nought h 
willi y.ni it r i4 1 walk llicni off. Iti-forr you linre 
wiilknl :i inll<' thing" will look ritoli-r. Jn*t try 
it." Have vmi iintlci-il t In* Incrt'iisc In walking 
of lute In ivirv <•• >iii iini'il t \ ? Mnny nt trllnite it 
to tin- comfort whlili A 1 1 ■ ■ 1 1 * •* Font Kn«i>. tin- iintl- 
si|>tlc |Mi\vili'i- to |n> sluiki'ii into the huook, given 
to tin' millions now using It. Am Wrston Iiuh 
mijiI. "It Ihih ti'iil mrrlt." 

PERSONAL, 

THE UNDERSIGNED DESIRES INFORMATION 
concerning the whereabouts of Mrs. Rose Zschir* 
ner, also known under the name of Grace Court- 
ney, wife of Charles Zschlrner, who left her hus- 
band about twelve years ago, then residing at 
No. 876 East 148d Street. New York City. 
7AC0B STIEFEL. Attorney for Charted Zschirner, 
No. 140 Nassau Street, New York City. 



'HI8T01" "IMPOITID" "BOYAL HI3T08" 



Orven L«b«l, 

MS. 




The Original Egyptian 



»» 



When awttccring advertisement ft kindly mention Variety. 



26 



VARIETY 



M&PR5S5NTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



JACK " 
SINGER'S 



BEHMAN SHOW 



99 



Presents MOLLIE WILLIAMS and LON HASCALL in the 2-Act Musical Melange " PALM BEACH" 

Book and Lyrics by BALLARD McDONALD Mutic by LEO EDWARDS 

Playing the COLUMBIA AMUSEMENT CO. Theatres 
P. S.-rCan use lO Experienced CHORUS GIRLS. Will Buy or Rent any kind of Big Stage Novelties, Mechanical Effects, Illusions 
and Etc. Address JACK SINGER, care of TANNER 6c CO., Room 220, Knickerbocker Theatre Building, 1402 Broadway, New York City. 






JAMES » LUCIA COOPER 



TALXniO AOT XV "OVX. 



M 



Q—t Blutoh m*d« ■* Uagh. 



BESSIE WYNN 




DALY s O'BRIEN 

Thot* "Tlbc lefoot" Dancers. 
Watoh for fSg "JUKOLB SHOP" BymAal Bomery and Effects !■ "One." 



WILFRED CLARKE 



rtlaf Hii Bketehet 
"HO MOEB TBOUBLE" aad "WHAT WILL HAPPEN 
Addreei, ISO W. 44th St., New York Oity. 



1" 



HARRY TATE'S G. 

FISHINL, MOTORING 



N^\a/ York. 

England 

Australia 
Africa 



Virginia Sargent 

"THX OIBL imOH THE BLU1 OSASS." 
4 Dal.ty Slager •» Qmalat %mmU •▼•r wkem ell the critic* ere meet eatbeeleetlc 



WORKING UK "OHS" WITH GRAND PIANO. 





1~ATB OF ORIGINAL "NIGHT WITH THI 



HENRY 



HEATH 



McWILLIAMS 



PARSONS 



WEEK JOTR 14, gHEA'g. BUFFALO. 



WEEK JUNE 11, TEMPLE, DETEOIT. 



M.n.ged by EDWARD S. HI 



cc 







II 



99 



BUN 



GRANVILLE » 




JHtre we are again. Didn't think we were any good when we first oame out 

WANT GOOD AGENT Address ROCK SPRINGS PARK, EAST LIVERPOOL, O., WEEK JUNE 21 



ILA GRANNON "BBEW5W8BT 

Orpheum Circuit to follow immediately 

Sole Direction EDW. S. KILLER, Long Acre B'ld'g, New York 



TEXAS GUINAN 35a£S. 



United Time 



M. S. BENTHAM, Agent 



MABELLE FONDA TROUPE 






BERT DELL MABELLE u« NELLIE rONDA — JOE KIRK 

SOME CLASSY JUGGLING Sole Direction JACK LEVY, 140 West 42nd St., New York City 

'When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



VARIETY 



27 





AND 



beg to announce that they have severed their connection with Jerome H. Remick & Co. and are now with 

The HouseThat's Got It 

SHAPIRO, Music Publisher, 



u 



ft 



Cor. BROADWAY and 39TH STREET 

NEW YORK 



where they will be pleased to meet their friends and show them the best songs published this year. 



expression to a beautiful composition. Martial 
and Maximilian furnished a satisfactory opening 
number. It could be stronger If Martini would 
be more serious, furnishing a stronger contrast 
to the comedy of bis partner. De Haven and 
Sidney pleased wltb their straight dancing and 
novelty flnlah and Harry Tate's "Motoring" 
filled In the closing position In good shape. The 
first pictures of Wilbur Wright's aeroplane In 
flight proved very Interesting. 

LUBIN'S PALACE (Isador Schwarts, mgr.; 
agent, William Morris).— Ttiere wis pleuty of 
variety to this week's bill but It might have been 
totter distributed to secure the best results. 
One or two arts of promise stood out ss festures. 
The Lowrle Brotbera offered some dancing above 
the ordinary, but followed too closely upon the 
lines of many others. Tbese boys are good 
enough steppers to work up near the front with 
something in the wsy of a novelty. Julius Am- 
ber proved to be a musician of some merit and 
pleased with his specialty. The full stage used 
hurt the appearance of his act. He would have 
figured much stronger In "one." Amber plays 
several Instruments well, but they are very much 
alike In style. Georgie Nelson, held over, got 
through nicely again wltb popular numbers and 
with Elisabeth Mayne, also a sluger of popular 
songs, beld up the vocal portion of the show. 
There was another corking good singer uncov- 
ered In a sketch offered by the Electric Trio. 
There Is not much merit to the sketch, the two 
men and one woman getting as much as pos- 
sible out of the material at hand. One of the 



VARIETY'S 
Branch Offices 



Advertisements and subscriptions re- 
ceived in each at regular rates. 

News items may be forwarded to 
the moat convenient, and will be 
promptly transmitted. 

Letters may be sent to either of the 
addresses, and will be forwarded or 
advertised. 

Publication Office 

TIMES SQUARE 

NEW YORK CITY 
CHICAGO 

Chicago Opera House Block 

riANH WIISBIIG 

Representative 



SAN FRANCISCO 

2064 Sutter St. 

JOHN J. O'CONNOR 

Representative 



LONDON 

418 Strand, W. C. 
JESSE J. FREEMAN, la charge 

Cable "Jessfree: London" 



meu lb a baritone wbo sang well euougu to be 
noticed among the members of George Evans' 
"Honey boy" Minstrels the past season, and 
bin solo in tbe sketch was the brightest feature; 
Ariuoud Melnotle la a female Impersonator. 
There Is no deception once the uiau opeus his 
mouth. lie personally reveals his Ideutlty by 
changing bis voice from a forced soprano to a 
low baritoue ot fair quality. Tbe act will do 
nicely for tbe small time. Tbe Martelles did 
well with their xylophoue playing. Sllva and 
Silva wou a lll>eral share of applause ror a 
comedy acrobatic turn. One appears in comedy 
make-up and a weak attempt at comedy is tried 
for the Introduction. Neither helps, but the tricks 
carried them through all right. The Great Du- 
bois had some tricks of magic and illusion of 
fair merit aud the Evelyu Sisters sang and 
danced themselves into mild favor. Several new 
pictures were shown. 

UNlgUE (H. J. Harry, mgr.).— Jimmy Jones' 
piano marathon through four reels of pictures 
without a let-up was one of the features of this 
week's show. It was a long race, but Jimmy 
finished strong. The familiar turn of Barr and 
Evans probably drew down as much applause as 
any on the bill. Randolph Brothers aud Blanch- 
ard met wltb fair sureess in their familiar 
musical act. Nealon and Massey finished up 
strong with their dancing after some talk of 
light merit. The remaining five acts were single 
turns. Estelle Hart pli'iised wltb her songs. Her 
voice is a sort of baritone of ouly fair quality, 
but she uses It cleverly. Virginia Henniugs is 
also a singer, adding a bit of comedy aud meet- 
ing wltb fair results. Arthur Kruna is a Juggler. 
He also attempts comedy and a song which he 
announces is for the purpose of "getting 
acquainted." Ills Juggling gave hlui the only 
chance he hud. Janus Mullen sang a "coon" 
song iioorly, but nnlslied in good shape with "The 
Kltl's l.ust Fight." With Hoinethl ig of value that 
he can handle to o|k*u his act. he will do nicely. 
The Salvation Army Muff should >*> drapited. 
John O'Brien hud his regular spot. "The Tramp 
at a Masquerade" whs the hest of several reels 
of pictures. 

I.IBKKTY (11. 11. McFarhmd. mgr.; agent. V. 
B. O.). — Blllle Sea ton. feature; Sliavue and King; 
(iardner. West and Sunshine, and Appleby, hail 
Joist, with the pictures were the others. 

ELEVENTH ST BEET, OI'EKA HOl'SE (James 
Simpson, mgr.; agent. direct). — May Florlne 
Linden. featured; Bradley's Minstrel Sextet; 
Frank II. Smith; !>>uis McDonald, "A Wee Bit 
o' Scotch"; pictures. 

PABK (Thos Dougherty, mgr.; agent. M. W. 
Taylor). — 14 HI: Woodford's Animals; Carlisle 
Sisters; Witman Brothers; Master Joe Foley; 
Felix Haney. IT ID, all hut Carlisle Sisters re- 
mained, and Valpon, Schacfcr and Val|s>s, and 
Campbell and Young were added. M. p. 



sr. louis 

By FRANK E. ANFENOEB. 

WEST END HEIGHTS (Oppenhelmer Bros., 
mgrs. ). — Frauleln Lillian Hoerltlii made her su«-- 
ressful debut as the prima donna of the West 
End Heights company Sunday, appeuriug in the 
role created by Kllzalietli Brier. The Gustave 
Kerker score gives her several Idg chances to 
sing and u.uny to act. She does not monopolize, 
however, and Bice and Cady, IMirynette Ogdeii. 
Margaret Ogden and others are seen to the 
best advantage of the season. An ample produc- 
tion Is made and the chorus Is prettily togged out 
and in splendid trim. 

DKLMAB GABDEN (Dan S. Flschell. mgr.).— 
Baymond Hiteliciw k. in his first. If not his hap- 
piest role, opened his engagement at the Delmar 
musical theatre In "King Dodo." Though the 
opera has been sung before In Delniar It has never 
lieen given with the present eclat. Ann Tusker, 
Bernlce Mershon. El via Croix, as well as many 
others of the regular company shine resplendent 
In the opportunities with which the IMxlcy- 
Luders score Ih replete. 

Ft) BEST PABK HIGHLANDS (J. D. Tip- 
pet t. mgr.).- -J. Francis pooley and Corlnue Sayles 
frlvid awuy fifteen minutes of entertainment. A 
novelty Is Slg. Travato. a Filipino violinist. 
Others on the hill are Bio Brothers. 
De IIollls and Valors. Jugglers. G 
Mitchell, blackface monologisr. Vmlg» 
Is the soloist of the week with CsvniL: 

MANSIONS PABK (Manuimi Bros 
— The bill t if the week Includes ll.iinllton and 
Bonco. Ehrendall Brothers and Dutton. comedy 
acrobats; AI Tyrell, blackface comedian; Octnvlu 
Callahan, comedienne. nml Musical Bandnll. 

LEMP'S PABK (M. Bachimin. mgr.) -"The 
Ijuly Minstrels" and Kaltenthaler's Band arc at- 
tracting fair crowds. 



acrobats: 

Herbert 

Caldwell 

s band. 

mgrs.). 



NOTES*.— John II. Ferris, an old time player, 
who, since retirement two years ago, has 1 1 veil 
at the Madison Hotel and has written sketches 
and plays, died suddenly Sunday from cerebral 
hemorrhage. — Edna Bruns, of St. Charles. Mo., 
has been engaged to bead a Boston stock com pan) 
at the Orpbeum. She was with Francis Wilson 
last year. — Stanislaus Stauge, the playwright and 
librettist is In St. I^otils to direct rehearsal for 
"Her Other Self." which Amelia Bingham will 
produce for the first time on any stage at Sub- 
urban Sunday. — The Garrlck, the last of tbe 
downtown houses to close, was darkened Saturday 
night. — Theatre plans are springing up like mush- 
rooms. The latest Is announcement that con- 
tracts have been let for remodelling the Grand 
Hotel, Qraud Avenue and OUve Street, one half 
of which is to be converted into a theatre. Tbe 
house will have a seating capacity of l.ttAO, but 
plans are being k*pt dark. 



AUSTRALIAN NOTES 

By MARTIN C. BRENNAN. 

Sydney, May 9. 

TTVOLI. — Chung Ling Soo still tbe great draw. 
Graham and Dent going strongly, as are Yeotba 
and Capt. Grade. Cull Pitt. Fred Bluett and 
<ihers. Business: Capacity. 

AMPHITHEATRE.— Gamon Bros.' dogs, top- 



liners. Also Jack Kearns, Starr Trio, Fanny 
Halle, Davy's Marionettes. The Drlacoll Boys, 
"Hanger Girls," Charlie Pope, Joe Charles, Con 
Carroll. 

STANDARD Jack Hussell. Bruce Dryadale, 
Connie Martyn and a big bunch. 

OPERA IIOIiBB (Melbourne).— Three Laurels, 
Fanlng and Fanlng. Olive Sinclair. Dale and 
O'Mslley, G. W. Hunter. Madame Deslree, Stewart 
aud Lorraine, Audy Roberta, Frsnk Yorke, Willis 
Sisters. 

GAIETY (Melbourne).— Fsrrell and Oaffuey, big 
scream; Ernest Pitcher, Dick Stead, Arthur Tan- 
chert. Phyllis Faye, Joe Cowan, and Art. Slavln. 

ADELAIDE— Blckard's Co. and Lennon, Hyman 
and lu noon's bnncb report good business. 

Rickards closed bis Perth (W. A.) bouse last 
week. Whether be will open It agsln next season 
Is undecided. 

BRISBANE.— Holland has a good crowd in tbe 
two prices. Victor Satnall, Maxwell and Roberts, 
Katie Maher. James Williams, the Zenoa and 
Flora Kirk. 

Although the Fuller proprietary Intended re- 
viving vaudeville this month there la now no in- 
dication of this move. Their bouses are nil show- 
ing pictures and the support accorded the) blograph 
does not warrant tbe firm playing vaudeville just 
yet. Many professionals will be greatly upset 
over this decision, as they were looking forward 
to tbe tour. 

NOTES. — Absolutely tbe greatest showman A us- 




AND 




LATE OF 



LATE OF 



Hanson and Nelson 



Sam Barnard's Company 



A LAUGH FROM START TO FINISH 




Johnstons 



Next Week, Fourth Consecutive Week 
at Hammersteln's Roof Garden 



FOR NEXT 
SEASON 



WANTED 



FOR NEXT 
SEASON 



FEATURES 
CHORUS AIEIN 
CHORUS AIND SHOW GIRLS 

HURTIC & SEAMON (INC.) 

1545 BROADWAY, GAIETY THEATRE BUILDING 



When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



28 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTIST© 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



X 



zz 







THE ORIGINALS 
THAT'S ALL 

Oh! did you hear them squeal 



Address care WHITE RATS, 1553 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 



GUY RAWSON 



AMD 



rRAINOBS GLARE 



Management QUB EDWARDS. 



JU1T KIDS 



•• 



Address VARIETY. 



DICK « ALICE McAYOY 

"Herald Square Jimmy' 9 



Xiaff of the Newsboys. 



It 



CHARLOTTE TOWNSEND 



VELDE TRIO 

la their Earepaaa Ea.ailisrial Asrooatla Combination, iaoladlat tha "LOOP-THE-LOOP" DOOB 
(The arifltaal, aot a oopy). Par Parks and Pain address Miss Ethel Robinson, Western Vaudeville 
a ss o d stio s , Obicaffa. Permanent sddrets, care VARIETY, Obioaca Omoa. 

Valerie Bergere 

AMD HER OWM COMPANY. 



AMD HER OW] 

Presenting • repertoire efl Playlets 



TINE ALL TILLED 



3 Marvelous IMells 

(1 Woman and t Man) 

_ SENSATIONAL GYMNASTS (Original). 

Opra far Vaudeville, Parka, Pairs sad Burlesque. Address ears VARIETY. 



GRANT 



GARDNER ••■STODDARD 

Presenting ••VAUDEVILLE FRIVOLITIES " 

Tremendous Success in England 



MARIE 



OPENED od the MOSS-STOLL Tour in LONDON, MAY 1 7th. 

Agent H. IrV. WI ELAND, 16 St Martins St.. London, W. C. 



RE-ENGAGED AT ONCE FOR THE ENTIRE TOUR. 

(REGARDS TO ALL FRIENDS) 



Rube Dickinson 



EX-JTJBTICX OP THE PEACE. 



Pew. Asset 

ClCh 



U N K 



MEW ACT, BUT GOOD. 



miss GERTIE de MILT 



AND 

DANCING 

BEAUX 



Opened HENDERSON S, Coney Island, 
Permanent address, 1456 Bedford Ave., Brooklyn. 



MAT 14. 



Phone, 1811-R Prospect. 



SILBON'S CATS 

At the 5tH Avenue, New York, tills weeR (June 14) 

PLAYING UNITED TIME 

sam - GORDON and SHAKEN - emma 

Eooentrio Sina-ers and Dancers. 
Direction B. A. MYERS, Knickerbocker Theatre Buildin*, Maw York. 



IS/1IIVI 



I 



ALEXANDRA DAGMAR 



Address care VARIETY. 



ISM RROADWAT. MEW YORK OTTT. 

CARDS OF ARTISTS 



UNDER THE HEAD IN O OP 



44 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



AT FOLLOWING RATE8 

■ •tlaofi aJnota o«4 n 64.00 monthly, nat 

1 las* ^ 7.00 

1-1 lean douMo sal., 4). 60 

t Mi u 1 £.60 

l~artfa>r ^paca Pro Rata 

Ma advertisement under this heading accepted for less than one month and no pro'wrod posi 
given. Remittance must accompany advertisements forwarded hy ma.l. 
Cash disoount for 6 and 12 months. 



1 Inohoa doubla ool., 622.60 manthly, 
1 -2 1 'oh aoroso aaaa, 1 6.00 
1 Inoh * 26.00 M 

2lnohaa " 60.00 



ft 



not 

•• 
»• 



tion 




AND 




UNITED TIME 



When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



Pat Casay, Agent 



VARIETY 



29 



If you remember about a year ago we told you about a song entitled "RAINBOW." We said at that time we thought it was a great song, 
that we were sure it was going to be a hit and all that sort of thing. 

We do not need to tell you now that it was a hit. It not only was a hit but was probably one of the most popular and satisfactory intermezzo 
songs that was ever published. You liked it, the public liked it and everybody was satisfied. 

INo\a/, \A/e Have Another 





By Heath and O'Donn 




I don't think we can gain anything by wasting this valuable advertising space telling you how great this song is or how great a hit it is going to be. All we want 
to let you know is that we have professional copies ready; that we have orchestrations in five keys — G, F, Ab, Eb, Bb; that we have slides — in fact, we have made 
every preparation to take care of our hundreds of professional friends to whom this song is an absolute necessity. 

Come into our office, at 131 West 41st Street, New York, and hear the song demonstrated, or if you cannot do that write us and we will mail you a pro- 
fessional copy, or if you are in BOSTON, ATLANTIC CITY, PHILADELPHIA or BALTIMORE, call at our branch there and get a professional copy and an orchestra- 
tion, or at our headquarters in DETROIT, or at our office in GRAND OPERA HOUSE BUILDING, CHICAGO. 



By PRESENTING A COPY OF THIS AD. you can also procure a PROFESSIONAL COPY at the following music departments 






THE GRANDE-LEADER, St. Louis 
AYERS A CO., Indianapolis 
STRAUSS * CO., Louisville 
HERPOLSHEIMER*S, Grand Raplda 



MILNER A CO., Toledo 
THE MAY CO., Cleveland 
THE FAIR, Cincinnati 
KAUfTMANN BROS., PilLburg 
HARMAN*S, Baltimore 



S. KANN A SONS, Washington 
THE POWERS CO., Minneapolis 
GIMDLE'S, Milwaukee 
HALL A LYON, Providence 



Slide singers, vaudeville singers and park singers all want desirable songs that make good for you with the manager, songs that make good for you with the 
audience. Now, here is the song; — 

"IN/IY PONY BOY" 

JEROME H. REMICK & CO. 



NEW YORK 



CHI 



We prefer that you address all professional mail to our New York Office 



I 



tralia bas ever seen is Chun* Ling Son. the Chin- 
ese ( 7) magician. He has created box office rec- 
ords In Melbourne and Sydney and will do so 

tbrougbout the « monwealth. He baa been feted 

everywhere and by people of great importance. 
Last evening be dined with the Lord Mayor, and 
his social engagements still to fulfil are innumer- 
able. The Sydney "Bulletin" — Australia's great 
weekly — invited Son and "Variety's" representative 
down to their works last week. The conjurer gave 
an hour's performance and was accorded a hearty 
reception. I*ast Saturday, being Hospital Day, 
saw Soo as a collector of cash for the hospitals. 
He and his retinue, clad in Chinese raiment, 
paraded the Chinese quarter. The Illusionist 
hopes to play America in two years' time. He 
should do well, as In addition to being a fine 
artist, he Is a brilliant, but most unostentatious 
man. — Octavla and Warne, a clever sketch team, 
leave for the States to-morrow. They were ac- 
corded a flue send-off at the Melbourne A. V. A. 
rooms last week. — Sydney A. V. A. matinee was 
|K»st poncd until last Wednesday night, when it 
was thought that some additional interest would 
he created, but the sup|w>rt accorded was most 
dlsapi>olutlng. — The Vaudeville Club (Sydney) has 
thrown In the towel. Various creditors closed In 
on the Instltulou, and Its effects were auctioned 
to meet the Insistent demands for cash. — Another 
combination that is jostling over a rocky road is 
the Australian Vaudeville Association. During Its 
two and-n half years' existence it has had many 
reverses, bnl the present time sees its limit. Leon- 
ard Pulton, the secretary, is returning to England 
next month, and his absence Is the biggest loss 
the organisation Is sustaining. The great diffi- 
culty amongst vaudeville people In Australia Is 
that so few of the more prominent are In any one 
city tor n:iy length of lime. For this reason the 
various nieiiihiTK of the committee are unable at 
limes to form a quorum. — Veotba. and Captain 
tirade, who are doing a sharp-shooting act, leave 
for America next mouth. They work the Orphcum 
circuit, opening either at Spokane or Itutte city. 
Owing to the turn having to show twice dally, 
the business will In' transformed Into a comedy 
art. This Is necessary owing to Miss Yeotha's 
make up, which necessitates a careful attention to 
detail and much expenditure of time. 



SOUTH AFRICAN NOTES 

By H. HANSON. 

Cape Town, S. A., May 15. 
There are several shows whose life In South 
Africa has been short. They are themselves en- 
tirely to blame, the promoters being Ignorant of 
the requirements of the South African public. They 

seem to forget that people out here have seen the 
best. There are splendid openings for good all- 
round little shows, and money can be made bere. 
There is very little doing In Cape Town. Wol- 
fram's Itloscope pays an occasional visit and la a 
good show. The Tlvoll Theatre of Varletlea 
iwhlch was formerly run by the Messrs. Hymao, 
the only variety managen In South Africa) la now 
open under the management of local people with 
local talent, and the whole performance Is crude 
and weak. We are shortly to receive a visit of a 
bioscope show, exhibiting the Burns-Johnson pic- 
tures. This exhibition has been doing well 
through the country, although In Johannesburg 
one of the leading papers denounced the show as 
demoralizing to the native and refused the adver- 
tisements. 

At the Empire Palace, Johannesburg (which is 
tlio Inridsoniest theatre In South Africa), Messrs. 
Ilymnn are putting on an exceptionally strong 
bill and doing excellent business. The programme 
comprises the Seve.i Faiences, In imitations of 
porcelain, exhibit I ig ticautlful | kiscs. Ross and 
l/cwls. comedy, musical and dancing act; Bros. 
I*uw'rciicc, clever singing and dancing act; The 
Erlks. equilibrists and acrobats; Little Fain, 
Juvenile comedian a id dancer, a talented turn; 
Tom Ice. light comedian ; The Strolling Players, 
In their Shakes|M'iircnn burlesque, "Koraeo and 
Juliet." old favorites and clever; Violet Wegner, 
comedienne: Cole aid Hags, Juggling act; Mile. 
Cainilb' Olcr. a clever and successful French co- 
medienne, with an excellent voice. 

The following artists have recently arrived from 
E igland on their way to the Empire. Johannes- 
burg: 'Hie Miles Stavordale Quintet; Duo Taiilns, 
comedy, singing and dancing; Little Ganty, co- 
median; Madge May. comedienne; Wright and 
l^awson, eccentric act. The future bookings for 



the Empire Include some excellent turns. Ada 
Reeve pays a return visit, opening June 14th; 
DIou Wade, comedian; Tennyson and Wade, patter 
artistes; Dec! ma Moore, Dolly Harmer (a big 
favorite), and Les Trombetta. In October we 
have Hackenschmidt, The Llewellyns, Australian 
vocalists; Paul Couchas, "Cannon Ball King," 
will head the Christmas company, followed by 
Rosina Caselli with her troupe of dogs; Marriott 
Edgar, Jackson Family of Musicians; May Edouln 
and Fred Edwards and tbe Harvey Boys in their 
boxing act. 

Fred Moulllot, a well known London manager, 
baa been paylug a visit to Johannesburg. He Is 
interested In a music ball which la to be erected 
In that town, and will be called tbe Albambra. 
It will lie opened as a variety theatre and will 
Include Winter Gardens. Tbe 'building will take 
twelve months to erect. 



ATLANTIC CITY, N. 7. 

YOUNG'S PIER (Ben Harris' Show; agent. 
C. B. (>.).— Nat Wills, big hit; Howard and 
Lawrence, very good; Zeno, J or don and Zeno, 
excellent; tbe Franelscos, comedy magicians, 
funny; Pollard, Juggler, clever; Artie Hall, good. 

SAVOY (Harry Brown, mgr.; agent, Joe 

Wood). -—Marlon and Rial, playlet, very good' 
Gertie De Milt (New- Acts); Moore and Harri- 
son, good; Harrlgan and Gyles, Hebrew kids, 
funny; Babe O'Donnell, songs. STEEPLE- 
CHASE PIER (E. L. Perry, mgr.; agent, Rudy 
Heller). — Jerome and Hunter, elever; Fred 
Wyeoff, nionolog, good; Reed and St. John, good; 

Carlln and Wlnsch, songs, m. p. MILLION 

DOLLAR PIER (John Young, mgr.; agent, 
direct). — Arthur H olden. bicycle, sensational: 
Arnold's leopards, excellent; Ad. Carlyle's dogs 
and ponies, very good; Winston's Seals, very good. 

I. B. PULASKI. 



BALTIMOHt. 

MARYLAND (Fred. C. Shannberger, mgr.; 
agent, U. B. O. Monday rehearsal 10). — Mrs. 
William E. Annls and Co.. big hit; Julia Frary 
(local), received remarkable reception; Smith 
and Alexander, second week, pleased; Princess 
Susanna, midget wire walker, good; Mullen and 



Correlll, comedy acrobats, well liked; Hoey and 
Lee, amused; Three Demons, excellent. (After 
their first appearance last week, Col. Kernan 
caused Smith and Alexander to omit their 
"Tempt aliou" dance, deeming it vulgar aud sug- 
gestive.).— VICTORIA (Pearce and 8heek. 
mgrs.; agent William Morris). — Columbia Comedy 
Four, good comedy and harmony; Clara Cubltt 
Trio, s. and d., and character changes, very good; 
Mayo and Mayo, pleased; Don Carlos Trio, Mexi- 
can Troubadours, well received; Keeler and Wes- 
ton, s. and d., fair; Frlts's Dogs, amused; Thomas 
lxtor, English comedian, ordinary; Al Wilson, 

comedy musician, good. UOLLIDAY STREET 

HJenrge Kofe, mgr.). — Jerome and Jerome In 
"Krogland," good; Braddoojc and Lelghton, won 
favor; Elsie Rodgers, chic songstress; Francis 

Elliott, very good. LUBIN'S TWIN (E. C. 

Kaile, mgr.).— Vaudeville and m. p. ELECTRIC 

PARK i.Mi.x Rosen, mgr.). — Outdoor acta and 

band concerts. SUBURBAN PARK (August 

Feimemaii, mgr.; agent, William Morris). — Vaude 

villa. GWYNN OAK PARK (John Paraon, 

mgr.). -Elsie Foudelier, wire walker, good; Prof. 
Shecdmaii'a Dogs, amused; .las. R. Adams, co- 
median, applause. FLOOD'S PARK (Jack 

Flood, mgr.). — Vaudeville and burlesque. HER- 
MAN'S (John T. McCaalan, mgr.).— Vaudeville 
and burlesque. — RIVERVIEW (Michael Fltisim- 
uious, mgr.). — Rand concerts, vaudeville and m. 

p. BAY SHORE PARK (Duncan Rose, mgr.). 

-Boston (Ladles') Orchestra. 

CHARLESTON, f. 0. 

ACADEMY OF MUSIC (Harry B. fleam, mgr.; 
agent, U. B. O. ). -Clever Trio; Earl and Bart- 
let t. excellent; Tbe I.cvollas, wire experts; Jim 
Ilnrkins, good.— MAJESTIC (Geo. 8. Brantley. 
mgr. i. Four Musical Cates, headline, deserve 
position Clarke and Clifton, roaring comedy 

sketch; IjhiIs Rates, character studies, flue. 

HAMPTON PARK AIRHOME (Clias. R. Mathews, 
mgr.).- The Manhattan Stock Co. still drawing; 
shows changed twice weekly. -THEATORIUM 
(G*o. S. Brantley, mgr.). -Mr. Kenny, vocalist, 
excellent; in. p. NOTES. The Vincent Amuse 

me lit Co.. lessees of the Academy of Music and 
the Pastime Amusement Co., Geo. S. Brantley, 
general manager, have consolidated lulu a stock 



rsi 



\^\z- 



EUGEhE 



WILLIE 



HOWARD 



AND 



HOWARD 



The Original Hebrew Messenger Boy and the Thespian 

Bigger success than ever BUT" wait until you see our new one 

Thanks for many kind offers for next season, but we are booked solid on the Orpheum Circuit 

(ABIE'S QC=>-r j*< FRUVIQ-N^V 



EDW. S. KELLER 

Personal Representative 
fS/1) 



When answering advertisement a kindly mention Variety. 



30 



VARIBTY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



FRED KARNOS Comedians 



• •at! 



NOW PLAYING LONDON. ENGLAND 



Night in an English Music Hall" 
Right ii Slums of London" 
Address all Communications to ALF. REEVES. Manager, 27 Vaughan Road, Camberwell, London 



WILLA HOLT WAKEFIELD 



BONO READ IN 08. 
WILLIAM MORRIS CIRCUIT. 



Pearson 



d 



a 



Joell 



ii 



IN VAUDEVILLE 

Presenting Their Original Comedy Playlet Entitled 

A CHINESE NUGGET " 

In Three Characters: IRISH, CHINESE, ITALIAN 
Address BERT LEVEY, 2053 Sutter Street. San Francisco 



4 Musical Cates 4 

America's Most Meritorious Musical Act 




BEST Cornet Soloist 
BEST Saxophone Soloist 
BEST Saxophone Quartette 
BEST Xylophone Team 



Addrsss 



ENGLISH ARTISTS BOORS — BIO HIT AT THE JOSE. 

M &A?* EDWARD H. LUCAS prove TOPLINERS 

AT POPULAR PLAYHOUSE. 

"The management made a ten strike when they 
booked these celebrated ENGLISH players." — 
"Morning Times." Baa Jose, June 7. 

"They are excellent actors . . . they show 
a complete understanding of his great characters. 
His 'Uriah lleep' waa a wonderful piece of act- 
ing."— "Evening News." 



"A very classy programme at the Theatre Jose. 
'Scenes from Dickens' capitally staged, pleased a 
large audience last night. Dlckena still Urea waa 
exemplified by the wonderful performance of these 
high claaa artists."— San Jose "Mercury," 



Address care of VARIETY. 



I 



irvi 



WIREINE 



The most sensational and daring slack wirt per- 
formance ever shown. For particulars address 

B. A. MYERS, 

KNICKERBOCKER THEATRE BLOC NEW YORK 



u 



Will Rossiter'a $5,000.00 Vod'vill Sensation off Art and Beauty I 

THE GIRL WITH THE ANGEL VOICE 



» 



A Masterpiece of Electric and Scenic Proficiency 1 

Her Songs are "ETERNITY," "JUST FOR A DAY," Tosti 

Booked Solely by And Her Great 1 1 

ISAI/ | ST WV 1^0 W. 42 St. Encore Number 
tJA\sl\ LLVT New York, N. Y. 



U II 



COM. NEXT MON. 



N.B.-This 



GOOD-BYE" j BRIGHTON BEACH JHNF 



6AMES OF CHILDHOOD DAYS" i m ii c i p u A i ■ 

► la the Act with the Swell Printing ( III U O I U NHL L 








•• 



Management 



THE 

German Twins 

ACT 

Fully Protected and 
Copyrighted 



»» 





THE, IRRESISTIBLE COMEDIENNE, 



Msgnetio little p arson.— " Zi t." A csptivsting little girl.— Simo. 



PLAY1MG UM1TCD TIME 





8709-2 1st Ave., Bensonhurst, L. I. 



rsj 



*S ■ Managers 




TWINS 



Remarkable Human Duplicates 
Big Success in America 

Direction B. A. MYERS 



EUGENE ELLSWORTH and EDNA EARLIE LINDON 



las Harry J 



lamia* farce), " BIS OAT OFT.* 9 WEEKS JUNE 14 AMD tl, CAMPING AMD tTHHJMO AT CLYDE, COL. 

When otuicering a&vertUemmU kindly mention Vabtett. 



VARIETY 



31 



JUNE 21, 



NEXT RELEASE WEEK 



AND EVERY WEEK THEREAFTER. 

We are pleased to announce that the demand for our filnta hai more than doubled since the first release, and our clients are more than gratified with results. 
NOTICE TO INDEPENDENT EXHIBITORS: It haa been brought to our notice that certain Exchanges are furnishing the Exhibitors with so-called independent 
films purporting to come from the 

International Projecting & Producing Co. 

DONT BE MISLED. We will ask every exhibitor to send us the name of the Exchange which furnishes service, and we will gladly inform you if they are 
handling our g oods. 

WARNING: There are a number of Exchanges palming off low grade, cheap and shoddy stock. Don't let them tell you they are getting our goods. We appeal to 
the Exhibitors who have been served with inferior quality films. 

ASK THE EXCHANGE if it is giving you the INTERNATIONAL PROJECTING & PRODUCING CO.'S product. If you don't think it is our brand, don't lose 
any time in communicating with us. 

IMPORTANT NOTICE: We have no agent or exclusive Exhibitor. Every legitimate Independent Exchange and Exhibitor is entitled to our output and weekly 
release. All business transacted direct through the main office. 

Place your orders in time to take advantage of weekly release. We are now permanently located in our new, large quarters. 

International Projecting & Producing Company 

(Suite 723) SCHILLER BUILDING, CHICAGO, ILL. 



It is said that a camel can go seven days 
without water. 

BUT THE 




SAYS 

He Cant Go Seven Days Without an 

Order. 

START SOMETHING AND SEE US GET 
A HUMP ON. 

The SELIG POLYSCOPE CO., Inc. 

45-47-49 E. Randolph Street, 
Chicago, U. S. A. 

Orisr SELN'S l«it 
"TIE COIITIT MIL'S PEIIL" 



company to be known aa the Colonial Theatre 
Co. They will one the new theatre In the German 
Artillery Hall, the largest In tbe city, capable of 
seating 1,200 people and will play first-clans 
vaudeville. J. EHRICHS MESSERVY. 



OLEVELAJfD, OHIO. 
The theatres are all doing well considering 
that the Cleveland Industrial Exposition Is in fnll 
blast. Keith's Prospect will be open all sum- 
mer with pop. Taudevllle and pictures. OPERA 

HOUSE.— Vaudeville and m. p. KEITH'S 

HIPPODROME.— M. p. FAMILY (Ed. Helm, 

mgr.). — Robert Chessalne and Co., Russian Illu- 
sionists, headline the bill; "Pbllllpps." trick musi- 
cal act, clever; Falke and King, singing and 
talking sketch, fair; Pearl Evelyn, won favor 
with her songs; The Wroes, dancing, closed the 

bill. LUNA PARK (El wood Salsbury, mgr.).— 

Slg. A. Llberatl, bandmaster and cornet virtuoso, 
with grand opera singers and favorites here. A 
four-set musical comedy in four acts. "A Racing 
Romance." Is given In tbe new Plaza Theatre. 

CLEVELAND BEACH PARK (formerly White 

City) has opened under the management of J. W. 
Wess, an old park manager. Macagllo'a Band, 
Alber'a Polar Bears among other attractions. 

WALTER D. HOLCOMB. 



EVANSVILLE, DID. 

On account of tbe street car strike, which la 
still on in this city, Oak 8ummlt Park la still 




ITALY'S LEADING PAPER 

FOB TH1 

Afltaitei Pktvc Ml Pftminpl BisImss 

PUBLISHED rOBTNIGHTLY. 
tt-M large aagea. Bight akuBag* far aaaaat 
(91.M). 
rt Pi*. OVAXTrXRO L FABBBI, 

(Mir). 



closed and will remain closed until the strike is 

over. ORPIIEUM (Chas. Sweeton, mgr.; Wells 

Circuit).— 13-19: It was Elks' Week here and a 
good show was being presented st the Orpheum. 
Heading the bill Is Miller and Atwood, comedy 
sketch, "A Warm Reception"; Kelley and 
Lewis, novelty gymnasts, received much ap- 
plause; Ah-Ling-Fo, good Chinese magician. 

OBERDORFER. 



DTDIANAPOUa, DTD. 

The vaudeville and picture shows st tbe Majes- 
tic were continued for a fortnight after tbe close 
of the Forepaugb Stock Co. shows and the 
Shubert production of "The Blue Mouse." Tbe 
theatre Is now dark. The Gayety, devoted to tbe 
10-cent variety and pictures Is also closed. Eng- 
lish's and the~Grand continue to present pictures 
and vaudeville specialties. Riverside Bathing 
Beach, an artificial pond, with a big grand stand 
and Weber's Band for the opening attraction, 
was launched upon popular approval Saturday. 
Broad Ripple's cement bottomed bathing pool, 
fed by artesian wells, is a competitor. Won- 
derland Park, with its new airdome, hss tabloid 
musical comedies, with a change of bill weekly. 
A "beerless" German village Is also a novelty. 
This la Wonderland's fourth season, and Mansger 
Frank Wicks has Introduced new attractions 
which sre attracting widespread attention. 

JOB 8. MILLER. 



LOS AYOELES. CAL. 

ORPHEUM (Martin Beck, gen. mgr.; agent, 
direct). — Week 7: Melnotte Twins and Clay 8mlth, 
clever; Angela Dolores and Co., In fair sketch; 
La Valera, dancer of "The Klrmess," popular; 
Francinl and OUoms, musical, well received; 
Russell Bros,, hit; Frederick Allen Co., In "His 
Phantom Sweetheart," went big; Avedano Quartet, 
very good; Five Juggling Normans, excellent. 

SHANNON B. MYERS. 



HEW ORLEANS, LA. 

WHITE CITY (Edward Sesmons, mgr.).— 
"White City," under the msnagement of the 
owners, opened in a blase of Incandescence on 
Sundsy. The power company which ruthlessly 
cut out the park without a light about two weeks 
sgo, has decided to let unpaid debts be unpsld 
debts, and all is bright once more. In the 
theatre vaudeville has been forsaken for lingerie, 
lace and lines. The Olympia Opera Co., headed 
by Lottie Kendall, Is presenting "The Belle of 
New York." Miss Kendall assumes tbe role of 
"Violet Gray." Her work elicited admiration. 
The first-nighters evidenced appreciation of the 
entire company. Concession note: The csshler of 
tbe "Third Degree" has promised to become the 

wife of the operator of tbe toboggan slide. 

GREEN WALL (Singer, Rose, Greenwsll. Leo- 
pold a Israel, nigra.; Lew Rose, resident 
custodian; all agencies). — Associated with 
Lew Rose In the management of tbe Green wall, 
is Arthur Leopold, s locsl barrister who would 
fain hold court with Muse Thespla. Becsuse 
Judgment dsy dTcT not come often, Mr. Leopold 
felt tbst it would be more profitable to "count 
up" than to "sum up," and his entry Into the 
histrionic maelstrom makes for advancement. Lew 
Rose, realising the box-office capabilities of Lew 
Rose's "Minstrel Misses," hss held over that 
attrsctlon for another week; Mayne and Msyne. 
sketch; John Lougblin, electric marvel; Knox snd 
Alvin. O. M. SAMUEL. 



SAVANNAH, OA. 

SAVANNAH (W. T. Klrby. mgr.).— Attendance 
capacity. Howell and Webster, headline™, 
scored big; Hanson and Bonet, exceptionally 
good: Senorlta Shermans, went well; Bill Jones; 

the Palmer-Psrker Co., very good. ORPHEUM 

(Jos. A. Wilenskl, mgr.; agent, Inter-State Cir- 
cuit). — Attendance Immense, with Jack Rlpp, 
hit; Msrcall and Lenet. bar, excellent; Eva Prout, 
Juvenile, work of high order; the Mortlock Co- 
scored; tbe Doner tj s, popular. AIRDOME 

(Bandy Bros., mgrs. ; sgent, Empire Ex.). — 
Attendance very Isrge; 8ammy Brown, headlluer; 
June Roberts and Co.. comedy sketch, scored; De- 
Mar Sisters, went big; Wolff Brothers, good; 

Paul Bowens, blackface, good. ATHENEUM 

(John P. Taggart, mgr.; agent. Empire Ex.).— 
Excellent attendance; Marie DeRossett, good; 



Gaumont § 




aGrnont 



Licensed by Motion 




: Films 



Picture Patents Company 



it 



RELEASE, TUESDAY, JUNE, 23d, 1QQ9 



A Good Hearted Policeman* 

DRAMA Approximate Length, 678 Feet. 



il 



The Troublesome Lamppost" 

COMEDY Approximate Length, 157 Feet. 



RELEASE, SATURDAY. JUNE 26th, 1909 

"THE WRONG MEDICINE" "STUNG BY A BEE" 

DRAMA Approximate Length, 602 Feet. COMEDT Approximate Length, 177 Feet. 



Urban 




Films 



Licensed by Motion Picture Patents Company. 

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 2 3d. 1909 

"Mrs. Simpson's Attractiveness" 

COMEDY Approximate Length, 278 Feet. 



"Winning a Princess" 

DRAMA Approximate Length, 686 Feet. 



WRITE FOR ADVANCE FILM DESCRIPTIONS. 




Importer of Gaumont and Urban-Eclipse Films. 
52 STATE ST.. CHICAGO, ILL. 19 EAST 21st ST., NEW TORE 






Young and La Dell, fine; Tracy and Carter, held 

over; Iji Rue and Holmes, went well. The 

SUl'EKBA, GRAND. CRITERION. WINTER'S 
and the CASINO are "pleasing good crowda with 

new run. Pictures and son^s, changed dally. 

NOTES. — The Pohertys are spending a week at 
Tybee Beach. Ga.. before golnj? on the DuVrieH 
time. — Howell and Webeter are playing the 
Savannah thla week and will. return to New York 
in a week or no to glTe their new act. — The 
new bouse that la being erected by Wllher A 
Vincent, and Jake Wella la well under way, and 
the opening date la announced for Nov. 1, with 
the highest-priced vaudeville nt tractions ever 
brought to this city. W. T. Klrby is to be the 
retddent manager. R. MAURICE ARTHUR. 



Smith. Evan* and WilllaniH. "All's Fair In 
I»ve," went well; Leon and Adeline, good; Smith 
and Brown, s. and d.. several <|iil«k ehaniP's; (Iht 
den and Somen*, grej:t; ltnmza ami Arno. Euro 
pean eccentrhpies, werl IiIk'. hikI HIjivoIii In n 
100- foot Arc dive. was. the fen lure free nil rue 

tlon. THE FARM (Joe I'eiirlsfeln iim'r. ■ 

Lewers and Mile hell. "The I'rinui I »• • • ■ i • :i nn.l tin' 
Maid." itond; The horln opera! ie 'In-.. IIhII-o 
and Fuller; Fred St. Onije find to. : The Tlin •• 
Ernests; Montgomery I Mm iiml <;...r;." I » . . ■ I-I-. 
THE VALENTINE i.\. Anhur r„i:i. . inu-r : 
Coney Holmes, njrenl i .liin.i--. F. I*'»i t i ■ •■ i . : 1 1 ■ >i i< • !■ -u 

Of the old h<||(mi|. ;iim| I hi . • ■ nihil _■ I :nt- 

THE AIMWDE (Will <' It. UK hut ; tins Sun. 



agent > 



The Melhv'i Si-I. 



TOLEDO, O. 

THE CASINO (Lake Erie Bark Co.. inRrs.: 
agent, Fred Barnes). — Sauiaoya, sensational 
acrobat; Gladys Van, fair-sized hit with her 
catchy number, her "drunk" song 1b a winner; 



"Dent in\ . " :i 
feature ■ ■!' lie 
I>enln. ph-n^.n.: 

llMS ><p|iic "11::' 

Bernard I ' .. 



II ;l I i ■ I ■■■ - , 
I.' I I . » Mill 
i 1 1 1 I ■ i : ^ » I ' 



'•■ iii" in- .i'l 1 1 in r< ' 
•,'ir i - ;i 'i. .! her 
I (hi.ii'ii (unny; 
i ;i mi y i r i > ' • i . * I i* 

I nl I |-;,!l.-l| 

■ ''•' .1: •.■■l|l.J_' I i| lij 

■ -I 

1 I'M 1 ! WIRE. 



When answering advertisement* kindly mention Vabhtt. 



32 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



= 



Netta Vesta 

SINGING COMEDIENNE. 
UNITES TIME. 
Direction JENIE JACOBS, 



1408 Broadway, Now York. 



Mr. and Mrs. 



Gene Hughes 

Per. addreao— SOI W. lMtk It, Now York. 
'Phono, 6080 Mornlnfaido. 

Henry s Alice Taylor 

THE BIO NOVELTY ACT. 
On the Morrii Time. 

BARNEY MYERS. Agent. 



WIGGIN'S FARM 

Apply to THE OHAPWION TBJO. 



BUSH and PEYSER 




Tho cleverest tinfinr and maiiooi norolty of 
tho world. Bookod on tho BULUVAN-OON- 
8IDLNE time. 

Direction of NORMAN JEFFRICS. 



"THE NARROW FELLER." 

THE PIOTTIS 



"THE ITALIAN AND HIS SWEETHEART." 
Caro VARIETY. Doin« WolL 



Two Racketts 



■«» MANLEY «• 
ooily STERLING 



"Fits in EToninc Droaa." 
nont address— S900 Eighth Are,, o/o R. J. 



Coin. 



Yes, wo had a food 
Harry F. Wobor was ou. Pilot. 

Wo aro at Hintorillo, Ont 

MAX GRACE 

Ritter ^Foster 

ACROSS THE POND. 

Address oaro VAUDEVILLE CLUB, 

ft Charing OfOM Road, London, Rag. 

OTTO VIOLA and BRO. 

Comedy Acrobatio Pantomimiiti la 
"JUMPS AND BUMPS." 

Direction B. A. MYERS. 



TAKE NOTICE. 



€€ 



I 



f f 



AT LIBERTY. Coming Beaton. 

Addroai No. 6 Linden Place, South Boston, Maia 



"THAT VERSATILE YELLOW.' 

IRVIN 

Working! YOB, United Timo. 



•7 VABIETIE8 OP VAUDEVILLE. 

LTON 

"00," What a Hit at Henderson's, 0. I. 




ANOTHER "SURPRISE!" FROM THE WEST 



HLFFORD 



AND 



CHAIN 



SINGING AND TALKING 



SOLE DIRECTION 

JACK LEVY 

140 W. 42(1 St., New York 

Phone: 3164 Bryant 
Cable Address: Jaclev 



The Original 
"AROUND THE WORLD 
IN FIFTEEN MINUTES" 

as played by 



SINGING M W IMPERSONATOR 

Alta Yolo 



IS NEVER "RESTING" 

Because tho only ALTA YOLO (now touring the 
Pacific Ooait) is under the 

SOLE DIRECTION 
OP 

B. A. MYERS 



4- 




■4 



FK IND 




ATLANTIC CITY 4 



OPEN TIME JUNE 28 

JUNE 13, 

Grand, Pueblo, Col. 

JUNE 21, 
Princess, Wichita. Kansas 



MRS. WWI 




ANNIS 



Assisted by FOUR MEYER BROS, and MR. MARIO 

'WILLIAM I*. LYKCNS, Booking Agont 



"Roaary" Ethelbert Nevins 

"Kisses" Raymond Hubbell 

Tonor Solo by MR. MARIO. 

"Ridi Paeiiacci" Leoncavello 

Written for MRS. ANNIS and Company. 

Final. 
"II TroTatore" Verdi 

With MR. MARIO and ENTIRE ORCHESTRA. 



HUNTER DE HOSIER, Mi 



rvi 



I'M COMING WITH A REVELATION IN VENTRILOQUIAL ART. 



rvj 



JOHNS 




IM 



I'LL BE THERE ALSO. 



L. T.JOHNSTON 

VENTRILOQUIST 



THREE SHELVEY BROS. 



Sensational-Flexible-Gymnasts 

Opening on the Paniagua' Circuit July 18. 

Exclusive Agent, ALF. T. WILTON 



RETURN 




VAUDEVI 



Late Stars of M Tony the Bootblack " 



a 

n 

d 



Genaro and Bailey's OWN fancy dancing has proven as big a hit as our original cake walk, introduced by us into vaudeville. 
We are now studying out offers received for next season. More anon (That's good enough to use; anybody can have it). 





ALF. T. WILTON, Exclusive Agent 






When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



VARIETY 



33 



SEND IN OPEN TIME FOR NEXT SEASON 

WitK Route Booked. Can Arrange Convenient Jumps 

WILLIAM MORRIS, Inc. 

Acts desiring immediate or later time abroad* forward particulars and photos at once. 

PARK MANAGERS, WILLIAM MORRIS, InC. Can furnish you with all the best acts you want 



MUKumnc mllwudihg. NEW YORK London orricc 41 • STRAND, w. c 

nriniM'TT 



167 DEARBORN ST., CHICAGO 



The Vaudeville Artists' Benevolent ■ Protective Order of America 

250 W. 42d STREET, NEW YORK CITY 

This ia a General Booking Office, not confined to the handling of talent nhi are member* of our order only, bat the theatrioal profession in f eneral, 
(ivinc na extraordinary facilities for procuring- the best talent available. 

MANAGERS of Parks, Theatres, Fairs, etc, will do well to consult us and make our offices your headquarters when in New York. 

PERFORMERS, send in your open time. All performers welcome. 

MEW YORK REPRESENTATIVES for VER BECK * FARRELL. Booking time in Pennsylvania, Ohio, New York and Illinois. Nothing too large 
or small for na to handle. Address WM. H. STANLEY, Boa, Mgr. 

Members of V. A. B. A P. 0. of A. tend your due. to this office. 'Phone— 4468 -Bryant. 



■■■ 



AN ENCORE EVERY TIME 

Harris and Vernon ordered a gown, and, upon receipt, enclosed another order with this letter: 
"Received dress yesterday; it is a beauty. Fits perfectly in every way. Enclosed find order for 
another gown." 

Oct our "BOOKLET OF STAGE FA8HI0N8 FOE LADIES," which is sent absolutely FEEE. 

WOLFF, FORDING t CO., 61-65 Eliot St., Boston, Moss. 



**■■■*■■ Vnil Get your RAILROAD TICKETS on the LEHIGH VALLEY A DELAWARE, 
^ HI ,U LACKAWANNA & WESTERN R. R. at the VAUDEVILLE STEAMSHIP 

sly 1 CAM AGENT - Write, call or telephone. My representative will deliver the tickets 

wBP^BJBalBeei MRU to you. 1 have always served you well. 

Going to Europe? Tickets on all Steamship Linea Lowest rates. PAUL TAUBIG, 104 E. 14th St., 
New York, German Savings Bank Building. Telephone 2099 Stuyvesant. 



THE ENGLISH PROFESSIONAL JOURNAL 
Circulation guaranteed to b. larger than that of any English journal devoted to tho Dramatle or 
Vaudeville Professions. Foreign subscription, 17a. 4d. per annum. 





HEW YORK AGENTS— Paul Tauaig, 88-80 Went tSd 8treet, and Saninel French 4k 
West Stnd 8treet. 

Artists visiting England are invited to sand particulars of their aet and data of 
8TAOE Letter Box is open for tho reception of their mail. 

10 YORK 8TEEET, COVENT GARDEN. LONDON, W. a 





Now booking Summer Parks and Vaudeville Theatres in California, Ariiona, Vow Mexico and Texas. 

Managers Write or Wire. 

JO TMEATRatS JO # 

THAT INDEPENDENT VAUDEVILLE AGENT 


m 


EC 


RT 


LEVEY 


2058 SUTTEE 8TEEET 


INDEPENDENT 1 

■ 


VAUDEVILLE CIRCUIT. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 





WANTED-BIG COMEDY and NOVELTY FEATURE 

Aots to write or wire open time. Now booking for North Avenue, Bohindler's and Thalia Thoatros, 
Chicago. Also other houses in Illinois, including Castle, Bloomington; Grand, Joliet. 

CHICAGO BOOKING AGENCY 

0HA8. H. DOUTRICK, Manager. Boom 29, 92 La Salle St, Chicago. 

OPERA HOUSE MANAGERS 

Let me book /oar theatres for the summer with vaudeville and motion pictures. Writ, for partlcnlara. 

CASINO VAUDEVILLE BOOKING AGENCY 

Republio Building, Room 924, Ohioago, HI. 'Phono Harrison 8909. CONEY HOLMES, 



ARTISTS' REPRESENTATIVE. 
Booking Vaudeville Aots Everywhere. Can always arrange plenty of work for good acta. 

Bend your open time. 
(BUTTE Ull-lllS) SCHILLER BUILDING (GAR RICK THEATRE), CHICAGO. 



WANTED. 



GOOD ACTS at all times. Booking, houses In New York, 
Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia, Maryland and Michigan. 

Addre.. : ASSOCIATED B00KIN8 AQEHCY, 404 Scheldt Bld|.. MTTS2I20, H. 





Among my LIMITED EXCLUSIVE PERMIT PARODIES are "The Eight Shirt but the Wrong Jew!" 
"Beautiful Lies!" "Meet Me With Your Clothes on, Rosie!" "I love my wife, but oh! you kid!" (with 
baby business). Price $1 eaoh. Send for List. Gaiety Theatre Building, New York City. 

NOT CONNECTED WITH ANY OTHER BOOKINO OFFICE 

LONG ACRE CIRCUIT 



53 1-5 SB Long Acr* Building*, Tlm.1 Sqoar., N.w Yerll 

ACTB WANTED for Family Vaudeville Theatres. Put your name on the books. If yon make 

good, we oan keep you working 

L. N. BNEDEN, General Manager. 



HAMMERSTEINS 
VICTORIA 



AMERICA'S MOST 
FAMOUS VARIETY 
THEATRE 



Open the Year Around 

VAUDEVILLE HEADLINERS 
- GOOD STANDARD ACTS 

If yon hsve an open week yon want to 811 at 
short notlc. writ, to W. L. DOCK8TADBB, 

Garrick Theatre. Wilmlngt.n. Del. . 
Can cloae Saturday night and mak. any city eaat 
of Chicago to open Monday night. 

ERNEST EDELSTON 

VARIETY AND DRAMATIC AGENT. 

1 7 Qreea SI.. L.leealee Sejsjare, LONDON 

Bole Representative, 
John Tiller's Companion. Walter C. Kelly, 

little Tteh. Fragson. 

Always Vaeowclee for GeeoJ Acts 




CIRCUIT 



The COLONIAL 
The ALBAMBIA 
The 0B.PHEUM 
The CRESCENT 



New Tori 
Horlotn 

Brooklyn 
Brooklyn 



The NOVELTY WilUamsherg 

Tho GOTHAM East Now Tori 
Tho GREENP0INT Brooklyn 

Addre.. til PERSONAL letter, to 
PERCY 0. WILLIAMS, Loot Acre Bldf., 
1505 Breedwejr, New York 



THE AUTHOR WITH THE GENOME SUCCESSES 

Aak Mark Murphy, Fred Bowers, Grscle Em 
mett A Co., Harry First A Co., Coombs and 8tone. 
Chsrles Bonnell and Mable Craig, Dave and Percle 
Martin. The Cbadwick Trio, Sommers and Btorke, 
and over One Hundred and Fifty others. Order 
your new material for the coming sesson now 
from the Author who has the reel successes to 
bis credit. CHARLES HORWITZ, Kniokerbooker 
Theatre Bldg., 1402 Broadway, V. Y. Room 216. 



THE COLUMBIA 




• It 



KLYN. N. Y. 

VAUDEVILLE 

M. S. EPSTIN, Manager. 

One place where all managers either see acts personally or get reports. 

Booked Through United Booking Offices. 



ILVIIVIEDI 

From two to five weeks 



Fox Vaudeville Booking Agency 

DEWEY THEATRE, New York 

VAUDEVILLE ACTS OF ALL KINDS WANTED 

ENTERPRISE AMUSEMENT CO. 

110 Bell Block, CINCINNATI, O. 

Artists send in your open time. WM. C. KITT, General Manager. 



When answering advertisements kindly mention Variety. 



34 



VARIETY 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTI«T« 



REPRESENTATIVE ARTISTS 



It isn't the name that make* the act — 
It's the not that makea the nam*. 



THE VENTRILOQUIST WITH A PRODUCTION 



ED. F. 



REYNARD 

Presents Both Dewberry and Jawn Jawnson In' 

••A MORjmro far hicksvtlle." 



Direction JACK LETT. 



MONA 




Tata Ck*\Bs»lom SUg>rt %t fmMOm 

BERT COOTE 



Club, W. 47th St, N*w Tern. 
IM Oxford It, W. 



Ml 




AO tho** theatrically Interested ar* 

WALTER STANTON 

"THE GIANT ROOSTER" 

and "Only Bird Impersonator la the Unirerae" 
(Tide Press), has had anything: to do with the 
phenomenal run of "Jack and Jill," which boats 
the record. 
Address direct, or WK MORRIS, Agent 




(LOUISE) 



(EDITH) 



Hamlin sNoyes 

"JUST GIRLS IM COMEDY." 

Comedy Playlet. 

Amount. ALT. T. WILTON 

STUART BARNES 

Direction GEO. HOMANS. 

SHEER «■ BURTON 

Singing and Talking Comedians. 
Invite offeri. Address car© VARIETY. 

LARRIVEEhLEE 

"The Candy Kid and the OirL" 
16th week on J. J. QUIOLEY CIRCUIT. 




THE KOTO OP IRELAND, 

JAMES B. DONOVAN 

AMD 

RENA ARNOLD 

QUEEH OP VAUDEVILLE, 
DOING WELL, THaJTE YOU. 

SEYMOUR 
and NESTOR 

NOVELTY BINGINO ACT. 
Address Ml West 170th St., Vow York, 



THE 

BARREL 
BUMPERS 

MAUDE (ASWELL 



AND 



ARNOLD 



MISS CASWELL, THE ONLY REAL ACRO- 
BATIC COMEDIENNE. WHO CAN "ACRO- 
BAT SOME." 

BARNY MYEB8, American Representative. 



Harry Atkinson 



Chas. 
and Josle 



TOURING EUROPE. 

On the United Time. 

PAT CASEY. Agent. 

QUINN 



"The Girl and the Gawk." 

Week June 14, Criterion, Atlantic City. 

GORDON A SOLOMON, Agents. Gaiety Theatre 
Bldg., New York. 

MARSHALL P. WILDER 

ATLANTIC CITY, M. J. 

Boll 'Phe— , ltd, 

ROBERT HENRY HODGE 

N«it esaena ia 

••HIS NIGHT OFF" 



GartelleBros. 



SKATORlALISm 

Direction, REICH A PL UN RETT. 

eBSMeMMMMnH*»E4MMMMMMHMMMSMMMMW*MMM*W*WnMMMMHMMHBBVt 

HOMER ». MAROAIERITI 

Mason i Keeler 



Direetle* MPRT H SINGER, 




GAVIN, PLATT 

and PEACHES 



Pr***ntlng "1 
Address 4417 trd At*. (Bronx), Vow York. 




Gee!! 

m noneo 
swell bill 

BH8l3eH t 

vordon, 
Perry S 
WiiDerand 7 
omer ids 



We're that important that we delayed three 
trains SO mine, at Parsons, Kan., in order to load 
onr baggage and scenery for a Sunday opening at 
Oklahoma City. If yon don't believe it ask the 
baggage-man (Gee!! but he was mad) and the 
train dispatcher. That baggage-man is the oham- 
pion "cusser" of the south. 



GRI FF 



"The Equilibristio Cynic," 
who thinks he made quite 
a big suoooss at the Ma- 
jeitio Theatre, Chicago, on 
opening; but one never 
know* until the news- 
papers come out. 

Next week my address is ORPHEUM THEATRE, 
SPOKANE, WASHINGTON. 

SAM J. CURTIS SCO. 

Tim Faust, "The Comical Schoolmaster," is with 

us again. 

Direction BERT COOPER 

Mark Stern. Building, 

108-104 W. Ilth St, New York. 

FRIEND and 

DOWNING 

Oar* VARIETY'S London Offloe. 




BILLIE REEVES 



m 



3 

ft 

e 

a 

o 

B 




a 

o 

B 

o 






"FOLLIES OF 1909." 



F. ZTEOFELD, JB. 
'CsVOS-'tO. 
1. Y. Theatre Roof for the Summer. 



MARION 



VICTORIA 




Direction AL SUTHERLAND. 



Barry -Wolf ord 

The Typical Topical Ttokle Stagers. 
Booked Solid until July 1* *#©9. 
Besting for the summer at 

Reeds Lake. Grand Rapids, Mloh. 
Address REBER'B PAVILION. 

Iliirreli! (2KORGE IJC MAIRB, of Conroy and 
I eMnirc. ix going (o get married, and tbey are 
K<>i-iK tii have h IiIk apread right on the atage In 
their act. His best mini will bo the Duke or 
King "f Baltimore. The principal dlnh in the 
mi mi will l>e beans. I wonder why tbey like 
Iwa-iH. I think bcuiiH pet them the money. Rne- 
ccwh to yon, Mr. I^'Mnlre, and Wife and- Dnke. 
' Huh." 

Han anyone aeen Minnie St. Claire? Watch out, 
Mr. Ted I.ennro. Do not fdgn any contracts with 
no agent unless you will (jet a chance to lay off a 
week In the summer. When Minnie will com- 
mence working they won't give her no re*t, »o 
lnnlst on one week'a lay off in the summer so you 
can go to MlaHourl for some more gags and a 
rest. Huh! 




NOTICE.— If Mr. Pat Casey won't p*y more at- 
tention to my aet I will quit and I mean it. I 
am aore. I know I am putting somebody wise. I 
am uiie mutt, but look out and be careful. I can 
hook direct If I want to. My act ia big enough 
for the big manage™. FRANK BYRON, JR., 

With 






Thin week Y*e are doing a very refined act. We 
are In Boston. Nuf ced. Next week, Keith's, 
Phils. 

BOB RICHMOND 

In his new monologue upon Current Topion, 
Address S74 Central Park West, New York. 



JUST 



LON HASCALL 



Jack Singer's "Behman Show." 



COMEDIAN 



"I LOVE A CHIN PIECE, BUT OH ! YOU CREPE HAIR" 



JOSEPH 



K 



FEATURED WITH "THE LADY BUCCANEERS 



• a 



WATSON 

* ■ * 

Mmnmgcjment, HARRY M. STROU8E 



When Qtuwring advertitementt kindly mention Variety. 



VARIRTY 



rvj 



WILLY 




andQq 




in their New Original £ £ 
Aero-Pantomimic Sketch 




LIMIT" 



TWO ARISTOCRATS Willy and Harry Pantzer 

TWO PAGE BOYS Jcicel and Abe PanUer 

MONSIEUR BUTINSKY Paul PanUer 

COLORED SERVANT Luther 

THE BULL (by dog) Bog 



I 






MUSIC SPECIALLY COMPOSED BY WILLY PANTZER. 

NOW PLAYING HAMMERSTEIN'9 ROOT 

NO OPEN TIME TILL AUGUST, 191 1. 

MAHAOER, GEHERAX MAHAGER, 

JEWEL WOLFERTH E. F. ALBEE 



E/V\IL 




AND 




r>i 



v 



Sole Direction JACK LEVY, 140 West 42nd St., New York 




Trade Mark 




FILMS 




Trade Mark 




IS 



WASJUSTICE SERVED?' 



SHOWING WHAT MIGHT RESULT FROM CIRCUMSTANTIAL EVIDENCE 
How often do we hear of the poor unfortunate victim of circumstantial evidence, who, after spending 
years of incarceration, is found to be innocent of the deed for which he was convicted? Worse still, a 
life has often been given to expiate a crime committed by another. The theme of this Biograph subject 
shows how easy justice may err. An ex-convict has determined to start a new life, but by a cruel trick 
of fate is almost returned to prison through convincing circumstantial evidence, superinduced by his past 
record. A gentleman drops his well-filled wallet, which is picked up later by another party, who extracts 
the money and throws the pocketbook away. This is found by our friend just as the owner returns in 
search of his loss. Appearances are certainly against him, and he would have been sent up had not, by 
a singular coincidence, the finder been impaneled on the jury, and saves him by returning the money. 

LENGTH, 962 FEET 



WAS JUSTICE SERVED! 






■ 



cc 



^ 



THE PEACHBASKET HAT 



This is a very funny Biograph comedy in which this latest feminine fancy figures in an apparent 
kidnapping case. What is more assuring to our patrons is the fact that our old friends, Mr. and Mrs. 
Edward Everett Jones, are the leading characters, and we might add that Jones, Jr., is by no means a 
small factor in the fun making. 

LENGTH, 666 



IS 



The Mexican Sweethearts 



A short dramatic subject which is an exhibition of the very acme of pantomimic art. It is a vivid 
rayal of the impetuous 
y a native born Spaniard. 



portrayal of the impetuous nature of the Latin type, from the fact that the leading character is played 



THE PEACH BASKET HAT. 



LENGTH, 309 FEET 

RELEASE DATS 07 BIOGRAPH SUBJECTS MONDAY AND THURSDAY OP EACH WEER. , 

SET OH OUR MAIL LIST AID KEEP POSTED WRITE FOR 00R DESCRIPTIVE CIRCULARS 




Licensee of the Motion Picture Patents Co, 



OOMF>AINJY 

11 E. 14th STREET, NEW YORK CITY 



When answering advertisement* kindly mention Variety, 



• 












. 



• 









'» 



% - f 



Leading Vaudeville 









• 







• 



j 









and Features 



UNDER THE DIRECTION OF 




. 






u' 











• 



. 









• 






- 






• ■ 



> 





Knickerbocker Theatre Building, New York City 

Phone: 4940 Murray Hill Cable Address: "Myersba, New York 

CHAS. S. WILSHIN, Representative 



i 









• 






• »• •• y 



I 






i 












■ 



' 












PAULINE ? 

HARRY JOLSON 

GEORGE PRIMROSE 

HARVEY and LBB 

CLIFF GORDON 

JOE FLYNN 

FIELDS and LEWIS 

HENRY and ALICE TAYLOR and CO. 

JUNIE NcCREE and Co. 

MARTIN BROS. 

wilson franklin co. 
madel Mckinley 

alto yolo 

THREE DELTON BROTHERS 

ADAMS and MACK 

THE STODDARDS 

OOYT TRIO 

COLUMBIA COMEDY FOUR 

RICE and PREVOST 

MR. and MRS. ARTHUR FORBES 

? NORD ? 

LA VELLE and GRANT 

THE BRITTONS 

WILLIAMS and WALKER'S "Chocolate Drops" CvZftX.&'F) 

FIVE JUGGLING JORDANS 

BLACK and JONES 

BERT SHEPPARD - , 

CARITA DAY and BOYS 

CARL DAMANN TROUPE 

WILTON BROS. 

■ 



■ 



- • 












CHARLES GRAPE WIN and ANNA CHANCE 

WIREINE 

WILLA HOLT WAKEFIELD 

ABOU HAMAD TROUPE OF ARABS 
CHARLES ROSS and MABEL FENTON 
G1RARD and GARDNER 
JOHN C. RICE and SALLY COHEN 

SEYMOUR and HILL 
COLLINS and HART 
BLAKE'S ANIMAL CIRCUS 

WILLARD'S "TEMPLE OF MUSIC" 
TOM and STASIA MOORE 
AUSTIN BROS. 

she an and Warren 

KELLY and RENO 
ED MARKEY 
CASWELL and ARNOLD 
GEORGE WILSON « 
EDITH HELENA 
MARR and EVANS 
THREE LA MAZE BROS. 
GILBERT and KATEN 
FOUR BARD BROTHERS 
QUAKER CITY QUARTETTE 
LIND 

WARD BROS. 

FOUR CASTING DORDENS 
THE BRADFORDS 
SCOTT and WHALEY 
RICHARD BROS. 





















When answering aivertitementt kindly mention Variety. 







JUNE 26, 1909. 



VOL. XV,, MQ. 3. 

mmmmmm 



PRICE TEN CENTS. 

' wmm 



I 










V 7-.--r 






•^*4 






<>v 



V»rBlBT¥-..- : .^:'^^' 



><>&»" 



— 



." .L "... 

uttmm* i ■ \\mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm 



■ 















\ 









■ ■ 



. 







- 



. 



AS MY PARTNER FRCD WHITEFICLD IS RETIRING PROM THIS BUSINESS. (I) ELI DAWSON, WILL WORK WITH 

* LOUISE GILLETTE op the ORIGINAL " GILLETTE SISTERS," to be known as . 

ELI DAWSON 6 LOUISE GILLETTE 



mmmmmmmmmm 
WATCH FOR NEXT 



■I 



r 



PEDERSEN 



• 






, 






' 



BROTHERS 






. 



EUROPEAN COMEDY AERIAL ACT 

FKATURINQ 





: V^ 



- 

R8EN TRICK 









This Trick has never been accomplished by any other Act in the World. Feature* oweur Fantasia's Circuit 

For Open Time Address, ALF. T. WILTON, Long Acre Building, New York City 



> ■'-» 



* <■ 












T.ROY 






BESSIE 



MAX HART 



THE ROUND ABOUT WAY THEY COT IT 

* (COPYRIGHTED UNDER THE NEW COPYRIGHT LAW) 

RES f*Pe BSBNTATI \JB. 

HART-MAX HART-MAX HART-MAX HART mEXT WEEK (June 28), 



; 

■ 



SHEA'S, 






L * 















It 



by Motion ^wVT*^ Mstess 

RILCA1K, TUESDAY. JUNE S+tAw 1909 

11 NO APPETITE FOR DINNER" 

OOMEDT Avmx. Li***, *** ft 



SAVED FROM THE FLAMES" 

LMfftS, 4M rt 



EEl,E>m*E. fATURDAY. JfJLY 0d. IfOS 

"THE HAND BELL" I "The Sunny South of France" 

r Aim. L«««tk, m Ft 9 TEAVELOOTE Apfm. LMftk. Mi Ft 

I 



: 



■ 






Urban 






. 








... 






■ 






Licensed by Motion Picture Patent* Company. 
RILLAfl. WtDNtlDAT, JUNE ©OtK. 1*0* 

"The Phantom Sirs**" 1 "Kslers of the World" 

Ararw. Uaftk. Iff ft. | EOVELTT ...Anra. LMftR, SM Ft. 

(TiaUd No Extra OmL) I (Ti*t«i.) 

WRITE FOR ADVANCE FUJI DESCRIPTIOHS. 

jA M i\ 



I 

< 




• 



■ 

■ 

■ 






Importer of Gtnmont and Urban-Bclipee Filma. 



it $T ATI ST., CHICAGO, ILL, 



19 EAST Jlat ST., MEW YOtK 



• 












• 






. 




aaEEnVawl ■ 

■ ■ 
_ 









s 



an rranciseo 










• •' 






i.' ■ M. ■'-.■•. 



— 









* : **+:-<2" : 7. 



v.-;* ■»>•;. -, . v'. v 






. 







IS A* 



•■ 



2064 Sutter Street 






* 



MM A O'COIMOR, Representati ve 

Advertisements and subscriptions may be forwarded to 
the San Francisco office St regular rates. 

New. items sentthere w4 be promptly traiiarnittod. 

Mail addressed care of VARIETY, 2064 Sutter St., San 
Francisco, will be forwarded when address is known, or ad- 
vertised. 






- 






■ 



■ 









mention 



i 1 



■>i> 



■r 



: 



Jf ; :*'L 



; y^^'7^7 •^:^K4^;7f;^% ;! -^:l^^^^ 



TEN GENTS 




VOL. XV., NO. 3. 



JUNE 26, 1909. 



PRICE TEN CENTS. 



ENGLISH-AMERICAN COMPACT 
EXPECTED TO MATERIALIZE SOON 



London Reports Understanding Exists Between Will- 
iam Morris and Thos. Barassford. Waiting 
for Gibbons. Morris Says 'Frisco 
Certain Next Season. 



London, June 16. 

Though 'William Morris left London 
without entering into any final agree- 
ment with Thomas Barassford on the 
hooking proposition, it if talked about 
over here that the two managers reached 
Honie understanding. 

If the proposed booking arrangement 
is ultimately consummated it will, as per 
understanding, include both the Gibbons 
and Barassford circuits, now linked to- 
gether for routing benefits and to oppose 
the Stoll syndicate. 

Should Morris bring this to a head it 
will mean forty weeks of large and small 
English time for American acts to play, 
with twenty of these weeks in and 
around London. 

London is aping New York in its 
vaudeville entertainment very closely 
now. Witness the engagement of Eva 
Tanguay at the Coliseum for four weeks 
in August at $1,500 weekly, an enormous 
salary for an Englishman to pay any 
foreign act, particularly for a first 
appearance. 

It is but a short time now that Lon- 
don will find its vaudeville on a status 
with the American brand as seen in the 
New York houses. Prices will be equal, 
and "opposition" which has brought about 
the condition over there will work the 
same here. 

William Morris returned from Europe 
last Sunday. With him on the boat came 
'•Consul," the chimpanzee, which is billed 
as "almost human." When seen at his 
offices Mr. Morris would not discuss the 
London report. 

Asked if he had anything of interest 
to announce for his circuit next season, 
the independent manager-agent replied he 
bad nothing to give out not already made 
public. 

Mr. Morris was asked by the Variety 
representative if he would make a posi- 



tive statement whether or not the Morris 
Circuit would play vaudeville in San 
Francisco next season. "It will/' said he, 
"and we will enter San Francisco by the 
easiest 'jumps' possible." 

Among the foreign acts engaged by 
Morris while away are Arthur Prince, Ida 
Rene, Bransby Williams, George Lash- 
wood, Rosario Guerrero, Paul Conchas 
and Cissy Loftus. 

R. A. Roberts and Severin have been 
previously announced. Mr. Morris stated 
he had not signed Cinquevalli. 

George Lashwood is understood to have 
been engaged at $760 weekly. Several of- 
fers have been made toJiim in times past 
for an American appearance. 

"The Divine Merma" is an attraction 
secured by Mr. Morris while abroad about 
which much mystery is thrown. Some 
months ago in London there appeared a 
dancer calling herself "The Divine 
Amylla." Mr. Morris says "Merma" is 
another person with a different style of 
act. From the title given "Merma" is 
supposed to sport herself in a tank. 

London, June 16. 

The Morris Circuit will have Arthur 
Prince, the ventriloquist, next season. 
Ida Rene, his wife, has also been engaged 
for the Morris time. 

The United held an optional contract 
with Prince for several weeks at $1,000 
weekly. Prince demanded that Miss Rene 
be booked as well. While the United was 
dickering about that Morris stepped in, 
signing both acts. 

(Special Cable to Variety.) 

London, June 24. 
It is reported that Albert Chevalier 
signed with the United Booking Offices on 
Tuesday, twenty weeks next season at 
$2,000 a week. The offer was first made 
by Percy G. Williams when here. 



THEATRE RENT JUMPING UP. 

New Orleans, June 24. 

Rental for theatre property in the south 
is on the boom. According to stories 
reaching here the Shuberts have been 
around the south offering advances in 
rents exceeding 66 2-3 per cent, of the 
present rental. 

It is also reported that a similar con- 
dition is prevailing all over the country 
through the strife for houses. 

A theatre in Dallas belonging to the 
Greenwall-Weis Circuit renting at present 
for $14,000 per annum was sought by the 
Shuberts, who offered $22,000 for it. The 
circuit would not lease. 

It is said the Shuberts are desperately 
after the entire Greenwall-Weis chain of 
houses, without much hope of securing it. 

The opposition to "The Syndicate" has 
also approached William Morris, accord- 
ing to report, to trade anything Morris 
may want if the independent vaudeville 
manager will give the Shuberts, Green- 
wall's, New Orleans, and The Jefferson, 
Memphis. 

Nothing has yet come of that offer, said 
to be an extraodinary one in its terms. 



NO CAST-OFFS FOR AMELIA. 

St. Louis, June 24. 

When Amelia Bingham read what Mrs. 
Katherine Clemmons-Gould said on the 
witness stand in her divorce suit she did 
with gowns after having worn them once 
— viz., gave them to actresses to wear on 
the stage, citing "The Climbers" as one 
instance, Miss Bingham was very indig- 
nant. She said Mrs. Josefa Osborne de- 
signed over $50,000 worth of gowns for 
"The Climbers," and from what she (Miss 
Bingham) had seen of the taste of Mrs. 
Could, she couldn't supply the cook lady 
in "The Climbers" with a gown. 

Miss Bingham has promised to go over 
the wardrobe when "The Climbers" is 
shown at the Suburban next week, and if 
there are any gowns suspected of being 
cast-off finery of Mrs. Gould, said gowns 
will go over the back fence. 



MISS TILLBY'S LAST WEEK. 

Next week will be the last of Vesta 
Tilley's vaudeville tour over here. Thi» 
English male impersonator will probably 
spend the time at Keith's, Philadelphia, 
sailing July 3 on the Celtic with her hus 
band, Walter De Frece. Miss Tilley is 
at Philadelphia this week and will likely 
hold over. 



REYNOLDS AND DONEGAN'S HIT. 

(Special Cable to Variety.) 

London, June 24. 
Earle Reynolds and Nellie Donegan, the 
roller skating experts, opened for their 
first joint London appearance at the Pal- 
ace on Monday, making a hit from the 
outset. 



HIGH-PRICED "POP" HEADLUfERS. 

Trixie Friganza, at $760 weekly, is said 
to be the highest priced headline attrac- 
tion ever to play a "popular" vaudeville 
house. She is the feature of the bill at 
the New Rochelle Theatre, New Rocnefle, 
N. Y., this week, being booked there by 
the Joe Wood office. Next week Alice 
Lloyd, whose salary is $1,500 a week, is 
to be the headliner. 

The house has been playing low-priced 
bills in conjunction with moving pictures. 
The lessees a short time ago decided to 
change the policy to two shows a day, a 
bill of seven turns and admission fees up 
to 50 cents instead of 10-20. 



IN RE "OPPOSITION SHEET." 

In casting up a summary of the busi- 
ness for the past season, Clark Brown, 
of the Bennett Circuit, figured out that 
during the season of '07-'08 the chain 
played 474 acts. This was the first season 
of its operation. 

During '08'09 the list included 446 acts. 
In this latter number were included only 
35 acts which had played the circuit the 
year before, representing only 8 per cent, 
of "repeats" on the total bookings of the 
season. New faces were present for the 
other 92 per cent. 

Mr. Brown said that for the coming sea- 
son he would again seek to hold the per- 
centage of "repeats" below 10. 



JAPAN CIRCUIT PROPOSED. 

San Francisco, June 24. 

Bob Burns and William C. Eldid are 
forming a company for the purpose of in- 
troducing vaudeville to the East. They 
plan to operate a number of houses In 
Japan and two in Hawaii. Honolulu and 
Hilo will be the Hawaiian towns, while the 
circuit in Japan will include Tokio and 
Nagasaki. 

"Dumb art -j" will he the attraction and 
will he l)ookr<l l»v Burns. Eldid sails for 

« 

Japan .Tun*- M0 to commence operations. 
He covered both countries recently and 
says that consequently h»' knows the possi- 
bilities of the territory. 



VARIETY 



ANOTHER "CONSUL." 

Baltimore, June 24. 

"Consul Peter the Great" it exhibiting 
at the Maryland this week, deriving a lit- 
tle benefit from the free advertising given 
the other "Consuls" to be imported by the 
New York vaudeville managers since the 
"monk" epidemic set in. 

This "Consul" is the property of Aleini, 
and was formerly known as "Peter the 
Great." It is a chimpanzee, and in its 
own way quite a wonder. 

William Morris' "Consul" still caused a 
great deal of talk this week in variety 
circles in New York. Besides the talk, it 
is said to have cost one young man his 
position. 

A nephew of Frank Bostock, who owns 
the Morris "Consul," was an attache of 
the Orpheum office staff. Young Bostock 
has often remarked he attempted to have 
other managers consider his uncle's "Con- 
sul" for their booking sheets, without , 
avail. 

When Morris' "Consul" arrived in New 
York last Sunday, the "monkey" talk 
started afresh. During the course of it 
Martin Beck is reported to have heard of 




"CON8UL." 

THE MORRIS "MONK." 



young Bostock's connection with his uncle, 
also the Morris booking. Mr. Beck is like- 
wise reported to have informed young 
Bostock that since he booked "Consul" ho 
should lopk after it, and to consider him- 
sell dismissed from the Orpheum Circuit. 

-Morris' "Consul" will probably first 
show at the American Music HallJuly 5. 
It was intended that the ape should be 
the feature of the opening performance 
on the new roof above the theatre on 
July 3, but the postponement of the 
premier in the air changed this plan. Next 
week "Consul" will be exhibited during 
each show indoors. 

On Wednesday the "monk" attended the 
hall game between New York and the 
Bostons. About 15,000 people were pres- 
ent. That the "monk" craze is on was 
evidenced by the cries from all over the 
stands of "Hello, Consul." 

"Peter Consul," the chimpanzee en- 
gaged for Hammerstein's Roof, is slated to 
open there August 2. 

William Morris said this week he would 

wager $10,000 that "his" "Consul" had the 

prior claim to that title through longevity. 

Mr. Morris also said he stood ready to 

(Continued on Page 17.) 



UNITED'S NEW BOOKDfO^ SYSTEM. 

The United Booking Offices* is handling 
its future bookings by an entirely new 
system. Formerly the offices issued a 
"blanket" contract and distributed the 
various acts to the managers associated 
together in the United. 

Under the new method a separate slip 
is issued with the name of each act across 
the top. Underneath is printed the 
amount of salary paid the act laat sea- 
son. Opposite appears the figure asked 
for the coming year. 

This slip is submitted to each manager 
in turn. The manager passes upon the 
act, making a memorandum of how many 
weeks he will play it and at what terms, 
signing his name to the memorandum. 
When all the managers have made known 
their decision the slip is returned to 8. K. 
Hodgdon. The act is then acquainted 
with the fact that so many weeks are of- 
fered at such terms, accordingly as the 
different managers have expressed their 
determination. 

In this tentative way it is said a great 
many acts have been disposed of, although 
the whole transaction has not been com- 
pleted. 

On Tuesday of this week was held the 
first routing session of the . assembled 
managers. It was short arid only one act 
was disposed of. The first turn to receive 
its time was Giegler and Walters. From 
now on routing sessions will be held regu- 
larly from Tuesday until Friday, inclu- 
sive, when the managers get together. 
Wednesday the meeting was adjourned. 



MIKE SHEA SUED. 

Mike Shea, manager of the Shea the- 
atres at Buffalo and Toronto, and who is 
known as "The Man From Buffalo, or 
Who Killed the Voss Bill ?" is a defendant 
in a suit brought by the Ward Brothers 
to recover $1,300. 

The amount represents the claim the 
brothers hold under a contract issued by 
Shea for a week each at his two houses 
for a "production" about to be launched 
by the boys last fall. 

Mr. Shea canceled before the Wards had 
opportunity to present the number in his 
theatres. Geo. M. Leventritt is attorney 
for the act; Maurice Goodman appears for 
Mr. Shea. The case wil be tried next fall. 



LASKY WANTS HIS RENT. 

Yonkers, June 24. 

Notices were posted on the Orpheum 
Theatre this week stating that unless 
Jesse L. Lasky, the lessee of the house, 
received the rent for May and June by 
June 2(1, l^asky would retake possession. 
The rental is mentioned as $887 for each 
month. 

Harry Leonhardt, who sub- leased from 
Lasky, left for Europe last month. He 
has no representative here as far as 
known. The former resident manager 
under Mr. T<eonhardt was Sol Schwartz, 
who is at some summer resort. 

The impression in town is the neglect 
must have been an oversight on Mr. Leon- 
l.ardt's part, as he has been the only man- 
ager who ever placed the Orpheum on a 
solid paying basis. Mr. Lasky, who con- 
ducted the Orpheum for vaudeville when 
first leasing it. lost about $30,000 in less 
than a season. 



GUERRERO'S ORPHEUM TIME?. 

"What about Guerrero's Orpheum 
time?" waa the question often put thif 
week by those who know Rosario Guer- 
rero, engaged by William Morris to open 
on the American Roof next month, also 
has a contract calling for the Orpheum 
Circuit next season. 

It is reported that Guerrero's contract 
with the Orpheum is somewhat different 
from that circuit's usual agreement with 
artists, and will be more difficult to break 
should the Orpheum Circuit wish to abide 
by its "barring" manifesto not to pli 
acts working on the Morris time first. 

The contracts for the western time, 
signed by Guerrero through the MpnnelH 
office, are for twenty -five weeks, com- 
mencing Aug. 2/ aM ^ao weaf Erv. Prior 
to her opening date cVi the Orpheum Cir- 
cuit, one week (Jury 20) at the Fifth 
Avenue has been held open for the 
foreigner. 

Guererro arrives to-day (Saturday) on 
the Augustin Victoria, 



COMBINATION EFFECTED. 

On Wednesday the combination . bring- 
ing the Feiber, Shea & Coutant, Mozart, 
Shea and Quigley circuits into the Inde- 
pendent Booking Agency was effected. 
The bonds were approved and all papers 
signed, sealed and delivered on that day. 

Sixty-three small time theatres were 
thrown into the combine by the various 
managers. H. H. Feiber was elected tem- 
porary chairman of the agency. Another 
meeting will be held on July 20, when 
Edward Mozart returns from a vacation. 
Offices selected will be decided upon, and 
preparations flntQe to jointly book in a 
general office for the fall season. The 
combination expects to be in working or- 
der by Aug. 1. 

Through some error the Independent 
Booking Agency has been called the "In- 
dependent "Booking-office,' " Its corporate 
charter reads "Agency," and that will be 
substituted hereafter." 



"BACK AGAIN" LAYING OFF. 

With several changes in. the cast and 
a new wardrobe equipment maybe, "Back 
Again," the Aborn musical comedy, which 
played for a couple of weeks this month, 
will reappear July 26, at Atlantic City, 
resting until then. 

The show was built for a Broadway 
showing, but upon production was discov- 
ered to be principally shy on costumes fit 
for the Big Alley. 



ALICE LLOYD'S VACATION. 

Next week Alice Lloyd will be the star 
of a show placed at the New Kochelle 
Theatre, New Rochelle, N. Y., by Pat 
Casey. Miss Lloyd has accepted the en- 
gagement in order that she may have an 
auto ride from New York to the subur- 
ban resort twice daily. Mr. Casey also 
told the English girl that there was bath- 
ing at Rye Beach, but a short distance 
away. 

The following week (July 5) Miss 
Lloyd will be the attraction at Young's 
Pier, Atlantic City. On July 14, she sails 
for England to r'main a month or so, re- 
turning here in August. 

Offers to star in musical comedies next 
fall have been turned down by Miss Lloyd, 
who was importuned by Mr. Casey to re- 
main in vaudeville for another season 
anyway, the agent considering her too 
valuable a card for the "twice-daily" to 
leave it just yet. 

Alice Lloyd holds the unique record of 
being the first high-priced head liner (she 
receives $1,500 weekly) to play a solid 
season in vaudeville in this country with- 
out holding a contract in advance for any 
week, with many returns dates in the list. 



PILCER IN "FOLLIES." 

Harry Piicer joins "The Follies of 1009" 
on the New York Roof Monday night. 
Young Mr. Piicer will sing two or three 
numbers and introduce his specialty. 
Pilcer's vaudeville engagements in the 
west were cancelled this week upon re- 
quest of F. Ziegfeld, Jr. 

Charles Robinson, the comedian, was in 
conference with Ziegfeld on Wednesday. 
It was reported shortly after Mr. Robin- 
son might also be added to the show's 
cast. 




"A SATISFIED FISHERMAN." 

"SIDONIA" 

And his 35 LB. SALMON. 

Caught In NICTAUX RIVER, NOVA SCOTIA, 

Kr<|t]lrinK ono hcur and ten inlnutt't* to land. 

The fly used was A DURHAM RAN(JKH. 



FIREMEN CLOSE 3RD AVENUE. 

On Tuesday a Fire Department official 
called at Frank Keeney's Third Avenue 
and informed Mr. Keeney his house was 
closed. It has been since, and will be 
until the first week in August. 

Mr. Keeney had intended ending his 
season there to-night (Saturday). That is 
why the manager did not worry when he 
received a letter from the Fire Depart- 
ment ordering him to place an exit from 
one of the boxes. Keeney did not know 
the signature to the letter, so cast it 
aside. 

During the closed weeks, the exit will 
be provided. 

New Britain is still open— and doing 
business. 



Dr. F. Schill, Jr., of Johnstown, Pa., 
the White Rats' physician in that city, 
will be married to Olive Virginia Shaffer, 
a Johnstown young woman, on June 30. 






\ >■ 



VARIETY 



EVERYONE AFTER BIJOU. 

Prtsburg, June 24. 
William Morris, Inc., is a party in inter- 
est in the battle for possession of the 
Hijou Theatre, which is being waged in 
the courts here. Felix Isman, the 
Shuberts and Klaw & Erlanger have all 
made bids for the property and it is likely 
that the Orphans' Court will be called 

upon to decide to whom it shall go. The 
tribunal is expected to declare in favor 
of the highest bidder. Should Isman take 
title there is doubt whether he would 
turn it over to the Shuberts or William 
Morris. 

The situation is rather tangled. Rep- 
resentatives of Klaw & Erlanger declare 
their principals have completed arrange- 
ments to take the house over at a cost 
of $850,000, upon which amount $25,000 
has already been paid, they say. Then 
the Shuberts purchased from Laura Big- 
gar Hennett for $215,000 a mortgage on 
the premises and announced their inten- 
tion of bidding for it in competition with 
"the syndicate." 

Felix. Isman, the Philadelphia real estate 
man. entered the proceedings here, secur- 
ing an injunction restraining the disposal 
of the mortgage on the claim that Mrs. 
Hennett had agreed to sell it to him for 
$1<M).000. The Shul>crts now hold the 
mortgage and it is expected that a hot 
legal fight will be waged before they 
give it up. 

The Hi ion is owned bv the McNultv 
Estate and H. M. Gulick. As the matter 
stands now the representative of the 
McNultv 'interests declares that tin 1 sale 
has not yet l*»cn consummated, while Mr. 
Gulick insists that the house has passed 
to Klaw & Krlanger. 

Several heirs not yet of age have to Ih» 
considered in the sale, so that it must l>c 
approved by the Orphans' Court. Lawyers 
are of the opinion that the property will 
l>c ordered delivered to the contestant 
offering the highest bid. The Shuberts* 
lease on the Duquesnc expires July 1 and 
thev must have the Bijou to assure them 
an entrance into Pittsburg. Their plan 
is to make the Hijou a popular house. 

AFTER KELLERMANN'S SALARY. 

A couple of highwaymen waylaid J. H. 
Sullivan at Columbus Circle last Sun- 
day ni^ht in a futile attempt to secure 

Annette Kellcnnann's salary for the week 
at Ilammcrstcin's. 

Mr. Sullivan is the diver's manager. 
He was on his way home after receiving 
the currency due for the week's work in 
the tank by his "divinj? Venus." 

Leaving the garage in the vicinity of 
the Circle. Sullivan commenced to wend 
his way homeward, when the fellows who 
knew where Miss Kellcnnann's wages were 
secreted attacked him. 

The highwaymen got nothing for their 
trouble, but Sullivan was pretty badly 
banged up in the scrimmage to save the 
coin. 

PANTAGES MOVING EAST. 

Chicago, .Tunc 21. 
Alexander Pantages, chief of the Pan 
tages Circuit, was in Minneapolis the 
early part of the week. He is expected in 
Chicago before returning to Seattle, and 
may possibly go to New York for a few 
days. 



SERIOUS SIDE OF LICENSE WAIT. 

The withholding of the formal theatrical 

permit by the New York authorities is 

said to have a more serious aspect than 
has generally been supposed. 

The theatres in Greater New York for- 
warded their applications and according 
to custom should have received a license 
for the year by May 1. 

One of the reasons assigned for the de- 
lay was that one or two Manhattan man- 
agers were attempting to evade strict 
compliance with the new regulations gov- 
erning permits, by secreting the name of 
the rightful owner of the premises, de- 
manded by the application. 

A theatrical lawver stated the other 
day that the real cause for withholding 
the licenses was to await decision on an 
appeal from an injunction order secured 
by a moving picture place. This injunc- 
tion retrained the Mayor from issuing 
what is known as a "six-day license," giv- 
ing permission to the picture place to re- 
main open only during the six working 
days of the week. 

The 'six-day" ruling was made by the 
Mayor during his recent spasm on the 
Sabbath closing. The plan of the weekly 
|M'iniit was to oblige closing of the picture 
places on Sundays through having no con- 
tinuous license. The shorter term of li- 
cense has been customary in the granting 
of applications from the class of "com- 
mon shows." 

The attorney said that should the ap- 
peal in the case which is now pending l>e 
decided in favor of the citv, the Mavor 
might attempt to restrict performances in 
all theatres by the issuance of the n six- 
dav license" to the first -class houses. 

* 

Whether the city could legally do this, 
the attorney would not express an opin- 
ion, but said it was a very grave matter 
to the theatrical managers who give Sun- 
day performances, esjN'cially the vaude- 
ville houses. 

Florence J. Sullivan is the attornev for 
the picture house in the action. The 
Corporation Counsel appears for the city. 

In the Supreme Court of Brooklyn this 
week on an argument bv tin* show man- 
agers of Coney Island against the Mayor 
issuing to them the "common show" six- 
day license, the Mayor submitted an alli- 
davit in which he said the merchants of 
New York were being unjustly discrimi- 
nated against by the permission given 
to shows to remain open on Sunday while 
the stores were obliged to close. 

KELLER LEAVES A WINNER. 

Haltinioiv. dune 21. 

This is the fifth and last week of man- 
agement by Edward S. Keller, the New 
York agent, of the Maryland Theatre. 
Mr. Keller leaves Haltimore a winner on 
his managerial term, something unlooked 
for. 

Due to the excessive heat since Mon- 
day the Maryland may show a slight loss 
for the final week, but on the other four 
Mr. Keller has netted about .* 1.750 each. 

The owner, .lames L. Kernan. is a mill- 
ionaire, and manages the house during 
the regular season, but thought so little 
of a supplementary season that he turned 
the Maryland over to Keller on easy 
terms. 

One other nick to Mr. Keller's credit is 
that during the five weeks, with many 
new numbers "tried out." no acl has 
"fallen down." 



PRODUCERS WITH MORRIS. 

The current talk during the week was 
that two large United producers who have 
heretofore placed their wares with the 
managers of the United Hooking Offices 
might become Morris adherents commenc- 
ing with next season. 

One of these was said to be H. A. Rolfe, 
who is now abroad. Nothing has been 
settled, but according to the story Mr. 
Kolfe has received an offer from Morris, 
and is awaiting a proposition from the 
United before closing. 

The other producer, now in New York, 
is reported as having had an interview 
with Mr. Morris at the latter's office dur- 
ing the week. He has given the United 
several large numbers during the past 
season. 

C. H. Maddox, the Kolfe representative 
in New York, left for a bridal tour in 
England last Wednesday. Kolfe may re- 
turn here for a short visit after Maddox 
sets foot on the other side. 
ADD PRODUCERS AFTER MORRIS y£ 

Resides the producers there were re- 
ports al>out agents, now considered on the 
United side of the vaudeville division. Two 
agents have been mentioned. One agency, 
a firm, is said to have submitted a list 
of acts to the Morris ofliee, without re- 
ceiving any encouragement. 

$6oo NOT ENOUGH. 

Louise Dresser will not play the Fiftli 
Avenue next week, although announced in 
the house press notices. 

The Keith- Proctor firm offered Miss 
Dresser $000 for the week's engagement, 
which she declined. A proposition for her 
t < » ap|M'ar in Chicago has $750 tacked on 
for the incentive. Miss Dresser is un- 
decided. 

Trixic Frigan/a will 1m* a feature of the 
Fifth Avenue show next week. 



SEEK AGENT. 

The License Commissioner is searching 
for one Arthur Nelson. Nelson was afore- 
time an agent in the Knickerbocker The- 
atre Building. Complaint was made l>c- 
tore the License Commissioner growing 

out of Nelson's sending a iiuiiiImt of 
chorus girls to Stamford. Conn., where 
I hey were left stranded. 

The Commissioner caused Nelson's ar- 
icst. He was released on bail in $300, 
and when he was called for trial in Gcn- 
eral Sessions, failed to appear. Gene 
|)]j*ir<>|l, wImi had furnished surety, was 
called upon to make good the forfeited 
bond 

MARTIN BECK SAILS JULY 13. 

On the Princessin (Vcclia. dulv 13, Mar- 
tin Heck, general manager of the Orpheum 
Circuit, will leave for Hremen. Morris 
Meyerfeld. Jr.. president of the circuit, 
i - now abroad. 

With Mr. Heck, who is to remain a 
month or so on the other side, will prob 
ablv "o Pat Cascv. Mr. Casey will re- 
turn with him. 

W. Pass part, the continental represent 
ativc of the Orpheum. will sail on the 
Millie lM»at. having ln-cn visiting here 
since the new Orpheum at San Francisco 

opened. 

Mr. Heck's family is at Deal Reach. 
N. .?.. for the summer. 



JAMES B. GENTRY PARDONED. 

Philadelphia, Juno 24. 

Governor Stuart of Pennsylvania on 
Tuesday signed a pardon for dames B. 
Gentry, the actor who has served nearly 
fifteen years in the Eastern Penitentiary 
of a life sentence for the murder of Madge 
York, an actress, which occurred in this 
citv in 1005. 

The Pennsylvania Pardon Hoard reeom- 
mended < Jentry 'h pardon last week. The 
actor left prison Wednesday. 

Plans have been made for Gentry's fu- 
ture by several prominent theatrieal men 
who have lieen his friends and have stood 
by him and worked for his release ever 
since his sentence was commuted to life 
imprisonment. J. Fred Zimmerman, Willie 
Collier, Nat Wills, "Hap" Ward, George 
M. Cohan, May Howard and several others 
have !>een unceasing in their efforts to free 
(Jentry. It is said he may return to the 
stage, but if he does it will not be for 
some time. 

Gentry has done a lot of writing since 
he has been at the institution and has 
l»een a model prisoner. He studied the 
cultivation of flowers, and the prison gar- 
den, which he had charge of, is one of the 
interesting features of the place. Gentry 
is in good health, considering his long in- 
carceration. 

Gentry was liberated at one o'clock 
Wednesday morning. He remained at a 
friend's house until alxnit six o'clock, and 
then did some shopping and called on a 
iiumlier of friends. He said that he in- 
tended to go to the country for a while, 
but gave no further idea as to his plans. 




LITTLE AMY HUTLER. 

AMY ItrTIJ&R. who linx appeared to advantaK*' 
In hcvcthI productions hikI vaudeville acln. Iihm In 
preparation h new vehicle which kIic will shortly 
launch under the direction of WIM.IA.M I.. 
IAKKNS. 

Thin Ik MIkh Butler's re entrance lnt<> the vHinle 
vllle Held. In which nhc ttppcHrcd successfully 
until 11 few \ears a«o. The inw in t will enlist 
11 ipinrtct of sIukIuk mid daiicliiK lw»vw. 



MANAGER MULLALY MARRIED. 

Fort Worth. Te\.. .Inn.- J t 

Thos. W. Mlllliily. Ill;lii:i^e|- m| the M,i 

jestie, wn* in;irric<l la-t M < * n 1 1 ; 1 ^ ?»i_'lil 1<> 
Mrs. Nellie M. < ',i|i'"')H. ♦ - » • 1 1 1 < • 1 l \ connected 
with I lie t li-:i' 1 ic;i! <!■■;. e ' '!•■ ':' '•■♦ one of 
t he loca I |>:i I'cfs. 

An ini""ns< 1 1 • < ■ • ■ i > • : 1 ■ t ( m.i- ht'M in the 
Savov Motel. 



VARIETY 



■^ 



■** 



GAiWS tiIS ftREET OPERA HOUSE. 

Announcement wu given out in New 
York tail week that William Gane had 
take* * lease upon the 11th Street Opera 
Hou*#, Philadelphia, and that after ex- 
tensive alterations have been made would 
reopen it Sept. 1 with a policy ol moving 
pictures and popular- priced vaudeville. 

Although the statement contained no 
reference to this detail it is presumed that 
this is another coup in the move of Felix 
Isman and his associates in Philadelphia 
to s afro control of the whole popular- 
pricAJ vaudeville business of the Quaker 
CMj. Already Gane, S. Lubin and Harry 
Earle, Jr., have taken over a large num- 
ber of houses in association. It has also 
been reported that Isman had purchased 
the Lubin interest in these ventures. 

The work of renovating and remodeling 
the 11th Street house has been turned 
oyer to Thomas Lamb, the New York 
architect. A gallery and balcony will be 
placed in the house, increasing its seat- 
ing capacity to 1,200. 

The small time controlled by the Isman 
interests will all be booked through the 
William Morris office in New York most 
likely. Lubin's Palace here has been se- 
curing its bills from Morris since opening. 
Fred Curtis, who was brought on to the 
Morris office in New York from the Bos- 
ton branch, will handle the smallest time 
placed with Morris, it is said, with Will- 
iam Josh Daly taking care of the medium- 
priced shows as before. 



CENTRAL 0. H. REVIVED. 

The Central Opera House, a large estab- 
lishment on 67th Street, near Third Ave- 
nue, will reopen Monday with a policy of 
popular-priced vaudeville and moving pic- 
tures, unless the present plans of William 
Rock, of the Vitagraph Oo. of America, go 
astray. 

The property belongs to the Ruppert 
Brewing Co., and has been dark for four 
years or more. The experiments of the 
owners with light entertainment were 
brought to failure, it is said, by the ex- 
cessive expense of running the house, a 
very large one, on the system of other 
theatres in town where the attractions 
were incidental to a restaurant and cafe. 

When the place opens Monday it will 
offer a bill of Ave or six vaudeville turns, 
booked by Joe Leo, formerly booking 
agent for William Fox, together with the 
pictures supplied by Rock's rental ex- 
change. 



VAUDEVILLE AT SEASHORE. 

Joe Wood's office is booking in a regu- 
lar vaudeville bill at the Casino, Asbury 
Park, N. J., having taken over that house 
on a sharing basis with Walter Rosenberg, 
'the lessee. This arrangement will last 
four more weeks, having commenced last 
week. 

Seven acts make up the show. Wood 
will also operate the Pleasure Bay The- 
atre near Asbury Park this summer. The 
tatter establishment opens a week from 
to-night, the first bill playing until the 
following Saturday evening, the usual ar- 
rangement designed to carry the opening 
bill over July 4. Asbury Park and Pleas- 
ure Bay are connected by a short trolley 
fine and furnish the only two vaudeville 
theatres on the Jersey coast between At- 
lantic Highlands and Cape May. There- 
fore Wood is in opposition to himself. 



UHIT8D IN OPPOSITION. 

From repormm local papers, the United 
Booking Offices, through Keith ft Proctor, 
is going into the "opposition" business on 

its own hook. 

In Perth Amboy and New Brunswick, 
both in New Jersey, and Important only 
to their own inhabitants, the Keith ft 
Proctor firm has announced it will play 
vaudeville. At New Brunswick, the story 
is the United firm will build; in Perth 
Amboy the rumor runs to the Majestic 
Theatre, now managed by Houlihan ft 
Shannon. 

In each of these Jersey hamlets, Feiber, 
Shea ft Coutant have Bijou theatres, play- 
ing 10-20 vaudeville. In Perth Amboy, the 
Bijou management has 4 site to erect an- 
other house to replace ther present Bijou. 

Whether Keith ft Proctor are going to 
play vaudeville or picture and vaudeville 
in opposition to the Bijous is not a cer- 
tainty. No one can be found who believes 
that the K-P people will build in New 
Brunswick. 

The activity of Feiber, Shea ft Cou- 
tant in erecting their circuit of small 
houses, and in having been instrumental 
in the combination of small time now 
under the Independent Booking Office 
charter are believed to have caused the hot 
weather "opposition" move by the United. 

When Mr. Keith starts building theatres 
on paper, there's no one with anything on 
him. 



LEO LEAVES FOX. 

William Fox's arrangement for booking 
vaudeville acts into his various picture 
and vaudeville houses is said to have 
changed recently. Joe Leo formerly took 
care of this department of Fox's inter- 
ests. Several days ago Leo left the Fox 
offices, removing to the Long Acre build- 
ing and there opening an agency of his 
own for the handling of "small time." 

During his connection with Fox the Leo 
Circuit also booked for outside houses de- 
sirous of playing the same class of at- 
tractions. Since his change in business 
Leo has retained twelve of these and now 
books six weeks (split). 

For the present Fox is booking his own 
vaudeville attraction through an employee. 



WANT HIGH COURT'S OPINION. 

The New York municipal authorities 
seem determined to get a ruling on Sun- 
day laws from the highest State tribunals 
in an effort to bring to settlement a much- 
mooted question. Notice of appeal has been 
served in the city's suit for the recovery 
of the $600 penalty brought against Percy 
Williams in the matter of an alleged vio- 
lation at the Alhambra, New York. 

This case was dismissed by Judge Green- 
lianm, of the Supreme Court. In his opin- 
ion the court ruled that the Doull or- 
dinance under which Sunday concerts had 
been given in the local vaudeville houses 
was of no effect. 

The appeal threatens to re-open the 
whole controversy between city authori- 
ties and the theatrical managers. 



EDITH HELENA IN PRODUCTIONS. 

Edith Helena, the soprano, has been 
engaged for the musical comedy company 
at Sans Souci Park for the summer. She 
will make her first appearance in a re- 
vival of "Erminie" with Frank Moulan. 
In the fall Miss Helena will be featured 
in a musical show or return to vaudeville. 



LOUD MjHI AND SMALL TOUCHES. 

In the elimination of Frank Morrell, 
"The California Boy," and at one Urne a 
member of "That" Quartet, last Molrtay 
under a supplementary order obtained by 
M. Strassman, attorney for Sherek ft 
Braff, London agents, Mr. Morrell testi- 
fied his theatrical wardrobe consisted of 
"a suit of clothes, wig, pair of loud socks 
and monolog." 

The order in supplementary proceedings 
was obtained through the judgment 
granted the agents against "That" Quar- 
tet for commissions "on unfulfilled time 
in England. Denis F. O'Brien appeared 
for Mr. Morrell, who was of the singing 
four when the foreign time was con- 
tracted for. 

Questioned by Mr. Strassman as to his 
assets, Mr. Morrell replied: "I have no 
bank account. A lot of people owe me 
money — all small touches." 

The judgment-creditor attempted to 
attach Morrell's salary at the Fifth Ave- 
nue last week, but found the blackface 
monologist had assigned it to Jack Levy, 
his agent, in payment for money due. 

Chas. W. Ridgeway has been appointed 
receiver for Mr. Morrell's property. The 
judgment is held by Peter L. Jones, to 
whom Sherek ft Braff assigned their claim. 



AWAITING COPYRIGHT FLOOD. 

Washington, June 24. 
The register of copyrights here has made 
all preparations for a huge flood of busi- 
ness following July 1, when the new law 

goes into effect. Applications for copy- 
right filed up until July 1 are excluded 
from the beneficial operation of the new 
statute, and all music publishers and 
writers are holding off for that reason. 

Since the agitation for the passage of 
the new bill there has been a falling off in 
the volume of business done in the Regis- 
ter's office, everyone who could holding 
back until the law became effective. 



$2fig6 FOR BARNOLD. 

Charles Barnold has recovered judge- 
ment for $2,696 in his suit under a Klaw 
ft Erlanger vaudeville contract. 

The attorney for Mr. Barnold was Geo. 
M. Leventritt, counsel for the Morris Cir- 
cuit. It was said last summer when Bar- 
nold signed with Morris that it was 
through a promise of Mr. Leventritt that 
the three weeks' salary due Barnold under 
the K. ft E. agreement would be collected. 

The judgment was paid Wednesday by 
the United Booking Offices, which assumed 
all the outstanding obligations of the K. 
ft E. contracts with acts. 



GASTON AND GREEN. 

Billy Gaston and Ethel Green are ap- 
pearing at the Fifth Avenue, New York, 
this week after a forty weeks' success- 
ful trip over the Orpheuin Circuit. The 
pair arc showing a novel oddity which 
they term "A College Poster Story." 

The couple are both well known to the 
theatre-going public and on their recent 
western trip were accorded much atten- 
tion by the press. 

Billy Gaston is the author of many 
popular songs and Miss Green's beautiful 
voice has helped to make them popular. 

Several flattering offers for musical 
comedy next season may take the couple 
out of vaudeville, for a time at least. 



RATS MEETING Of CHICAGO. 

Chicago, June 24. 

Headed by mounted police and a big 

band the Chicago White Rats turned out 

in regal fashion when the big chiefs of the 

organization arrived at the Union Station 

last Friday. About 400 people joined the 

procession in automobiles. The party 
paraded through the streets and attracted 

much attention. 

Arriving at the Sherman house, a meet- 
ing was held in the lodge room. Addresses 
were delivered by Harry Mountford, Junie 
McCree, Wm. J. Cook and Tim Cronin. 

Great preparations are being made for 
the meeting on this Friday wsxen the 
chairman will be supported by AIijsjhmh 
Col. Milton J. Forman, representing the 
mayor of Chicago, Rabbi A. R, Levy, 
Father Shannon, Mangor Sarian, Col. 
Visscher, a representative of the Actors' 
Church Alliance; Bobby Gay lor, Walter 
LeRoy, Geo. E. Delmore, Frank Fogerty, 
Tim Cronin, W. J. O'Brien, W. J. Cook, 
Ren Shields, Joseph Callahan, Denis F. 
O'Brien, Judge E. F. Dunne and Harry 
Mountford. 

Among those present at the meeting 
last Friday were Harry Mountford, Junle 
McCree, Tim Cronin, Bobby Gay lor, Will 
Cook, Ren Shields, Harry Spingold, Joseph 
Callahan, Mr. Ricardo, secretary of the 
Actors' Union; Dave Lewis, Frank 
Fogerty, Bert Baker, Geo. Delmore, Robert 
Nome, Geo. Fredo, Bob McCauley, Ralph 
Sherman, Chas. Car berry, , John Lynch. 
Mark Germaine, Fred Wilson, Dick Fergu- 
son, Geo. Stubblefleld, David Scott, Gilbert 
T. Craig, Arthur Kick, Eugene C. Rogers, 
Tom Haverly, Frank J. Conroy, Ed. C. 
Perry, Kd. Carroll, Calvert Dean, Wilbur 
Dean, Griff, Geo. Lemaire, Eugene Sheck, 
Ned Melroy, Al Burt, John West, Glen 
Schoaff, James T. Haverly, Lew Wheeler, 
Richmond Kent, Joe Burton, Hank Adams, 
Jim Toney, John T. Rand, Cliff Dean, Herr 
Jansen, Fred J. Kern, Albert Lavelle, Joe 
Miller, Tudor Cameron. 

A "scamper" will follow the meeting at 
the Colonial Theatre Friday. It will be 
held at the Sherman House. 



WEBER ft RUSH REOPEN. 

The Mohawk, Schenectady, N. Y., will 
play vaudeville once more next season 
under the management of Weber ft Rush, 

who hold the lease of the theatre. 

It will be booked by Joe Weber as 
before, likewise the vaudeville theatre in 
Binghamton, through the United Booking 
Offices. 

The Crescent Theatre Co. will operate 
the Binghamton house. 



ARRANGING MINSTREL CARNIVAL. 

Atlantic City, June 24. 

The week of July 4 at this resort will 
be Carnival Week. It will include the first 
carnival of minstrelsv to be held in tin* 
United States. 

The Apollo Theatre has been secured. 
Lew Dockstader will be the grand im- 
presario of the occasion. Associated with 
him will be Neil O'Brien, Al Jolson, Eddie 
Mazier, Rees Prosser and fifty other black- 
face artists. 

Geo. R. Allison, of Pittsburg, is in 
charge of the advance work. A large 
party from "The Flying Squadron" from 
Smoky Town will come on a special train 
to see the first performance. 



VARIETY 



niETY 



A Variety Paper for Variety People, 

Pobllaeed iw7 ftetarday by 

THE VARIETY PUBLI8HINO CO. 

»ew Yet* OKy. 



(ISf 



Proprietor. 



Jalarei at — tw asT-o I ee s staffer Dtetm h m 22, 
1106, el **« Posf OJfcw •# Jrsw Tor*. V. 7., 
earfer *** mot of Coasreat o/ Jferea a, 1879. 



UHlUaOO OFFIOX, 



<reeae> Mala INI). 

e. 



torso* oma, 

ill etna* 

(Gable, "Jeaafree, Leadeau") 
J. FITllfsaT, la ebarge. 



■AM FBAVOOOO 017X01, 

MM Batter It 

JOHV J. O'COsTVOE, EepraeoatatlTO. 



SOTII OTTXOB, 

Crystal Taaatre Salldlaf . 

HABIT BXATTIIOWT, EepreaeatatiTe. 



FAJLII OTTHm, 

MBU.1U lalat ©idler, 

EDW AID 6). KXVDEKW, meareooBtatlve. 



Biminr oirxox, 

Bator dea Lladea II, 

EI MBL 'l XJBBAST. 

0. K. IE1BT, Bepreeeatative. 



Eate card nay be foaad la advertlalaf Motion 
of tali iaeae. 



annual 



tVBSCXIFTXOV BATBa, 



U 

I 

8U and tare* moataa la etoportloa. 
Mag to coplaa 10 eeata. 

YABlaTTT will oe BMlled to a peroMnent ad- 
dress or at par roote, as desired. 

Advertleenenta forwarded by mall moat bo ae- 
coanpanled by romlttaaeo. made payable to Variety 
Pabllablng Co. • 

Copyrlf bt, 1801. by Variety Pabllablng Co. 

No, 3. 



Vol. XV. 



JUNE 26. 



Manning and Dixon have separated. 



Belle Blanche has an offer from Europe. 



Fannie Fields returned to England last 
Saturday. 



Fred Watson and the Morrissey Sisters 
have dissolved. 



Colby and May open at the American, 
Chicago, June 28. 



Wilfred Clarke returned from his long 
western trip this week. 



Jake Sternad reached New York this 
week. He is from Chicago. 



Bill Dillon has recovered from his re- 
cent operation, a very serious one. 



Howell and Scott will arrive' in New 
York next week, coming from England. 



Arthur Roy, of Bedini and Arthur, is 
spending a short vacation in Mt. Clemens. 



Bessie Rosa has engaged for Hanlon's 
"Superba" next season as principal sou- 



Morris and Morton commence a tour 
over the Sullivan-Considine Circuit Au- 
gust 30. 



Billie Burke's vaudeville company, which 
has been playing a post-season engage- 
ment in Canada, returned to New York 
Monday. 



The opening of the American Roof, New 
York, announced for July 3, will be de- 
layed a week. 



'illie Cohen and Harry Bailey, former- 
ly a Weber & Rush employee, have formed 
a comedy team. 



The Musical Johnstons have been placed 
over the Orpheum time by Pat Casey, 
opening Aug. 15. 



Desperado and the Banda Roma will 
open at the Chutes, San Francisco, July 
14, booked by Pat Casey. 

Bandy and Fields have been given con- 
tracts for six months over the United and 
Sullivan-Considine Circuits. 



Selbini and Grovini open at the Bijou, 
San Francisco, June 28, continuing over 
the Sullivan-Considine time. 



Mr. and Mrs. Geo. M. Cohan are the 
parents of a baby girl, born last Tuesday, 
and who will be named Mary. 



Edith Livingston has placed herself un- 
der the direction of Will Rossiter, the Chi- 
cago music publisher, for a vaudeville 
tour. 



Stella Gilmore, late of "The Wise Guy," 
is at the Prospect Heights Hospital, 
Brooklyn, about to undergo a serious 
operation. 



Tom Barrett and May Belle have re- 
signed for "The Century Girls" next sea- 
son, making their fourth with that or- 
ganization. 



De Biere, the magician, has postponed 
his appearance at the American, New 
York, for a couple of weeks, and will open 
on the Roof. 



A daughter was born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Charley Brown this week. Mrs. Brown 
was May Newman of "Little Johnny 
Jones" last season. 



Dawson and Whitfield have dissolved 
partnership. Eli Dawson hereafter will 
appear with Louise Gillette (formerly of 
the Gillette Sisters). 



"Darktown Corporation," a colored act 
carrying eighteen people, with Abbie 
Mitchell at the head, opens at the Ameri- 
can, New York, Monday. 



After one performance at Orange Lake 
Park, N. Y., Emerald and Dupre were 
placed for fourteen weeks this summer by 
the Park Booking Circuit. 



H. S. Woodhull, manager of "The Lid 
Lifters," has also engaged Al Canfield, 
Harry J. Kooper, Tyson and Brown and 
Alvin Brothers for his show. 



opens at Dublin July 12, and plays the 
Oxford, London, Aug. 2. The foreign time 
was placed through the Morris office. 



It was said at Percy G. Williams' office 
early this week that Mr. Williams had 
commenced laying out next season's time 
for acts in his houses last Wednesday. 



Manhattan Beach opened last Saturday 
with the British Royal Guards' Band. The 
Band, booked by Thos. Brady, will tour 
to the coast under Mr. Brady's direction. 



Simon and Gardner sailed on the Cedric, 
June 25 from the other side for a short 
home vacation, having been rebooked 
abroad through Edw. S. Keller, their 
agent. 



Harry Ricards, the Australian vaudeville 
manager, who is now in London, will start 
shortly for a long tour of Europe. Ricards 
books independently in England and on 
the Continent. 



Paul Durand, formerly connected with 
the United Foreign booking department, 
returned from Europe last week and has 
taken up new duties in the New York 
Orpheum offices. 



Mr. and Mrs. Harry Montague, Lilian 
Keeley and Eva Van Osten have been re- 
leased from contract to William B. Wat- 
son (Western Burlesque Wheel manager) 
at their request. 



Dave Genaro and Ray Bailey will play 
\audeville for a few weeks at the open- 
ing of next season before appearing in a 
large scenic production for which they 
have been engaged. 



Alf Tack, a German who makes a 
specialty of jumping from a table on his 
head, a la Patty Bros., has announced his 
intention of coming to this country. Harry 
Allen has undertaken his bookings. 

"Homeward Bound," the sketch by 
Mason Peters, which was to have been a 
part of "The Follies of 1909," will prob- 
ably be duplicated by Jos. Hart for pres- 
entation in this country and abroad. 



Horace Porter, a monologist new to 
vaudeville, discovered by Edw. S. Keller 
at Baltimore, has been placed by that 
agent as a permanent attraction in vaude- 
ville, to open July 5 at Shea's, Buffalo. 



Dazie opens at Keith's, Boston, June 28 
in her pantomimic dancing novelty. There 
will be fourteen people in the act, which 
carries a musical director, besides requir- 
ing six additional musicians in the or- 
chestra. 



Jim Oorbett sailed on Wednesday. He 



Jos. Hart's "Football Dogs" may be 
booked over the Orpheum Circuit. The 
act has not yet shown on this side, Mr. 
Hart having recently purchased the 
animals. • 

Tudor Cameron and Bonnie Gajylord 
will play "On and Off," the former Cam- 
eron and Flanagan skit, at the American, 
Chicago, next week. Mr. Flanagan is re- 
hearsing the same act in the East with a 
new partner. __^_ 

A benefit for the relief of the widow 
and children of the late W. J. Comley, 



who shot himself last week, will be given' 
tomorrow (Sunday) night at the Hew 
York Theatre. 



Dan Dody, the Empire Circuit "doctor/ 
has been approached by a musical comedy 
producer with air offer ta attend to thv 
staging of "numbers" in hts shows. At 
the last report Dody and the manage* 
w